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Haiti sun

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date:
October 9, 1960

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00282


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Full Text
341 *-*. E N
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bhone '206;.-V6o xtnl Sunday, O0
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1J*W1Lws*Revsed

a S- BoN..I T ised rgultiwus; for foreigners desiring residence
,:;.. ..": ": "- '" ,A^iyTV 'rt LtWre, Iupingr-oet purdiase tax on foreign and domestic
J^A ,-i.iti-. A- J auafrline ticketss .;nd a 2-cent tax boost to. 47 cents on
-ii jasoiuc ,arem taooing six newv, degree measures to raise
S, ,.ina nce -fr..Haiti's 10,000,400 dollAr Jet Airport.
flans -Submitted
101 -Announced Wednesday, Sept- ary, 1960 wen. cigarette, gasol-
T o C' Vt. ember 26th, in the official Go ine, liquor and auto prices were '
"ernrment Joarnal ''Le .1M'o i!."2ur,' increased.
ithe, i-e taxes and -4las 'corn'- In order -to meet obligations
Plans-' 'for Haiti's ten. million iprise 'the first "rise in -cons-me. contracted for new airport-w~aarf
dolarns, rpt-whar p p e c t li goods prices since early Janu. facilities a two dollar tax has
do^larJ lairport-wai- proyenm been placed on Igreign airplane.
were submitted to the Hai t Gan i With Fake tickets and a tax of 50 cents
Goverriment for approbation -by i t .(US) has been added to the pur-
the John ,C- Peterson. Construe- iotte ry T; cet Won chase price of domestic airpla-
tion .Corporation, Baldwin. New ne fresh Regular and Premium
Yror and the Erwin Enineer- ., ne fres Regular and Premum
o .k and the Erwin Es ineerk. gasoline has received a tax boost
g. n Co., oni Tesday Bis week An unnamed forger discover of two cents (USi which takes
j-In Caiti or discussions and e Thursday that gambling o the price per gallon up to 47
ovetr ment m actionn are Messrs ake national lottery tickets is cents (USi this gas tax [ol-
Peterson-. and Jones- treseecti- like -playing -vith fire gun lows the two cent (US) rise in :Y
yce-presigents of; .eter- fire. January last imposed to pay
:.a idt~r~ :-l i,, as. ,rgpr:~, 1IjA-.) -A 5~~ .,, ~~.p.. t~ ke4ti.to th.14go thee.-
a --d iw -4 ... I A. ym n r t: e Avtbe4P, ..


aa a whic w ta-'' .n par ~ Continue1t. on page 16)
-gsa: "whifi.- ,Was"approved.
[. -J,.eg.slatIve Chambers .
.Zie .construcJtio of -a M. od- -
.jet a or s, -n, pple en t
..;...wr:i.f..ltle.s a~d othe" pbiblid'.". r.. ot Vo.p.....
l.. nlIti L -
A-- to~~th. e local v news-


n -.pa.. uve' 8 the! pn::-. '. r.4,,a e l'..: ,.No vel ist he pur- '
N "'N-S *.e "' .'tr"i-.
3 s ,io submit, ion onformity with
(Continued on page 5) ,:v; .


,five SuF rversivors O
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iC *ubanInvasion /

S z: Shipped Home
ob.rt -. -
e.. Pieoung barefooted survi-
SJr'i ,.a ea td h ,,lis :-in adat vors, so'e iemnanls oT the ab-
-e1P2 56"e 0n tthe next two r .tai 7tman Oni b ai n bidviirinT
"e ': a.s" --an .a:4 w. Scjiool force-- wiped ant by the. itan "
rough q~ "b ad 16 April 22 3;lhe was Armyi shortly after lauding o
in and. 'e at i efi na-niw d to Kat.,arine S qq The this. islanl'i south .coast in Au-
'-s. H'has o-oi'een tio on paige. 17) gust, 1959, -were released from
dad~o'ruj asSrPort au Prifice's National- Pri-
rv r.ll a'er iie 1s onday and deported back
sul ti 1DA"6 1
1r iB&gr, V ? '. (Conutinfied on page )
cry R ": obet rt- ew..

dE A CI dodgerr Using
PF-- 6.-.1-.AI.beb.e. v A -..,
,, E -,1Fj jVTH TW s )'en' Assumed Name
nIsTni .s ,AY- .;: Ties day .Deparment,
IR -- is e i Mugh B. Ca- W: MACDONALD
v1'9 fBlack Sun;"-a novel writ-
.'Adnral. Heard C eaig tfe tyaf.''t otImdTl ""'-. of. -
Comrmte -the. .~ 5th -T" -' obvjams- W. MacDonald, ..West-
aA fist itepresentatv .. ..
Swlithe. ad.uarters QpiI ewr.."lbert st.tipg .or olgap.Palmolive .Inc., cal- 7'"
a madeEa. Three .da9.i pt or-xc, p1 b oci ixi avW l i: leeL- d it Sufi to clear his .
this apart of a to ia nzsla~ this week and gave- rise :Georges Liaufau 's famed 'GCricifixion," sculptured from sheet
this. commandpsts. u th a lan e speculation that his -name metalarid' solid iron. This and 14, other pieces of the artist's work,
sted here b I'-o tA -' ,,,trivi l e .Il 4 'ainalF.wia& iting6'f1sed by a..smoth alk were, on display recently at the Pan American Union Buding in
is iezil es of:.die -Lfan l Manyn mat i sle 4a enio-, g -,non-.perf hol ls.'- Washington, D.C. where they drew favorable audiences and com-
andle.-US .arne- Mis- mieally ~.on et"emrer 27th Joe celebrat- ment. (See story on page 4)
-..'(Cohtxiud" on, page 17) ( nCoont n page) tibolnued on page I 15)
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"-- HAITI SUN."


Sunday OCTOPEfr9th, 1960


AS RECOUNTED


BY

AUBELIN TOLICOEUR



In Haiti ThisWeek


...English Playwright Julian Bensley More and wife Sheila
Christine arrived here last Saturday from New York. Julian is
the author of the English version of "Irma La Douce" which is
being played in London and New York. He went to New York
last week to attend the opening of his play on Broadway Thursday
September 29. He is also writer for GO MAGAZINE in London.
His lovely wife Sheila works for J. Walter Thompson Advertising
Co in London. Julian and Sheila are leaving today after 8 days
at the Hotel Oloffson'.-
...Mrs Pierre Vizutti and her two children Annie and Claude
left Haiti Sunday. Mr. Pierre Vizutti, an expert of the United Na-
tions here, has spent more than a year with his family in Haiti.
...British Newsman lan M. Ball, married beautiful blonde Lcle
Lewis, on Saturday October 1st in New York and flew down here
the next day for a two week honeymoon. Ian, an Aussie, is a Cor-
respondent in New York for the Daily Telegraph 'of London. His
wife Lele, a former model ,is a fashion Reporter for. LIFE. They
are currently guests at the Gingerbread Palace.
...Mr. Natan Abramovitz, Honorary Consul of Haiti in Israel
came back here last Sunday from a four week vacation in New
York. He was followed here the next day by artist wife Mirtza
and son Danny.
...Julian Spitz, a Salesman from New York and his silver blonde
wife Cary stopped here this week on their honeymoon trip" .Lovely
Cary is a model. The charming couple made their outings here
ii. company with Lou Di Pasquale. in the Lumber business in
New York, and his charming wife Julia. They were guests at
El Rancho.
.. Marie Miclele Cantave, daughter of Lawyer and Mrs J. B.
Cantave arrived Saturday last from a three months vacation in
New York as guest of her uncle Ernest Leroy. a resident in N.Y.
...Mrs Roger Beauvoir, and daughter Mireile Beauvoir arrived
Saturday last from a two week vacations in New York and Cana-
da, in company with son Joel Cawley who went to New York six
weeks ago to study architecture. Joel has changed his mind, life
in New York is too hard, he said.
..Mrs Lili:.n Mihy Enright, of the La Bele Creole D,- Dpartnr.nt
Store jist spent six wet ks ir. New York. She combined .vork -ind


- pleaci'r., ."hr aid.
.. Indub.,i'list Oswald J. Brandt enme badi here early this
wee".
....aocial worker -Lilian Jeannette Brown from New York is a
current guest at the Castel Haiti.
...Pierre Laraque, of All America Cables has just completed
a two week vacation in New York.
.:Businessman Armand Klang is back from abroad.
...Misses Nicole Revest and Denise Manuel have just completed
a three week tour through the Caribbean., -
...Rose Mane, Michel and Richard Cassagnol. children of -Mr.
and Mrs Paul Cassagnol flew to Washington, D.C. Sunday..t join
their father who got a job in Washington. Mrs Paul- Cassagnol-
who has seven other children will join -. er h-:.bnndl ii a ,few-.d *;:'s.
..Jules Arbuthnolt, an Engineer-architect, a lawyer, an Adcount-
ant, an Ethnologist, etc, etc., flew to Rotterdam Sunday--t. study
with a scholarship from the Bureau d'Aide Technique. de Haye,
Holland, and will also study at the Institute of Hispanic Culture
in Madrid. -,
..Lovely .4.ess. maker .Yolande' Montas arrived here early this.
week fr m 'New York.
...Ben Shindlei, President of the El Rancho arrived here Sunday
with sister-in-law, Mrs Janice Fox, and Mrs Rose M. Wacht. and
Mildred Miller .from New York. Ben was very disturbed by the
Pan Am flight Engineers strike what made a great many tourists
cancel- their trip to Haiti. El Rancho lost thirty guests because
of the strike, Ben said. It is terrible for a country Which is devc
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.Lunch Dine Havei Cocktails

By The SEA-SIDE -

KYO NA' BEAC

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DEEP-SEA FISIMNIG XPJUPjSIONS

Swim, Spearfish, 'S qrkle, Water-Ski "

'And Sail In afe Coastal

Waters From Kyona

HAVE YOUR PARTY AT KYONA

.-.".--.- /

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loppirig-tourism to depend on o~e ai ie, he' id the other

-*nadne he
land, he--afi' d. h ipip f .-S 0. t-"t '- ot-the
Fditorial-art a.ad producctiit^Stal,. ofi-e;f',,- ofthe
iost popufir Magaunes in the U.S. This party of 25 was given
this vacafon as a Prize for attaining the goal set by the Owner
Bill Gains. The Prize consists of a trip to the most exciting Island
and in :the most beautiful hotel. The committee appointed by Mr
Gains :selected -Haiti and the Hotel El Rancho. The group will
arrive here oiOctober 18 for the 'thaddest vacahtion." They will
stay here four days, Let.-us.-bope that-teir expectations will be
fulfilled.
...Dr Wolfram Langer, Minisjerial Director at the Department
of Econoiy,.of -Bonn spent -a few days lere this week. He was
guest here of Mr. Luedde.Neurath, Chief of 4the German. Legation
in Haiti.
...The new 1961 auto models are expected to arrive here next
v.eek... "Isabel" is the name of. the new ten and a half pound
member of the Me Ti George Leger family... COlonie Jacques
Laroche and Mile Raymonde Sajous were quetly w, d 1y .'wek.
Queues before firestone sale-success... now five _-ojocjldosiig..
...Mr Christian Germain, Salesman'de, la -Pan i ;i -spent ki" week
irl Miami last week, attending a Silg"e'minargl nized "by the
airline.
...Misses Mary Ann De Zutter and Betsy. .6lai- tw-o Excut-
;ries fiom Chicago spent a few days here:laslt week:iiod X6re'
lulored by Andy and Tony Khawly. They stayd.':t le Rifvera
Hotel. .
...The French Ambassador in Haiti, Mr Charles'Le.Genissel
who presented his credential letters to President I:. DllWber la t
month brought his family here Monday. Ambasmador-Le Gcnissel
and his distinguished wife, former Mfadeleiner .1DeTahrienburg,
from Paris, arrived with their seven children; Catherine 13, born
in Mexico, Monique 12, born in' Mexico, Anne 10, born in Paris,
Bernard 9, born in Tokio, Beatrice 7. born in Mexico, Christian 4,
born in Rio, Francine 11 months, born in Monaco. The family has
travelled with-their Maid, Miss Therese Mercadier.of Marseille.
...Well known Haitian Lawyer Georges Leg~eiJr. 'dmne back
from Europe this week. He tiok his daughter.'to scool;,'in Switz-
erlard. -
...Textile Tycoon Victor Assali came c !miL ez6wwe weeks
irip in New York and Canada thlisweelik .t'S his
sons who are studying at Columbiatinfiveti IkJ9t h U ..&iver-
sity of Montreal.
...Pierre Chauvet and Elias A. Noustas flew to New York early
this week. Pierre Chauvet, Managei of the Agence Citadelle went
to make the necessary contacts for his agency and Al Noustas,
President of La Belie Creole and Le Perchoir Restaurant- will
attend the wedding.of his..'elder daughter Therese Marie with
Ivan Laurel Kovacs on October 15 in the Chapel .of Our Lady of
the St. Patrick Cathedral in New York City. -
...Carl and Joanne Postighone are currently guests at. the .El
Rancho. This young -couple is from-NeW-.York: -
...Me' Louis Lamarre, young and capable lawyer .came batk
here this week from Luxemburg where he was.studying compar-
ative law.
...Civil Engineer Hamilton Bowser from Montclair, New Jersey
End his lovely wife Merle arrived here -his week on a honeymoon
ti-ip thro.glh the Caribbean. They got married last weekend. Merle
works for the "Fellowship and Business Admninistration and Eco-
'(Continued on page 19)


...Pilot Robert C.--Lewis f oi
Georgia and his wifel-raXnces
are current guests at the Rlve
ra. .
..Miss Julie Alice Mack from
St. Petersburg, Fla., -flew down
here this week to join'some.fril
ends.' She is staying at the Mon
Reve Hotel, for two wieks. -
....Miss Madeleine Derr:n from
Switzerland-and Dr'Silvio. F'anti.
an Italian Physician from Switz-
erland are staying three weeks
at the Castel Haiti. .
S...Engineer Robert C. White-
hurst is currently guest at Hot-
el Choucoune.
...Geologist Wilfrede Weber.
accoubtaits Gordon Henry Haw-
ker and Robert Bell from, pa-
nada were greeted herp this!
week by Haitian Gelogist Remy
Lemoine of SEDREN (the Cop-
pei Mines in Terre Neuve, Gon-
ieves.) They are. staying ten
days in Haiti.

