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Haiti sun ( December 25, 1960 )

Digital Library of the Caribbean Duke University Libraries
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: December 25, 1960

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00292

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: December 25, 1960

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00292

Full Text






Weekly
Evey
Sunday


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PO PU HA Aee are-Jeanne CITE D ARSAIS ESTE one 2 Vol XIV Sunday, December 25th, N
POBT-A.UPR E HAIM- Avenue_ Mtarie-Jeanne -- CITE DU LIARSAIS ESIIME -- Phone 301 Vol XI Sunday, December 26th, 1986*-Ntt 9


MERRY CHRISTMAS


Electric C.Employees
StrikeAgain
Employees of Port au Prin-
ce's Compagnie d'Ecl a i r a g e
Electrique commenced another
sit-down strike Saturday last.
This is the third such strike for
1960.
According' to the management
of the Electric Company the
firm's employees are protesting
the dismissal of 15 employees
who were released from- their
duties for economic reasons.
Electric Company officials sta-
ted this week that the employees
dismissed were put off work to
allow the company to meet cer-
tain financial obligations. The
striking employees are asserting
/that the Compagnie d'Eclairage
Electrique shouldn't dismiss any
employees while a commission,
(Continued on page 6)
VICTORY SCORES
WIN OVER-
RED STAR
':-: Hig-'up to their name the
Haitan- soccer-'chmps- Victory.
Scored a 2 goals to nothing win
over ,the .visiting Czech team
-Red Star on Wednesday night.
Despite a few altercations on
the playing field the Haitian
players' fully deserved their win
over I their heavier opponents.
The Czech. visitors won their
first game of the four match
tourney over Aigle Noir 4 to 2.
and won the next two games,
against Racing and the national
side, 4 to I and 4 to nothing.


MISS HAITI 1961

.,Edna Delinois Wins Beauty Title


Beaming Edna Delinois recei-
ves an embrace from a 1969
Edna Delinoi, Haiti's beautiful Queen for 1961 stands before the es an embrace from a 1966
beauty queen contestant shortly
large audience gathered at the Casino' Sunday last for the finals after winning the title of Miss
of the competition. Miss Haiti left this week for the Sugar Cane Haiti 1961 at the Casino Sunday
Queen of the World contest in Colombia. (See Story page 31) evening last.
I


Decree


Creates State

University

The following .is a translation
of the -decree issued this week
creating a State University and ;
the rules governing student en- -
rollnient to the University:
"AVANT-PROPOS"
The particular historic condi-
tions in which the Haitian State
was forged have, with difficulty,
permitted it to institute, after a
century-and-a-half, a National
University.
Supported by the funds of Pu-
blic Treasury, this University,
where higher education was gi-
ven gratuitously in different
branches of learning, in fact
must be rightly considered .and 7
is a State University. '
Throughout our history as a
free people, the leaders of yes-
terday, as today, have always
been anxious to safeguard the'
nation that came from 1804 and
has been tormented during 150
years of turpitudes.
To maintain Haiti's place:.:
among the sovereign nations, it
is important for the Government
to organize the University in
(Continued on page 32)


Tortugas ,s Good Samaritan


Bustling French Priest -On Island 13 Years
. .. ., ... ... ...
The pre-dawn peal of chapel
bells wakens the little commu-
nity of Notre Dame des Palm-
Sistes to another day of industry
and heralds in 17 hours of var-
.ed activities for Father Roger
Riou. Cure of lie de la Tortue's
Mission des Peres Montfortains.
S... For the past 13 years e lives
of the people of "Turtlesland",
an almost esthetical hump of
land rising out of the Atlantic
off Haiti's Northwest coast, have
evolved around ever-bustling 51-,
7 year-old Frenchman Father Riou
whose working day is an epit-
,ome of his colorful life.
SOnce stronghold for the. infa-
Father oger Rhou (center back 'e) doctb aind priest of mous renrl pirate band "Bro- Pere Riou pauses before the cross n*rklng
Itheog ulin) . -therh ol of the Coast," Ile de
To'tug'a island,, stansa with his devoted staff of doctors, nUrses ,priests drowned in the bay of Oayanne while ret6
t a Mt ottsIde th- iSland'b main church, o e on page 16) land, from Tsrtuga island over a decade ago.
,.," P%:". :' ,./ ,::. .. ..; :.,L,' ' =. :.:..''.. - ,. .-'.


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PAGE 2
4.."


"HAI-TI SUN"


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25TH, 1960


"q In Haiti This Week


AS RECOUNTED


BY

AUBELIN TOLICOEUR



-Baron Werner Von Kuegelgen, a doctor in law and economics
from Heidelberg Universily, Germany, and a research analyst for
the American Standard in Newv -TorK arrived here this week with
lovely Belgian wife Stephanie. They are current guests at the
Hotel Oloffson.
-Mrs Victor Mansour has returned from a three month study
in the Department of Cosmetology of Lancome, in Paris. Mr Victor
Mansour her husband is the General Dealer for Lancome in Haiti.
-Miss Yvette Laraque is maybe the only Haitian who has under-
gone a heart cardiotomy. This operation took place in Cleveland,
Ohio where her local Practician, Dr. Gerhardt Helmke suggested
her to go to.
-Lovely Miredle Turnier, daughter of Mr and Mrs Auguste
Turnier flew down here this week to spend the holidays with her
parents. Mireflle is a Secretary for the International Bank of Re-
construction and Development from Washington, N.C. 'where she


has been living for three years with her sister, Mrs Clotilde Cole- Lc Genissel, the General Director of the Department du Tourisme
man. She is being introduced here with pride by IIPBA brother of Haiti. Mr Jean Jacques Honorat. They spent-two days at the


-Tony.

-Mr George Fields, Director of Freedom House, a world famed
Organization tone Founder was Wendell Wilkie) from New York
is visiting h e r e with. wife Molly. Freedom House is
totahtarism. This Organization sponsors educational programs.

-Mrs Lydia H. Behrendt, a pianist of great fame and piano
teacher at Darthmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire is
visiting here with Miss Gertrude R. Stein, Director of an Employ-
ment Agency in New York. They are staying at the Hotel Oloffson.
-Mrs Betty Forgham -greeted at the Bowen Field this week
her parents, Mr and Mrs Earl BockstedL They are fervents visi-
tors of the Country. Mr Bockstedt is with Columbian Rope Co.
wtuch buys sisal from Haiti. The Bockstedts are from Auburn,
New York. Mrs Forgham was accompanied at the airport by hus-
band Dick, local Manager of the Coca Cola Factory known here
as Brasserie La Couronne, and her children. The Bockstedts-will
spend the holidays with their children and grand children.

-Betty Dupuy who went to Vermont four years ago to study
nursing is back here with a husband, a young German Physician,
Dr Karl Heinz Kosse, from Lubben, Germany. Dr Kosse is a
resident at Mary Fletcher Hospital of Burlington, Vermont. Betty
from Cap-Haitien took her husband to her home townwhere they
will spend two weeks.


Hotel Villa Creole. A series of parties have been offered in honor
to the Secretary of State of Tourism of France and his wife.
- -Tony l(hawly is back this week from a two Week visit in
Miami.
-Tom Dell Resident Manager of the Hotel El Rancho is back
this week from a six week trip in the. Islands. He did a very good
job on selling Haiti and El Rancho.


-Caressa shoes, made in Haiti are also sold in the United
States at Lord & Taylor, Saks Fifth Avenue, I. Miller, Burdine's
I. -Magnin, Neiman & Marcus. The Housq of the Caresta Stibes
here is the Lamp Post Shop at Rue du Quai, No. 6. -
-Mr Joseph, M.. Trexell,. Director of the Interamerican jSchool
Service of the American, Council on Education from Washington,,
D.C. stopped here this week .to meet with Archie W, Spillett, Pre-
sident of the Board of Directors of the Union School.
-Sixteen students of the Lucea High School from Jamaica con-
ducted by Miss Mary Braithwaite, a teacher were'-greeted here
Sunday last by some officials of the Tourism Department including
Mr. Brun Candy, Chief of,the Information Service of this office.
The party is staying at Mrs. Simon Desvarieux' Pension at Chemin
des 'Dalles.
-Singer Jean Benjamin one ol the Stars of the El Rancho flew
lo New York last week-end. He is making a five month visit in
the United States.
-Bruce Laurie Seaman, a Tour Conductor from Honolulu arrived
this week with lovely wife Taitian actress former Ramine Allan
They were married last month in Charlotte Amalie U.S. Virgin
Islands and went to Latin America on honeymoon. They are now
spending a few days with their parents, Mr Igor Allan-bf the Point
I' and his wife before flying to Honolulu where they will establish
their home.
-As expected the Commissaire du Tourisme of France arrived
Thursday in company with beautiful wife Claude and Mr. Myron
element Public Relations Director for the French Government
Tourist Office in New York. The distinguished .party was greeted
here by the French Ambassador in Port au Prince, Mr Charles


-Mary Ann Mongeau flew down here from the University of Zi Ur, ,1 I-... ground outside into,a morass of
M 11lontreal this week to spend the holidays with her parents. mud, and the unwise moye by
S -Stunning red head model Wanda Future Fulton d'Adesky arri- the doorkeepers ;AO allow
hundreds of people' to enter ,evn
ved here this week loaded with Christmas gifts for her handsome ater it was possible to see
four year son Lucky Pierre d'Adesky. Future spent Wednesday any 'of the proceedings.
night at the Kyona and is current guest at the.Gingerbread Palace.
-Fritz Brandt, 13-year-old son of Cliff Brandt and wife formerly -
SPaquin, arrived here this from his school ini Montreal to spen k porter Lemaire
the holidays with his parents. Accompanies Miss Haiti
-Donald Born, Jr. Commercial Attache at the U.S. Embassy here i'
lpeeted at the airport, Wednesday his father Donald Born, Senior M" Spanish linguist. Jac-
r .e d -at ,.airportWe dn .e' daques Lemaire, reporter for the
a Professor at the Boston University, and his wife Eileen. The local daily La Phalange, accom-
Borns are staying two weeks in Haiti. panied Miss Haiti 1961 -Edna
-Psychologists Solomon A. Weinberg and Aaron Katz from Delinois-to the:.Contest.for,t he
SWashington, D.C. are staying ten days at the Hotpl Villa treole. | "S4gari Cane Queen ,0f oie.
-Salean Leonard Green and wife Marilyn are staying five World" title, iCGl.dd
tI Miss G!ds Magloire, selected:
-Z. days at the El Rancho. to go with Haiti's entant. as
-Prominent industrialist Oswald J. Brandt arrived frof Jam- hair dresser, did not fly with
aica Wednesday, in company with young 'Willim: Stecher 16. .. OSEPH N4DAL & O Distributors . the party. . '
".P 3(SEPH .. .) Distributors 'e party.."


MISS HAITI' 1961
EDNA DELINOIS

An a u'd i e n ce 'of Ithousapds,
thought to be the largest social
crowd ever gathered in Haiti,
acclaimed Miss Edna Delinois'
crowning- as Miss Haiti 1961 at-
the finals -held iq the Interna-
tional Casino-'Sunday night.
Miss Delinois, a Port au Prin-
cien, 'won her title over seven
other finalists selected for: Sun-
day last's parade after two
months of competition between
beautiful young. women from all
over the Republic.

Sunday night will also remain
memorable for Gladys Domond
for she won the title of Miss
-Coffee for 1961. Miss Delinois-
will represent this country at
the beauty contest for the title
of The Sugar Cane Queen of
The World 1961, to be held in
Call, Colombia and Miss Domond
vill go,on behalf of Haiti to the
Manizales. Colombia competition
for the Coffee Queen of the
World.

The title of Sugar Cane Queen
of the World was brought home
,to Haiti this year by Miss Clau-
dinette Fouchard, Miss Haiti
1960, who received international
acclaim for her victory.

On December 21 Miss Haiti
1961 departed for Cali. Colombia'
for the Sugar Cane beauty con-
test accompanied by- a lady in
waiting, Miss Danielle Verne of
Cap Haitien, photographer Q(a-
ton Roy, journalist Gerard -DAiu
mec and singer Ti Paris and
his group. Also in the sover-
eign's party were Mrs Paulette
St. Lot, a hairdresser and the
Director of Tourism and Mrs
Jean Jacques Honorat.

. Early in January Miss Coffee,
Gladys Domond, will take the
plane -for, the Manizales compe-
tition and she will be accompa-
nied by lady in waiting Annette
Vilma of Aux Cayes and the Na-
tional Folklore Troupe.

Following the selection of Miss
Haiti on Sunday evening last
there was a floor show followed
by a brief session of dancing.
Only thing marking fl.e evening
was the rain, which turned the






Pages
Missing
or
Unavailable








SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25TH, 1960


HAITI SUN,
THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
Editor-Publisher BERNARD DIEDERICH
Gerant-Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMIERICAN PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1950


"HAITI S.UN '>


I


A CHRISTMAS MESSAGE n

The "Haiti Sun" takes this 'opportunity to wish b
.reader's and friends, both in Haiti 'and abroad, a very b
'-3erry 'Ohrisltlmas and a Happy New Year. .
Christnmas, to most -of us, is more than one day. It's
a whole season of exciting days. starting with the
visit by the children Ito the stores with' a Santa Claus
atmosphere anrd ending when thbe ast small toddler,
with 'Ohristmas 'gifts 'cutdhed in arms, reluctantly goes
to 'bed on Ohristmias night.
O0hristmas is a time for ,happy festivities throughout
the world. 'We 'of the "Haiti Sun", in the months of
1961, hope to 'be able to presentt news ,of a much brigtht-
cr vein than '60 produced. By brighter news we mean
.the eventualities tthit lead to a 'higher standard of
.living 'that will, in time, enable everyone in this country
to fully enjoy and ibemiefit of 'the Christmas 'season.


CITY STREETS ON THE REMAKE

The 'Ministry of Public Works is 'to be congratulated
on the soundness of its current action the repair of
vital -city streets before the advent of the Christmas
season.
Poft au Prince's streets have-been deteriorating. ra-
pidly in recent months with resulting disruption to
tralffit and destruction to the vehicles beingg driven
across .the pot hole littered thbrou'ghfares.
IRepairinag these streets not only means smooth sur-
faces -for motorists. The wide use of m'arnual labor inll
this -work will mean that so many more families wil
benefit at Chridtmas with more money coming in.
This work 'also utilizes lo'il mmatetri'als including ce-


Dear Mr. Editor:
The following press release
rom a U.S. Travel Weekly will
no doubt be of interest to your
public. Mr & Mrs Josephs will
ie arriving in Port au Prince at
:05 p.m. on Saturday, Decenm-
ber ?4th to visit at El Rancho
Hote[ until January 2nd.

AUTHORITIES SAY U.S. INTE-
REST IN HAITI TRAVEL AT
HIGH POINT

"U.S. interest in holiday tra-
vel to Haiti is at the highest
point in many years and like-
ly to increase, thanks to a grow-
ing awareness of Haiti's many
and varied attractions for peop-
le of every taste and interest."
That statement was made by
Mr & Mrs Ray Josephs of New
York City, widely, known autho-


WEEK, AMERICAN WEEKLY,
The NEW YORK TIMES Sun-
day Magazine, CORONET Ma-
gazine, and many others.
Mr Josephs is, in addition, the
author of more than ten books.
His "Argentine Diary" and "La-
tin America: Continent in Cri-
sis" together with "Those Per-
plexing Argentines" are among
the best known in covering the
Latin American field.
More recently, his books in-
cluding "How to Gain an Extra
Hour Every Day" and "Stream-
linng Your Executive Workload"
liaue been extracted as articles
in newspapers and magazines in
the United States. Great Britain,
France, Japan, throughout Latin
America and elsewhere.

The Josephs' last visit to Haiti
was about eight \ears ago and
both confess that only the press
of travels to other parts of the
world have kept them from re-
turning to what they call "an
enchanting and attractive land".
Commenting on current U.S.
intere-sts in Haiti, Mr and Mrs


rlues on travel and specialists Josephs said:
in lthe Latin American field, on *
the eve of their departure en- "As the tide of American over-
route to Port au Prince' for a seas travel increases, and as
ten-day stay at the El Rancho more and more people are to
Hotel with Mr Ben Shindler, Ma- satisfy their hunger to know
nagging Owner. other places in the worldJ Haiti
Mr. and Mrs. Josephs have is becoming a magnet attracting
written widely on all phases of the more sophisticated and ex.
Latin America and oilither foreign perienced traveler. Efforts of
travel and their articles have such organizations as the El
appeared regularly, among other Rancho Hotel, Haitian govern-
places, in THE CHRISTIAN ment and private agencies and
SCIENCE MIONITOR -the inter-, leading airlines have helped fo-
nationally distributed newspaper cus attention on Haiti's many
- and in such publications as attractions; on the character and
THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY, remarkable individuality of the
READER'S D I G E S T, THIS people, the many historic trea.


MARIE FLORENCE ROY
MARRIES PIERRE BAYARD
Well-known Port au Prince ar-
ist Maiie Florence Roy married
Pierre Bayard two weeks ago.
The young couple are now set-
ting down to married life in
their new home.

OBITUARY
ROGER COSTER'S MOTHER
PASSES
The mother of ex-Oloffson pro-
prietor, .Roger Coster passed
away last week. Roger flew to
Haiti from St. Thomas, V.I. to'
attend the funeral.
' The Haiti Sun extends its sin-
cere condolences to the deceas-
ed's family and friends.


ment whidh means th'alt mare repaving work can be ,, -
done for the 'same a.mounit of money that would 'have
to be outplayed were materials imported from overseas. MANAGER AND PERSONNEL OF
With the. repair to several main city streets well u-n-
derway the laborer will ibe'happy land so will the puddle
jumping pedestrian and the motorist, who has been
getting a little frayed in the nerves avoiding a'll tnho,,
bone jolting holes."