...Prominent Haitian. -Lwyer

ely wif ~ farmer Micliene Sal-
gado came back this week from
a foir. week vacation in-the U.S.
..Dr. Massillon' Coicou of the
'"Cpu' Superieure des Compt.s"
arrived from- IMexco and. New
York. In Mexico dhe attended, the
Conference of the FEDECAME.
...Executive Max Robert Da-
vis and his wife Irene Frances
from New York are ctiren.t1
visiting the Couiitry. So isl es-
igner Julius Schwartz from'New
York, a guest at the Riviera
Hotel. ,..
S...Mr Burton Wander, Vice-
President of the Puritan Beef
Co of New York City is current-
:y visiting 'Haii: With his, dliihi-
ing wife. The-Wanders make
their outings here in compaiiy
with Mr Jack Mendes, General
Manager of the 'Surfside Plaza
Hotel in 'Miami Beach and his
wife, and Miss Mollie Daube
from New York-City. They are
guests at the El Rancho.
Statistician- Antoine de Horns
tein is being mentored here "by
lady lawyer from Canida, Miss
Francine Geoffrion. Antoine..is
froni Switzerland. He just-com-r
piled a book on the railroads of
the world that he finishedin Ca(
nada. He came here after .a tw
month visit in the U.S.? "He is
making a film that he will show
in Switzerland. He will sail Ifome
by the SS Antilles on October
1. -He is currently guest at, the
Plaza Hotel.


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S y O ROElI t 1960 A IAGE 3

!:. s N.AY---. P50AG- -C A
iOURo:DIY :aAm : Pi' .-CAB 5 Cuban Rebels Depart
-ECMT CO.-. foSti..i JIMC a .. WORKE.S. -TO .
S1T,, li SETTLED .WORK.,IN -
stalea~ j isente onG. R D BAH MAA S
Muhial .nrstanding b betweL position. .Sunda last .in-i ea- ::. (Continued- fro~~ page 1) tionary mnrce had been -muster-
the. e E rage.,Electrlque ly evening hous pressed a M thr t of several visits .Led by an Algerian revolutloi- ed to free Algeria; all o .them
and; theC y:'. W ers variety of reaction: t t tio he t aI 'to Haitisby,:ixedtitves of the ist-,wha fought against Batista admitted that they had no ideit
Union .was 'aq ed-at a.,reunion man ( rocodiles)disglaking-their Green Covev Pe'a s. syndicate, the invasionary 'force was swif- where Algeria was. .
las tig:om.0a i( .to 2,.30pm nrecunib iant forms- on er'ft paye-: Bahaias;: .fifty Haitian Bgritul- ly surrounded int the hills and -
TuesdaY ani .eld at the D-parf mient outside. Lad Fregate. night 'tural. wo.rkf are .now prepar- issued.the coup de grace with Well treated while.s e r v i
mentor r-, -., ,cub. ..ng to d-p.artfor Freeport, the exception of the surviving their jail term the five youths
.The answer -as to how. they Grand Bahamas, for steady and fve youths wh were placed on- were escorted to the dockside-..-
--a-Lgted b-- .the ,p' .couldehave' .-rvedethe _e pu n- ec d t dk e.
It was d b the w pr- could have arrived there puzzle lucrative employment. G ree n board the S a n t i a g o de Cuba by Mexican Ambassador Fr .
ties itigfon ffo;.reenimploy .nany but the .lution could first Cove Farms consist of an ex- bound vessel "ecuba" of the cico Vasquez Treern arid First
Electric-Cormpany AorIer Poly- be disceried- by the gapihg-hole tenive-.chain of large farming Holland American Line Monday Secretary Juan Manuel Ramirez
care li was dfrismissed frpm ih -he -middle of -ihe fore head enterprisess hcessitating a lot of following a year's s .ojourn in who have been in charge of Cu-
his "position onn-J th 1st of. Sept. whidh certainly, wasn't caused farm labor employment and the prison. The five's departure was ban affairs in Haiti since Cuba
ember, 1.9 6,0Pi vileges.-whib ..by any fish hook. A little, quei- directors of the- operation have not publicized. and this country withdrew re-
gave fni raid-i' rightsw-i -tioming and the answer came promised to give-as much em- Describing themselves as far- presenlatives following theTnva.
iee rmiai ne ar i e wil be forth:.. ploymen tto Haitians as possi- iers and soldiers of the revolu- sion August last.
consid as ai native e I- .u o ble. iouary. army of East Cuba, the While in prison the five Cu.
terat p -' i In the.ealy hours of Sunday te -. five young men stated at a pri. bans learned to speak Creole fin-
eca e mr morning s "armed o the tefh" GOLDEN WEDRAING son press conference that they ently. Their fate on returning to
A secorihT-.pl.oye- etroas.' Lexpedition. set out by launch for ANNIVERSARY had though that their expedi- Cuba is unknown and debatab:t., I
ly diisissed fbm.the Cap fHat- the lakes of La .Gonave island, A celebration of their 50th
Iian plant becaffs of- econbnucd bearing 'on boardl10 members wedding anniversary was held
reasons, Safrji,-is to be t-en bof the 'resident U.S. Marine by Mr and Mrs Alphonse Denis
on agaid and given 'aeiel m -c Corps and alla senal-.of weapons on .Saturday October 1st in their
lion. .~ .~ ang& from pistols .through f- -Petionille home. -
Duri: Sa1rhsitraining for the: Carbines and FN's. A complete Strictly a .family and intime
inew posiftio he iw'l bie salaried case of 'ammufiition for the-wea- celebration the Denis' marked
one quarter of .hh :old mintlily p o9 s completed' the firepower their Golden Weeddndmg anniver-
pay. As of Octbber 10 the De-side, while word- has it that a sary-with a special mass said in
parlieni: of 'Social Welare and couple of cases ;of unnamed be\- the chapel of the "Soeurs de la
Labor" wifm -, m a corninissidn erage -completed:raind took care Sagesse." .
to 4tudyl tflher -pboiits -elved .of the thirst-.side.. -
froinm tl r "t'taopn of Unr:in. he' t .e advintuiers "return- OBitUARY
Those attending the: rduniting ed late that ,'ening-they- bought CARDINAL GUISEPPE FIETTA
conference: were Lafboi- Minist- three Caimans with them a car- Cardinal Guiseppe Fietta who
Cr Dei~arieux, Dirtctor Max An- 'go of overheated fire' arms and
Lciie, Co;rhpan~~: Maniager Ever- reports of empty bcer cans-and e in Haiti during his long
ett Shrel~tbury, Company La'aw- bottles serving., as targets whe holy life died during this past
,ei J~an Claude- Legcr,t lis t the-..croees. were not -around. week.
Lafontant and Rene- J Acoeur,: Seems like a ,"smashing" day'
espe tive P :restdkntt ir i.sd s had. bI`. all; especially the- jng. to sell the catch at. 10 dol-
president O- tthe Workers Union. little chap :oh the -ExpoSition try- lars each.
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^^*(sac~K/~:o~si^^ff^^Kes~a^^w^^^xCsiwyrcsaA sw


'I.it 4ays Left To
..V

SPurchase Your

Sweepstakes


: TICKET ON THE "CAMBRIDGFSHIRE", OCT. 26th,

: '- AT NEWMABRET, ENGLAND.

S.MAKE -'HE -OCTOBER. 20th DRAWING OF R:.H.E.F. SWEEPS

AN EVEN GREATER SUCCESS THAN THE FIRST DRAWING

OVER $40,000.WAS DISTRIBUTED' IN PRIZES:

THE WINNER OF THE TOP PRIZE RECEIVED $20,000

The sale of tickets in all of Haiti is extended to

'TIRSiSDIAY, OCTOBME -13th, 1960'
-- Tickets ost $2.00 each Books of 12.tickets cost $20.00
4 Official receipts-can be obtained immediately at our new offices

Scorner Rue du Centre and Rue des Miracles.
BE 'SUR T '-SELItER OF THE TICKET-.ES KNOWN TO YOU
DEMANDD THE OFFICIAL RECEIPT WI1T THE STAMP OF L.I

TICKETS WITHOUT RECEIPT ARE VOID
S- AND CANNOT WIN A PRIZE.


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rOrorXLrooBeOaooX~OXQ rorPOrrOraarrarrarraaraaraarrarra


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Tihe- tie Cuban Rebel survivors photographed shortly after
their capture in South HaitE.

TOASTMASTERS ELECT
NEW COMMITTEE

The international .;Toastmast- ing President Douglas A. Crew
ers Club, which includes.Haitian Iof the Shell Co., spoke to those.
and foreign personalities in its assembled for the event.
ranks, and functions iii the role Those elected by fellow mem-
of cultivating the art of speech- bers to hold connittee office
making, celebrated its first an- for the next twelve months
niversary with a grand dinner were: President, Mr Jean Liau-
held at the Hotel Choucoune of taud, vice-president, Roy F..
Saturday October 1. Carison, vice-president, Donald
Sixty-two me m b e r s of the W. Brown, Secretary,. Michel A.
Club and their wives for the c- IBrisson, treasurer, Willy Guer-
lebration and dinner and outgo- cy and Coordinator. Jean Bolte.

GIVE YOUR ROOMS THE


PRS LOOK
FRESH HOMK
a l -.1.


TOSEPH NADAL. AGENTS


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"HAITI SUN"


SundayL OCTOBER 9th2,9 f


a listic e-xpres.sion of our he-
misphere. Unlike tHie composi-
tions produced in Paris at the
PIIIIIAO TiltPIC 103, INTEINATIONAL .6-BANtDJ RADIO thrn of the century, Wlkep, rmotlsA
islten loathe lligh-Fidelity brilliance of this 'Philco master mod. fron African sculpture were


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el and you'll think you'ree in the studio, so keen and-clearis every
pr ilrn:lime.
1'il th:ia's on:* olnel ol this model's many line features; others
in :,ld.; ('miplete short wave and standard broaiklisf receplimii
un i; iBandI. Fascinating 'long-low' styling fully -Mt. in width
wi h rich walnut finished cabinet.
I';:iFilelily sound from speaker network of duo-cone front
sp -.li;er nnd dynamic side speaker.
: -par:Irl bass and treble audio controls.








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grafted o n to modern painting,
Linuauad's creations'- "eair .no
mark of French intellectualism.'
The. are, raheSa' ire ftrs "-
planting- of i "ic, into .r66-;
n." '

Liautaud's work is drt li,'
to two categories: religious-art
Where Catholic and voodoe*o"f
bols 'are ombbied in- hi;lf
blend of shapes, and forms; iand
fanciful woik'" .where meimards I
and. monsters :disport in a whhni-
sical and .- mada vorld 'o. fteii.
own fthoogh the 'merniards oft-
en have crucifixes around their
necks just to be on-Ihe 'safe
side.) The ancient. and .poyer-
ful Afr.c.-in snIa;e image .s usec.
frequent y in the relgious art:
a crucified Christ is ent\wined
with the poterit magic of crossed
snakes; "a small figure' uphold-,
ig. a cfucifix has legs which
end in snakes. .

Ani'nials .and birds are .ot-;e
crossers \\with hlinians, who 't'e.i
partake of L'[e rmnaiic- q iqliti'r
of bothllI a t c.L dc xol-, r -n
fias led like a hitd. Ot ier K ;,
tires, liie -the, erotic .\'Volupi:,':
recall the ueo-piilitive .work or
Dubiffet, the'large, almost shlap
eless f gures hammered out 6
iron in simplified, -expressilv.
distortions.
All the Sculptures are' cut.
hammered and perforated in ti-
or iron on the simple villu'g~
forge in the tiny topyn of Croirt
des Bouquets in Haiti; where'
the artist lives and works. Here
he has designPed the rcruifi 's


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Senate dombo '

- I ^ -^ ^*


_. .," ., + -- -. .
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PAGE 4


'I i i


,--------.------.---- -. ...". .- ..:*..., .-+ .. .." -* .,. .^ ..' ,

Washington ArtCri1 n Liaitaus Show

A second critic gives a com- mary education, studied mecha- y." aart. 19p60 years, combining Chrisian adld alibe" Yrt.inl*h
mending re'ioew of Georges Liaii- nics and the black-smith's craft, .I' ., Ni'Ifl $ '- oodopo symbols i filigree works on .l Texas, the Car.egie.
taud's iron sculpture il the Wa- with which he earned his living By Leslie Judd AHLANDER of rarely beauty. I teianational. and -ti'1I ftB '
shingtoni Star. this is art critic for somC years, making agricul- -- at Sita Paulo. ThNefer
Florence S. Berr)nman writing tural implements, branding ir- A -ombination of -knowllgI t was thanks to DeWitt Pet- 'Gailery-in New Y ork.gavie, iau
in "Art News of the D.C. Area." ons, and crosses for the" cemet- and sophisticatiof to n astoaish. eps, director of Haitis Centre aud a -one-man show this; year
Georges Liautaud's mermaids ery of his Village. The artistic ing degree" Is Leselie Judd A 'art, that- the' artist.. was first' -In a world where, art el
carry more conviction than the quality of these crosses led to landers favored opinion of the 'eouragod o tr-y his hand at gion -has almost been replaced
glamorous creatures of Caucasi- his becoming an artist. iron sculpture work of H.tils sculpture of purely- artiste sig by art as totem, LIiaitautd's: worl
an illustration. The Haitian scul- famed Georges Lianitaud -who's nificance. The e tfaordini serves as a rich source ot stud
ptor's mermaids, with their ves- Generally using iron, he mak- one man show has julst condlud-. ary work that Tesulted ha' sin- of hristian, -pagan and.contem-.
tigial arms and fish-like heads es his fanciful creatures flat, ed at the Pan America Unio len exhibited nthe.Gulf-porary abstract fori-s.. .
and bodies, look as if they could: two-dimcnsional forms. When he building i Washinfgon. c bn te Gf a f ..-
actually live in the sea. Three turns to religious themes, Cru- '
of them in his first one-man cifixions and Pietas, he creates The following review of Liau-
inud's unique art, written by
show in Wasllington, at the Pan sculpture In the round. But all laud's 'uique art, written by ; -. -
American Union through Octob- of his work, as staled in the long Alnder, appeared in thSep- e
er 5, are akin to his many other introduction to the catalogue, is ember 25th edition of the Wasi- AI.CNDD-
strange creatures three-head- "a direct transplanting of Atri- ington Post in ihe "Art in CO DITION
ed women, bird women, women ca into America." (Open daily ington" column. STRAW-GOODS FAC',TORY
with anvil heads, winged devils. 9 to 5, Saturday to -1, Sunday 1 The P Ame n n is T 34 Rue du Cetre
The Pan American Union is -134, Roe dei Ce 'tre
Mr. Liautaud received a pri- to 5. oldg the rst .Washingo -
hold-g the first "Was .
__ sowing of sculpture by one of -
H-aiti's most interesting artists PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
-- Georges Liautaud. A self-taught -
artist, Liautaud can by no means : 7.
be considered aprirriitive, for S-iOES -' HANDBAGS RATS
his wor-k combines knowledge
and sophistication to an astoni- I RECORI FRENCH FRFU
shing degree. .
"- iHIIAITIAN CERAMICS
A o:-.e (;oz Siere, direct- 5 Years Experience iir iindicrafts
or of visual arts:-aI lie Panl
Amicerican Union, writes ill his P.O. Box 975 pen Every Day
introduction to the cafilog "The
2 work of Gebrges Liadtitud is a From 8:00 a.m. o5:00- pni
.... -,:s i e i..l..o.th io ..
specific example of the incorpo- A.
al in-f African farsno h




"- e? "up -,



Sand my OCTOBER'. 9th, 1960 'A I C I I A: PA' "-- et st


HAITI SUN
TH 5AITIAN, ENGLISH LANUUAGE NEWSPAPER
CoMnnilty WeeMbl Published Sunhay Morning
Edltor-Pubtudher -, BERNARD DIEDERICH
Geranftesponsable MAUCLAIR LABSSIsERE.
MEMBER OF THE INTERAMERICAN PRESS .ASN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1950. .


LOCAL TV FOCUSING
INTEREST ON FOLKLORE


It is gratifying to note that unlike the 'hypnotic tele-
:ision inpadt, created by detective: murder and vidlen-
*e programwin other countries, Haiti's TEIIASA dnan-
iel 5 is colcenltrating its nightly entertainnriet on ba-
efici'all antd 'puic service programs.
The scuurge of the three DDD movies ---divorce,
-opc aind dehkiquency, which were featured during the.
early ranuths of Tele-Haiti's Activit;es, have been dis-
arded and:-replaced with more instructive and enter-
aining movies, .
In this direction lrhe,-weekly--Tuesday nightt AArt and I
tlture program is .especially commendable. Dealing '
,ith the various facets: of. Haiti's history in. art and
cultural fields, the-program is both entertaining and
natructive. Last week 'Mr. Emmanuel Paid, Director
f 'the Museum of Ethnology, Port 'au Prince, was feat-
ired on the Art and Culture program along with Mr.
)ril of ihe- Ethnology Bureau this week with Lucien
.:onnet as the program's narrator.
Phese two gentlemen's presentations of 'the facts
irouTnding 'Haiti's vibrant folklore and its .origins
served a solid educational purpose-at the same time
providing the viewing audience with an entertaining
ogriam. .The narration was illustrated with .folklore
ncing performed by the National -Fdlklore troupe.
We at the Haiti Sun do not wishi to ,appear moralists
S puritans en the. issue of what should and should not
e screened on the TV. If avid murder and crime fans
adn t o pursue their interests, taking the films off TV
n't serve as a prevenl ative they'll ju t go to the
movies instead But with -so ,much Haitian art and
culture, song, i0usic and dance, to be obtained in this
country, it seems a -pity to'sacrifice their' institution
r the sake of 30 minute moments of blood and guts.

CAP HAITIAN GETTING DIRTY
END OF TOURIST STICK

"In seven years of coming to Haiti it has been my dream to
e Cap Haitian, but once again I have been thwarted." This
atement, voiced by. Doyle Payne, President of Delta Airlines
Puerto Rico and Skal Club visitor to Haiti last weekend, ex-
esses, the feelings of -many hundreds of tourists visiting our
land.

Of the thousands of annual Haiti tourists only a very -small
rcentage get the opportunity of visiting Cap Haitian Haiti's
'ond and most picturesque city and, surprisingly, an even
caller percentage are aware of its existence and offerings.
Thus Cap Haitian has, for the past-10 years,. constantly struggled
ainst an overwhelming tide to boost her tourist trade but has
ly succeeded, in getting the dirty end of the stick. Why?,
The historical city possesses a fund of tourist attractions and the
mediate facilities to cater for several hundred guests. These
ilities could be boosted swiftly to cater for additional influx:
eed for the past three years U.S. backers have expressed their
rest in building additional hotels in Cap Haitian when the
rsts start coming and when the North receives the essential
lot in the arm.
little or no advertising is giVen either abroad or in Haiti itself
the attractions of the North and several obstacles stand in the
Y of those tourists desiring to travel to Cap Haitian. Air service
the Cap.is unsure and irregular and potential travellers by
(Continued on page '6)


Is -

October 3, 1960.
Mr Bernard. Diedericb
Editor Haiti Sun
Avenue Marie Jeanne,
Cite Dumarsais Estime.
Dear Sir:


I havesnoticed that your news-
paper for October -2nd, 1960 has
pages 10 and 11 not separated
from each other. For convenien-
ce. I used to clip on the left
side each issue of your newspa-
per from top fo bottom on the
first page for easy reading and
turning of the pages. This can-
not be done now on account oL
the middle sheet presented as
it is. Could you revert to your
former presentation of the mid


Also, i find .that .there is no you give us the one inch margin
margin on the 'left side of the and oblige,
pages of your newspaper. The
margin should be at least one Yours very truly,
Inch ih older to prendt the clip- Ed. Note: This will be reetl-
Aing as outlined above. Could lied in our next edition.


IET AIRPORT PLANS SUBMITTED...


(Continued from page 1)
the contract terms, the plans of
the airport project which were
designed by the Erwin Compa-
ny.
Plans and detailed specifica-
tions presented by Mr Jones
were viewed by Public Works
Minister Lamartiniere Honorat
on Wednesday afternoon and, ac-
cording to the reports issued
Thursday, the Minister has for-
med a commission of his depart-
ment technicians to study and
revise, if necessary, the submit.
ted plans.
'We are able to announce,"
stated Le Nouvelliste, "that this


commission has already begun
work and a date for a second
meeting at the earliest possi-
ble opportunity has been set bet-
ween the commission and engi-
neers of the Erwin Corporation
to discuss the plans."
On Thursday morning the two
Americans met with Ministers
of Finance and Commerce Ge-
rard Philippeaux and Herve Bo-
yer. They had-a long discussion
concerning the execution of the
airport project; a project which
has been long awaited and that
the country, and especially the
tourist industry, has long look-
ed forward too.


Planning



SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION


FOR YOUR LAND?


0t will pay you to patronize the man vr.


the yellow (AT* Machines

if ,' ei'rc cnc of the many farmers who have signed up for conservative '
,npnitrc; in a watershed program, you'll want to choose with care the mrni
who d'gs your ponds, builds your dams and terraces and clears your land.
Clhcck his work record and his equipment. Ask your neighbors and friends.
They'll recommend the man with Caterpillar equipment. He's the man with
the know-how, who expects, to b= in business for a long time, who is a good
,-i'-.hbor and businessman. He can do the best job for you because he hlas
the best equipment. It will pay you to patronize himl


'm TE IN PI LLAIR*DEALER
4 WI.vpdla lids ( ra l Ton ailnd IldOrlf e rmI er1

CATERPILLAR HAYTIAN TRACTOR COMPANY
MAURICE BONNEFIL, Manager Chancerelles


I ,' .


~~y, 1~
~Cs.-~ C~rs
r,




- ~ ~





CAPS WANING TRADE HAITI MID-WEST PROMOTION..... .

(Continued from page 6). '_"' .. : '

load are faced with a long journey uneased by smooth roads all appointed .Driec, p .'t
r.orth leading arterial highways have long since suilered from the for $iaiti in Chiq"i? -
scourge of rain, flood and lack of upkeep. tainted at a small diner party
by Mr and Mrs Ehrenreich.
Private plane tourists are also discouraged from coming to n those present were .
Among those present were N'
Cap Haitian because of the law forbidding direct flights. All pri- and Mrs Fred Avendorph, pre-
\ate planes have to come to the Capital city first, receive per- sjdent of Welcome Tours Chica-
mission to fly North and then r urn to Port au Prince afterwards go, she is a Travel Editor for
the Chicago Defender; Mrs Mar- -'' --.
to receive a final clearance. This is sufficient impetus to discour-jorie Robinson, wel known Cli-
age the most avid Cap Haitian advocate. cago business leader; Allan J. -
Beasley, noted interior decorat- : .


Tourist ships calling at the Northern port are few and far bet-
ween but this is true only because none of the other services have
patronized Cap Haitian sufficiently or long enough to warrant a
I costing of tourist shops etc.
The consensus of opinion in the tourist world of the Capital city
is both fixed and illogical. The line of thought is that Port au
Prince will lose many ot its tourists and discourage tourist trade
if visitors first call at Cap Haitian before coming on to the major
c'ty; but the answer to this has been proven time and time again
-how many tourists visit a country without seeing the Capital
City?- very very few. So that even if in the future tourists are
encouraged and transported to Cap Haitian it is unlikely
liat they will leave the country without inspecting the additional
attractions offered by Port au Prince and its near surroundings.
All the Skal Club members expressed their disappointment at
n.issing their scheduled Sunday last Caribair flight to. the North;
I-uson for the cancellation is vague blit appears- tc tL th*, ugl-
some sort of restriction.
As \ ith so many of Haiti's problems the time for action rectify-
ing the deplorable non-tourist state of Cap Haitian has to be. now.
With the new tourist season coming, and scheduled to draw 90,000
people to this Republic, it will be interesting and decisive to see
just how many of our visitors are encouraged and-get-the chance
t' visit the historic and romantic North, Cap Haitian.


or and. his wife, Mrs Frances
Beasley, -prominent Chicago
President of the BPOE CHAPT-
ER; Mr and Mrs Bernie Char
bot Regional .Manager of Atlan-
tic Cruise line in Chicago, -whose
two ships Franca C and Blanca
make Haiti on every .cruise.
Mrs. Ehrenreich is a Midwest
Area Director and also repre-
sents the Haiti Herald in the
Mid-West.