500 Teachers NelededIn The Congo

The Director General of UN- .Haitian Government to Ircruit
ESCO, through the intermediary 500 secondary school teachers '
of the interested services, has here ifr duty in the Congp. 7l/sh A
solicited the authority of the
All candidates for the Congo
JOELLE M TO W .^M positions must be aged between 4

dpm -ad btb Merry Christmas
JOELLE MARTIN TO WED 2 hnd 55 years of age, ave 4,e
PATRICE DE MATTEIS dplomas .and at least three M
years practical teaching Expe- -,
Joelle Martin, daughter of e rience behind them. -
Cultural Attache of the French And A
Embassy 'and Mrs Frederic It has been specified that for
Martin, is to wed Patrlce de the present there is-no call for
NMatteis- at %the Sacred Heart omen teachers. All prospective
Church, Turgeau on December candidate teachers must have a
2th. thorough working knowledge, of -Hp y -
Patrice works for his\father the French language.
in the. M & S Construction firm.
*. The Martins, in Haiti for sever- UNESCO has made the safe T C
al years, are leaving soon for appeal to other member coun- To, A 1 1 leir C ustoers
reassignment. They will be mis- tries of .the organization in an
sed by the large number ot attempt to enroll teachers to fill 4
friends they have made in this the drastic gaps in schools in the .,
country. Cb..go,

V' .- .
g g . .. .t" . .. i A x " :-. . - : ; :": : : '.:: /,
% -. . ':..' ." X A m..u, ,41, -4.,-. 't,.: ..,!, .." ..,. ;. "= .-


k7


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'PAGE 5,|


sures and the widest variety of
scenic attractions.
"We hope to find many things
of interest to report and to meet -
those whom we first encounter-
ed in Haiti years ago."
Sincerely,
EL RANCHO HOTEL
D'HAITI S.A.
Thomas M. Dell
Resident Manager

LAB EQUIPMENT
FOR FRENCH INSTITUTE
ARRIVES
The motor vessel Bahia arriv-
ed in Port au Prince this week
with a precious cargo in her
holds material to equip the
laboratory of the French Insti-
tufe-valued at $3,000.
A gift of the Cultural Relations
Department of the Foreign Mi-
nistry of France,. the lab equip-
ment is a great addition to this
worthy institution and a gift
Irom which the students of the
French Institute will reap the
benefits.





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25TH, 1960


the communes of Croix des Bou-
C i NI quets, Kensqoff and Leogane,
t D o W 'and. this following.-the terrhs of
SI 1944 contract. The priced to be
XMAS BONUS STILL 'APPLIES. paid will be agreed upon by the
Haitian Government and the
(Continued from page 1) tion of the Peligre diesel gene- company's plight. This memor- Company.
formed by the Haitian Govern- rators. andum is reproduced below: The capacity of Port-au-Prince
ment, is studying the accounts Asked if the traditional Christ- Plant has grown from 500 kilp-
and operations of the company. mas bonus would be given to MEMORANDUlM watts in 1923 to 12,000 kilowatts
The commission is making the company employees the manage- Compagnie d'Eclairage Elec- in 1960. The Plant provides ser-
study to ascertain if the finan- ment stated that the bonus trique des Villes de Port au vice to Port au Prince and sub-
cial situation of the Electric would be the same as in past Prince et du Cap-Haitien was urbs, including Petionville, Croix-
Company is .as reported by the years. established in Haiti as per con- des Boutiuets, Kenscoff.and Leo-
management and also if the Meanwhile there is a skeleton tracts signed with the Haitian gane totalizing, a population of
company is justified in its dis- crew operating the generators Government in 1906, 1934 and 250,000. The number of meters
missal of employees to reduce and on duty at the plant but none 19-18. These contracts shall come connected to the company's sys-
operating costs. of the maintenance men are to an end on August 31, .i971, tein by no means indicates the
A statement by the manage- working and if any mechanical at which date all the properties number of users of electricity
ment indicated that the 15 em- problems should arrive they of the Company acquired or ins- as many people leaving in the
ployees, mostly frdm the elect- would place the company in-a tailed in virtue of 1906 and 1934 city and suburbs have found
rical department and the cons- dire situation, contracts "will revert to the Hal- means of taking service from
truction division, had been dis- tian Government with no com- the Electric Company without
missed. These men had been em-r The management states that sensation to the Company. How- use of meters. Furthermore
played at the timq of the chan- the problem is in the hands of ever, the Haitian Government many customers have also found
geover of the electrical system the Labor Department and a will have to buy all real estates means to slow down their meters
of Boulevard Jean Jacques Des- memorandum has been issued to used by the Company for the by installing what is known lo-.
salines and during the installa- local newspapers stating the distribution of electric power in cally as "cumberlands". The va-


rious means of fraudulent use of
electric current have caused the
loss of current to reach the un-
believed figure of 50 per cent
of the production. Actually 3,000
Kw are needed to furnish only
the stolen current between 6 and
9 p.m. During the past ten" years
the Coimpany has lost more. than
112 millions of KWH and hasp
spent .more than one million dol-
lars ($1,000,000) for .lubricating
oil used to.produce stolen cur-
rent. "In 1960 approximately
20,00,0,000 KWH have not been
registered by customers meters.
Between' 1950 and 1959 Com-
pagnie d'Eclairage Electrique
has installed live generating
units in Port au Prince Plant
having a total capacity of 5,360
KWH. During that period the
Company has invested $2,054,659
to meet with customers de-
mands. Since many years, the
shareholders have received no
dividend on their investment, ha-
(Continued on page 27),


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PAGE 6


.0PTONIL



Sinlir-a tfo


DAILY RATE


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"HAITI


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SNDAM =EMSEH, 19H T- I S U. N PG





A tea nsla CompanyZC




THE ONLY REGULAR SERVICE TO AND

FROM MOBILE AND NEW ORLEANS

IS PL EASED TO ANNOUNCE A DOZEN

YEARS OF SATISFACTION TO

THEIR H AITIAN CLIENTS AND EXTEND,
"THE BEST AND MOST SINCERE WISH EFOR

'THE PROSPERITY OF H-AITI

ryChris Itasn


appy New Year
o h
















Tos _-Na l & -Compay

Genel Aet
i:,42 4







H HAITI SUN' SAY, DECM 25T196%*
.- SI H I I UN" StNDAYDEGEMBER25' 60


SPGE 8


IPlug For BJaifis


I Toutism
UNIQUE CULTURE REVIEWED IN NEW YORK- HERALD


Haiti's unique culture, histori- all the time, is probably the
cal importance. and her strong 'most obvious example of that
lure to Caribbean visitors were .trange blend which characteri-
described recently in thte New es all of Haiti: an intriguing
York Herald by Cacique Island- mixture of the' primitive with
er Nancy Baussan under the the highly sophisticated. Artists
heading "Haiti First Negro --and you meet them every-
Country to Become a Free Na- where-range from uneducated
tion Is an Intriguing Mixture of peasant boys to Parisian gra-
African and French." duates of abstractionism. Haiti
Haiti has. something that sets- is art-and few visitors leave
it apart from all the other is- without a painting,_mask or fi-
lands of the Antilles. It has its guire.
own unique culture, a blend of
African and French, yet is in- Music and dance greet "the vi-
dependent of both. sitor everywhere. Most rhythms
Haiti was the first Negro came originally from Africa, but
.country to become an indepen- with time they have become
dent Republic and the story of wholly Haitian. The Merengue,
her fight for freedom is one of the popular dance of the coun-
the most dramatic of this or try,. has captivated North Ame-
any other century. French is ricans.
the official language, but Creo- Spectacular Vistas
le, a mixture of French, Span- Scenically, Haiti is unsurpas-
ish, African, Indian -and English, sed. Her unending mountain ran-
is dear to the heart of every ges and verdant valleys offer
Haitian. some of the most spectacular
"The Arts" are not just a vistas in the world. Fine hotels
fashionable phrase in Haiti-but in the cool mountains above Port
a part of daily life. Haitian pain- au Prince, the-capital city offer
ting, becoming more well-known excellent French, Creole and


American c.u i s in e,. combine
with the most comfortable ac
-commodations arid first-class ei
tertainment. Hofel oIb.-Lele, on
of the best mountain establish
ments, boasts an incomparable
-panorama of the city. In Poi
au Prince itself, there are man
fine hotels geared to every pobk
et.

The list of things to do is never
ending, but no visitor should
miss seeing the famed Iron' Max
jet, where everything but.iron
sold, and' the equally well-know
Art Center. Another must is .
drive to Kenscoff, highest point
in the mountains, with a stop fo


_________N-'-
"'-A. *-dii


a -Cat track-tv
serve you. W
discuss the9


S- i '- our specialist
;. *- "Tyrodacrs and
NOW 3:r be the ju,
INTRO-CING v
THE LATEST IN OFFICEFUIRNTURE -E
WHERE COMFORT MEANS RETURN '
5000


CARKLES DIJEAN C'
RUE BONNE FOl


'.-. .


w_ -Eu - "" LAR LAND lsa the power, traction and rug-
- ofiiCaterpillr Diesel Tractor to move rocks
and push out 'tree s.

The yield capacity of your,, .
farm can be economically in.- -
creasea by the extra useful* .-. -
ness, economy and work .
capacity of a Caterpillar Die.- -
_ sel Tractor. Illustrated here .
are only a few of many ways "
,. ,Y~il,t>;..


ype Tractor will P OM LAND. Mote d" with .dozer or scraier for.
e invite yol I beter "drainage, proper irrigation dter coverage.
e invite yot. tO Bu||e,,,takoff.high.poal. -;'..-"
re points with-
rs, compare our-.:
services. Thet: -
dge!
.. '.,,'" "-. : 2_ ":.:"


ki-.jrirokuf lsip,1rl !i ",SA^
S .' SUBS<
Sj" " penetrs
-- nd. chi
MAI p BONNEFIL, .Manager' --
ATIDRL'R .-: . I .AN'"'.


Oa & toiis..
itlon; aerat.1911
""*ll. -


CIP-IRTIEN AND THE CITADEL
ONE WAY BY PLANE'.ONE WAY BY LIMOUSINE


-; -- 4 0.. INCCUDED
--- OPERATED BY' dI9STOPiE.TOURI5
j AVENUE PAN AMEPICAINE
it -. ^ PETION-VILLkE -HAITI
-. P.O.Box 312 .Phone: 7761


-x


lunch on the ."way down at Le olyf. thirty minutes -.from Port
Perchoir,- -a fine restaurant 'per- autPrince. The: preious:lack of
ched on the edge "of a. cliff. beaches close,- to the- cliy 4"Ls,
Shopping is excellent" with ,Free always beei a drawback,. The
Port prices on FPrench, English beach is on -a sixty-two-acre is-i
and, other imported products. land (reached by a. five-minute -
Good local buys are mahogany motor .launch ride) has .a fine
and. straw items and-hanhdov- bar-, and.restailrant and. unique
en Haitian -.fabrics: banaria-thatched' cottages- for
d ; overnight or weekly %visitors.
c- Cap Haitian, on.the other side Future' plans call format least
n- of the island, -isthe site.of the forty -cottagzes. of various sizes,
ie world-famous 'itadel; an'.imos-. a .sixty-room hotel, tennis, golf
h- ing fortress bidilt.-by Henri Chris- .yacht club .and- drydocck. There.
.e tophe to defend Haiti from the are excellent- re.fs for skin-div-
rt French. It is-well worth talking ing k nd s-pear-fishing and faci-
y .the time to -drive. to. the- Cap; cities for water skiing'.
k- stopping pri the way, in 'some of -
the smaller towns -through the Haitians are delightfully frien-
country. There is also daily dly and eager to talk to tourists
ar plane service. about anything and everything
d --but mostly, about Haiti. They
r- New Afttraction- have a- natural -charm-and a
is Haiti has a- new attraction that pride in their country"hiat visi-
n is expected to appeal to tourists. tors find contagious..
a The Cacique Island Beach -Club, Haiti is one of-.the inost pop-
In which opened last February, of- ular ports of call .for cruise
ir fers -t fine, white sand beach ships, and is also served by air.






F ," .sy :-' .* ^- '^' "",":-- '. """ .* . " ....... - .

-u N AY D- D E1i lBE "25TIT, 1960 .- 0"-- A ITI S N T '

SI MEDICO SERVES 7 i COUNTRIES Dr. E. A.' DILLARD
S'FIIS 3 MO HS SERV-ICE AT- IREEMIE HOSPITAL
We; e.t trig' work at eve Dard left .hi private geon Dillard worked'in the jun-
S ,:l'ee'-nd -ultinately hope t practice in. Chapel: Hill, North gfls of Eastern Peru at the Hobs-
,be. Able. ito uork-rel.ve's out 'Caolina .threei~'~onths. ago to pital A m.a z o ni co de Albert
S 'a job' a.ndmove onto another oin-.u"with MEDICO for ser- Schweitzer. "The work in Jere-
-nee dy .co:.. nty," tatd IDr E- vice in Haiti.-He was the first mie has been plentiful. During
ArcherPill'ard :atttdhed to6 MIE- surgeon, seit here by the orga- the past 66 days I have perfor-
M ''DICO' in Jeremie to6r- i' past nizatiob to. activate:the surgical med 42 major operations inclu-
'',.three mo.nths,- ador to his: d part: of MEDICO's- work at the ding. hysterectomies, hernia re-
S-parture fori the United States.' Jeremie-hospital. . movals,. abdomenal operations
. ..' graduate of the. University and general orthopedic work."
,MEDIO (Medical Internaho-, of Pennsylvania in 1Q51, Archer 'The North TCarolina practicion-
,- 1 Cooperationi) plans to b- in DDUlard served-in the. South Pa- er is married with three child-
-Haili J'f a long time ho1weveri cifidc during World War 1I and ren, two.girls and a boy Re-
biuring' our'indefinate stay we .set himself up in-private prac- becca aged- 6, Barbara 4 and
'will, work with *Haitia.n doctors twice. .ia .Florida following his Archer the third aged one. His
v nd nurses with, the basic aim tour of. duty. In 1956 he corn- wife Ruth is on the faculty of
of helpirig the needy people:, of mended instructingg at the. Uni- the University of North Caroji-
_Jhis' country," .stated .the'North varsity of North-Carolina where na in the Pediatrics Depart-
Carolina surgeon, interviewed by he remained .until early' 1960. ment.
the Haiti-Sun last week. Prior to, coming to Haiti sur- am


. . - -
I --


5aco ulo u





.SO EXCITINGLY DIFFERENT FOUR WORDS,
-. THE -

AMPUS BACOULOU
VOODOO DANCERS


-


You know
t's a really.fin
k- .Sc-6"" .w en it,' y....
JOHNN|E Slr
WALKER


JO_--ftHNNNiE'WALKERS

Bra 1 I going Strong

ntsTRIRITTiR PREETZMAN-AGIERHROlWI


- -' '1 **- -


Describing the origin and aims
of MEDICO Dr Archer Dilard
stated that "MEDICO has beer
working in Haiti since June of
this year and is a singular thing
of its kind in the world today."
The Medical International Co-
operation organization was for-
mulated in the U.S. just on three
years ago by American doctors
Tom Dooley and Peter Comman-
ders. (Dooley has aroused con-
siderable argument in medical
circles as to his merits but Dr
Dillard maintains that as a hard
working surgeon Dooley is with-
out equal.)
Since its inauguration MEDI-
CO has flourished and today
runs and--supports 17 hospitals
in- 17 countries of the world.
Keep in operation_purely by pri-
vate donations MEDICO is a
private, non-sectarian and non-
government organization. Dr.
Tom Dooley himself raised one-I
and-a-half million dollars for the
organization last year.

According To Archer Dillard
MEDICO is the only organiza-
tion known to him where an or-
dinary-IMD can move into the
channels heree he can utilize
his abilities. This. has a big ad-
vantage ;over* other medical or-
ganizations and medical teams
sen t to overseas countries as
these units require "name" doc-
tors. of high status. MEDICO
opens -its doors to doctors, nur-
sek, laboratory technicians and
X-Ray technicians.


Here i Haiti since Ju
bt . .', -. .. -
UWR .i LIQU EUR. (Continued on p
4 '* !' "'i : **' :; Y L ': ;. ;'- ,- 4 -
S'INDISPENSABLE FOR

S CHRISTMAS ,AND:

THE NEW YEAR-. 1-PIutE

il'INTES FESTIVITIES 0

S_ o4ti. Des-ns

WMi pensable for-tbs vtts uId for Sevry .B
sion-.r I:-, ::'. .7:; -... 10-. --SU P

;.T": ...- .' :A "- ... L ." i CO GRAND RUE -


ne, 1960


page 24) 1


SERVICE


mORK


Flight time from Ciudad Trujillo:
3 hours and 25 minutes to New York
'Save hours over conventional piston travel!
Depart at 11:45 AM on Super-6 Clippers* for
immediate connections in Ciudad Trujillo
with Jet Clippers. More than 500,000 pas.
sengers have crossed the Atlantic by Pan
American Jet Clipper-at 10-miles-per-min.
utel For reservations see your Trivel Agent
or Pan American.

WORLD'S MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE
WORLD'S MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE


I pA-IW


PLACE DE LA REPUBLIQUE ARGENTINE, CITE E. I'EXPOSIION
PORT-AU-PRINCE, TELs 3451

YC *rt au.t.o


suomaai si*oI '0 s "IVUVN aHdsor


PAGE 9'-
I.1.*1


A'


IT THE


il


I


.1








PAGE 10 -


'I
'4..


"- "HAITI SUN".


SUNDAY, DECEMBER "5TH; 1960


Co ckFighting, Once Sport Of Kings


F 1S.HE R' S

HAIFTS LARGEST FREE PORT PRICE S OPS

1) THE CORNER SHOP RUE BONNE FOI.

2) ART -& CURIO SHOP- FISHERS ACROSS- FROM CU


STI


OMS


SHOPS AND MAHOGANY FACTORY-


I ,


SAVE UJ TO 60-Per.Cert Oa IMPORTS

AND BUY HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS .
(AM. -E"E :. AND-D ia B 'ACO'PTED) -

o'rc A' rx r p ]Dr nxrH Fr r AOrrrfv ".


S AfA H1 .- A ..J 1 ,f" rflE. .. ,-.
- ,. T .U.... .. I ., .
. . ..-. -.. ..ON. ..THE...E. .-DU...QUA. .' .:. ,..,. .

^:^ ~ ^:: t.c ^i(. ^- xd, '--F..tr.^ !