ANTOINE HERARD

INTERVIEWED

ON CHICAGO RADIO

On August 1st Mr;'iAitoine R.
Herard'was infeviwed on Ra-
dio Station WTAQ by announcer
commentator Harry Lepinske.
Mr.' Herard gave a half hour
Information program that-was
both stimulating and interesting,
Haitian music was :.r~4~ dedt.
This was the.first i,,a, series--of
radio broadcasts to acquaint,the:
.Midwestern audiences with Haiti.


.


WITH A




,'_ ". 'ASSLBM.
B-BE SSAMATIC R- rf


Us A CA MERAS AT FRil: 'lRT P' 11:5. 1.





RUE BONNE FOCI


. ...MnageS.KRIN


31 Reasons OCTOBER IS THE MONTH TO- SEE .-CARLOS PEREIRA


F y --...ALL"YOUiR AUTOMOTIVE REOUIREMENTS-.
Why ..- -


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2
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Full flow type for
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9
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16
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23
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30
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Hard parts a product
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S. -4 5 6 8- .
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RIDE SHOCKS bearing in the seek ask for SPRINGS outlives to -ordinariy "CIRCLE gives you:
for better controls right place DELCO REMY. of finest European mufflers 2.way power
on all roads. Div. oGM manufacture protection'
10 12 3 14. 5 -- '
VICTOR GASKETS ELECTRIC WIPERS HOLLEY GE HEADLAMPS ,- WAGNER the--brake ORIGO -HYDRAULI,
the 100 per cent clear the view for -CARBURETORS precisely. placed for. parts that- offer : JACKS .well-known-
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products line. thrifty going
_________________... 22
17 18 19 20 21 Rubber Automotive
R U S C AUTO-LITE SPARK TROSTEL OIL CARTER PERMATEX products b .
brake -lining fqr PLUGS fit over 700 SEALS ZIP-KIT ihe- what er ydu iorld famnmous '
safer stops and different makes of forget about oil leaks mechanics need to seal DO AN N -
longer long life. cars and trucks preference
S 24 25 26 27 ..' 28 29 '
A C AIRTEX FUEL ECLIPSE Put new life Its I D'E: A L R A D C0
Cable & Casing PUMPS- Vital BENDIX under your car for hose clamps -- Fuel .LiT s..i
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-"----- ----.-- "------ ------ "------. --- *---
S 31
SParts for AT CARLOS ,PEREIRA DURING THE OCTOBER SALE '.
European Cars. YOU'LL FIND SAVINGS UP- TO 30. PER CENT. -
BUY TODAY AND SAVE MONEY!I! .;
Make October-your safety month! Check your car... Cheek your driving... Check -accitentts;.

4; .A .


PAGE 6


S.Phore: .23:0 OSM
'''-: -' -- R- .r .'.ND r-.. ._


-.-- ...-



"HAITI SUN' Sunday OTBE9I*4-600


-1
























p- ... .., ox 6,B
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Nsoi. ....




i' "OYAL. DO ULTON,
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..- e_ '. ...* .o i^ .;..; ..... ., *,. ? ,. ..- r ^ ,, .. ,
.. -. .I '- ,
S. .... -0.
,r -. i- -
PAGE 8 "HAITI SUN" i....u-da -OCTO.I

S "- "the first ..ee ok bf after,. per- haf. on Tuesday ev gg" Oc
Comprehensive Progam For Music Lver, sg inlPldille.fr.ei' n
1mngi e d lfi otbe l -ndi-.ll .return .Oom
First Lady Of The PtanozI ': i,; ratidWrthe -- -'.,ub "it "3:h a ii.in her
--iI L L--., d,. Rpb&ot CooIn .1 bdncW- .- W- e plednqfdepi the:C i.- '
PHJILIPPA DUKE SCHUYL R G. hha7 .she was: personally i' 9.* Sh e: arts -n ton
vited by President Nkri'mah to for Jamaica,; Nassaii and .er-
The piano concert of Miss Phi- ton Monnerville, President of urous fosl.ys. intlfit countries rf m .fr- hi2.. ugeation iuda to conclude her coner
lippa Duke Schuyler, internation- the French Senate), Schuylere; around the -eglol*.- She--reveals esti. Schuyler o the Caribblea- prioF: o
... ..`.Miass- ehtyler i g : artinj '.shortly" after. on". no-i
ally famous pianist, at EI-Ran- Suite Africaine, Schuyler; Scher- the colorful, exotic aid shocking' special concert a p.Hi- r European concert to.
cho Hotel on Wednesday, Octob- zo en Si Bemol Mineur, Chopin, hazards of travelling alone .1 special t a European concept to
er 19, at 8:30pm; will include and an American in Paris, Ger- Africa, Asia, Europe i d Latin. .
a most unusual selection of in- shin. Her encores will include America. She has given com- '.
teresting and beautiful music favorites of misic lovers. Tic- mand performances for kings,. .. .-
seldom heard on the concert kets for the concert are on sale princes, noblemein, prime min-' /. .
stage. Her program is especial- only at La Belle Creole and El sisters -and presidents. She was .:' '
ly selected to appeal to her Hai- Rancho Hotel at $2.50 each. Tic- paddled by lepers to play for C r bbean Constructi n o. S
tian audience. The program in- kets will also be sold at the Dr. Albert Schweitzer in Lam- -.. L
eludes Concerto en Re mi- door on the night of the con- barene, kidnapped-and drugged. .
neur, Vivaldi, Bach, Murdoch; cert. in the Dutch West Indies, al- -
Chaconne en Re Mineur, Bach, most strangled by a Frenh Builders" OF The M itar C.t
Busconi; Tableaux a une Expo- In addition to Miss Schuyler's madman,. nearly kidnapped' in -. .. -:- ..- -
sition, Moussorgsky. (Interval) fame as a pianist, she is Nigeria, ate flying ants in East .. .:----. .
Musique Folklorique de l'Orient, a world traveller, a reporter for Africa, played ad concert fbr .
trans. par John Kelly (China, United Press Features, a writer "Men Only" in the Sudan, ce- : .G Manager ::,
Japan, Korea): Musique Folldo- and a lecturer. Miss Schuyler's lebrated a birthday in the Con- :. .. .- -
rique de France, Mme Gaston new.book, "Adventures in Black go and was poisoned in West- ...
Monnerville (Madame Gaston and White," just issued, is an Africa. P o n 395 P -.' BO' ".2. "-: '
Monnerville is the wife of Gas- exciting account of her advent- Miss Schuyler left the Congo ..

-A A A. 4A A- A- ,A-""aa aa a,
,a..,a',.Sa,..,a,,.,, ,s,.i^ ..,'s.,s ,a,,,s ,s ,f,,.! '" ".. S '.,,x, '-. ,


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PerD34(24 hr's


So d Plpe Mile ...lEL'


PICK- UP AND- CL E :...












FOR RIFSERVORONM OAD MAPS AN, SUGGESTED) ERARIES' TE ORIOABLE
S. IN F O R... 'C' "" ." ".TIO' :!" "

P.O. Box 602 RT-A-P TE AITI .. -
OELlV ERY *R5VA HO ELS 'UELRAEVLk4vMI
l$359p.er, : Week-
P -u Otpe. ile
Air Pofport d p e Ml
Pi r'. .JL .R'r-SI NCLU DEL AD N HO40" .
.QPiers ILJNURRNJC

FOR RESERViAxIONS, ROAD MAPS ANVASUGGESTED $itifE~mSa WTE OlCAIU r.
ATV I-S CA:R- RE _NT A.- S
P.O..Box 602 PORT-AU-PRNCE, HAITTI.=

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aru curated



Aires


Mr Hubert Carre (right) Ambassador of Haiti in Argentina, and
Osr. Osvaldo J. Tovo of the Municipality of Buenos Aires, at the
-tnipmente-of the .diveiling of; the bronze plaque with the inscription
Alexander Petion, champion of emancipation born in Port au
Pricee, FirstPresident of the Republic of Haiti. Hommago to the
City of Bueuos Aires, 22 yeptembr&e 1960."


: o*, .
7., ". .. :.,


-Dr Armando Cocca, Director of culture and SoFia
Replying to the speech of Dr. Armando Cocca and thanking him bouncing a special speech iii which he paid tribute
ii~-the -nne of the Haitian Government and its people is Haitis heros, Pan Americanism and Alexander Petion (one
i-ibassaidob r I, H ubertCarre. rsof Pan Americanism) in the Tribune set up befo

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al Action, pro-
to the Haitian
of the found-
re the square.


U N "-


PAGE 9


i







PAGE 10


Land
By Suzanne Comhalre-Sylvaln
This study is a partial report of
a survey made In Haiti In con-
nection with the Unesco project.
The region of Haiti includes a
number of extremely narrow
valleys with all degrees of ero-
sion present. It covers about 150
kilometers and is inhabited by
about 30,000 people. Politically It
Is divided into four sections: Co-
chon-Gras," Marbial, La Gosseli-
ne, and Fond-Melon.
LANDOWNERSHIP
Landowners.-Most of the land
belongs to the peasants who oc-
cupy it or who live near by.
There are no communal lands,
and the state owns only small
patches in the Fond-Melon sec-
tion. The percentage of land be-
longing to city people is insigni-
ficant in La Gosseline; less than
80 acres do not belong to peas-
ants. However, it reaches almost
20 per cent in Fond-Melon, ac-
cording to local informants. In
Marbial and Cochon-Gras the
percentage is rather low. but
with a tendency to increase in
the latter area. City. landowners
are usually children or grand-
children of peasants who beca-
me urb a n i z e d, or surveyors,
lawyers, or middlemen who are
paid in land after lawsuits. So-
me of the best coffee lands are
owned by moneylenders.
Forms of ownership.-Besides
individual ownership, there is a
form of temporary collective
ownership. Because of the high
cost of surveying, most of the
peasants do not divide inherited

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MINIMUM

4A


77 heM


Tenure In T eM


Region Of Haiti


holdings immediately after the only child, but not to his parent
death of the owner. In some cas- The wife inherits half of tlh'
es, division may be uneconomic- property acquired after marria-
al because of the smallness of ge.
the resulting individual parcels. When a godchild has been edu-
Sometimes t h e wealthier heirs cated by the godparent, has liv-
abandon their share to the poor- ed-with him for a long time, and
er or, conversely, buy the shares has proved a true child to him:
of the poorer heirs so that a leg- t he peasant usually bequeaths
al partition can be more easily him something. Owing ro the
achieved. An informal partition fact that the law does not re-
usually occurs, however, long cognize this special relationship;
before such a legal partition,..making a will is very common
This is called the apataj dwet-in the region. Sometimes a ivill
(finger surveying), and consists .is made by a childless person


of each heir being given a se-
parate plot to crltivdte. Such a
property i9called a mineur and
may retain that name during the
heir's lifetime, even after legal
partition.

Acquisition of land.-Land is
acquired by inheritance, purch-
ase, mortgage, donation, exchan-
ge, or occupancy under certain
conditions. Inheritance is the
most common method of acqui-
sition of land. In an investiga-
tion of 147 families of the region.
it was found that -70 per cent of
them had inherited-at least a
part of their holdings.
Children of both sexes, legiti-
mate and natural, inherit equal-
ly at the death of their parents.
According to custom, if a man
dies childless his property goes
to his brothers and sisters, or
first cousin in the case of an

a *J% J J


to favor a sibling, nephew, nie-
ce, adopted child, or illegitimate
child. The miner, however,
cannot be willed.
The dream of every peasant
is to increase his property. Love
of land is very deeply rooted,
and even the poorest tracts do
not sell easily. Prices are quite
high in relation to yield, and
large plots are not easily-obtain-
L'W. fl-.1..I r -.r *L, npn


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Sunday OCTOBER 0th, 1960 ..


II


able. r.esulti U trhe su-Iy men- l U I
the oandartire, individuals who
toned previously show that 58 the manda'tire, individuals who
families (39.46 per cent) ha d act as legal middlemen beteenI
peasants and representatives of
purchased at least one plot of peasants and representatives of
til. te law, are often paid in land.
land'.
These mandataire often atvan-'
Because of the sciucily of ce: the necessary money for ah
land available for purchase, ma- investigation and even for law-
ny prospective buyers find it-suits. In this case, they received
more convenient to lure the pear- half the land initigation as pay-
sants into some kind. of mort- ment. A piece of land may also
gage. The worst variety is cal- be exchanged for another one of
led kakalmere. The owner, in about the same value, usually_
dire need of cash, gets it from for reasons f proximity or 'con-
W W C' ^ W W 'r ^C 'C 'C C' U C' C' C' C' C' C' C' V


11 grandfatheuu r find waas give
one bull and a donkey-topea:
his disappointment.
Amount ol. land- owned.-TIl
number of landless peasants.
very small. Itis true.that amqm
the 147 families included -i .th
survey: 18.. (12.24:,per cent) a
oo land "a All, but 13 of.. the
were adle to use-land belongini
to their parents. One of -the- .fa
milies'had abandoned its: inher
itance because it was too.. a

.


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The Casino International D Hasti
.. .