A"


Haiti's initiation into the noblest,
art of cockfighting and the his- F
tory and longevity of this sport th
make a story dating back to pl
antiquity, An undoubted leader of W
the cockfighting circles of this be
country, Milo Hakime, filled in ed
the gaps during an interview foi
with the "Haiti Sun" this week do
The sport of cocking originat- ex
ed in the Orient, stated Hakime, no
who himself owns a 125 bird
breeding farm outside Poit au
Prince where he raises the fight- lai
ing roosters for export. thE
mE
In the course of bygone centur- len
ies, cockfighting attained a high er
reputation in Rome, Greece, Per- sai
sia and Egypt as it did in India, Ha
home of the famed Asil strain, ab
where cocking is said, to have hac
received its start. cei
An emblem of divinity was glo
once the fighting cock's status coc
according to Milo Hakime who fur


HISTORY OF BATTLING BIRDS DATES BACK TO ANTIQUITY .

ated that the Syrians, Greeks, by these noble fighting .birds in ta -and Fulgencio Baptista, both arid' Milo estimated that some
rench and English all revered bygone days there is the, case one-time presidents -of--Cuba. :two -million.. Gourdes are wager-.
ie birds which have a Jarge of the soothsayers who warried Although cocking was orice the ed annually on the sport in this
ace in the annals of history. Marcus Antony to beware of Ju- sport .of kings, nobility, .presid-' country. !'When the -economy .of
/hen Themistocles decided to lius Caesar for the simple reas- ents and the rich, it is novw, for, Haiti is good and running smoo.
eseige Dalmatia he command- on that Caesar's cocks always some- unknown reason, a sport. thly I would up this 'estiinate
that two cocks be placed be- won. that has fallen into the hands, of to around 4,000,000 goutdes," he.
re his assembled armies to commoners-and the poor people, said. "If this sport were regu-
battle. The Greek leader then It was the Roman leader Ju- Milo Hakime stated that cock lated it would be a solid source
horted his troops to fight as lius Caesar who took the sport fighting is a sport which, if well of revenue for the Government."
bly as did these birds. of ,cock fighting to England regulated, could-help Haiti con- .It is only the Haitian 'business-
where for many centuries it-was siderably with the tourist trade.- man who can afford to breed
Pompomius Mela, the histor- considered as the royal pastime. 1-akime continued that ex-Presi- their own stock of fighting cock
n, asserted that the decline of British Kings, Lords and the dent Estime had thought'of this according to Hakime. "The poor
e Roman Empire did not cornm- highest nobility of England were and had built the modern cock worker,'' he said "at a great
ence until cockfighting had fal- all devotees of the battling birds fight pit Coq d'Or on the Expo- sacrifice, has to pay as 'much
into disrepute by the Gov- -until the 18th Century when Bri- sition but unfortunately this was 30 and 50 dollars or even more
nors of ancient Rome. This tish law, against It-rong opposi- never, in his. opinion, regulated- for a Dominican or Cuban codk
me historian proved,- stated tion, prohibited the sport. and thus could not' render the 'and I would, say that Haitians'.
ikime, that Severus 'was not Such was.the impact of cock- services for which it was cre- spend close.oh 1,000,000 Gourdes
le to conquer Britain until he ing in England that King Henry ated effectively., annually buying game cocks
d rendered his principal offi- the VII-built a stately cockfight-- Haiti's 'working class, contin- from'these two countries. Some
rs passionately emulous of ing pit at Whitehall where he ued Hakime, loves cockfighting -. (Continued on'page 11)
iry by exhibiting a main of often went to watch the birds
cks every day before them. As fighting along with his most no- a
tiher proof of the power held ble and loving subjects. Such BEST FOOD '"IN THE CARIBBEAN.!!
was the love of Sir Thomas Ur- 4
quhart for the fighting cocks that 4 HOTEL CHOUCOUNE
when he was mortally injured *E ""''""
at the battle of Naseby his dy- CABANE- W UCOUNE
ing words were "My King and by
a good cock have ever.loved, and as described in the TO O0NTO GLOBE MAIL by
like in my King's service I [Mrs. ALAINE J;. HEINTZMAN who was, a guest at
now expire." HOTEL CHOUCOUNE. during the month of i
.-- -February 1960:.
Spain was another country q "OUB HOTEL, the, O(honoune, was about five ails..et v
where cocking became a byword qthe city of ellonville. This is the resuential section where
in the everyday way of life. houSes are modern Fnd the hotels are lavilka d i.l.forta'
In Spain .it was the sport of beid te oo ca h ion. A'.IeS
- the nobility right up until the a Id te fo eat.h ..riihy nmeided .heualmeaniO
last 30 years and even now the' :' or n a lm P =a mixea with 18 "-hbaey aned lmA
best game cock is still consider- ed to come from Spain where vith rioe a d black madsamsm,-and then porhapsa a swet potat
-it is a prize export. Every year 4puading. lTM would all be topped off with b strong black" "i
Spanish breeders travel through- of ga lliane's..
out the world selling the fight- Aside Jem hoel gnit 111fe, Petionile possesses a night club
ing fowl to-a ready market.ud ailposees anihd
B F a^m o s3 menalover' the mIniq 10b a the fWst IndlM, the CABANE CHOUCOUNE, a bulUd-
world have, at different times "ing of bamboo shaped like an lavrted lee-cream cone. The
been addicted to the sport of cock.- exterior looks Ike the dler's hautIn ah African willinge, but the
fighting and among those of na- interior contaan a large, mooth dance floor where-a goodI
me among Haiti's neighbors ~ orchestra play e Uul meriniague."
have been George -Washington, COMPLETE. DINNER, A LA tCARTE: $4'
Andrew Jackson fnd Atraffam SP I TR.T .7
Lincoln (t br.e e United States .-SPECIAL ENTERTAINMENT:
Presidents) and Carlos Mendiet- U RS. DA 5 .. ..TURDAY',EVENING







SUNDA, DECEMBER 25TH, 1960 ttHAI1'I SUN" PAGEli


p t Of ings. n couldas an example,, take fought, ac o ding to weight
10 cents from the lowest entran- "Cockfighting cculd be Haiti's
ce price and 30 cents on the dol- number one tourist attraction as
NOW THE SPORT ,OF THE PEOPLE lar entrance chafiges.' A 5 per it is in Puerto Rico where mil
d cent take could be passed to the lions of dollars in cock fight




(C continue fro m pag A i cock. tw ei ghightnd fand e!SeweThe cf r
(Continued from page 10) Avid cock fighting fan aki-Th opks continue fighting until Government on the betting. bets change hands each year"
people here .-are 1now breeding me c ontinu d that there one either runs, yields, or is concluded Hakime. "Any advan-
good fighting., strains but the is no champion cock in Haiti but killed. The average life of a co& "All the small pits. around ces made for the fo'mulation of
people still prefer to pay the that he felt that this should be is, 15 years (although they have town should be closed and a. lab- increased and better managed
higher price for a Dominica or established by the pit owners lived longer) but when one dies oratory should be installed to cockfights in Haiti will encourage
Cuban fowl in order to stimulatO the port. in battle there is only one place clean the fowls before fighting and stimulate lo'al breeding and
'' 'Although there is a Mid. Novem- for hiq. -. straight into the fry- for the protection of everyoime thus save thousands, of dollars
"Cocks are trained "liIed box- ber to Mid. June season-, for ing pan. Milo. Hakime maintains interested, ine I u din g visitors. for Haiti which at present go
ers; they have special food three cockfighting, it -is so popular that game flesh is "indeed very; Each fight should be loud speak- into iinporting the cocks from
times a day, they spar once or with Haitians,. it runs the year very good." er announced and contesting Cuba, the Dominican Republic
twice a week and they receive round.. cocks should be weighed iand and elsewhere.
cocks *shouldLie weighed anda elsewheresod '
a daily massage. It takes bet- The. most important fighting ~In conclusion Mlo Ha tinme
ween .6 and 8 weeks 'to put a arena in this country is the Coq suggested to thIe Haiti Su-n a
cock in prfct condition for na. d'Or stadium and her the rules means of. boosting the sport' of, Caibbean Construction Co. S- .
tural spurs fighting and from are the same verbal rules as cocking in this country and fur-
9 to 17 days for gaffs fighting." used throughout the Republic. other providing a steady income Builders Of The Military City
"to the State: Buider Of The M C it
"The Government should ap-en. Manager Gerard EA .
proach a bank for finance to en. Manager: Gerard THEARD
THE PUREST TREATED WATER build a modern cockfighting pit
which would in tur. attract Phone: 3955. P., 0. BO.. 284
S FOR YOUR HEAL TH many tourists. Entrance. could
be from 30 cents on up to a MAJESTIC AND MARABOUT
Cnstntly tested and approved by two leaing dollar from which the Govern .
S. rs HOUSE FOR S.UAT.D ON PETIONVILRTE SQAR
Near the Mlexican Embassy. S.AT O N CT O LOS
ANADA DRY INTERNATIONAL, Furnished or tin-furnished; giv- LEAST AND COLORFUL
NEW YORK ing an exquisite view of Petion- ATMOSPHERE
SEVEN UP EXPORT CORPORATION, vile and Port aun Prince Bay; EUROPEAN OR AMERICAN PLAN

buy you Ew tread water 3 bedrooms with built-in do- IF REQUIRED
USINE- A GLACE --NATIONALE, S. A. MAJESTIC AND MARABOUT
5Also the only and best CUBED ICE available it Haiti. bathrooms al with hot ALSO OFFER SPECIAL RATES
water, FOR









I- room for office, 'HAD I'TERl
tom rCB0 ,WANT i COLOR AND CHARACTER
spacious living room, dining IN YOUR OFFICE FURNITURE?
room, kitchen with Youngstown WHAT MAK!P A WEDNESDAY NIGHT SPENT
IN PETIONVIL ITcabinets and -sink, charcoal kit
chen, independent servants quar-
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with spacious lawn and garden.


.lt 00feek a13itude.yel only-7maid American departing. Excellent
decorations, suitable for -Christ RT GA LL
The rniost exquisite 'oIev~s ,&eIloRln, e d~y mas 'Gifts; antiques, reproduct.- o joe dv Q A
ions, hand blown ,glassware, or,
n bayt, l mounto-n n5 uiuents, etc..... 1958 4 door..
Sedan run 78000 miles at bargain X
seride ullet attractive 2 bed-room J. DU PERRIERPr

Personalized' alention to e'ery 9e hO:1 be e 10e0 an. J.00 -.t PERRrIRI

SWimmin ob1 will Lundbeon t oun hind Albert ROY's residence A DMI N iani
ana, Bar PatforamaTerode ---
Air-eondifioned de-luxe rooms .
Lunch Dine Have Cocktais
EEKLY ENTERTAINMENT PROfiRAM By The SEA-SIDE
TUESDA9 n o andtngfrorrn KY 0 NA BEA CH
oMevinque indtruchion and'daontest
V'EO[)ESDA4 6mphrnentacy get-togetberPunA owI DEPSEA FISHIN E U IONS
90Pari from 7p m to 8 pm.
Fmr)Ay 61a Di nner-Dande fom 30mn to Swim, Spearfish, Snorkle, Water-Ski
:odm; uRifo -And Sail In Safe Coastal -
1L LOTHE1 4T4 OC OUr Yo7to9 Wi l Waters From Kyona
HAVE YOUR PARTY AT KYONA
-~ -0




- >~-
.~I -.


"HAITI


SUN"


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25TH, 1960


The following report from Wa
-shington gives details of the vast
U.S. investments in foreign n
countries. According to the re-
port a large percentage of this
investment is centred in Latin
America:
Washington Dec. 11 U.S. In-
dustry has investments overseas
totaling $30,000 million according
to the latest study published by
the U.S. Department of Com-
merce.
The report, the second post-
war census of direct private
foreign investments, explores
for the first time the total im-
pact of private enterprises on
the balance of payments of the
United States and on worldwide
economic development. The new
publication is titled "U.S. Busi-
ness and Investments in Foreign
Countries."

The new report shows that for
many types of manufactures,
and in many countries, produc-
tion from U.S.-Owned overseas
plants exceeds exports from the
Unitect States. Imports of manu-
factures into the United States
from these plants were over
$1,000 million in the Census year
1957., with only about $200 mil-
lion originating in Europe.


. Other highlights from the new
survey:
1.-U.S. companies have inves-
ted abroad on a massive scale
r since the previous census for
1950 the current total of over
$30,000 million is some two and
one-half times the figure of 10
years ago.
2.-Over one-third of the total
investment is in Canada, a some-
what smaller amount is in La-
tin America, and over $5,000
million is in Europe.
3.-Petroleum investments -
With more than $10,000 million
outstanding- continue to lead
other industries, but rapidly
growing manufacturing facilities
are now nearly as largq.
4.-Aggregate production of
commodities by U.S.-Owned fa-
cilities abroad totaled about
$32,000 million in 1957, the cen-
sus year, and has now climbed
to some $35,000 million. Sales of
foreign manufacturing affiliates
rose nearly 15 percent from 1957
to 1959, and now exceed $21,000
million. Leading products are
automotive equipment, chemic-
als and machinery.
5.-Production outlay abroad
of the foreign affiliates exceeds
$30,000 million. Major expendi-
tures are for wages and salaries


MOWAU -UT'
cigpUmMgrT


SAMS CHAMBHN


oulemeat done wo track a d
securitM suppl6nenataiir. WU han9m6
'dispositif de silence Adud 6a6
rents bruits d4sagr6ables du
andis q" la construCfiorn he&*
Super-Cushion Sans Chakbe
permit crd'absorber las cahofs 1.
route. Vous aurez moins do pulS a
iplat. .f moins do dglais parcel qum &t
Consfrmction Grip-Seal exclusive d
Goodyear 61imine pratiqueS J
yalsons kIabinaAlll










s... '
:" -:'.:'- ;, "'k " -,, L_-; ". ; ,-,n.'. $ '* i .


U.S, Has 30.000 Million In Overseas
Investments
a


o.-roreign-- Affiliates of U.S.
Firms employ oveb three million r
persons, with only a minor num-
ber sent from'the United States.
7.-The U.S. share in the ear-
nings of the foreign enterprises
reached a peak of over $3,500
million in 1957, dropped to about
$3.,000 million in 1958, and has
since recovered to about the 1957
rate. About $1,000' million annu-
ally of these earnings is retain-
ed abroad for investment.

8.-Nearly three quarters of
the direct foreign investment is
in enterprises in which the U.S.
share is 95 percent or more.
Over half of the investment is
held by 45 parent companies,
each of which has over $100"(mil-
lion invested abroad.



STEPHEN BROS,

M.V. HAITI TRADER

M. V. HAITI MERCHANT

PERSONALLY SUPERVISED
LOADING AND- UNLOADING
SERVE HAITI AND FLORIDA
forthliightly sailings of the
Miami- Port an Prince -Miami
MIAMI ADDRESS:
Telephone: Highland 51767
Franklin 9-7228 -


FRENCH RESTAURANT
In Petionville

FISH LOBSTER OR CONCH
AU GRATIN'

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Mrs Gerard BALTHAZAR,
L PlManager

LE PI-CARDIE


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See Your Travel Agent or

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PtUE ABRAHAM LINCOLN TEL: 3062

S,',

.' I" -


PAGE 12


Notes From The Centre D'Art

The important exhibition of tion and a one-man exhibition to the celebrated collection of
Centre d'Art primitive and mo- of work by Antonio Joseph in the modern sculpture which he re-
dern paintings and sculptures Fall -of 1962. gentlyy -gave to the Israeli gov.
held recently at thq Newman xxx eminent. He 'is contemplating_
Galleries in Philadelphid was d commissioning Liautaud to do .a
one of the most successful ever A selected exhibition of Coen- life-size "Crucifixion" for this
held here, receiving high praise tre d'Art primitive and non-pri- same collection.
from the criitcs. A total of 21 mitive art will open at the Palm
works were-sold. The exhibition Beach Gallery, Palm Beach, xxx
was under the sponsorship of Florida -on February .1st.
Ambassador Bonhomme. His pre- -- x x x The Georges Liautaud one-man
sence.and that of his charming sculpture exhibition recently
wife at the brilliant opening ad- Senator and Mrs Joseph Clark held at the Pan American Uniop
ded greatly- to the eclat of the .of Pennsylvania were recent vi- in Washington was a sell out,
occasion. More Than 300 art lov- sitors at the Centre d'Art where received high praise from the
ers and members of the city's they acquired several paintings. -critics.-
highest society were present. Mr The Clarks were later guests of xxx
and Mrs Newman, proprietors Honor'at a 5 a.7 at the Bizoton
of the handsome gallery were home .of Pierre Monosiet, Assis- Denise Otis and Nikita de Mor-
so pleased with the success of tant Director of the Centre d'Art.
the exhibition that they desire gill of' "House and Garden"
to present another group exhibi- x xx spent half of last Sunday taking
BUly Rose acquired an impor- color photographs of the interior
tant metal sculpture by Georges of Pierre- Monosiet's house at
($,000 million,) materials and Liatad which he intends to add Bizoton.
($7,000 million,) materials and
services ($17,000 million), and .
direct and indirect taxes ($4,500
million).