TAKES PLEASURE IN PRESENTING


Miss Enid Mosier -


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A F venience. Such transactions i a
^Vsr1 ia Ibe legalized eventually. -
6 1 ." As sodon--a a piece. of l
o seems vacant, a.peasaht'icom1
some wealthy peasant with and aks possession.' He
whor-he deposits the title to a tel nei os hehasbought
piece of Iand worth at least one- and then wait for the owne.ug
and-a-half times the amount of make a claim. The law pfov 6
the loan. The land may. be re-that hemay acquire legal ti
deemed at any time during the to the land after 30 years ofru
year by paying twice the amount disturbed possession. Inthe Ma
of the-sum received. After a bial region; however ',.-the-law
year and a day, if -the loan is not very strictly observed. Fd
not paid, the title is transferred example e father of. a .m
to the moneylender. Although il- who lived'near the author noti
legal, these-transactions are oft- ed thatduingtwo consecuti
en practiced. In most mortgag- years nobody had come -to '
es between city people andpeas-. tia a beautify estate of-
ants, the rate of interest is 50. s in hi neighborhood. -
per cent per year. Interest rateswent to-the'town where -he kne
of 100 per cent are common he owner' had .migrated
among.peasants. learned.that the man -had die,
SThe same reasons that lead to He began cultivating the laIn
the making of a will apply to do- neighbors thought ie :had eith
nations. Beneficiaries of donati- bought it- or was farmini t.A
ons are usually. privileged god- ter 20 years of undisturbed--u
children, nephews, or adopted of the.land, he went to town
children, and sometimes coqcu- said he had purchased the estai
bines or illegitimate children. 25 years before and had'los t
title. A new "title" wvhs ma
Land may beexchanged wvith-the complicity of a survey
against services, as in the 'case or.-Two years later, the grand
of surveyors who sometimes ac- s o e rs er cae
cept one-fifthfof the land survey- claimn the land. Hst was told t
ed as payment when tUe owner it hadh been soldlong .ago b
has no cash available. Similarly .t. had been sold.long ag.
hih mtf ., ;


.- I. _-- JL i ne is a c e r T a I n
property,-the parents have amount of risk in the agree-
ght to-use tlel property un- ment known as potek. The te-
Schild come 6of age. A man nant, instead of paying rent each
leave his wife, 'iis coticu- year after the harvest, pays the
a relative; or a friend the full' rental at the tite of the
f a plot of land with the agreement and gets the use of
o that it is to return to hNs the land for three or four years.
when the user dies. A wo- When the potek is small, less
may do the same. than $600 per harvest, owner arid
cement. Parents often tenant go the- marecbal, the as-
Sson or son-in-law by al- lstant to -the commandant of the-
a small plot to the boy. section, each with his witness,
tivates it as if it were his to prepare the agreement. When
rnd keeps the full yield,-If the: potek is larger, they; "must
cceeds, mor. is allotted to go to fhe commandant and biig
ntill his lnd roughly ap- two witnesses each.
nates the amount of land
ill inherit. Aging parents This form of transaction is ve-
y keep very little property rypopular in the Marbial region.
themselves, but instead di- The peasant, who wants some
he land .long before theii, cash for a funeral, a wedding, or
among their grown child- anything he deems indispensab-
l: e, is happy to find money with-


Managing. Landowners who
live far away from their pro-
perty often hire someone who is
called a jeran, a kind of dnana-
ger who is supposed to take
care of the land for them. If the
estate is large, this manager,
with the approval of the owner,
may employ sharecroppers to
help him. In the case of a 30-
acre estate, for example, the
manager will cultivate 3 acres
himself, while if he has grown
sons he may increase his plot to:
6 acres and give 3 acres each
to e eight sharecroppers. The
landlord bears all expenses con-,
nected with planting, cultivation,
and harvest of the manager's
plot. If coffee is grown on the
estate, the manager cares for it,
but cultivating and picking ex-


night or use may also be out selling or mortgaging his penses are borne by the owner.
to needy relatives and Property. On the other. band, the .The manager gets a share of
o utter strangers. This man who needs'mtore .land--for everything produced by him or
e is sanctioned by cust- farming, is glad to get it at a under his supervision: from one-
d no legal documents are lower cost than he would by-ren- tenth to one-fifth .of the maize
SIn the sample, 33 fa- ting or sharecropping -it. The crop, one-tenth of the yam or
(22.45 per cent) had free usual price paid for. a potek is banana crop, one-twentieth to
a plot of land belonging equivalent'to one-folrthi:of the one-fifth of the coffee crop, etc.
eone else. average 'harvest-produced by'the He gets his share of the- fruit
.land. harvest, -and is given 2 of the
ilng. written agree- Of those families included in 8 shares belonging to the owner
between a landlord'and ar the survey, 47 (32.per. bent) had from the sharecroppers' harv-
who '-ishes'tod farin the potek agreements. The size of est
ay be.ifhade which -speci- the plot varied from one-tenth
Certar -um of m.ioney to of an acre to 9 acres, with an Some jeran are paid a nomi-
d yearly tp the landloidd average area of one and a. half nal fee of about $5.00 a year,
sensation for ite. right bof acres. While those whosublease and all are housed. They are
he lengt:of -the agreement or sharecrop are either landless usually small landowners, young
erally eight years, and'the .or may have some land'of their and energetic. -The managers
Sthe: Iparc is .usually own, those who farm uider a are often allowed to use pasture
.r th'1: two -'acres. .Some potek "agreement may own'large land for their livestock and may
rds supply resi d-e ntial estates and do so to help"-a re- be loaned money at what is a
ers. others help their far- lative or friend, especially where 'low" rate of interest, 50 per
build -ta house,;-while the.the soil is good and may bet6k- cent per year-
tty do nlot provide -lices peeled to bring large turns. There are very few jeran in
e The farmer m.y further In most cases, however,.the man the Cochon-Gras and Marbial
ide the land on a sublease who farms land under a potek sections. Some" are found in La
precrop basis, -Such agree- agreement is young and enter- Gosseline, but the practice is
Must be made with the prising, without much land- of most common in the Fond-Me-
it offhe Jandlord.and can- his own. on section.


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PAGE 11


The rerhailaing four fami- not exceed four years in length. Sharecropplng. The share-
ad sold their land. State land rents foi "less than-cropping agreemeit,is ,alas -. -
ge estates are practically privately owned land but is verbal, with no witho tS negWde, *
xistent. A few peasants available for subleasing only on and covers o-n ly'one harvest .
fm 30 'to 200 acrer, but a year-to-year basis. After dividing the.-produce, both: -.J' -"::t-' "
estates are .usually compo- Coffee farms constitute a va- parties' decide ivleer. pri'not: ; .
f a collection of small pro- riation upon the generaL.pattern they will sharecropthie nexthar- '"v"
s lying Tar apart. It is becau le payenent is in pourids vest. Where there is some-kind
rare to find more than 10 of-coffee which the farmer dmay of crop rotation, they also de-
in one block. This is:due deliver to the owner or replace cide what will be planted next.
ep-rooted feelings of dis- by the money equivalent. Coffee The agreement covers a mini-
of one another among the farms are usually divided into mum period of two years when
ts. For example, when a two 'parts -- one planted with cassava is planted, four months
dies, his land is divided coffee whose whole harvest goes for maize and beans, ten months
g his heirs: If he has five to the owner and the other plan- for sorghum, etc. Theoretically,
d five plots of land more ted with food crops whose pro- the' sharecropper is responsible '
s equal in value, each son duct is supposed to go entirely for all cultivating expenses and
insist on having.one-fifth of to. the-farmer. In places where must haed over half of the har-
plot. -. erosion is advanced, however, es to he landlord; the Haitian '
the :cotfee yield is low and' the name for sharecropping is de-
he sample, one family had farmer cannot pr,o'du ce: the mwat.e,, literally, "of half." In
res,-another had 34_acres, amount required by contract. He practice, the owner u-s u al I 1y'
ilies (29.93 per cent) had is then-obliged to sell the better helps in the harvest and leaves
en 5 and-27 acres, and 101 part of his food harvest to sa- part of his half ,to the share-
es (68.71 percent) had less tisfy the landlord. Where. ero- cropper to compensate him for
5 acres. Five acres is the sion is very bad and all the cof- the purchase of seed and plant-
um area required to grow. ee .trees have died and cannot ing expenses. If the owner is .i 'li
or a family of six. The be replaced, the farmer plants not satisfied with the work of J I .
ge holding was found-to the land with food crops that his partner, he may insist on y y
icres, buL it felt to less than are hardly enough to survive. the letter of the agreement and
es when the.two families In this case, he may obtain-a take his whole half. When there
large holdings were omit- reduction in the number of "cof- are fruit trees on the land, all
'om the average. fee" pounds to be delivered. the furit belongs to the landlord.
RIGHT OF USE In the sample, 40 families (27. The agreement covers-only what "'' :''
right to use a .plot of land 21. per cent) rented land. The has been planted by the tenant. / .- -?" 'i "
be obtained- by inheritance, size of rented farms varied bet- In the sample, 54 families (36. i
ment, or payment of mo- ween one-fifth of an acre and 18 73 per cent) sharecropped plots : e..ofuWbe
ir services. acres. The average' was four varying from oie-fifth of an acre : :.". '* .' '
and a half acres, to 6 acres. The average size was
ritance;--When a child in- Poteklr -Ther i .a rt i : one and a half acres. 'ul


AND


Alfonso


SONG AND COMEDY TEAM OF INTERNATIONAL PRESTIGE

WITH. THE- MUSIC OF
MAESTRO .ERNEST- LAMY.
AT



Bamboche Room



'Hotel Riviera D'Haiti


CHARGE $2 PER PERSON

.ping the remodelling of the CASINO INTERNATI ONAL D'ILAITI their gambling facilities '
Transferred to the HOTEL RIVIERA D'HATI -adjoining the BAMBOCHE ROOM.


t/ '_ ~


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Navj


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OVERFLOW CUTS OFF
PENINSULA AND NOTHING
U.S. SERVICE DOES. SEEM
TO HELP

By JOHN W. FINNEY
In The New York Times

Washington. Oct. 1.-The Na-
vy, after taking a trial dip, has
got cold feet about unplugging
an overflowing lake that has
isolated the southern tip of Haiti.
In the process of attempting
to unplug the lake with divers
an explosives, the Navy has
acquired an international obliga-
tion that it does not know quite
how to fulfill.
The Navy's difficulties wit h
Lake Miragoane began last
spring when the lake began to
overflow. As the waters rose,
they inundated several villages
and covered the only highway
serving nte area, thus isolating
the western side of the southern
peninsula.


S l the level of.1Ie-ake remained
r Isu .o-, rains .. i:ndlca eng he eras-had
been. :at lea$st C" : lay unpiyg-

SThen -gthe. ate ke begati; t ri s
: again,: and' the- 1avy began-to
S. -. have second thought-abod t wlhe-
goane bad done the same thing o the Marine mission, was..somn- ti&r unplugging- was -really -,a
in 1928. :. "explosive laxative" and" a Ical safe. aindivalid answer. '"
Then, -the Marines suec~tdile went to the naval base.at. Gua;- An- investigation the Nvy re
in -unplugging the' lake by 'jsen; tanamo Bay for divers. -, ported, showedd thatithere were
ing divers down to-clea'r.away Last'August. 1, with theprop- no..drainage" caves and that
some underground p.as's a.gW .er publicity buildup for the'lo- draini;ge actually wis -acc nip-
through which the lake appir& cal press, two Narvy divers aid. listed' throtig small, limestone
ently drained into the ocean. The an officer from the Seabee am- ar ambers "Which appear a-s
new flooding was ascribed to phibious construction Battalion '
the same d i f ti c 1 t.y ts 2 arrived al Lake Miragane an -
stumps, banana stalks and other proceeded to set off-some ex
debris clogging up the.'under- plosives in hde underground ca- Le Picardie
ground .drains. velrs. _
T he prescription ozrd Tor a while, the prescription EN -RESTA A
Col. _Robert D. H.e1uaJ4'#kit^nemed to work. For. eight days


MAJESTIC


AND


MARABOIUT


LONG RESIDENCE


SITUA AED ON ETIONVIILE SQ JARB'

PLEASANT AND COLORFUL
ATMOSPHERE

EUROPEAN OR AMERICAN -LAN
IF REQUIRED.


In Petionville .


: SNAILS ONION SOUP
FISH LOBSTER OR- CONCH

AU GRATIN.
FRENCH- ESCALOPES
PEPPER- STEMA


FRENCH BREAD


springs .on the saeward.;
the lake.
'The -indrease in. tte .le
water level-: s presumably' e
to-the'usuan y hlei rai!
during 'the' 'pst-year ibeond:
capacity o -attiaV'lfriif ge
the Navy said;.- ': :
One recornm ~ endatibn' was.-th
"!the'. quickest :anid most pra'ct
al solution" was hot to 'tr"
iinlug the lak e t' tA th i.u
earthen causeway, and-
to bridge to. tarry 'Ihet h
ay over the' flooded lake'f
." Thisft- ,coimmendationli' t
Navy said, ''is'. p'resentify utide
study?' 'As tiinslated iby a''Na,
spolesman,-'" at~:i -mes is
have any.- money ..to b-tbuild
bridgedat Lake Miragobane,-
ST h i s. last paragrrap,'in I
[ew .:York -Trmnes1ptate ave
eaderies :-ith- seve~lrali.- hdcs
tb whetherr _nmiey.i, -oy-9 n
available for 'a bndge,, '"."'
.


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: FRENCH-WINE
The Haitian Army engineers MAJISTIC AND MRAO "
came running to the Marine MAJESTIC AND MARABOUT
trair.ng mission in Pdrt au Prin-- .
ce for assistance. By checking ALSO OFF'R t'SPECIAL A'tiES :-S';i*~ "" -"
the' cords of the Marine occu- '. Ma
patron of Haiti, the Marine mis- -R ;E
sion discovered that Lake Mira- : E ICE






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1 < .STRAW GO05. PAINTrIG


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TRY INCLUDINGG


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Single -- .$10' i -b
CIU E -ISLAN
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P'Overniaghti -
O)r Weekly V.sit
ecial Siunnet Rate
^In %flrdct: .-'*
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S unday O TOBER th 1960 "HAITI $i


rpbassador Bonhomme Wiell

ReceivedByPhilade hia
t- thai that.-But-I tlinl hwe should mer newspaperman.he had once
e SS wait until the dust settles."'..- been editor of Le Nouveliste
oldest daily .in Port au Prince.
SVISITS TO SHRINES He was named 'Ambassador in
.T .e .. he'Anbassador made his re- '1958.
Philadelphia's leadingnewspa- marks during a tour of histori- 'He is.official host and sponsor
ers devoted extensive coverage cal an other -points of interest of the art exhibit, featuring some
Haitian Ambissiador to the in Philadelphia .He came here 100 paintings of Haitian artists
united States Mr. ;Ernest' Bon- for the opening receptioniof the front the Centre d'Art of Port
onmde during.a visjt, in compa- Haitian Art Exhibit at the New- au Prince. Guests included De-
y with Mrs Bohbomnme, to Phi- man G-leries at 1625 Walnut St, Witt Peters founder of the cen-
delphia to a .Haitian atf exhi- Wednesday night. ter in 1944- and- Luce Turnier,
it at thelNewian Galleries a Haitian artist recently returned
irtnight ago.. Accomp -nied: by his wife, the from executing a series of com-
.. Ha it i an -Ariibassador arrived missions in France.
September ,;29th's Philadelphia here from Washington. in .the Commenting on the Ambassa-
vening Bulletin gave a column morning a n d w a s greeted, by dors visit to Philadelphia from
Ambassador .Bonhdmme's op -Normian J. Kaichiem, Haitian Washingtoa, with Mrs Bodhom-
iing of the Haiti Art show, and Consul-if Philadelphia -and Mrs me, the Philadelphia Evening
i. city tour while the Philadel- -rancis. J. Myers, of the City Bulletin stated that the Haitiiin
ia Enquirer-ib the same date Representative's offce. diplomat came to Philadelphia
vpred e a uress conference- giv- ,,to an a.. t ehihitin onn


Sby BonDhonmme in which be
pressed the view thai the then
current. 'hited:-Nations Genieral
ssembly'- "might prove a tirn-
u; point in history."
"On the surface 'it would ap-
ear to be a.three ring circus,-'
tated Mr.' Bonhomme to "En-
uirer" reporters on September
8, "I.am quite-sure' it is more
-. ,'- .-


First stop on their tour was
Independence Hall, followed -by
visits to lie- Betsy Ross House,
Old Christ Church and Franklin
Institute. .- j
NEWS CONFERENCE *
I n the afternoon the Ambassa-
dor sat in on a news conference
at the Inquirer and then toured
the various departments. A for-


listing of the work of well-known
Haitian Artists:
Bonhomme, stated the Bulle-
tin, js a tall man with a big
smile who told us that he hadn't
been in Philadelphia since the
Army-Navy game last fall.
"We arrived this morning he
said, "and we first went to In-
dependence Hall and then to the


., ,, r .-'
PAGE -S
$' MOGE 13 -":..


Betsy Ross House. and then to FEATHERS FOR BRUSHES
the ,,Fraanlin Institute. 'We had Anderson, who owns more than
a fine time.-". .--. 1 20 works by Haitian artists, says
He said he would have liked he goes to that island for his
to have -een more of the Fran- vacations every year.
klin frintitute but that this would
have to wait, since he was re- "Here's a- felow, Anderson
turning to Washington on imme- s a d, pointing to one painting
diately after the reception at the "the granddaddy of them all -
Newman Galleries, 1625 Walnut Hector Hyppolite. He decorated
St. voodoo temples. He used chicken
feathers for brushes and coca-
CROSS-SECTION OF cola caps' for palettes. He be-
HAITA ART came very wealthy. He's dead
This is a-very good exhibit." now."
he said "It is so well balanced Another primitive p an t e r,
- a complete cross-section of Prefete Duffaut, created big
the works of our artists. murals on the walls of the Epis-
.copal 'cathedral in Port au Prin-
"Haitian art, you know, is a ce.
very young movement. De Witt e
'They're giant, multi-colored
Peters began the Centre d'Art
murals, depicting Bible stories."
in Port au Prince during World
War H. Before, our artists were Anderson sai d. "An important
considered eccentrics. Mr, Pct- personage would be painted rid-
ers gave them a minimum of ing a bicycle. The cathedral us-
normal training without squet- ed to be dead white before.
ching their originality. Now its walls are like stained
"You know, sbme of them us- glass."
ed automobile e n a m e They
painted utilitarian things and In another room were the
this is something that may ac- more sophistical works of mod-
count for their sincerity." ern Haitian artists Luce Tur-


Peters, an American painter,
was at the opening. So was Win-
slow Anderson, of Trenton, art
director for a china manufact-


DRVID A WRfLY TRLRMAS

vould be happy to be

honored bi youp
SQisit at


'Pert


WALLY'


nier, Haiti's best-known' woman
artist, was at the gallery for the
opening. Fifteen of her \work-
are among the current exlubit,
which-will continue through Oc-
tober 29.


4- tits most exciing RC PORT STOR


Sit sfmous MWNO- FTOR.
f" t4t -ostifamous Maonr0Fj"i. ThcTOR'


,. 2enok (erfl mes

-* g155 'Wafclhe.


.% enek iquoi's


* %m cg-es


cI


*ESexzctdecl ed a15 5JPQlWaUe

*rnalitL ^ld5es-, Uotaltan ge-

r* Casrme Sedters At ers


Detrw


T FREE PcORT PRI C IM -
- .R "T-. "' -r FREE PORT PRICeS ---_ ---


PORT-AU-PRINCt'
A ITI


"' '
a e" '-'
'- 3: -i3' ''
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PAGE 14 "HA T. SU ,
w:- : :. **-.*:-:C "I ':" i"-* v -

Haiti Land O

MAINE ANTHROPOLOGIST:- VINDICATE$' ttj J .- t
... a -, ,C -,o cannib, '. ... #,
SColumbus was not far off the Archaologists have long, been Ialtians there-:have ndiver-.een possible bt't,"r. BPr _.vAie--,
golden track when he returned suspicious oE Columbus' log. Af- la white. man. Ao-lHiatianr (.: Efo h na bofe. a daie. r sje,
from n Hiaitian expedition it 14- ter yedrs of digging in graves doo)' gbod o4s s;oetims: command k ben f',1th rnrt "" "-
92 with tales of rich lodes of and townsites of the Indians who tfieit .worshipers to e m ve roW 'culdl &' -pie
Sold in Haiti according to Iai- then inhabited the Caribbean is- strangers, like' arkei *post-lias- iee ,.. .- t'-. iA"
no Professor Paul W. Barker in lands, they found -only three tiny ;. te from the "premises ut libs o e.goa.isT. e-wr.i he:'ie
a"Tine M1agiazine" article of scraps of gold. It looked to them tiachiodd :Pht Bal ir.- 'afor lial "- "'"?1 .foi'rg ia-
October 10, Following Barker's as if the "Admiral of the Ocean .ierchaht-seai an, chemist a.d religid ti tti
tale of adventure in Haiti it also Sea" had sweetened the. record' Baptis irlninif .;"soqmeliw i Dr.' Barker.is Ispeally tu jr9iggi i
Frempis lu-ky. that 'lie was not to increase the- .attractiveness naged'idto'get 'alorig. On -th eor .&6'-by 6' hun rpI and kId
nsummarily excommuInicated by of the lands that he discovered. ithemr seacoast near Pot de neystqnes Whthisdhoa
tIL voodoo god Dambala. 'But .last week Anthropologist i Paix a 'local' ianidowne'and may ignffy e d.es no kow r a 'tFiknois
Whli-i Columbus firsi lande., in. Paul W. Barker of Maine.s Gor- i. amateur ethnologist '-wh fiis. al-'
northern Haiti (Hispaniola) in ham State Teachers College vin-..- ,o a 'oodoo potentate- 'helped ~" IF'. eDI SNCi0"A
1492, he captured a loely In- dictated Columbus. In, northern Bark!? -excdate .itownsite N :
dian girl who %as expensively Haiti, he reported, he dug up'- where. the gold. "eniaiits were -,.: i. ..p j ,-
hut sparsely clad with a gold- two golden lendant-. just like found: Tense moments :ca e- :'.
en nose plrg and nothing .lso. those described" by, Colufibus. when if \ias repaoted:t thai be e -... .
Next day he found a town of Barker may even -have found- god Dambalhad.ordered Brk "
1.000 houses, some.of whose in- them in the village where dwelt 'er' dt pulsion. utie l6cal'o
habdiants wore golden car pen- the lass with the', nose plug. doo expert sent :off messages t.: ..
daiits. When lie returned to Tense Moments. An anthropo- ihe god,-wonhim a round totar- .'' -l_ ..- '. ''"I" ~'~
Spain, lie reported man., of logist's job is especially. tough in ker. O F' .o.- 'ioi'i-, -FioOivo"
these small treasures. northern Haiti. Many grown .- -'- .I' .
The townsite near. the-sh s or" '...e .
looks mer h' ': ethed.place& tamps, an pt e dtailerS No
-- that ..Collimbu": described. Its. -:, ,. i
1,000-odd houses: probably sbe, G
ered 15,000 i::alitants and- -4: f c
there were manyi ma ter set ''
elements : nearby. Dr "Bt.er .O. Box 72 -
and his Haitian helpers f6ujiid .
stone, tools, : fis g sinkbrs d nd.
.' e a probable, ball court, as well as
the 'two god pendants .
-',-'S. p'Lb'.. .6
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-if
STEPE1" BROS,
Mtv.: IAmr RfIEK
M. V.MAf M CHAN,-At: P
PERSONALLY SU.tPER ED '
LOADING A3lD UinTo- rn1qi wdr.t
6KE.VEHAIF' TVr -,NDYl o r r Ni1' 3 ,
-..-: ::. ii
forthniightly asthi s the
[ Miami-- Port an riice--Miam '
lylAMWI ADDRESSS -

-.r,. io .- 9432 T- ....-,--'::"U .P;b
..leph one F .ght nd -,W .
7

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'L'. ." + : -,... ."., ,...-+.._,.', -M.A' .,'. ? ..:,


I n I *' I
1. .121 _. .;, 0 J
Haiti's'r Ginigbread Palaee'' .an, 'b'.Fs v '.-';i !n;

Li tl -u.e al -l Pq u ite cnisin i.Hdn. coeii.ta d T .. ..
a'- grdeuq tliq. O soujjl, _o_. 1,.
A-a' '. I4 W"
:m .ec r (be Va.lbb-an .uriL. .It .. 'i4:


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-- : __ 2 .. -
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Sundaxlp.JPPER 9t11r496,9 ... 7-


"HAITI SUN"


-, .