IfATI t PAGE ,


















4g4'










44
idIND ` AMN AH OA












THANKRTES MANY' CLIENTS -AND




AMONG-THE RAELNG PUBLIC'



FOR THEIR LOYALTY


ND PATRONAGE.
L I L



71V 7*








S.G E 14 .- .. .. : , ,
... ", ". .... & ". ", ," "- :_ ." . 'I ..... ; ." .- : F' ^';";" a M -A **


SMax Fombrun Store

"Haiti now cones right be- nationalist in English, as well as play,... Ma.ogany .also las.
Shind "Mexico for arf world. anl his native French and Creole, part idi the Istores Ir _ndiose,: l-
;here, is no r e a s o n why this Max swiftly "proved himself ppo- section of drum-s
country's mahogany and sisal pular with Amnerican residents A ver .pop u l a r iteii,. the -
S' g oo d s cannot compete on the and servicemen who 12 months drumsixange from the nt- ad-
.-sne standard," states intera- after the launching of the store thentic voodoo drums to *rassiv 0
'-. tioAlly kown Max -Fombrun, dubbed it with a secofld name and. weighty '.'tambop .t-., gi
; proprietor of the Exposition tou- that has stuck ever-since --"The ant. proport Bong. druis are
: .rist haven "Store Club." -- NCO and Officers- Club." 7Max also sold at VI -as .e- -~on





. ith 14 years experiece in maintains -that despite the fact craftly. pur has'"' g e
the tourist business behind him that dice and beer became a drums once ued le ,aB
Max is currently concentrating very popular pastime'ip thd llttI, -ta of' att'di i ,"': Ti"'
on a buid-up of Haiti's name on store, his. business did not suf- ,o--Ro. -
the world market and his ex- ier and in 1958- he -decided to BIG BOOMTQ. SISAL .
tensive range of Haitian craft is move premises to a more.expen- Max Fiombraun states that the
finding its way into homes sive location. demand for sisal go.ds .ade .n -h :-. .
.throughout the Western Hemis- H a;Qiti b" b"; tenfold n r. e-.
phere. Enlisting the aid of his broth- cent yers-id .Stre Cub" i1.. ., ..,-" ",.
Just as "Store Club's" merch- er Gerard, one year older and a following thf.icrease it Irdegu- --' -\ .. .". -'.'S &-! .
;. andise travels out to the rest of qualified architect and'engineer, flkfexpoits. The Exposition-store :- w%'" .. -'.: :' A-
the world, a large proportion the hemisphere seems to gravit- a new store on a site directly b'- varieties o straw aid cloth to- .... ,.
ate to Max Fombrun's large and hind the original "Store Club," gether. with goods -manufactured". ---,. _-.: : -
contemporary free port shop. Gerard Fombrun constructed from string, hemps and ra: ffi-
Every second person who comes the new edifice and sifice late The iai-iety-of hits, hadba...-
to Haiti seems to know Max 1958 the second "Store Club" has and.shoes-to be -found in -"Store S "p
and the procession of friends and been making a name for itself. Club. is practically .ed e.ss. .... -.
visitors in and out the portals An oblong 90 foot lbug building There are literally doz' ot ty- ""
.% Z
of the store, is never ending. the "Stite Club" features a me- pes of plain and er oidered ..: '' -
'. Many visitors express dire cu- zanine floor .where sisal and handbags and .customers -can .. ... '' -....-; ..; ....i"
riosity as to where "Store Club" straw goods are .on display.-and spend .an ..hour detrating which '"" ''..-.. i.... *- ..:
took its name and Americans es- ample groud.floor space for the of the many styles of Haitian .AGER
pecially always seem to detect large range' of items that corn- made -hoes to choose from- ..
a familiar ring in the- catching prise just about everything he -. "-. -
title, tourist--deems essential to succ- Pushing ti~e export of -mahoga -. ...... .. ..*. "'-'. .. .
esful shopping. .ny and sisal Max ha shipped.
"When I opened my first shop .The store iu fully aircondition- his goods -to P-ue -R.To t he: .-.,:-. ,-:... .,..
in November 1955." stated Max ed and large bay tyipe windows- United States and -Europe ad :
' this week. "I wanted to have a admit plenty, of light. Recent e- proudly pointed.- ot- this week
name that was different. All the novations to _the mezanine floor that .his sisal articles-have been- -,
tourist establishments a r o u n d have turned that -area into a displayed sur !a- "Cote.-d'Azu .'".
Port au Prince tended to have form of "supermarket" where the famed French resort. "I'm ..:.:.
the word shop included in the prospective shoppers n readi- doing all I can to bud up Hai- -
name so I had to think of some- ly plan the display of hundreds ti's nate overseas- and- present -.-. .
thing entirely diverscd. Up came of sisal and straw items at ease Indications are--that there is a EX E D B Wi[^TT ISH S '
the name of the famous Ameri- and buy on a "self-service"-.bas- pronounced- awakening through- ,-
can night club Stork Club and -is. 'out the. world iecognizing -the "
the answer was there." Thus SUPPORT OF..HAITIAN quality and-popularity of Haitian -* ----.-- --... ,'" :=.
Store Club was born. CRAFT ESSENTIAL made goods." -. -, .
ONE OF SEVEN BROTHERS ""I am interested basically in As a prominent. ember.or the -...
A resident of La Boule. Max Haitian made goods because I'm- HPBA Max Fambrn is a- past.
Fombrun is one of seven broth- convinced that-it is sound policy master at choosing" the..thop Har .a'i. ''
trs and has four sisters. Now to help the tmall e industries tian Meringue iords for l. the -
: 2 years-of-age he received his which abound-here i Port -au store: 1ax states--that he "has "
Education at the, Ecole St. Louis Prince. Notornly-does.this supp- "all" .the top meerngue -recortids ..,-.. .-,..,-. :
Sde Gonzague and the Academie ort make for development of Hai- plus oxe which has been featur- .... "' ........-.'. ..



Prince Uniersity for. a period living from this type of employ- ving meringue featurig. a V cal-. ... -.
.- of one year with the not to fix- meant - -'- its describing-2 the- joys ofrthb f l r- -
.. ed intentions of becoming an en- i . island .and thesa weicomnie wa Yin. .'. -. .-
months decided to "drop it" in ed a large emphasis on import backed .by the er 1-pdpt lar .. .
Sfaor of a business career. Even perfumes, his present establish- "Haiti C herie as ye. : .




no' Max remembers his days at meant has confined that--lineo pul Guilai me;. as ., adefor
w. engineering study and each pie- a minimum and has raun ild on Max. for. .adv ertisivng pp .. :' .... .. t ..
Sce of mahogany that receives a Mahogany ranging from primi- and swift pro .ed be -a ;. ... -- -
hook or nail for hanging under- live articles right through -to ,orite fod-ancng b ut Ustener - 4 to
.. goes a meticulous and painstak- modern styled nahogay .war.. "When You Come To'Ha r





-ing engineer's calculus before Included .amongst the extens" aistently.-ref.seto-beve that.. '
being hammered into place. ive range of wooden ware ismthe Madr jr-the vocalist despite"las TO' -' '1-115 ^I"NZ2^&. ''4
FoLlo'ving his departure from latest "crate" with tourist shop- sistance that .hewas "a good -.
Univcisity Max took yp employ- pers Tave.neau wood articles sugerat e ttime," butbi's ... ...',
shop in the Capital, in 1946, mahogany. the Taverneauispft -- -- .. V. -
Swhere he remained for the next unpolished and instead is given me we.oi o_.-t_ Mi. .r...rO I' -...t :....-..S; 6i ,-..
r uine years learning the pros a..d a finish of highly polished zIwax.:-Co wN..g -.. V ..... ;... .....- ...;







cons of the tourist trade. In 1955 Steak plates and bowls ard .-the A wid e.range of Mexican Jew i-,
he decided to branch out on his top sellers in-the Taverneauzline-. re -is oni order for th'he ^Store '.'-'r^'-'V-
own end in November of that To run -through. th"e -ie to. Club" the saver in are '
S.ne year he opened smal. of "Store Club's". .-mahogany expected to a rr eH any day to.-,'' .' .. *.
-. nrst shop entitled, naturally, lines would take a- ollie-,. b-t .icompli gntthea aea .dy exte-- -. -.-'.i .- .. ,
S. 'ore Club" on the Exposition everything froni tin-y .ncaryed we 'range -of goods available "at :-"' -,.A ...-J':,. --'
I.. m t(":!f of.:,, i, - -7. . .-"" i' :i ar .'-. A"i







han ord, directly beprhind u dere -axspln th-t forih s 'h rop'd-.o.:. a a i;.L ;.*.. ..








tueh U.S Embassy is located. es,) right upn to five foot tally. -Rp& v rie seih' ' 4 d E -"'.' ; ,-:--v-. -r N ,
-By engins time a fluent coater.tues a i abl h e tOtes itfd~Aq_ e0.. ,' ,n' '. .
.. c .. ,C -. :. - " :




ii 1011< 4< I


SUNDAY, DECkMBER 25TH, '1966 HA ITi F I VNAG is'.

million dollars aid consist of and ttrniIg t
andt esetial oils. a mnajor ~Haitian~ export nte,,'
,A.a4tEc o ncwo thirds of private future are good.
productive industry in Haiti is Banaffae could changes th
comprised of United States in- fate of the country but it will
vestments. The principal fields be a gradual progress before
tion) s production was higher in lume and value decreased sligh- mal ig up this investment are banana exporting reaches the
,,Behind tourism m money ear-. the late 18th century when, an- tly 1i the fiscal ydar 1959-60 t sugar, electric power, bananas, levels set by the Standard Fruit
g power and ranking, third, on nual production was estimated an estimated 31 thousand metric sisal, flour, fisheries and the ma- Companywhich, in its peak year
Scounhtrys economy chart I i to be approx lately 80,000 me- toils valued at 5.6 million dollars. jor bauxite mining industry. of 1945, turned, out 7,000,000
ug~r. The export production of trick tons._, Haiti's gross national Product Newest additions to U.S. invest- stems to make bananas a crop
Haiti.'s sugar has, jumped- from The refining of the sugar crop isivalued at roughly 250 million mients in Haiti are the flour mill, comparable to coffee.
uhfi place (behind',siWl) to generally starts in January but dollars annually, or, calculated the SEDREN mine and the West Rice is being grown, especial-
trd since the fiscal year, 1958-. the big- HASCO mill has already on the basis of the 3 and a half India Fruit & Steamship Co's ly in the Artibonite Valley under
5 whe was a started on the current sugar million population, a gross na- banana. plantation. ODVA supervision, in
igligible 3.2 thousand metric crop., (In November.) It e is not tional product per capital of SEDREN (Canadian Consoli- production for local consump-
tons valued at 0.3 million dol- known how sugar the U.S. will roughly 70 dollars. The gross dated Halliwell Ltd., Toronto), tion. Another potential export is
lars. take from Haiti in 1961 but al- national, product is believed to commenced operations in Haiti that of vegetables. Some vege-
Haiti-'s approximate total pro- red there is a marked increa- have declined 'from about 300 as early as 1952. In September tables, mainly tomatoes and let-
ductiorfor sugar in 1960 is es- se in sugar growing throughout million dollars in the early of this year they started. produ- tuces and cucumbers, have been
timated at 60,000 metric tons. the country and a lot of circula- 1950's. cing copper concentrate and the exported as a pilot project to the
Haiti's original quota on the U. ting talk concerning the erection Trade figures show that about Terre Neuve sited mine will U.S. markets on a seasonal ba-
. m market for this year was of new sugar' mills. Whetherthis 45 per cent of Haitian exports mainly bauxite, bananas, cacao sis and this has met with sue-
7,014 short tons but with Cu6ba's latter is true or'not is not known. go to the United States and about start export sometime this cess.
sugar exports to the United Sta- It is not likely that sugar will 65 per cent of Haitian imports month.
tes drastically cut off last year, replace coffee as the premier ex- come from the U.S. This. coun- The West India Fruit & Steam- TENNIS LESSONS?
this country's allotment was port of.,Hitei. try's principal imports consist of ship Co., in Haiti just over a JOE ETIENNE
pushed up to 35,672 short tons, Ranking forth on the list of wheat, cotton cloth, lard, soap, year, commenced exporting& of
(this- ,includes quota and, non- Haitisprincipal exports is Sisal. fish, motor vehicles, machinery, bananas in July but bad weath- JOE ETIENNE
quota permits,) -valued at 3.9 Tor the fiscal year 1960-61 the and manufactured goods in ge- er, coupled with the fact that is the only Professor (coach)
million dollars. figures, estimated or otherwise neral. The principal domestic the company has been unable to experienced, patient and
This enormous boost to the are not available but sisal has crops are beans, rice, mangoes, purchase all the land required, meticulous
sugar export market here leaves held a'steady volume in recent millet, corn, cassava, fruits, ve- has meant-less production than capable of making a champion
little -to spare on the internal years. In thefiscal year 1958459 getables;- the firm anticipated. Neverthe- Player of YOU! -
market which consumes appro- the volume of' production was All other exports by this coun- less, the Cap Haitian plantation Inscription For Lessons at:
ximately halfltf the annual pro- 31.2 thousand metric tonsvalued try total up to an average (in has invested well over one mil- Carlstroem St. No. 1377
duction. As with coffee- Haiti's at 5 million dollars and this vo- the past two fiscal years) 7.3 lion dollars in banana growing Port au Prince Haiti.





The Director & The Personnel


Of



e Shell 2pDny 'West Indies Ltd.'




Wish, 'You

IOU











U&A
us n ei"*

Un oin< HeAr 6144;<<~-~

6 ~4 -I <-








SUNDAY, DEOEMBER 25TI, -1960 -.. -


PAGE 16
^'' ,...
.;-. ".
';."
" *i,


Tortuga 's


G ood-


Samaritan


(Continued from page. 1)
]a Tortue still bears nostalgic
marks of a past era and the
plateau mission of Notre Dame
des Palmistes exudes a Medie
val-like pic I u r e s q ue charrr
swathed by cool breezes cutting
through the rich tropic growth
from the ocean below.
Pauline Was There
Here Napoleon's sister, Pauli-
ne Bonaparte -one of the first to
appreciate the climate and beau-
ties of the island- held residen-
ce in a magnificent chateau still
marking its existence with crum-
bling pillars and winding stair-
case.

This monument to the past and
the rusting "Long Tom" cannon
at Basse-Terre recall the days
of marauding pirates and French
society, pitted with the clash of
bloodied sabres on the "white-
sanded beaches, which have giv-
en way 1t:, the toiling days of
the present with 15.000 HaitJans
working with medicine and reli-
gio:1 towards a better exstence.
Integral centrepieces of Turtle
Island life today are Father Ro-
rer Riou and his devoted mis-
rion staff, all of them people
who have give up the outside
world to give their help and
knowledge in the never-ending
work of cure and education.


Conunie Beginning
c As early as 1926, at the age
e of 16, Father Riou was entang-
e led in a search for the solution
- to his homeland's poverty. Born
i at Le Havre, France, in 1909
Riou was born into an era suf-
fering the pangs of hunger, mi-
sery and persecution.
Roger Riou's father was the
Head chef on the Transatlantic
liner lie de France and an rabid
communist. His mother was a
sympathetic but non-mil i t a n t
party member but nevertheless
had her only son, Roger, bapt-
ized. A born leader Riou Jr. be-
came the head of the "Faucons
Rouge" a young peoples' com-
munist party at the age of
16. *
In 1926 a general strike swept
Le 'Har-e and as leader it was
Roger Riou who led Jthe young
party "Faucons Rouge" into op-
en battle against the police.
Deaths on both sides were in-
curred and Riou found him-elf
thrown into jail awaiting trirl
Lodged in a cell Riou swiftly
learned what "a terrible thi-ig"
French prisons of that time
were. Still not 17 Riou was sen-
lanced by the .convicting court
to. a spell at a re-education cen-
tre and school for morally aban-
doned children in Northern Fran-


ce. Far from put down R ioa u Celled ,aloqe for a minth on a
commenced training. 100 youths bread and water diet Riou bad
for re v olt and indoctrinating plenty -of time to.-think things
them to communism. out. His only companion was Na
Determined to b r e a k away book-_on evangelism which. lad
from their. re-education Center been thrown into his cell and
the 100 youths made a prison which he tried to throw back.
break. The revolt was put down He also attempted tearing'.-the
and RJou was once again caught book up but failed under the han-
and thrown into solitary confine- dicap of his bonds. -
ment with his hands and feet Finally Riou began reading
manacled. the religious doctrine and later


Iort an Prince Mayor Jean Deeb (Far Left) talks with Mrs Joseph
Rosenfield, Big Joe himself, Tortuga's Pere Riou and -
Pere Desjardins.


1


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THE ADMIRAL REFRIGERATORS 'AND FREEZERS RALEIGH BICYCLES; -
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SEWING MACHINES AND A LARGE' DISPLAY OF MODERN/ FURNITURE:
.,': ... ... ". .. .. . -:- "- .. ...: . ; ':*" 2, :% :" "" : '" " :" '*) ; ':.'., ,.. e,. ;,. ,r.,',. ' .-,- ,. ,. .-o . . ...:10

~~~~~~~~~ m.",WAA':M.: .:. : .


1-


ORl


r


AR ,-*^^^^^^^i^^>^?fi^^^


held talks with Robert Stahl-.
founder and "director of. the re-
education 'centre- who began to -',
visit the 16-year-old in his cell.-
-Riou, an angered young man, ex-
plained to Stahl that he could
not understand why-so man poor
people should be living in, mise-
ry while the. rich squandered .-
their money on caprices.
Turn To Pfiesthood
Lawyer Stahl gradually chang-.'
,ed Riou's- way of thinking and -
convinced him that the one-sure-,
way of helping the poor was-.to--:
become a. priest. Roger 'Riou-
stayed on another year at the
reform school under the watch-
ful eye-of Stahl, in that time de, .
hiding that-the priesthood was to
be his vocation. Stahl later fol-
lowed a n d entered t h e priest-
hood himself,
- At 19 Riou left Ihe re-educa-
tion centre and entered the se-
minary at Montfor-sur-yeu in.
Brittany. H i s seminary studies-.
were interrupted by military ser-
vice and he served a- two-year
stint as a soldier .first 'class in
the ,capacity ,of hospital nurse
During this period Riou spent :/
his spare time attending classes
'at he Faculty of Medicine 6f
Strasbourg and at the conclu-
sion dof his military service ad-
ded another six months to his:--
medical studies by attending the
Lillu Medical Faculty.
Roger Riou was ordained a
Pere Monfortains in 1938
at the age of 29. His first post-
ing was Haiti his-homeo.'fo'."
the past 22 years. As a member.,
of the Monfort -Mission Fatheir-'.
Riou served for 12 years in Hai-
ti's Northwest areas of Port de'"o
Paix' and Jean Rabel. His ap-.,.

.KdP-d -k ,'.





1 7 'T ~ -. -= "-


SITI S-U'N PAGE 17

pointment to lie de la Tortue villagers he comes into daily the U.S. When Father Riou is ching mail and supplies from the de la Tortue Nassau is the land
care in 1947. As a conclusion to contact with. asked where -a particular item mainland is a constant job and of golden opportunity and many
his medical studies Father Riou With head stuck well beneath comes from the usual reply is pne which Father Riau takes of the men sell e ver y poss-
etumrned. to France in 1950, took the ,.. aishre kerosene -stoy6 he "Big Joe." over when the wind is too slack esion they own in order to raise
a 15 month study course in med- still cant.- resist the occasional Father liou's morning cup of for. speedy crossing of the seven funds for a -trip to the island,
iclem followed by an internship quip.-r- usually -rendered in Cre- coffee is quite often replaced by mile channel to the mainland by three day's sail away, where
at the StL Vincent Hospital -in ole u- suh- as repjying sardoni- a glass of beer. Father Riou's the sailboats which anchor off they hope to make an ample
Lillu where he. studies an-obste- cally,'1o .am'aquestibn posed of i attributes run to a long list and the beach below the plateau. nestegg. In season the boats also
tries course at the-St.' Cauiille Creple worker .as to where his making his own receive beer is run across bananas, mangoes,
Hospital. unique shaped hat came from one of the major ones. Utilizing Picturesque C o y a n ne Bay, sweet potatoes and other fruits
One thousand feet up the -1- "That's a gift from Big Joe." maize, sugar and a number of once the careening and anchor- in addition to the illegal rhum
mountains of Ile de la Tortue Who is Big Joe?_ Many of -tIe ingredients about which the fa- ing place of the bucanner galle- and human cargos.
sits the plateau, and the mission essentials; needed for the func- their is slyly quite, Notre Dame ons, is the shelter for the sailing Prices per head for passage to
village of- -Ntre' .Dame -des Pa~ .fioti-g, otA. e.- mission, such as des Palmistes beer is a real non- boats homing at Ile de la Tor- Nassau have been raised by the
mistes. E a c h mo rn i n g the vitamiiiz6d f o od s;' bandages, alcoholic thirst quencher. tue. Fiom here adventuresome Turtle Island boat captains to
church bell sounds the start of tools, and machinery together A checkup on the internal sys- sailors in small craft set out al- 40 dollars as both boats and
the day and commencement of with surgical equipment have tern of the one and only out- most daily with cargos of fruit their crews are being seized by
long hours of- work for Roger come to the island as gifts from board motor on the island fol- and Turtle Islander-, for the Ba. authorities in ever increasing
Riou and his helpers. Joseph "Big Joe" Rosenfield of .lows the- priest's brief appear- hama Islands. numbers. When the unfortunates
Father Riou rises from his bed the Happiness Exchange Fund in ance at the breakfast table. Fet- To many of the people of 11a arrive penniless in the Bahamas
in the combined bedroom-admi- .. they are thrown in jail awaiting
nistratidn office, situated in the aa ,a t ,>- a .. a transportationn back to Haiti but
"Hotel" building erected dur- there are always those willing
ing the time of Father Riou's to take the risk especially du-
predecessor, and dons -sport ring the droughts when food is
shirt, khaki trousers and sand- S ~w S S O S C O t short and the lure for earning
als. .- good money is strong. Many of
S- the returning sailing boats bring
Unlike the priest before him, a l ON FAMOUS AMERICAN-FLAG SISTERSHIPS hack empty bottles and other
Father Joseph Geert2, from-Hol- 4 essentials which may be cheap-
larid who. lived for .rriany years er in the islands.
in a- "caille paille" anti spent .-,. -.. Adding to the atmosphere of
14 years altogether on Turtle Is- < ANCON CRISTOBAL going back into the days of pir-
land& Riou has a comprehensive ac-y and adventuring are the 13
office but an office that belies slups being constructed on the
his lack of time to filrd neal beach. Heuen and carved by ma-
storage jumbled filing cabin- nual labor these vessels range
et;-scattered papers on the desk from thirty to fifty feet long -
and packaged contributions ly- constructed from timbers labor-
ing in foot tripping positions.. iously cut from the island's fast
[-uring a typical day's work disappearing forests. The build-
Father .Riou rises and spends the q ing of the boats is a slow pro-
fist-"hour- or so in an attempt c fD a C ruise-T ouress but their owners daily and
to clean up the administration ay ru meticulously toil away in the
wori. Doffing his sport shirt he hot sun only a few short yards -
dons his surplice walks through TO EXCITING away from the inviting sea and
the courtyard, to the church to the sounds of the children swim-
officiate over three, marriages. mang.
A tall,' robust man; Father Riou, A after arranging a trio of
with long. crew-cut grey hair i "bouriques" (donkeys) and their
a-L.d blaLck bushy eye-brows, drivers for the task of taking
bears a. strong resemblance to P a C m C anal erry cans down to the beach
Hemingway and makes an imn- for- transportation to the main-
presisie figure in his ecclesias- FREQUENT SAILINGS land and lling thereby ensur-
tical robes. R UEN SALINGS lng a steady and uninterrupted
The .church is as impressive as FROM PORT-AU-PRINCE fuel supply for the many motors
its ptjest. A long narrow build- .-around the mission, Father Riou
ing, the Eglise -was built by. Fa- makes his way across the court-
ther Riou'-s predecessor and suf- ard and gardens to the neat
fered frontal damage during the 4-DAYS AT' SEA buildings that house the Hospital
Hurricane Hazel which wrought All convertible parlor-bedrooms are amidships> Notre Dame des Palmistes.
severe damage to Northern ai-. and outside with private bath. Large air condi- Consisting of a dispensary,
ti. Father Riou reconstructed the o po cypool
ftr faer thohurchns -it a tioned dining salon. Dancing, outdoor pool and dentist's room, X-Ray quarters
front of the church givingI-if a
shaded beach decks. 8,000 sq. of outdoor sports and recuperation wards, the hos-
Sbuildinrg a multi-shaped belfrey decks. Spacious shaded promenade deck, cool pital is me gathering place for
.in-front of it. lounges, cocktail-bar. More space to roam per tie Island's sick and daily
Following the church marriage- passenger than on any other ship of comparable dren ne up to patiently wait -
: service attended by the villag- j e nn l u t p a -.
service, attended y the viag- size. their turn for treatment.
ers clad in colorfull neat- clothes . -- -) SPECIAL FIRST CLASS ROUND TRIP Set n a f orm of rambling
many of ... which come from i
outlying islands such as the B a-,- STEAMER FARES $90 AND $100 plus TAX oblong, the hospital buildings
llamas, the priest heads for the Ask for new folder of all-expense shore excur- iely fillneat, and clh patients. The de- .
kithe n t aking off the surplice on- ing tours including Cristobal and Colon on the mands of the sick keep the hos-

cator, Father Rio indulges in a Caribbean. Also 1 and 2-day tours of Panama -pitars staff fully occupied and
cup of coffee eyeing the Kero- - City and Balboa on the Pacific. Sea ocean liners hours comment at san untiloo
closing time and the seeing too
scene refrigerator all the while. "/ "-- "climb" 85 feet up through the mountains via of the nal pent for the day.
The daily list of chores for the 4 mighty locks of the Panama Canal. In addition to the buildings al-
French priest includes a weighty 4 ready erected to serve as inics
thet many g mo itors on ahd.-maine RUE ABRAHAM LINCOLN TEL: 3062 and hospital wards, there is the
the marny" motors aid..-machines new children's w a r d presently
of the .village and the kerosene under, construction and mad.e
Sstove.. Js a piece of. machinery f possible by a 300 donation from .
Sdemanrding a lot of attention. ag "Big Joe"'Rosenfield. This buil-
of .bantering humor, head ding is being built from the vol-
,ats which resemble wallops and K o-w- canic rock available in larger.'
back slaps, Father Riou keepses on the island and f I
...,', :- hopquantities on the asac anstd fr
i up a constant string -of humor mshi i hoped to add a second storey .
with' the Haitihn worked. dad (Con.ned on )
; '=',',.:; -,' "''." :... ". ... ,, o -. . . . . . :..tc








SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25TH, 1960


Tortuga's Good Samaritan


(Continued from page 17)
at a later date. Gardens ar
now being laid out in the sans
torium grounds and a new kit
chen and laundry in the vicini
ty of the psychiatric wards i
being constructed.
Long Waiting List
Over 200 applications are list
ed at the hospital for entrance
to the sanatorium and it is hop
ed to be able to enlarge this
building in the near future as
well as to provide more accom
modation for handicapped child-
ren from the Northwest section
of Haiti and the Artibonite Val-
Jey. Meanwhile well over 10C
patients fill the hospital and out
patients number 30 to 60 daily.
A devoted and capable staff
assists Father Riou with the hos-
pital work. Dr. Maurice Nicolas,
a graduate of the Medical Fa-
culty of Lyon, Franice and a spe-
cialist in Tuberculosis disease
who came to lie de la Tortue
five years ago. A Laic Mission-
ary,, Dr Nicolas came to the is-
land in company'with his wife,
Dr Y\onne Nicolas of Toulouse
and a medical school graduate
from that Toulouse Faculty. The
Nicolas have two children, both
of them born on the island a
boy of two and a girl of 10
months. Since their arrival in
Haiti in 1955 they have not had
a single vacation but both of
them express their love of the
island and its people and both
always bear a happy word and
smile for t he ir numerous pa-
tients.
Seven Swiss nursing sisters
all members of the Laic Mission,
Fribourg, Switzerland, work in
the hospital. They are, Sister
Bluette Boillat. a pharmacist-at
the hospital for the past five
years; Sister Rosa Wurms, a


mid wife with five years behind
campaign an da net-work of self-
her on Turtle Island; Sister Jac-
queline Vaglio,. a specialist nur-
se in T.B. who has been working
with Dr Nicolas & Father Riou
for three years; Sister Odile
Moulin, the nurse and analyst
of the dispensary in Haiti for
four years; Sister Annie Muller,
also working in the dispensary
as a nurse and analyst and on
Ile de la Tortue for the past two
years; Sister Klara Grob, nurse
and home economics specialist,
in Haiti two years and Sister
Erika Flammer whose accom-
pl ishm ents run from nurse
through home economics to or-
ganist and chorister in the
church and organizer of the
well-voiced church choir. It is
expected that an eighth Swiss
sister will arrive on the island
shortly to take care of the diet-


availawTe to the people was giv-
en by a Haitian nurse with a
basic three months training.
Needless to say this nurse found
her work cut out tending to the
many sick and needy.
Twins Began Hospital -
Shortly after Father Riou's ar-
rival on HIe de Ia Tortue he came
across a peasant woman who
had given birth to twins about
to cut the umbilical cord with
a machete. Calling on his medi-
cal training Riou saved her and
only a few hours later repeated
his surgery on a farmer suffer-
ing from a severe machete cut
in the arm which was almost
severed. These two incidents de-
cided Father Riou that a hospi-
tal and dispensary were essen-
tial for the island and he com-
menced the setting up of Notre
Dame des Palmistes Hospital -
which, since its inception, has


ry work, the laundry organiza- continued to extend in operation
tion and the administrational se- and size.
cretarial work. A daily visit to Dr Nicolas and
Another vital complement to a tour of the hospital are made
the staff are the 10 Haitian nur- by. Father Roger Riou througL-
ses working with Father Riou. out the week. As he moves from
These young women competent dispensary to clinic and wards
and quick, are selected for their he always carrys on bantering
tasks by Catholic Sisters in. the conversation with the-- waiting
North and all 10 have had se- patients and quite often makes
condary school training. While a visual check-up on a patient's


on the Island the Haitian nurses
receive board and lodgings and
10 dollars a month addition to
the knowledge, they are acquir-
ing.
Although surgery is not per-
formed on Ble de la Tortue, in-
deed there has been very few in-
cidents where it has been need-
ed, it was- a surgical operation
which first caused Father -Riou
to set up the hospital at Notre
Dame des Palmistes.
Prior to his posting to Turtle
Island the only rhedical care


AT THE



ODVA


SALESJCOUNTER
ATTENTION! !
ATTENTION!!!
YOU WILL FIND SUPERIOR QUALITY BLUE
BONNET RICE EVERY DAY
A HIGHLY VITAMINED RICE
SOLD BY SACK OF 100 POUNDS
AT THE FOLLOWING PRICES:
Blue Bonnet Grade-A $10.50 or 52.50- Gdes.
Blue Bonnet Grade-B 8.59 or 42.50 Gdes.
Blue Bonnet Grade--C 5.80 or 29.00 Gdes.
Discount of $.30 cents or 1.50 Gde. by 1001b sack on
any purchase made directly from the Rice Mill at DE-
SEAUX (Artibonite Valley).
Discount of 4 per cent on purchases of 20 sacks or
more of rice.


TO BUY ODVA RICE IS TO BUY
HAITIAN PRODUCED RICE
TO BUY HAITIAN PRODUCTS IS TO
HELP DIRECTLY IN STABILIZING
THE ECONOMY OF THE COUNTRY


condition on the spot.
Able Dentist
Roger Riou adds dentistry' to
his accomplishments and daily
tasks. After greeting the Doe-
tors and nurses he moves to the
dentist's room to garb himself
in white surgical jacket over his
sport shirt. Comprehensive
equipment, including drill, X-ray
and gas, is placed around the
rgom and Father Ridu likes to
open draws and pull out slides
etc. to show how well equipped
the dentistry's department is.
But if the dentist's room is
well able to handle major dental
operations Father Riou believes
in swift action with no time was-
ted. Issuing Novocaine to a
young girl with an infected
tooth Father Riou doesn't wait
more than half-a-minute for it
to deaden and take effect. His
method is,- perhaps, not as deli-
cate as some but it is certainly
swift and effective. Holding the
patient's head back and steady
with one hand he utilizes den-
tist's pliers on the infected tooth
and jerking swiftly up and down
soon has the trouble rectified and
displayed between' the plier's
teeth. Asked if maybe, his swift
action doesn't allow the Novo-
caine time to take hold he re-
plies "It's very fast acting."
Father Riou, despatching as
many dental patients as require
attention, moves from his hospi-
tal rounds to the building hous-
ing the electricity generators
and from th espotlee cleanliness
of the hospital to up to his el-
bows in grease while he checks
and adjusted the threb motors
providing power for the village
and Mlission living quarters.
Notre Dame des Palmistes has
three generating plants, one bat-
tery and two diesel. Repair work
(Contin ed on page 20)


I


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PAGE 18


ESSO


KEROSENE.




Flamme Bleu


helps

HAITI FIGHT-AGAINST EROSIONi





WPIDE il UIE OUIM6N. V9









r. .





c ombatting erosion mto

-. j



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the new revolutionary stove

loin- the fight to preserve Haiti's Riches






LEADother IN ATHMERICAN coutriOGRESS.



CUISINESSO the quick cooking, econo.
ical fighter against erosion and a CUISIN


ESSO only costs $1.80.
-I









SBuy a CUISINESSO, buy BLUE FLAMES

kerosene and help promote taid preserve Haiti's Riches

HAITlly forest andalreadyselling
HAITI's forests...


-I


toa






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.4't-t~~


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ROYAL, CTE
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_. ._ _._._ _ __r "4 "-"" .. .. S "7 A U "y l' .


X,-.AJ .TI- S- U-'N PAGE 19:












Ts S lOPPIN-ENTER
JUVENIA TISSOT, BORELCARO CHAtNE








laD. .... A idUET, RAPHAEL, PATOU,








ULrIF;NARDN,. RIVO, REVILLON, VIGNY,
POATLANTASTUDRT SHOPPIO, CARVENE GALON CENTER
676INFABE PRTAU OF PARRINE, HAITI



JE THE WORLD IMPORTSALBET,

A,- I JDEMA- PIGUET, '"ff B RPHAEL, PATOU, 4
'AEGE1 LE COULTRE, fli.'1J B."' LMAZT, WORTH, 4
I,,- ULYSEI NARDIN,, RIVO, H IEVIULON, VIGNY, ,
rODE,: ATLANTA, STUDIO, CARVEN, LE GALLON,
.' -FABEGE OF PARIS.
, -- ." JEAN D 'ALBEET,
"- .:::'-"-7 :.'+' "- _Yv,.,, . .. .


JACQUIES GRIFFE
FATH,.PIGUET.
,UISLAV .CORDAY.
.E IES E ENGLISH DOESKIN,
A.a i E TAA.ANTELOPE. MINOX.CANNON


PRJNGLE.E BALANTYNE, ROYAL COPENHAGEN,
' t. BERN HARD ALTMAN. ROYAL DOULTON,
. .- .I A_.."-I LUISA SPAGNO I- HUMMEL

xMaui, B AnCE~t
:.wu a "COZEW,-..._ ...DA .SH..S.LVER CREAM..-.All- FRENCH.--4
r RREO. HARVEY'S BRISTOL
EliBA8088 IN.DANISH SILVER CREAM, All FRENCH.
.a -GOLD & smvEr-JEWELRY DANISH and 4
--. --and BRAZrAN.. mfnis. SPANISH LIQUEURS.

K-HIAITIAN HIANDICRAFTS-

SC ULP UES RAFFIA BAGS
& SHOES
.-. .. .+ :.." . ..





1on
_.acw uvi
'.. ...,, . .- .



collector's Itens
....MAHOGNY i h A E


4 fi m
..--- .. .- -. .. t. .



.~ DOLLS"
- 7. : -, r.: '
-4 " -

',':~~MMM RUM' '7+:" S.,, ....."
'.'_ ". " " F - .," '



ARDNCOUT --. s~sedi ii~sto ourfriends in the U. -9. A,. i
lb -S" us41. f or more information.
44,z
00
I ,& ; d. -,.r
--". .. -+..+. xa. ,++ u~s++. ,.. -. . ..'I ,
















areatfrmuwiditliingitalo R Tao d hi ellw i

Tor utiugat s outa ana
thPrty 20teany, Heae TcityJrene a egl