PAGE 15


"BLACK -SUtNF NEW CAVE BOOK BILL DODGER
.. HARMAING- ~.
*: MACW IlD0CLAN
-. (Cqntinued from pae. 1)
.(C tinue pti page ) aid peasants, and an, i Last week the Sun front pag-
T. is pitiable vi ew po tlecual, a poet and historian, ed an article conicrning James
the raw mateialp of literature whose backing comes from the MacDenald, described as a Ca-
so cogvulsiiedJy .abundant there- rich merchant class-and the des- adian National, aged apprxi-
about. A. few, competent recent cendants of.early French aristo- mately -37 years, and the man
novels, including this one (Black crats. Also deeply concerned are who niade off last week owing
Sun) demonstrate the point. the incumbent President, who the Hotel Oloffson a total of
"The highly skilled Hugh Ca- hardly proposes to allow mere 572 dollars in unpaid bills. -
\e names his island St. Joseph constitutional taboos to prevent Hotel staff added to the little
but there is only one. French- him from staying in office, and known about MacDonald by sta-
and-Creole-speaking Negro Rep- the army and the secret and. mi- ting that he spoke fluent French
public in .the Caribbean --. and litary police. and was 'as .charming-and aff-
since Mr Cave staked -out Haiti Watching and t a ki n g,some able man." The disappearing
.s his special concern as early part in the proceedings are the guest ad termed himself as an
as 1952 (with an excellent travel book's hero, a successful. Ame- Executive of Proctor and Gam-
book aboqt it,, "High Road to rican writer; various other Ame- ble. -'
.-'dventure' .as well as with an-.. ricans, correspondents, teachers, On Monday James W. MacDo-
orher novel,) it is easy .to pin- an altruistic white nurse and nald caed a he Sun to clear
point thejocale of "Black Sun." some functionaries of, a Point his nahie and suggest that there
'On that assumption .tbh book Four .program. The plot whirls is an imposter inthe clan, "be-
scems to offer an l unexpected through riot-, rebellion, -isues of cause it's more than aconcid-
piecis .o Haiti's. recent- political race, grim political chicanery, ence that e (the Oloffson's Mac-
hlstory, or-,a story teller's reas- dictatorship, police, brutality, and Donald,) should say that heis
winnable' facsimie of the same. assassination. While. Mr. Cave's a Proctor and Ghmble represen-
ils belig in essence a political story is tailor-made for the po- native when they are our com-
novel. A. presidential. election is pplar market and his white folk editors
at hand. There are three :candi- are stereotypes, the action oc- Genuine James W MacDonald
dates, a' demagogic leader of the curs in a convincingly three-di- has ben in Haiti a dozen times
desperately. indigent .town and Tr e s i o;n a world, especially during the past year and retains
city worke.rs,'a wealthy.si sa J when the native characters have a house in Village Willy La-
grower- whose .appeal. is to the the stage. mothe. The Canadian Colgate
*- Palmolive representative stated
MEUBLES MARABOU (CHAS. DEJEAN & CO) ,that -he was most unhappy to
read about the escapade of his
O OR D CHARACTER namesake. He h i m s ef is a
.... ..........:i~i~ HR .sourd payer of hotel bills 1 he
stayed at El Rancho for three
A-" YOUR -OFFICE FURNITURE? months and at Montana Hotel
S s r:"-''f for seven.
SAs James W. MacDonald was
leaving this week on a business
trip he wanted to ensure- that
the situation was made clear
and thut no stigma was placed
on his name. Meanwhile the fal-
se James MacDonald. who dis-
appeared on the 25th of last
month the same day the crui-
seship Coronia was in port, has-
failed to show up Or make good
his weighty hotel bill.


FOR SALE TO THE HIGHEST
BIDDERt
9 Ford Sedans 1957, 4 door
.. ..1 Buick Roadmaster S edan
S "" 1957, 4 door
II you're looking for office furniture that really expresses your 1 Wllys Jeep Station Wagon
Lhdlvidualty, -then take a 1 mme to or visit yo1 M&. .L1957
RABOU dealer. ,4 ,. I Jlthevrolet Sedan 1955. 4 door
Beautifully designed diskA strlg blIb dbt v 'darkdak ( Chevrolet Panel Tiruck 1954
2 Window Type Air Condition.
walnut, woodgraln or traditional plain gray; also available modern, 2 Window T ir on
dr'an atero tlre toe .erarrpgemepts .'., S : May be seen from 8:00am to
Ri GULA SIZES 80 x 60 tops NOON, and from 2:00 pm. to
I-:EAONABLE PRICES 7 41 4:00- pm., Monday through Fri-
No. 5304 $ 89.95 day at 'the American Embassy,
o 0 1 5 Cite de I'Exposition, Sealed bids
.- ,r ', wil be received in the Embassy
Administrative Office until 5:00
pm. October 17. 1960. The Em-
"i -' t *-' a a bassy reserves the right to re-
i"sc ec -( e r t eJc any or all bids. See Recep.
.' -tqnlst for Information. A separ-
'UU. "ate bid should be submitted for
each 'Item desired.
S Amerlcan Embassy
Port au Prince, Hatii.


\ OCCASION
FOR SALE:
On account departure:
FORD ZEPHYR 1957
Excellent condition
Contact Fablus Dutch IWae
Phone 3888.


UJ ( /. ^OOTEL

EVERY NIGHT IS A
WONDERFUL
NIGHT AT EL RANCHO
THE PLACE TO MEET
ALL
OF YOUR FRIENDS
Monday--Festive Barbecue And
Revue Intime
TUESDAY-A Special Floor
Show
ainment
WEDNESDAY Feature Entert-
.THURSDAY "Night Of Love-
liness" Fashion Show
FRIDAY "Eva & Ernst's" Spe-
cial Dance Party With "La
Petite Jo"
SATURDAY "La Ronde" Night
Club With Gala Floor Show
SUNDAY Orchestre Coumbite
And Game Night





JET CLIPPER SERVICE


TO NEW YORK


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3 hours and 25 minutes to New York
Save- hors.over conventional piston travel!
Depart at 11:45AM on Super-6 Clippers' for
immediate connections in Ciudad Trujillo
with e6t Clippers. More than 500,000 pas-
"'' s-'ng r~hla've.-crossed the Atlantic by Pan
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ute! For reservations see your Travel Agent
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eaar .AwLrE atc Al
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PLACE DE LA REPUBLIQUE ARGENTINE, CriE OF EXPOSITION
PORT.AU.PRINCE. TEL 3451 -

'PAi'-IBNr =1 e.


" .;


-F, -


1~_ _I_ ~ __




*~ ~ -... ,* -
''I** *.I
-... Z.. r. 9 .


"HAITI SUN"


Sunday OCTOBER lih, 160


New Taxes, Aliens.,


(Continued from page 1)
Income derived trom the new
taxes will augment a special
fund for construction of the
scheduled Mais Gate Jet Air-
port now under contract to two
US firms. An official establish-
ment of the taxi tariff was an-
nounced by "Le Monlteur," zon-
ing has been fixed and the mi-
nimum charge of 10 cents (US)
applies with this fare doubling
between 6:30pm and midnight.
Foreigners wishing to gain re-
sidence in Haiti on a permanent
basis are now subject to revis-
ed and additional laws. These
la ws cover consulate applica-
tion, minimum 10,000 dollar
bank deposit in a Haitian bank-
ing house and a 1,000 dollar
deposit share purchase in a gov-
ernment loan for construction of
the jet airport. This share will
not be negotiable.
A new tax of five dollars (US'
has been imposed for a booklet
of application of licence for for-
eigners. This is good for one
inscription and four renewals in
the course of five years. This
new tax law is a modification of
article 3 of the law of June 7.
1955.
DECREE FOR FOREIGN
RESIDENCE IN HAITI
Any 'foreigner desiring to be-
nefit of a non-immigrant or re-
sident visa must make an appil-
cation to the Haitian Consulate
of his jurisdiction or to the one
nearest to his residence.
That consul will receive a fee
of 15 dollars and the application
must be made out in triplicate
and contain the following infor-
mation:
The name and surname of ap-
plicant or his given names, pla-
ce of birth, the nationality of
origin and actual nationality,
profession or occupation during
the past 10 years, name and
surname of father and mother.


their original nationality and ac-
tual nationality, the place of
their residence, "marital status,
name and surname and occupa-
tion of mate, nationality of wife
before marriage, reason for im-
migration to Haiti, length of pro-
posed stay, capital, means of ex-
istence income and banking re-
ferences.
Applicants must justify of a
minimum deposit of 10,000 do!-
r.-'s of a bank established in
Haiti or provide an affidavid. In
the latter case applicants must
justify of a deposit of 1,000 dol-
lars at the National Bank of the
Republic of Haiti; said deposit
will be affected towards the buv-
ing of a share of same value
(or an interior Government loan
destined to the construction of
the jet airport This share will
be considered as a dcpoiit and
,1ll NOT be negotiable.
TWO DOLLAt
AIRLINE TICKET TAX
According to article one of the
,ax laws and decrees announced
oy "Le Moniteur" a tax of 10
Gourdes (two dollars USI has
been named as a contribution to
the construction of an airport
on all air line. tickets flying
from Haitian airports to a &or-
elan destination. This-tax will
also be levied on the airline tic-
kets purchased abroad for 'he
account ot Haitians or persohE
residing on Haitian territory.-
Article 4.-Those exempt from
paymentt of this tax, established
by the present decree, are the
diplomatic and consular agents
on active service and members
of their families.
Article 1. of the revised tax
laws also levies anr airport con-
tributing tax of 50 cents (USi
on all tickets of the domestic
airservice COHATA.
Article 4.-T hose exempted
from the payment of the tax es.
tablished by the present-decree
_ie


are diplomatic and consular
agents on active duly and their
lanmilies and military on active
service.
EXCISE TAX OF 2 CENTS
ON GASOLINE
The additional tax on gasoline
is set forth in Artick- 1. A sup-
plementary excise tax of 2 ceits
(US) is created, gourdes 0,10,
on each gallon of gasoline
t3,7853 litres.)
MERCHANTS CODE
RECEIVES REVISION
'Any person is free to enter
any trade, states "Le Moniteur",
providing he has purchased the
required licence and providing
that person abides by the law.
Any person trading in the terri-
tory of .the Republic of Haiti
must be in the possession ot a
professional.identity card which
costs one dollar and is obtained
from the Tax Office.
Article 3.-The foreigner who
has been authorized -to reside
m Haitian territory and who
wants to trade there will benefit
within the limit of the law from
the same treatment that applies
in his country of origin and of
the law of Haitians of the same
profession.
Article 4.-The foreigner who
wants to benefit from the resid-
ence visa to trade in Haiti must
post a permanent deposit of 10,-
000 dollars at the National Bank
of the Republic of Haiti.
The Haitian law recognizes
five trade positions- manufactu-
rers agent, importer-wholesaler,
importer-retailer, retailer arid
peddler. These are classified as
follows; the manufacturers ag-
ent is the trader who places or-
ders for the account of import-
ers (wholesaler or retailer) not
withstanding forseeh exceptions
as outlined in article 8.
From the date of publication
of the present decree (Septem-
ber 26, 1960) only Haitlan citiz-
ens can be, manufacturers ag--


r


ents. However, the fore i gn e r
who is already the holder of a
licence as a maAufacturers. ag-
ent for the fiscal 1959-60 will be
able, within the limit of the law,
to continue that profession- for
the current agency contract.
The Importer-wholesaler is a
merchant who imports goods to
be sold wholesale. He cannot
sell the goods below the mini-
mum quantities that will be spe-
cified by presidential decree.
The importer-retailer is a mer-
chant who imports goods to be
sold retail or goods which are
sold by units.
-The retailer is a merchant
who buys, in Haiti, all manner
of goods to be sold directly to
the consumer by units or frac-
tiofts of units.
The p&ddler is a merchant who
ambulates from one place to the
other to sell his goods retail.
Apart from exceptions forseen
in article'8 of the present decree
merchants 'can only be classified
as one of the above defined-po-
sitions.
Article 6.-Regulations .of the
trade of products that can be
classified in the following cate-
nories, or if need be for a spe-
cial product, will be done by
presidential decree. The catego-
ries are as follows: fabrics and
other wearing apparels and cot-
ton, food products and drink.
toiletries, dry goods and lotions.
glassware, chinaware, flatware,
hardware, building materials,
mlaonery, cobblers goods anu
leather, articles of prime neces-
sity.
All sales by the importer who-
lesaler must be written on sales
slips without erasing or over-i
writing. Said sales slips fill
contain the name ot purchased.
the number of his -.liessional
identity card and quantity- sold
and must be presented at ai-y '
inspection of the fiscal depart-
ment.
The manufacturerss agent can-
not sell wholesale 'or retail the I
article he represents. His com-
mercial activities are limited. to
the importation for'the account t


..
-



* "^
'~ i


(AM. EXPR. AND DINERS CItB ACCPTKD',
r


PAGE 16


IN HAITI -SHOP
AT



FISH R'S

HALTI'S LARGEST FREE PORT PRICE SHOPS

I) THE CORNER SHOP RUE BONNE FOI. -


2) ART & CURIO SHOP FISHERS ACROSS FROM CU


SHOPS AND MAHOGANY FACTORY


SAVE-UP TO.60 Per Cent ON IMPORTS


AND BUY HAITIAN FIANDICRAFTS


STRAIGHT FROM THE FACTORY

ON THE RUE Dtf QUAI


.~


of the importer of the products
for which he is the agent. How-
ever, he will be permitted: to
Impot a new product'for a p-e-
riod of oie year so that he i ay-
aake it. known on the mariet..
Moreover, he will be able"'.;:
take out of Customs, and 'sel,.
any merchandise-refused by-cus-'
tomers so that he can safeguard-:
the interest of his principal ,-
In either case the agent must*
first of all obtain from the De-.-
partment of Commerce and -In-:.
du'stry an authorization. and pay
a wholesaler licence equivalent
to a fourth of the cost for a nor-'
mal licence. ".
Moreover t h e manufacturers..'
agent is authorized tp sell in.
quantity or unit any products.
such as machine fools or equip:
ment, trucks, autos, tractors.afid-
stationary machinery and. their
accessories. .
Article 9.-No foreigners, in.-
trahsit or in residence, or any.
Haitian citizens, who do not have...
their professional identity card.
is allowed to trade in one fom-n
or another. The foreigner .in.
transit or on temporary sojourn.
in the country for the;.needs of
his trade must always be es-
corted in his business visits..by
his local representative who
must be licenced.-