the Watlery the~nt feos
(Continued from page 18) Teeare. also schools at 'each ly as. a guest house. The build- A uiri Iqpabshdloave i optIeise he asel





Thereng qj~ Las~ aaba thednle.1i hp
something that always seems of these areas, with the pxcep ing for patients travellingrto Tr us._






es uterahi the ell Caa anwraf~i_
to be going on in the generator tion of Teti! de 'lle, and these tle Island from the Bmiainland. Is dependence 'in 1804 the- Wand
plant and Father Riou has his are run by appointed professors, 'ctmvp ,oad completion remained uniifihabitted ittitil the 's. to th6 'f li, as1






fast aoin jqwaitoil uturis en Asllan
Work cut out seeing to and chec- certificate and sent to the i- and a -hand Oat village builders turn. of tie. 20t4. century whenl Faher t:oi, is convinced, _.that;







ltilt farers beggn o acdxybl
king the equipment. Switched on land byo the Education Board. work from parly-morniag come across well become a toutit
n -the early evening the diesel late evening on the construction from. the: mainland and ii afadie H ed o it thatthe








athire thed which"~in upb-,:' naa
plant runs until lights out at At the approach to the, quaint daily. 'hln hc;u itodIsland is not: always .as green
nirne-thirty but any electricity re- village at Notre Dame des Pal- This building is--divided: into belongs ,to the'-State. as jt is-this month but there
quired after that can be acquir- mistes stands a large concrete two dormiitories, one for, men, The: Government'o a Dh'rai ?mar6. several under~grounid springs







ONE nea wit aepl larg ccar- Duaier 6
ed from the battery plant. es w'ithat could be capped to provide








crossto wit etg inscrptio the an oesselwrn
ie, .bvteorfho alc~ s~at aio ekiun e
All buildings and rooms at the sion 1 t nst e c king area owned water the yar round and save









sio tooth. Suc isa year aatc cam the uHthe. few ,r
4i~l tfiat thi abet Aha AEe da~ tbini thm Wekin
mission hold the biggest conglo- aign against voodoo was begun courtyard. A. special cookhouss lands such., s Ile aV ea the I rs i











hehoi is woxding consruc i .h on-whiengil oth
-moration of electric wiring ima- by the church IWO Ctoiisuder ontuinwhcwiloer ex-pirate. sfrqghold, and of nseywheif fitherrains'- fall..
ginable with light bulbs and priests Father Desroches a enable visiting patients to cook has -alreLdye signifies its inte.lTghe. motto dIsplayed- on the
switches interaaling the black Canadian and Father Morganne, their meals inside under shelter. tion -of pling Ile Iea& laerortue: walls 6f theaconsultatial room
wires crossing walls and ceil- a Belgium held meetings in the If patients to theIhdspital desire in the same category. de~pictthe iotto of. the mission
ings. When a visitor arrives one village but no one attended arid a private consultation- the a' Ti Mouton,;fit I or To e a id depict its no segregation
of the first things explained is they finally gave up the island. dollar charge is:nadd. Public born owner of an a uxiIi~ar character.."Je xe vett1 connai-
which light to turn on and when The morning they packed up consultation is charged for at coer "Dieu Seuld tre i ta -ace,_ i. t religion, ni
to change over from one light and departed Turtle island by the rate of 50 cents per visit. 'Only exemplifies .0the high re- 0a Tortunej je ne veux connaitre
4o the next. boat they were hit by a squall Hlowevier, it a patient cannot aft 'ard and esteem held oqrjFather 'que ta souifrapeep.
During the years Father Riou mid-way across the channel The ford to pay the hospital fees then
has acquired the fascinating ab- Canadian priest, was- immediate- service and medicine are still P A E T E G L C
ility to speak to people and car- ly drowned but the Belgium pri- given free of charge.
ry on conversation from practi- est was held up by a third fathb If a radiology is suggested by
:cufly everyvertical and hoerizon- er who hadvtbeenetra vello toto hep













ta psitio -t aaleg.udrte, Mo e vesel ithteto-rets ie oewhc e1 st
stove, above the roar of the out- Placed in a Haitian boat after one of the Sisters who in'turn'
board motor, while cranking the two hours in the water, the Bel- inquires into the patient's fian-
big diesel generator or pulling gium priest lost consciousness cial status. If he.,can afford it MA -ONDE',
out a tooth. Such is his practice an~d the Haitians in the boat, he pays, if not theservices isPOU A I M-0
at that this ability that he can thinking him dead, let him go still given. Laboratory charges
pitch his words to exactly a and he perished. The third are either one or two ngordes
comfortable listening level ac- priest was saved. The people (20 or 40 cents USA.) All patients IS A
cording to the position from of the island said that the inci- .are hospitalized free but. pay, for owo shw etrn tefposSMDO 1 1 ioces la
which he is working. dent was the revenge of the their -medicine, if 'they can af- a_ spca oiay. program, at: 11 30pm1-folowed Ily_ a spet
Equally as amiable and.busy voodoo gods. fodi.Telretoeain show with the EI*Rancho. Vrety lile fIAan rs
with his chores is the mission's Notre Dame des. Palmistes is performed to date on Ile de la
other priest Father Alexis Le a village of .neat and- colorful Tortue -was'the removal of an
Quere from Brittany who has houses, bustling neatly clothed advanced throat Goitre. The rare
been on the island -for the past people and a centre of building incidenrits of a ppend'ic-
-five years. A short amiable man industry. A school for 240 pupils, tue Iare either treated .At Ithe Yania, Jean Benjfamin and, the acclaihied
who likes to move around the turned over to the State follow- hospital by packing them'-with Dance music ofEduer GTinr s P14 ln rhs
mission in sun glasses and white ing its construction on a rice ice. or-the patient -is taken by Reserve your table NOW for ,Christmas Eve- and,
tropical sun helmet, Father .Le and b e-an ba s is is to be boat to the mainland -for surgm New Year's vGaw
Quere is kept busy visiting the augmented with another school ery.ADIIN 20
other chapels on the island the building in the near -future and The main sicknesses ti-eated
most distant of -hc strecurrently in the building stages at-the hospital .are, Tuberculos is,
hours away.ar-e a new rectory anrd a special tropical ulcers of Taiuknd, Am nfceta elionsieelon 8 dfo
The five chapels conducted by -lodgement building- for patients malnutriction and there are five M~idnight -1) for Whe additi onal plte ot 50.
the Mission on' Ile de la Tortue coming to the island fromaltar known. cases of le'rsy Ywnepciallywrdea tsout
are sited at Lavallee, Montry, for medical treatment. once a big problem' ory the is-
MVonrouge, Les Plaines and Tete When the rectory, building is la nd, has' been wiped ou -t by the
eI'lle and one of the five are completed the main building at utilization- 'of Penicillin., As 'an EL RANCHO:
Visited each and every Sunday- the mission will be devoted sole- example- of the varied and mrany








1-, I ;,9







i--H

%:4V rhe r e si is c et in S io a
IVe t.
$2.6a'D 4








SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25TH, 1960


t HAITI SUN"'


Kennedy-John


Policy

Washington, -- President-Elect was Chairman. It- was adopted
John F. Kennedy and Vice-Pre- at the party's 1960 National Con-
sident Elect Lyndon &B Johnson .vention in Los Angeles five
are pledged to "restore the good months.-ago.
neighbor policy" in United States The people of Latin America,
dealings with Latin America. the platform asserts, are among
a billion and a half people in
Senator Kennedy and Senator that area, Asia and- Africa who
Johnson were elected to the Na- are "engaged in an unpreced-
lion's highest Offices on a De- ented attempt to propel them-
mocratic Party platform calling selves into the 20th Century.
for "Far closer economic coop. They are striving to create or
ration and increasedd respect reaffirm their national identity.
and understanding" for the other "But they want much more
American Republics. than independence. They want an
The democratic platform, ter- end to grinding poverty. They
med "The- rights of Mgn," was want more food, health for them-
prepared under the party's corn- selves and their children, and
mittee on resolutions and plat- other benefits that a modern in-
form, of which Chester Bowles dustrial civilization can provide.


MODERN HAITIAN-
PAINTINGS

By MAX PINCHINAT
On Show Now At
GALERIE PINCHINAT
106, BOIS VERNA
just before you reach the "PONT MORIN" bridge

This is an ART GALLERY, not a picture shop, ex-
hibiting over 100 of the most attractive FRAMED
PAINTINGS made both in Pdrt au Prince and Paris by
FAMOUS HAITIAN PAINTER MAX PINCHINAT
now in France.
The artist WHO HAS EXHIBITED BOTH HERE
AND ABROAD for the past 15 years, comes back to
Haiti every five years and for 15 to 18 months renews
the contact with his pecle and his source of inspira-
tion.
In the GALLERY PINCHINAT are grouped
some paintings of the 15 years of work by MAX PIN-
CIIINAT, from 1945 to 1 60. Prices have not been ar-
bitrarily based on beauty of the painting, but on its
size, just like. Paris Fashion for MAX PINCHINAT
and OTHER WELL KNOWN ARTISTS. Visitors can
consult the paintings price list.if they wish to.

All the taxi drivers know GALLERY PINCHINAT
AND don't let anybody tell you that the GALLERY is
closed. It is not.
The GALLERY PINCHINAT, sole represen-
tative, and sales agent of PINCHINAT's paintings, has
exhibited a few samples only at "Foyer des Arts Plas-
. tiques", "Galerie Brochette" and Galeria Suisse".
Op9n from 10 A W to 5 PM, and on appointment in
the evening. ADMISSION FREE.


Ison


'Good Neighbor'


hotelSANS SCIJiCI


with its treaty obligations, per-who takes office next January
mit the establishment of a regi-will face unprecedented challen-
me dominated by International.ges. His administration will pro-
Athetistic Communism in thesent a new face to the world.
Western Hemisphere... It will be a bold, confident. afhr-
"The democratic President mate face."



-- ----.---
'm "4 .- .-4


"Communist strategy has v
sought to divert these aspira- n
tions into narrowly nationalistic 1
channels, or external troublema- A
king, or authoritarianism... V
"The democratic programs of
economic cooperation will be ai-
med at making it as easy as
possible for the political leader-
ship in these countries to turn
the energy, talent and resources
of their peoples to orderly eco-
nomic growth.

"History and current experien-
ce show -that an annual per ca-
pita growth rate of at least 2
per cent is feasible in these
countries. The democratic admi-
nistration's assistance program,
in concert with the aid forthco-
ming from our partners in West-
ern Europe, Japan, and the Bri-
tish Commonwealth, will be
geared to facilitating this objec-
tive..."

The platform on which Sena-
tors Kennedy and Johnson were
elected calls for the creation of
"Working partnerships, based on
mutual respect and understand-
ing" with the non-Communist na-
tions of Latin America, Asia and
Africa.

Mr. Kednedy is further pledg.
ed to "revamp and refocus" the
objectives, emphasis and alloca-
tion of United States foreign as-
sistance programs. "We shall
place our programs of Interna-
tional Cooperation on a long-
term masis to permit more ef-
fective planning. We shall seek
to associate other capital-export,
ing countries with us in promot-
ing the orderly economic growth
of the underdeveloped world,"
the Kennedy-Jolmson platform
asserts.

The new democratic adminis-
tration has affirmed in its party
platform "Our historic policy of
of opposition to the establish-
ment anywhere in the Americas
of governments dominated by
foreign power...
"The Government of the Unit-
ed States under a democratic
administration -will not be deter-
red from fulfilling its obliga-
tions and solemfi responsibilities
under its treaties and. agree-
ments with the nations of the
Western Hemisphere. Nor will
the United States, in conformity


PHILCO TROPIC 103"- INTERNATIONAL 6-BAND RADIO
Listen to the Iigh-Fidelity brilliance of this Phlco master mod-
el and you'll think you're in the studio, so keen and clear is. every
programme.

But that's only one of this model's many fine features; others
include: Complete short wave and standard broadcast receptionV
on 6 Bands. Fascinating 'long-low' styling fully 2ft. in width -
with rich walnut finished cabinet.
High-Fidelity sound from speaker network of duo-cone front
speaker and dynamic side speaker.
Separate bass and treble audio controls.


Dunt' forget the WHITE CHRISTMAS BALL at HOTEL SANS SOUCI on Friday December 23rd.... I
A truly BIG AFFAIR, the famous PARTY OF CI RISTMAS and NEW YEAR FESTIVITIES... Tick- I B .A'
ets-are rapidly -being sold. There, will be the traditional WHITE CHRISTMAS TREE under which I _
presents to be won will be piled, including the 1960 AngliA which will be raffled. Remember only
500 tickets are being sold at 15.00 per, ticket... Co nsolation prizes will follow... The Supper Buffet
at $2.50 Per Person will be something. with the famous cuisine of the SANS SOUCI... Don't miss FIRESTONE INTERAMERICA
the WHITE -CHRISTMAS. BALL and remember it is a benefit for the CANCER LEAGUE... Have a Radio Pleasure
" wonderful evening and help in the fight against CANCER... Remember December 23rd at HOTELNJOY I
SANS SOUCI the WHITE ClfHRISTMAS BALL. NOW E J E ,F
~ ...4


.* *',,. -,.


PAGE 21


If you're looking for office furniture that really expresses, your
individuality, then take a few wmoiients to call or visit your
MARABOU dealer.
Beautifully designed desks in striking blonde, distinctive dark
walnut, woodgrain or traditional plain gray; also available modern,
dramatic tire-tone arrangements.
REGULAR SIZES 30 x 60 tops
REASONABLE PRICES
No. 5004 $ 89.95
No. 5005 134.95



















m flour to personally super-
e the arrival of a very spe-
d shipment from Fundador
stiller, Pedro Domecq in Jerez
la Fontera, Spain.
'he merchandise that Milo
ikime even gave-a hand
help disembark was not the
al vintage bottled kind,. but
there gladiators, veterans of
Spanish game rings, and not
)it less fiery than the famous
ndy.
years have passed, and so
a lot of fighting, inbreeding
crossbreeding. Today, "Mi-
a rare bird with his share
the old gladiator fighting
id coursing in his veins, has F
t up a breed of fighting cock a
'The Hakime", from the fin- I
birds from India, Japan and 1
in, and what is more, he is d









X.-











\\If'I

t 1 I








'9t DA-y E1 1906E1TA 1 StJI PAGE 23

bac nd courageously peck its share their chief s passion for srnecrusacst
way to victory. The -Peruvian 'the sport, and show a fatherly Cockfight enthusiast Hakime re-w
was elated and asked the own- loe n handling the -birds. One fuses to describe.
KFIGH INGer if, be hiad any more at home fowl of breeding, is said to have
7 for sale. come from a famous farm in a COCK-FIGHTING, as a sport,
,Cohitlnued from 'page ) more-, tlarah1bby ik w.as a foreign land in a strange man- according to Hakime was first
one~~~~~i thi an, ivee afighs.4 -good flights.. onofth
He has, doeti fv ihs od fi gh tugh o.o h -Two "War Horses" went South ner, and Mr Hakime is taking introduced either by the Greeks
A cofgtcan last from. third. sppetaculgYr' thrills were attach- oPeuAnd $150.00 stayed here no chances that any' cock-lover or the Romans. At Athens, theme
ty -five to. forty' minutes, he e ed to it like 0i hs ob on and was ploughed back into ex- will try to borrow one of his fa- were annual cock flights. The
pli in cock t. pn gthe iviere Froide mouse strais of fighting blood. sport was long a favorite with
Froide Farm. Local cock fight Dogs and barbed wire discourathe Briti, and the
operated the Usife-a-Glace, Na- Galianf18d 06 dC Got Him' owners can't afford his prices ge poaching breeders. dieting and breeding of cocks
tionale (ice factory, which bot-. Exp so he' intends to concentrate on 'for fighting was the subject of
tes ,a D CitaI g t I 1o o the export trade. The fowl of -breeding in ques- many treatisees.
Cola)::. takes. an icecream and the, Farm, said, Millo, -put .him tion was lifted from the farm of
'has, a- large importing enter- into the exporting business, by, 'Andre -Paul and Herve Jules, -ex-President of Cuba, Dr Carlos Cockfighting was first introdu-
re handlerss at the Farm, Mendietta and 'arrived in under ced to Haiti by the English when
pany, on Rue- des MV~iracl~es, Sunday, at the De' M~tteig' Coq they occupied part of Haiti du,a
calls his hobby of cok beed d'Orarena on the Exposition he seventeen ent
ing a passion, and says that the cording to Hakime, With a copy
thrill o4 the afeila s like-seeing This' cock lost an- eye- and othlaetsueofheUS
pf the latest issue/of the U.S
you ow n son fighting .' e .t e W ent' d w n 'b i deed,-b blood, 7C g s h ~ d t
The oldfigter wholed thec I I/i lim I -. A 7 W I 7W a r steel" in his hand, Milomoet
bloc against 'the. establishment -10, to 1. AL startled crowd -which A LOF KS AND WASHES LIKE BAKEDENAMhis eed
of the. Fhour IVMll laughig today, include a Pie ruvian. enthusiast, 1f1-k Yifrsta i re il
and says Although flour was saw Halkime s blind, bifd come ....some-doay ebe fihting trughout
........ ..the world, and will help 'to si
inti1ate the sport in Haiti
'4o'
DISCOVER: IH FSCINATION cACOU kSAN
nv'-FA, QACIQUE ISLAND
"IBO BEACH"
ONLY 30 MINUTES
OFHROM PORT-Au-PRINcE
ENTRY (INCLUDING
~- ROUND-TRIP
Through-, Its Postage -Stamps: BOAT"
TRANSPORTATION)
Far cmlete information in Ha~iti OwNL $1.00
Children 50 Cents
Stainaps. and -otter details which will be' FOR VITCHENS, Privat Drssn Ror
BATHROOMS, White Sand Beach
Karni std, you free of, charge write to ALL WOODWORK
--,.. .TOSEPH NADAL, AGENTS SKNDIIG1-
B Mt 2 PbiRT-AU-PRINCE S;NOREELING
---------**-* -Com~pletely Equipped

Or Weekldy Visits
Special Summer Rate,
In Effect:
$6 Single $10 Double

CACIOUE ISLAND
"IBO BEACH',
SAME OWN'ERSFP AS ROTEI
IBO LELE MANAGERS:
PAUL & NANCY BAUSSAN
NOTICE


HOUSE FOR RENT
raI

3-Storey House At-
Mont Calvaire
Petionville

49 RUE- DU QUA!




1i PE; FUMf5 an IULOR

WO 90 VINGS "140GANY
J. A& $H L


4>4
4' 4' 4U






-." -: -i' '"' L -'2.' ,' ": "., *'-, "t ;.. A A ". "' s : "-" t. e4'- Z'"if. 7,i" :'.X 1 'C" 4t2XN." 4 '.V4,{,
I -!-o. .'. -,* ,,. -. ,. ,

.- "H-AITTI'... S U'N" -."* : "" :I.....,


PAGE 24


MEDICO SERVES 17 COUNTRIES

(Continued from page 9) ans we are working have turned
the MEDICO team working side around and started learning En-
by side with Haitian doctors and glish."
nurses at the Jeremie hospital When MEDICO first came to
consists of three doctors, three Haiti with its working motto of
nurses and two technicians. Dr. "giving medical assistance in
Dillard's replacement, Dr. Hilda newly developing and needy
Jane Walters of Maryland has countries of the world," consi-
already arrived here and it is derable hostility was expressed,
expected that a fourth doctor by certain people resenting what
will join the team in the near they termed "unwanted intru-
future. It is ioped to bring the sion." All these problems have
staff enrollment up to a total been ironed out and.in the words
of 12 within the next few months. of Archer Dillard, "we are work-
It is planned to keep the ME- ing well together and like each
DICO teams here for a period other."
of one year "or better" accord. "MEDICO is providing most
ing to Dr Dillard and it will be of the supplies and equipment
required of all to learn Creole. for the Jeremie hospital 'and will
"Our present team is taking continue doing so for some time
Creole lessons but all the Haiti- to come" stated Dillard. "To


on the label


nur .*'i'<{,, .i, ', n I
SUCrs. .pau LardG rer" OQ8,.
i,. Pport-a.prince(-") "-


Served txcwswvra at Haiti's tLead.-
HOTELS & RESTAURANTS & BY CONNOISSEURS
S THROUGHOUT THE WORLD -



sIwezc. agiaeC fe TFw&e.





SIRE R PERSONAL TRVEL00






.'-. ..,
C,' :-- .. 2:. : .- "" .'
:, ..- .A~ ~ r $ . :, . ,.,


date MEDICO has provided the
hospital." with a 190 milleamp1
Westinghouse X-Ray machine,
put in a 1,400 dollar sterilizer
in the operating room, ..giVen-
5,000 dollars -of new laboratory'
equipment and doubled the.size'
of the lab .
"'It is hoped t-y the MEDICO
organization to be able to gra-
dually extend- its operations
throughout the Republic of -Haiti
and among our aims is that of
sending to this country shortly,,
visiting professors -from the
Jdhns Hopkins University. These
professors would teach_- at .the
local medical .school (in Port
au Prince) for a two year -per-
iod and would be payed for their
work by MEDICO. -
Dr. E. Archer. Dillard 'stated.
that he had come to. like Haiti
very much during his three
months of work here and wished
that. he_ could stay longer. It -was
imperitive however that' he con-
clude his work here and return
to his private practice- "I alsol
have to go home and..play Santa
Claus" he concluded. .


PANAMA LINE PANAMA
CANAL COMPANY
The SS Cristobal of the Pana-
ma Line, will arrive from New
York at 7:00 AM, on-December
24th 1960.
On board are. a total of 152
passengers of which the follow-
ing 55 will disembark at Port
au Prince: .
Mr. L6uis Aukustin, -Mr & Mrs
Robert M. Becker, Dr. Michael
Burnham Sr, Mrs & 4 enfants, -4<
Miss Doiothy Caplan, Miss Car- f
men Charles, Miss- Marianne
Daiser, Mrs, Marie Rose Delien-.
ne, Mr Jean Leon Destine, Miss
Odette Elie, Radm Calvin B.
Galloway & Mrs., Mrs Helene
Gaston, Miss Mathilde Gentillon,
Mr J&seph Hfedaya, Mrs & 2 -en-
fants, Dr. RrP Hippolyte<. Mrp
& 3 enfants, Mr & Mrs Carl
Janke, Miss Yolande Julien, Mr
James.-Kish, -Mrs S 1 "enfant,-
Mr Jean Claude Laforest, Mrs:
&- L enfant, Miss- Michelle Ly-
guer, Miss Therese Diane- Ores-
te, Mrs Analf a Paul, Mr-Gilot
A. Prudent, Mr & .Mrs Maurice
Sagoft, Miss Marie Therese Sa-
lomon, -Miss Laura Sanon,- Mr
& Mrs Irvin C. :Shaffer, Miss
-Ruth Stern, Dr. Wilhelm H. Van
Almsick, Mrs & 2 enifants, Mrs .'
Pauline Walters ..


.CALL AT THE-


STORE CLUB


AND VIE .
THE ,-COflPREHENSIVE.. '
... RiNGE OF 7
Mahogany & Sisal goods, t
Paintings, Jewelry,
:. Tortoise shell
by: Hiti' top Craftsmen '
STOkE CLUB-
Offers Top Quality :
Goods
In A Moderi.n Store '
-.-"" W.Wth Full:."-'-'.
Airconditioning .... ,
iitoFg;MAsk AX-
.*- S.-^^ft


S- Maric ^Jeanne


AIR-CONDITONED-
T RW-GOODS JAOTORY
13, 4, Rue du Centre


S-". ROitTAU' PRiNOE, HAITI .


SHOES HANDBAGS HATS .-
'" 'AN "RECORDS FREN I PERFUMF

SHAITAN CEMMICS .
i- L5 Years Experience in- Handicrafts.

P.O. Box _. :- .Open Every Day -
.- .. ..'- From 8!00 a.m., To 5:00 Lgib.t


~34j5$ ~- 'z"
~. _____


ril
te^ y"
_ i
F^yHR
r-?^
(!Sai:it


5* *4,"<


4-' .f-t:-;4~-;%Sr-n2-4-r~ V
AS -.


*4-.
' ,l ',


IMT."'







SUN y; .D I960 ., HAI TI SUN


-Gr-a--ce


. PAGE 25


Line


The Best Ships Serving Haiti


NO- OTHER STEAMSHIP LINE OFFERS
,": -i -


SA DEPARTURE EVERY FRIDAY FROM NEW YORK


A DEPARTURE EVERY


15 DAYS


FROM BALTIMORE; PIAILADELPHIA


A DEPARTURE EVERY SUNDAY FOR NEW YORK


A DEPARTURE EVERY -TUESDAY 1

S NO OTHER IS FASTER


O CRISTOBAL


REFRIGERATION


GRACE


SPACE



LINE


AT ANY 'TEMPERATURE


SERVICE


REQUIRED


IS UNEQUALLED


TAKE ADVANTAGE

OF GRACE LINE


j josepn muaaia a vompanx


General Agew





,.5 '4e G, . . .. .


"P


S


-*-


4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Y.
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4


i


4
4~I


e. **







4I~~~~ie-7 1~gy w eri "Tt,
4 0


theSL~ stat coinidevco
Ug _1W~n anrt areas#d ~S SN
The Slyay Merican Gets A FaceLifingB
wtto the, ioerest of &a 'brgd pr. t f -.th fto a
te ndutrileoncen lon g-range ,efforts -to esitablish
otA Haitian company, Haitiw Mee futureemarket that. will' to some Espo s biggest, business in
By JAMES RUSSErn the natives to use kerosene -in- talks S.A. is making- the portable degree make up for the big !loss Haiti no tor el.




aur than Cu50n aii Butr af big- kerosene perogram
Mvanm Herald Busined s Editr stead of charcoal. cookstoves, t thern out 'ato. bp,
xxx ~~~the rate of 16,000 a month. Esso x t -cths ie adi' iia
SThe following article appeared THIS IS NO easy task. For gets no. prftfo aeo-h ATO'S* TAKEOVER of U. cant that 10,000 of fli stores
in the Sunday Edition of the generations, e S. and British oil firms in Cuba has be6'ensold intwo months




gehe Haitiatnons 'hv vs
Miaml Herald on December 11, cooked on charcoal fires, using fbrceed Esso to move,- its Latin- a profitable, eniterprhe mna,. de-
n196i fuel they themselves produced Another Haitian builnesd ba American headquarters from Ha- velop -that' in
All the r erican are not ugly by cutting de vana toCoral Gables and shifted 'US. efforts to make the "I





ownsts trns ketwevig Ls prfiin from> th
south ofle he border. Program, because each stove is the company's ehepasis o the American" look pretty
In the little poverty-stricken Year after year, of tree-outting packaged in a woven shopping,-
.country of Haiti, where the aver- and charcoal burning has laid- basket.
age iaco per person is no many Haitian forests bare apd CREDIT CARD :DIRE TORY
tan s5ono are impv-o d -aderain th ahed adpr- p a eE mney n-e big LISTSi CARIBBEAN. SERVICES
e n sora $ ed t thcious topsoil into the sea. cook ineg change of course
actions of one of America's lar- through steady sales of kerose- A special Troan other use-,
f o o oBut with the use of sound ne.nThe compaNd also is count- story g hunres oof, loca- ful data.-
s porins. ttrucks, posters, pamphlets writ ing on the government lifting actions in the tabe, Bermud
Esso Standard Oil S.A., head- ten in the Haitians' native 12-cents a gallon import tax on and the Bahamas..where- ser- I Prs ans o
quartered in Coral Gables, has French' and simple world of kerosene that Will drop the per- ces can be charged haI just been





noepn tas whll-one eubl toss" the eHal publisheedeii by the Arntory >6f>ri to, crispasngr
taken the lead in a plan to fight mouth, the kerosene r gallon cost of the fl to Ex-
soil erosion and destruction v f is maki steady progn 1 H IS capitalist- oothef vacuatiotlrs bound for a





00 mst- BTTHSI N 0 rdtCadSrie
forests in Haiti. ward its goal of changing the ic move- that is 'Widely regarded 1, .holida~y in the -.tropics. .,,Copies.
cooking -habits of an entire na- with faior in an underdeveloped every
The Key to the whole program tion. conyweepvrysmt-ribbean cardholders, will fincltho- quelst, fromn the-, American- Ex-
is shplecoostoe tat sse~ mes 'makes the siren song of tels, restau tss6~ -l Y,,ShOPi pressCo an t
Standard is selling at cost to Esso Standard1 is making surpcmuimsudset cair-reltal *agencies- 0-d other 'Dept., Box 37,. Church St., Slta-
ihe Haitians for $1.80 each. The the natives know U.S. -private services where, the card ~is hon- tion,, New, York _8, N.Y.
stove burns ixerosene, -a gallon enterprise is behind the program One Haitian :newspaper -called ored.
of. which can cook for a family and that it will be years before the move "the first concrete The directory also suggests the About 45,OO service, establish--
of six for five days.- the thing begins paying off in step toward solution of our dra- best shopping buys, on -each is- ments including hosee in -the Ca-
Working together, the .Haitian profits for the company. matic problem -of erosion. An- laud; hoW to 'convert -sizes ---hat, ribbean area honor the kinrican
Government and the Americail "THIS IS ONE of the. rare other hialled it, as a. "new phase shod IInd clothing, --- .frorn '-the Express Crdt Carid. Some 780.,
company -- a wholly-owned sub- cases": the Haitian government in the history Iy of Haiti that will Amferican to the. European syist- 000 cardholders cahn use thecard
sidiary of Standard Oil of New said in a statement, "where the-contribute to the nation's pros- em; Ia table othluid and linear in -virtually every country, at the,
Jersey are try to convince Iinterest of the population and of perity." measures; hifits 16 facilitate }*us- free'.world.



THE MANAGEMENT AND PERSONNEL F HA'S





OSe- -ags 0o2npny



MANUFACTURERS OF THE~, HIGH 4ALITY




ROSE FACIAL .TISSUE

TRANSLUCENT GLACINE -BAGS

HEAVY DUTY KAFT- PAPER -BAGS

PAPICARTON




EXTEND: 'HElk -BEST WISHES. S.OR- THE



Christmast Sea'son,
>44

















And New Year
Aw e









SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25TH, 1960


"HAITI SUN"


Electric Sit Down


(Continued from 'page 6) ..
..v\ng been obliged to reinvest in
the Company the small benefits
resulting from its operations.
Right now the Company is fa-
ced with' a very difficult finan-
cial situation. dn account of the
economic situation the Company
meets more and more difficult-
ies to obtain payment of its bills
and amount due to the Company
according to the execution of its
contract, reach approximately
$900.000. Considering the high
theft of current and the restric-
tive clauses of 1934 concession,
Compagnie d'Eclairage Electri-
que is not in a position to pur-
chase new equipment.

According to an agreement si-
gned between the Haitian Gov-
ernment and the Company, in
1960 four generating units hayv-
ing a total capacity of 3,000 -K-,
WH have been installed in .our
Port au Prince Plant. However


Port au Prince and the Commu-
nes served by .our Port au Prin-
ce plant. are developing so ra-
pidly and the daily requests for
electric service increase in the
same way that the improvement
brought by these supplementary
3,000 KW is temporary.

- If urgent steps are not. taken
in the near future, it will be im-
possible to furnish continuous
service.
The necessary steps to be tak-
en are as follows:

1; Strict and continuous ap-
plication of the contract
clauses to arrive to a
complete stop of theft ot
current. ,
2) Regular payment of elec-
tric energy by the custo-
mers and rapid settle-
ment of all obligations
owed to the company.
These measures will permit tu


furnish sufficient electricity and
to help to the industrial and so-
cial development of Port au
Prince area.

For' the future, the establish-
ment- of an hydro-electric Plant
at Peligre dam seems to be the
solution which will furnish the
necessary services and will per-
mit an eventual rate demcease.
Negociations between the Haitian
Government and the Company
for the hydroelectric develop-
ment have been in progress for
:some timn. Even if these nego-
ciations are successful a period
of two years will be necessary
for the construction of the Plant
and the creation of transmission
lines between Peligre and Port
au Prince. It will be absolutely
necessary that immediate steps
be taken so that during said
time the situation of electric dis-
tribution stays normal in Port
au Prince area.
t


Chicago Gets Haitian.Xmas Receipe


Sil'ort au Princiens Odette and
UGeard Wiener received the fol-
io ing clipping recentlyy from a
Chicago newspaper. The story
-was accompanied by a photo-
graph of their friend Mrs. Jaok
Lindsey:

Mrs Jack Lindsey not only
gave a fascinating menu and
serving instructions but also
showed the Dedorative Living
Group some colorful glimpses of
Haitian life.

Her Christmas menu was in-
tended for a late formal supper
to be served outdoors, where
most meals are eaten in the
warm climate, with a king-sized
Christmas candle at each table.


"As midnight nears," she ad-
ded, "candlelight parades of
singing Haitiaris wind song the
mountain roads toward the chur-
ches. As you finish your mdal
and the' candles at your. table
burn low, the whole countryside
is lighted with these moving
candles."

r The main feature of her menu
is, Tasso, a unique Haitian. tur-
key dish hardly suitable foi Fort
Wayne's climate. The turkey is
cut from the bones and soaked
in lime juice, hot peppers and
salt, -then put 'on the roof all
day in the blazing tropical sun:.
For three days and. nights it is
alternately soaked in the hot spi-
cy juice .an4 "sn'.ke'd" in the
-rooftop, Finally it is cooked in
more of the same juze ah d.pep-
per combination and served with
:a hot sauce called Ti Malice.

'. otter than blazes but ideli-:
,cious" was Mrs Lindsey's com-
ment. This is her Christmas sup
per' menu:


Onion Soup -
Escargote
Tasso With Ti Malice
Fried Plantain
Red Beans And Rice
Christiphone
Heart Of Palm and
Avocado Salad
Fruits And Cheese
Frehnch Bread
Coffee
She explained that.-plantain


is


a fruit very similar to banana. Chicago.


1Red beans and rice are a French
Colonial staple served at every
meal as potatoes are' in this
area. Chinstiphone is pear-like,
and is sliced and boiled in water.
Since palm trees are scarce in
Indiana, she doubts if that part
of the, salad would be practical
here. She bought the immense
palm hearts for 40'cents in Haiti,
but has-been heard they may be
purchased for a mere $60 in


MEN S ,AWIRTS



A HANDKaRcwiars



Sy YARD



LIBERTY



Douses
[ *


.' -FREEPORT SHOPPING CiENTER
S ., B53.ss.RueduQuai
*. Desses and Sh;rts made on order
. ; and' delidered'in 24 hdu.. 1


PAGE #!




a


MOVAD$T,- t


ON SALE AT MAISON ORIENTAL
AND LITTLE EUROPE


o0i'mR"
16'tnif


,actttoe4-


WITH A


BESSAMATIC


Is.
is C A M E R A S AT FRIT lMIRT I'll"X'S


'&cefal, Centew


I. UE BONE FOI.

Manae. :AIR-CONBITIONEG


S.ship t,. ge Sita es v . ,. ._ .


IL WA









IASSEILRIAD
BiD AH











BRUnl
hd bhy


V1A.t-


" ? .. i.'I. ';.:'.-:,:". ., .?."


I '


II


I.l-t. M:|I













Many Christmas Gustoms Date



Back To Ancient Times


The following article tells the and Christmas trees we ,asso-


story of Christmas, its origin
and historN. In Haiti Christmas
takes two forms:
Alfred Metraux' book Voodoo
in Haiti, in a chapter entitled
"Voodoo Chlistmas in Haiti,"
tells of the ceemLnijfies falling,
on Christmas eve and Christmas
day and their relation to Christ-
mas is explained by the author
who states:

"The cycle of ceremonies, be
ginning with a quest for sul-
phurous %water and ending so
brilliantly with Chrisriiias night,
is mainly designed to bring good
luck to the devotees by rneansi
of 'baihs' and to. give priests
an opportunity of preparing. with
a.il due pomp and ceremony, the
mugic poiNders Whlich they use
in their tre.tmeniils.
*The flel hlich ii%' refer to
as 'Christnmas'. onil account of
the coincidence of dates, is at
root only a magic ceremony de-
signed to ensure the capture of
that vague power called 'luck'
and to confer immunity against
sorcerers."

Thousands of laili.mn people,
mostly those ii the cities an:!
towns, celebrate a traditional
C'*ristmas Day with early morn-
i gathering under the gaily
L Located tree, the distribution
4 presents and the Christmas
.c -iner.
i.rfSTLETOE and Yule Ings.
1-asting and gifts, carols, cards


.- I


elate all with the midwinter ho-
lidays. However, have you ever
stopped to consider their origin
and history? Some of these cus-
toms date from ancient times.
Greens for decorations came
to us frum the Romans, who
used them during the winter sol-
shce or Saturnalia. At this time
of year, lat6 December, the
Orwds of ancient Britain gather-
ed mistletoe for their sacred ri-
tes. The plant .'as believed to
lie so powerful that enemies
meeting under it would lay aside
their weapon and embrace.
Hence our custom of kissing un-
d.r the misLletoe.

The word "Yule" come from
the Scandinavian feast of Juul.
Grc-at rires were built to' honor
the lod Thoc and to defy the
Frost King. The medieval Eng-
lish considered it bad lucl: if a
squint-eyed person entered the-
great hall while the traditional.
log was burning and even
worse luck if a barefooted or
flatfooted woman appeared.
W\'ELL-LADEN tables and sa-
ustied diners always have been
pait of the season. In England
ftor many years the serving of
brawn the boar's head was
traditional. Mince pie was pupu-
lar, too, but in earlier times it
carried other names. About 1590
it wore the unappetizing label of
mutton or suet pie.
R o a s t e d peacock, however,
was considered the greatest treat


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needy. In one favorite tale he
left bags of gold for three girls
who had no doweries; needless
to add all three soon were mar-
ried. Other names for the gift-
giver are Papa Noel, La Belana,
.Jule-nissen plus many more.
Kris Kringle, for instance, co-
mes from the German "Christ
Kind" or infant Christ, but is de-
picted now as a girl wearing a
crown and carrying a Christmas
tree. She shares honors with
Knecht Rupert, who gives pres-
ents to the good children and
Pelsnichol (Nieolas with fur),
who leaves only switches in the
shoes of naugthy boys and girls.

It probably is from the Euro-
pean custom of setting out the
shoe or sabot for gifts that we
derive our own ceremony of han-
ging up a stocking on ChristTnas
Eve.

Some scholars believe caroling
is a carry-over from. the Romah
songs of the Saturnalia. The first
songs of the Nativity date from
the Fourth Century and German
lieder from the 11th. Some 200
'years later, carols found their
way into France' and Britain.
One quaint belief of northern En-
gland 'was that on Christmas
Eve the Iees gathered and hum-
med. carols.

The Puritans strongly opposed,-
singing and even the celebration
of Christmas itself. In England
they passed.'laws in 1644 forbid-
ding its observance,' but these
were repealed after the Restor-
ation.
From 1659 to 1681 in, parts of
America it was a criminal bffen-
se to celebrate\tne holiday. Later
infi our history, George Washing-
ton ciedited his success against
the Hessians at Trenton- in 1776


to the enemy's evening of Christ-
mas reverly. that left them open.
to a surprise attack. .
The seasonal card is a relati- "
vely late development. It seems
to have evolved from the pen-
manship qards issued at school
during the Christmas season. .
Used to test the student's pro-
ficiency with his pen, some were
so well done they took the place
of other gifts.
BY 1864 the custom of sending
these cards was well established
in England. It became so popu-
lar in this country in the 1870's
that L. Prang and Company of
Boston broke the British mono-
poly and began manufacturing
cards in America.

Decorated trees, h o w e v e-r,
stretch back into history. Accor-
ding to legend, trees were sup-
posed to bloom on the eve of
the Saviour's birth and, in reco-
gnition of this, decorated trees
were made a part of the festi-
vities. I /
The first recorded one was in
Strassburg, Germany, in 1605.
Introduced" into France in the
1800s, they didn't become really wl
popular until sometime later.

When Queen Victoria of Eng-
land married Prince Albert, he
introduced the custom to the
British and it soon gained gene-
ral favor. The tree-came to'our
shores with the Germans, who
settled in Western New York
and Pennsylvania.
Customs vary throughout the
world. The United States not'
only is an amalgam of people.
but also of their customs. And
.no matter how you celebrate it
or how say if... "Felices Pas-,
cuas"... "Froliche Weihnachten"
... 'Joyeux Noel".. it still neans .
Merry Christmas!


of all. After being cooked and
cooled the bird was sewed care-
fully into its skin and then ser-
ved by the fairest lady among
the assembled guests.

Pagan and Christian customs
are combined in our giving of
gifts. Santa Claus is a variation
of the name Saint Nicolas. His
festal day is Dec. 6.
Living in the Fourth -Century,
according to legend, he secretly
went about giving gifts to the


.SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25TH, 19 n
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25TH, 1960 (


PAGE 28


'QHAITI SUW'






Pages
Missing
or
Unavailable









SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25TH, 1960


PAGE 3


4i'A IT SUN"


COMMUNIQUE OF THE MINISTRY
OF THE INTERIOR


The Ministry of the Interior
and National Defense,, by order
of His Excellency the President
of the Republic, recalls to intdr-
ested persons that the Ministe-
rial Departments, as well as au-
tonomous organizations of the
State such as the National Bank
of the Republic of Haiti, the Ins-
titute of Agricultural Credit, the
Water Service, the Telegraph
and Telephone Service, the Insti-
tution of Social Insurance, the
Tobacco Monopoly, etc., are in-,
tegral parts of the Public Ad-
ministration and are consequent-
ly subject to the Constituion -and
to the internal laws and regula-
tions of the Country.
The Ministers and the Direc-
tors of autonomous organizations
are obliged to require of interest-
ed officials and employees that
they carry out their functions
within the framework of the
Constitution and of the laws and
regulations in force. They must
also remind their subordinates
that they are public officials
compensated under State Servi-
ce, that the Penal Code severely
punishes any coalition of public
officials, under any form whatso-
ever.
PENAL CODE-Artlecle 92.-
Any combination of measures
contrary to the Law, effected
either by meetings of individuals
or of groups which are to any
degree depositories ot public au-
thority, either by deputation or
by correspondence among them,
will be punished by imprison-
ment of at least one month and
at most three months imposed
upon each guilty party, who can


also. be condemned to the denial
of political rights and of any pu-
blic employment .for a period of
at most five years.
C. Pep. 26, 28, 85 and follow-
ing, 127 and following.
Article ,93i-If, by one of the
means, stated above, measures
have been concerted contrary to
the execution of the Law or con-
trary to the orders of the Pre-
sident of. Haiti, the punishment
shall be imprisonment from one
to three years and surveillance
by the high. police of the State,
for a period of not less than five
years.
C. Pen.-9-10, 26, 31 and fol-
lowing.
Article 94--In case this combi- Famous "Diamond Horse Shoe
nation shall have had as purpose man Billy Rose with his wife p
or result a plot prejudicial to the here. They are talking with RBo
security of the State, the guilty
parties shall be punished by
death. COMMERCE CLUB C
C. Pen.-7-10, 12 and following,
63 and following, 67, 68 and fol- Elections of officers for the
lowig. year 1961 were held by the In-
Today more than ever, it is international Club de Commerce
required of those responsible for at the Sans Souci Hotel on Tues-
administrative authority to watch day' evening.
over the strict observation of the Those elected were: Harry
Laws and administrative regula- Tippenhauer, President; Dick
tons, in that it is the duty of Abbot of PAA and Kurt Fisher,
the Government to safeguard vice-presidents; Andre Kawly,
unity in the State and to avoid treasurer; Luois Noisy, secreta-
any alienation of national sover-
eignty, by preventing the forma- In Haiti
tion within thie Public Services
of any association of subversive -Stunning Peggy Magloire w
character or any penetration by Le MVatin and the MBC and th
international communism, which flew to Miami this week. She
can place in peril the structure news.
of the State and of Society. -ne -
Dr. Aurele JOSEPH -Rear Admiral Wilkie Hill B
Minister, wife arrived here on board of tU


NEW YEAR'S BELLS

WILL RING THE MERRIEST

AT THE

LA RONDE CLUB


e" night club proprietor and show-
rior to departure after a vacation
bert Baussan at the airport.


COMMITTEE FOR 1961

ry. The Council elected consists
of Edward McGurk, Charles Fe-
quJere, Jean Claude Nadal, Ber-
thony Madere, Elias Noustas,
Woolley Guercy, Serge Gaillard,
Christian Ge-main, Jules Taylor
and Fortune L. Bogat.

The new officers will be ins-
talled in mid-January 1961.

This Week

'ife of the Director of the Daily
e Chatelet de la Montagne Noire
went to Miami to put Haiti in the

3rereton of the U.S. Navy and his
he SS Ancon. The Admiral (retired


since two years) is from Easton Connecticut. iney are guests at
.he Dambala Hotel. They are spending winter here. Admiral Bre-
reton and his wife are very good friends of Haiti.
-Bushinessman Merrill Edison and his wife Joan from Ccars-
dale, NY; Executive- Robert L. Resnick and his wife Kay from
Great Neck, NY. were joined at the El Rancho by friends Designer
Richard Winston and blonde wife Lee from New York. They are
staying four days in Haiti.
-Nabad Albert Silvera is back from Paris with a beautiful bru-
nette, 20 year old Christine Marietto from Switzerland. Albert and


DELAY OF
THE SS CRISTOBAL
DECEMBER 24, 1960

The SS CRISTOBAL of the Pa-
nama Line will arrive at Port
au Prince at about 6:00 P.M.
instead of 7:00 A.M.
This is due to a maritime tra-
gedy which look place nearby
Cap Hateeras.
The SS CRISTOBAL was en
route from New York.
The SS PINERIDGE, a tanker,
broke apart and the SS Cristobal
which was in the vicinity joined
the rescue team in search of
survivors of the wreck. The ship
of the Panama Line received
instructions from the U.S. De-
partment of the Navy and the
Coast Guard to stand by; the
slip was released after a delay
of 12 hours.
This is the second time in a
few months that a ship of the
Panama Line was diverted to
give help on the high seas. The
first time the SS CRISTOBAL
went full speed to a ship on
board of which was a danger-
ously sick sailor deprived of
medical care.

America's Top Salesman
To Stay At
Hotel Oloffson
Jim Moran, a 6-toot-3 Texan
with red beard and mustache,
creates an impressive figure. He
is also one of America's great-
est salesmen, practical joker and
theatrical press agent.
Due to arrive in Haiti shortly
for a stay at the Gengerbread
Palace, the Hotel Oloffson, Jim
Moran holds such unique selling
records as peddling autos door
to door, ice to an ice company,
an icebox to an eskimo and
straws at 10 cents each.
On the practical joke side (but
still with the selling idea in
mind Moran one personalLy
hatched an ostrich egg. "That,'
Moran explains "was a practi-
cal example of imagination ap-
plied to a specific object to
sell a book and a movie, "The


OF and Christine will spend part of the winter in Haiti. -gg and "
-Miss Esther Middlewood, Director of Mental Health Education Moran's motto is "you can
EL RANCHO HOTEL in the State of Michigan arrived here in company with Mrs Bar- seeing ina." Wonder what hekind ose
bara Oldenburg, an optometric Assistant. They were greeted here Oloffson's proprietor Al Seitz?
ON by Mrs -Marcel Craan, Misses Gilberte Vieux, Marie Torchon,
of the Centre des Meres of Port au Prince. They stayed at the (.
-SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31 Majestic Hotel. Destine Returns
.Carrying Medicine'

A SPECIAL GALA SHOW Jean-Leon Destine, internatio.
-. .., I 8naly' celebrated Haitian Dancer-
Wr i i a m N a rr Choreographer, will be among
*. "/ the passengers arriving ui Port .
-IEATJIRLE /au Prince December 23rd via

The brilliant El Rancho Variety Ballet, 14 members DISTRIBUTOR FOR Pnam Line on te Cristobal
YANICK, Haiti's First Lady of Song B. F. G O O DRIC H During his stay Mr. Destine
MICHEL PRESSOIR, Sensational tar of the Ranchera plans to further negotiate for an
and dancing to .the music of extensive U.s. Tbur of a Na-'
WISHES A tional Folldon'que Troupe. '
ED? 1ER GrUIGNARD r Mr Destine, wbo 'has recently

SM RRY CHRISTMAS collected a large supply of me-
and his 14-piece orchestra presenting Mdicine, penicipin and vitamin ta-
blets valued at about :,100.00,
"A NEW SOUND IN' MUSIC" AND A which was donated by various A
organizations in New %rk, will-
MItON -- $2.00 PR-PE.RPSON, HAPPY NEW YEAR offer same to the Albert Schweit-" ,i"
zer Hospital and various Inati.
om .,h on" ..00e e n TL H S tutions for theUnderprivioege,
RevelUon from Midnight on $5.00 per person T O:, ALL HIS CUSTOMERS Cu"pw/ in ma. .

', ..:-' .~: ' ,,. .- . : .-' .
'" P N .: .. "":: "=" ,. >" '". .' -.; :.Le, '?-=: : r" '] - ;,., ,'. )..,, "-" ~ z :' '. : ', '" ""= :' '- 'u. : "=*. ":.J '..'%..'; {k .r':. ; -, ".' =- .,i (,-.A, .'









" iHAITI S#N"


, -, ,.


Decree Creating State LTi'versitf


(CoftHlidne from page 1)
view of the formation of thi
elite and cadre.
The University guardian of thi
flag, permanent and inexhaust
ible reserve of the country, mus
be regulated by norms allowing
it to accomplish these superior
aims. The renewal of the ruling
elite and the perenity of the
State. The Republic of Haiti is
classified among the rare coun-
tries that support the expenses
of a national university.
Given the present circumstan-
ces: the anarchy of international
communism, the mentality of
Haitiai politics, the permanent
state of insecurity of Latin Ame-
rica and in the Caribbean Basin,
it has become more and more
indispensable to regulate the
code of the Haitian University
students, to give it a definate
basis on legislative grounds.
If, since the formation, it is
an institution of the State as
important as the Army and the
Public Administration, the laws,
the duty of the students and the
teachers in regard to this natio-
nal institution must be defined.
The codification of the Haitiahn
University system responds to
this urgent necessity.
The peace and the public se-
curity will be better guaranteed
by normalizing the student life
that must be essentially acade-
mic.

The youth of the country will
be brought back to a new disci-
pline for today and tomorrow
they will be able to accomplish
with dignity, in imitation of their
predecessors, their civil duties
and assure the future generation
of the uplifting of the nation.

DECREE
Dr. Francois DUVALIER

President of the Republic
In view of Articles 90 and 92
of the Constitution;
In view of Article 31 of March
3943 creating the University
Council;
In view of the decree of De-
cember 27, 1944 creating the Uni-
ve-sity of Haiti;

In view of the decree-law of
November 19, 19366 prohibiting
communist activities .in Haiti:
In view of the law of Februa-
ry 20, 1948, relative to commu-
nist activities or manifestation
of a character subversive to ph-,
blic order or public peace;

Considering the necessity to
-organize the University'on a new


basis to stop its foyer from being
e transformed 'by the subversive
ideas of international commun-
e ism;

t Considering, the gratuity of
g' Education to all the decrees to
r respond to the mission of the
g State, the Generalizer of Culture,
2 On the report of the Secretary
s of State of National Education;
And on the notice of the.Coun-
s cil of Secretariep of State;

DECREE:
Article 1.-A State University
is declared as taking the place
of the ancient University of Haiti
in view of dispensing theories
and practical education in the
faculties, schools a n d superior
institutes; to stimulate the or-
ganization of scientific research.

Article 2.-The State Universi-
ty takps entirely to its charac-
ter the general functioning of
the faculties, schools and higher
institutes that become an inte-
gral part, pay the fee of ins-
cription of the laboratory. assu-
res the cyclostylmg of courses
for' the students and also assi-
milates the boarders.

Article 3.-Integral parts of
the State University are: the
Law Faculty, the Ethnology Fa-
culty, the Dental Arts Faculty,
the Pharmacy Faculty, the Me-
dical Faculty, the Science Fa-
culty, the Ecole Normale Supe-
rieure and, following the cir--
cumstances reported by the Se-
cretary of State of National Edu-
cation, all other faculties, insti-
tutions, lnd .schools.

Article 4.-The State Univer-
sity is placed under the High
control of the .Secretary of State
of National Education. A Rector
will assure the effective direc- I
tion with the collaboration of his
coqlegues and the University
Council. The University Council
is composed of: the Rector, the
Deans of the Faculties, and
the Director of Schools and
higher Institutes. It will function
under the presidency of the Rec-
tor and, in extraordinary cir-
cumstances, under the Presiden-
cy of the Secretary of State of
National Education. It will meet
quarterly.

Article 5.-The Rector will be h
named by the President' of Ihe
Republic on the recommendation i
of the Secretary of State of Na-
tional Education. The designa-
tion of the. Deans and Directors
will be made under the same


procedure. The higher university
grades of a candidate, his moral.
integrity, will be the. prime con-
ditions determining the choice.

Article 6.-The Rector assures
the Academic and administrati-
ve direction of the State Univer-
sity. He will represent the State
in the acts and- contracts con-
cerning the University. He will
preside over the Council of the
University and, in exceptional
circumstances, certain councils
of teachers of the- fadulties,
schools or institutes. He will
control the establishments and
the work instituted in the inte-
rest of the students. He will he
the intermediary between ,_the
President of the Republic or the
Secretary of State of National
Education, the Deans of the Fa.-
culties and the Director of the
schools and university, institutes.
He will prepare the budget of
the central administration of the
University, in agreement with
the Deans, the directors and the
accountants. He will register the
diplomas attained- by Haitians
abroad and accord the equiva-'
lent university grade foJhowing
a recommendation of the' Coun-
cil of Teachers of the interested
faculties. He will be assisted in
the administrative direction of
the University by a Secretary
general, an accountant and a
stenographer.

The General Secretary will be
the Secretary of. the University
council.. With this -title he will
draw up the verbal process of
the meetings of the council and
look after the archives,

Article 7.-The Dean or the
Director will be assisted, in the
direction of the establishment by
the Council of Teachers. He will
hold an up to date and complete
list of the students; establish
monthly statistics of attendance
of teachers and of students and
will send statistics communiques
each month to the Rector of the
University. He will establish,
with the aid of the Council of
Teachers, every year, l'horaire
des course, the distribution, the
grand lines of the program of
each course; watching that the
subject of each course is inscri-
bed in a course book deposited
ivith the secretary of the faculty.
He will be responsible" fQr the


complete annual inventory of the'
library, of the laboratory mate-
rial and furnishings belonging to
the faculty or the schools he,
directs. He will address to the
Rector each year, no tWan July


31st, a complete report on the and wish to, be boarders must
functioning of the faculties and write to the Rector declaring
the schools, the report to which "and submitting to the regulations
is annexed the-"inventory men- stipulated by the State Univer-
tioned in the precedent,' para- sity in general and by the facul-
graph. ty, school institute of particular
interest. He must 'also present;
Article 8.-The education per- (1) A- certificate ofthe Police.
sonnel comprises: attesting that he does not -be-
a) The Titular Haitian teach- long to any communist group or
ers; association suspected. by the
b) The non-titular Haitian State.
teachers and- (2) A copy of his birth certi-
c) The- teachers or the' for- ficate.
eign specialists. (3) A certificate of good con-
duct issued by the Dean of the
The President of the Republic Civil Court.
names the first by commission. (4) A certificate of the Healthl
The Secretary of State of Natio- service.
nal Education names the second (5) An authorization of-the pa-i
by service letter with approba- rents if the student be.a minor.;
tion of the President of the Re- ,(6) A certificate of secondary
public. The choice in the case-classica1 studies, first or.-second.
-of sections (a) and (b) is made part.
-by operationio, on title and on (7) The identity card. .
recommendation, of the'Dean or Article 10.--All students must
Director of the interested esta- have a booklet with' his photo-
blishment. The candidate in all graph attached and. containing.
cases, however, must fill in an his civil status, 'the -courses he'


employment demand for
the title of "Univers
equal to the identical co
ce, the Haitian profess
benefit from the same a
ges and privileges as his
college.

SALARIES
The scale of salaries i
as follows:
Salary of the Rector
G. 1.500,00 to-
Salary of Deans and
Directors 1,000.00 to
Salary of Titular profes-
sors 750.00 to
Salary of non-titular
teachers 500.00 to
Salary of Univer- ,
sity General
Secretary 900.00 to
Salary of Accoun-
tant 600.00 to
Salary of Sterib-
grapher 40000 to
Salary iof Chauf-
feur 300.00 to
Salary of Messen-
ger 150.00 to
Salary of House-.
keeper 150.00 to
Salary of Yard
boy 125.00 to


rm. To is following and the -'grades. to'
sitaire", which he is entitled.
mpeten- Article 11.-All students who
or will violate the essential regulations,
idvanta- of their establishment can bet
foreign expelled. The expulsion will be"
announced by the Dean alter the
decision of the Council.
Article 12.-The State Univer--
is fixed sity accords scholarships of sup-
port. The attributions for a
scholArship are in terms of:
2,000.00 (a) The economic situation of
the student; -
1,250.00 (b)- His application and
(c) His marks.
1,000.00 The appreciation is left to the
discretion of the Dean or the
750.00 Rector of the Faculty, School or
Institute.

1,000.00 Article 13.-Any conflict is re-
solved by a committee ad hoc,
800.00 formed by three students, the
dean and two teachers of hi-
500.00 choice. No case of conflict can
be permitted to degenerate int
350.00. abandoning of classes, the clasi
rooms and manifestation in th
200.00 streets. If the solution proposed
does 'not give satisfaction then
200.00 the Secretary of State of Natio
.. nal Education, -and the Rectoi
150.00 of the. University will submit the


RECTORS AND DEANS .,- .point of view -of the State tU
The Directors will keep their Which the interested parties
chairs in the, faculties, schools must submit. In a contrary cast
and institutes where they teach. the student 'loses his enrollment.
At the end of their respective Article 14.-The student why
-functions they will continue their enters.the final staged is subject
professional activities. to the Interior regulations of lit
practical training cFnter, suc
STUDENTS .as the general hospital etc., 'the
.Article 9.-Those who desire have contact withf the faculty
to enroll a the State Universityd only for'the State diplomas.


FOR EVERY OCCASION THE WORLD


SHOES I I. j.ir &i


K LU -' .'--' -. .
. *I. -~ -
-' A '*-~ ~ '''..:;ty~t~,~.~:.;


PAGE 3


. SUNDAY, DECEMBR. 25TH, 1960 0


]