Article 10.-A n y, importation,
whether for wholesale or retail,
as well as those made by con-
tractor 0o great public works,
must, of obligation, be- done
through representatives duly es-
tablished-in-Haiti. The importer
must .pay the "genit-his commis-
sion and the agent may take
any measures for the guarantee
r hi's rights. 1

-For articles or iprodIcts nof
represented in 'Haii the -i'port-
er-must demand-from the sup-
pier tie: appoitnierit 6of a local
representativee of -his choice
thrug b- which all 'orders will
ie paced.
(Tl6, continuation and icnbdu-
iios of these laws will follow in
hef next issue.)-.
-


;I
L.*~Y






C;-; 7 ': ~ "- i'`'r!- : .-.~ ..- ,. i,-; .1;


I S ?dn .OCTOBER 9th, 1960
--

S-:- S. ADMIRAL CALLS... -
.. I -
(Contimued- ftom page 1) taiia. In- attendance were Inte-
sion,, Vice-Al m'iTa li Craighill rior and 'Natonal defense Mi-
made-a'hfalf-hour'iispection tour mnster- Aurele. :Joseph, General
of 'the.-new -installatio6h under -Pierre Merceron, Chief of the
ronstrnition::'o -house the "Set- General Staff of the Armed For-
vice ,:esr:ransiiissrons of FA- ces and other high ranking ofi.
d'H-'.---the corrinunications sys- cers together with American
ternof Kthe -Armed Forces, on Embassy Charge d'Affaires Phi-
,Wednesday'.amt .8:5lanr.' The buil- lip- Williams. Wives of the offi-
ding' is 'to be inaugurated on cials were also present.
Army -Day,', Novembert.18th.
Accompanying the vice-admiral As Commander of the 15th Na-
on the installation tour were Co- val District Vice-Admiral .Craig-
lonel.-'Alexandre Laraque .the .hill has 10 Naval missions-under
Engineering Corps and Majors his chag-e-- Argentina, Brazil,
Andre' and Aimand. Also on the Venezuela, Peru, Chile, .Haiti,
tour were.Captain Joseph Fjanti- Panama, Uruguay and Ecuador.
ez of the Signal Corps; Colonel This was his first trip to Haiti.
Robert-flHeinl.-USMC-Naval Mis- During an interview with Vi-
ion and Major Wagner. ce-Admiral Craighill's Aide-de-
c-amp, the newspaper Le Matinf
A cocktail party was given asked if the commander's visit
or the visiting Navy.comman- to Haiti had anything -to do with
ier by :.Haitian Coast. Guard Caribbean tension. The aid re-
oimmander; Poitevien oh Wedni- plied "Not -at all :- it is a
sdAy-evening-at the:Hotel Mon- strictly routine visit."


Nest Buys



In Radio


At Curacao Trading Company


': -
\ *,


t_
4 *I


THE PHILIPS :

SEVEN TRANSISTOR

PE$SONA- RADIO

RUNS 0ONi' 3 PEVN LIGHT

SPRIGE 3- 400


CELLS


-I


, A A IT-I. SU N"


N.EW .U.S. ENVOY...

.4tdntla ed-.from jage 1) .;-



Newbegins..have three children
- ..ofothy King, Robert and
Ann Slade.

Newbegirr received his first
diplomatic appointment when he
was 'assigned to Berlin as vice-
Consul in 193', followed -by the
same office in Montevideo the
next year. From Montevideo
'Newbegin was posted to the post
as third secretary of the Ameri-
can Embassy in' Mexico City
(1933) and then as Consul and
third secretary in Istambul -
Ankara in 1938.

Ciudad-Trujillo was the next
jump for Robert Newbegin and
he was assigned there as sec-
orfd secretary and Co.is- in '42.
In 1944 he iwas appointed as
first secretary for Ciudad Tru-
jillo.

The rest of the extensive
countries roster covered by Ro-
berr 'Newbegin and his official
status are: Assistant Chief of
Division Caribbean and Central
American Affairs Department of
State, 1945, as Chief of Division
Central America and Panamani-
an Affairs,' 1946, Counselor of
Bogota Embassy in 1949, a move
to th, Air War College in 1951
for one year followed by post
as sociall assistant MDAP Pa-
ris in 1951, Foieign Service Ins-
pector. 1952, Director office of
Middle American Affairs, Dep-
artment of State, 1954, Depart-
ment Secretary of State for per-
sonnel 1956-58 .and as Ambassa-
dor to Honduras in 1958.


"* 'I.


SHILIPS :- BETTER TEN

ALL 7TRANSSTOR P ORTABLE -

SRUNS ON 4..ELASIlH HT CELLS ..
,LOW

T' BROM)CASt ABAND 4RICE

2 SHORTWAVE- -BANDS -
PRICE $59. 00 .



.'- .. "


FAKER SHOT...
(CotLinned from 'page 1)

with the "Gros Lot"' fffr;prize)
winning ticket. The lottery. peop-
le inspected. the ticket which re-
suited in their suspicions being
aroused and the calling of the
police. The ticket was a fake.

Questioned by police the pre-
senter of the forged ticket dis-
claimed all ownership-and stat-
ed that he had been approached
by "a man" near the banks and
asked to collect on- the ticket.

Playing along with the sche-
me the police and lottery offi-
cials made out a -check, gave it
to the unwitting messenger and
escorted him back to the vici-
nity of the banks where a ren-
dezvous with the perpetrator of
the dud ticket had been arran-
ged between him and his envoy.
The wanted p"rt,' was on the
look out and saw the welcoming
committee coming. He started to
run but was brought down with
four bullets-fired by one of the
detectives. Having gambled and
lost the ticket forger is now ly-
ing in hospital seriously wound-
ed.


246 SIT ENTRANCE EXAMS
FOR MEDICAL FACULTY

T w o hundred :and forty-six.
candidates took part in the re-
quired entrance examinations to
the Faculty of Medicine held o-i
Wednesday afternoon this week.
Beginning October three, the ex-
ams results will be announced
on October 25.
Of those candidates sitting
the exams 189 were for medic.-
ne, 22 for pharmacy and 35 for
dentistry. Courses will open at
the Faculty of Medicine on Oct-
,ober 18 with the exception of the
P.C.B. year.'


GERMAN ECO-

NOMIC AFFAIRS

VISITS HAITI

Dr Wolfran Langer, Director
of the office of General Econo-
mic Affairs of the German Fe-
deral Republic payed a brief vi-
sit to Haiti this week enroute
from Germany from Washington
D.C., where he attended the
conference of the World Bank
and Monetary Fund.


01


," .


JOSEPH NADAL & CO. DISTRIBUTORS


I


- -


PAGE 17


:: '"" .... l['''
IIII II I I 1 111 11 11 1
:-i ~ ~ I lll. "' "' '.






*. -- -- ",.. .... -..: ..c*i
4- .- ", ". -. :*:. .- .. '-7 ,3 -.-f ;f.,Z_
PAGE 18 -N A T S UN." S. .

BASEBALL ON THE RISE HERE? -N'VA Y NEEWS A::6N::ANiSoSI.'oJN,
USS SURIBACHI SOUNDLY The diwho.ws-seen t :c-' .
BEATEN BY -HAITIANS step forward with a special .- robaoo,, t
:spring in his step '-frorn-tfie wait I.Hait' n t r b
Despite a well equipped team team. Playing bare footed and ing line at the Quai thristophe -i. ,' .h ::;Cnt '" '1 -oom
with all baseball paraphanalia batting crop handed the Haiti- Colomb, early Tuesday zorijing 'seval' rte Bibop kitchen sevaplt N
down to spiked shoes, the USS ans' ran up a swift score which was USOM's George L.": woore d Ago:u':i "a -"AddresBs; -.r4- .
Suribachi baseball team was the Suribachi boys were unable Sr. George was on land to wel- ,..ec-ted' Mby r.',ietrich .- .:'
soundly trounced 11-2 by a bare- to match. come his bride, the, former EP i'r oi splay iithe Bad --.,.
footed Haitian team on the St. leen Lorraine Hebert who arriv- IBad .: bit(Ge y): LRN1~ E
Louis de Gonzague sports field Overjoyed by their victory the. ed on the.; Panma&-lioer. from of wnhch Gur- ,,-T.F
last weekend. local team drew a lot of atten- New -York to join. Her. husband, T -- 'M ayfi'g nr
tor., To 4go-Vqn. i t y Dinig 'p'o',' Ll n""
tion to baseball by their win; ICA Busines Manaeger-at ;D-. 9'the selection i ,ue ks others... ........
Up against the neatly unifor- It is hoped by local enthusiasts VA; The riewlywids wh9-wiU;ibe t' oim ad 'Jas i. vetoonl, Tte
med Americans were nine Hai- that the- game may well have it home in .the Artibonite at i : ; : 4 to-pi, ecep
lians coached by U.S. Navy sparked a revitalised interest in' PonT Sonde were married on Au" -'.: :' .' :' '.:-.'..
Chief MacGloughlin, the volun- America's national sport in this gust 3rd in Leesburg, Virginia -- .'-- .. '
teer coach of the keen local soccer dominant country. Mrs Moore -:leaves behind,".her .';"- .--: '." .. '; "
post of Chief Litrariah in .,- t.he
--- U.Si Department- of- J u s.t ic e ./H-AT rK-i S A` We) i ESAY^ N' IHT-, I
where she workedjfor 16 years. .... .. '!R -'- .. -:-'-''
HAITI READY FOR HAITI ISSUES NEW y-'.- .,;.. '--.. A H'.
RECORD SEASON BANKNOTES ." '
Over-all increase in Fall-Win- The National Bank of the Re- The Jean Brizzards aref'au,. -""
ter Caribbean bookings reflected p u bl i c of Haiti put 10,6.00,000 anges" since last Saturday when' --.-..-"|-
itself in the scheduling of 124 Gourdes in circulation this week. they. welcomed. their first c -hild, '-. n C '
calls by cruise ships to Haiti, in Received from the American a lovely little girl i'hoi-p they '. ".'
addition to. regular year-on traf- Bank Note-Co., the denomina- have named "Jessie.". -le. -:ni d
fic. Advanced hotel -bookings tions of the gourdes were 600,- her bow to-theI-worldr:.at .lini SO -XCITIN LY'IFFERENT "-FO U '-
are climbing. Special promotions 000 of the 2 goujrdes, 5.000,000 que Dr. Pierre-Noel,; .in. oi -. : .- '
are being planned right up 50 gourdes and 5,000,000 100 Verna, on September24t h, and : T
through Carnival time, and mer- gourde'. Issuing ao the new no- will accompany heri parent '-
chants and hotelmen have been tes took place in the presence back to their pqst-of .Agronomor --.-'- .
refurbishing the i r establish- of Mr Frank Bouchereau, D:rec- ist at Mauge ini tire Artibonite FAi-o i
ments for the past 2 months in tor of the BNRH and Mr' Ar- .. AU..*i
anticipation of the record tour- mand Allien, Minister of FLnan- Joseph Bernard' Agriculural
ist influx ce. Division C-hied and member of --..
the "Big-Three" f ODVA, ohbs- ... -:
served his birthday anniversary
Son Septembier' 27th., oe celbrat- .- .
BEST FO. OD-^s..w I ..// A- .. ed by iwoiking-had bUay, Wut .:- .- .- '
< BEST FOOD IN THE CARIBBEAN!!! got "hapSy :b rti-' inthe
S evening: -.by --a7y",-tup '- i n.friefld" -. 'l
HOTEL CHOUCOUNE. at'Desciiplgby roUPpftC d -.t 9
4A Ci I art cheese playing a''ecirole -$i, -
CABANE CHOUCOUNE e
^ go the menu.
as desribed'in the TORONTO GLOBE MAIL by :E eStpardGr
S HOTEL CHOUCOUNE during the month of ant; -observed his' birithd i- .
< February 1960: 1 versary o' September 24t, ibut
"OUR HOTEL, the Choucoune, was abouj live miles -above celebrations wil ot'get under-
1'he city of Petionville. This is the residential- section where way till this ed
.. .. .'.. .. .- h,' drives up to the- fa r ily .om e :- : -- ^^ .. "'
housess are modern and the hotels are lavish and comfortable stead is St : "Mar." ifei'
id the food pan be highly recommended. The usual meal might (nee Haris) and the bla*ne '
tart off with a rum punch mixed with wild honey 'and lime youngsters 'are treparing.if. the" '. ..
l youngsters pare repanrg'-. the ", .';,
Snice. The next possibility could be flaming foster fried pork fatted for their r, ulT ,
th rice and black mnsuoo6ms, and then peraitaj "waet :.pobiat-- weekend. co #ios 'i ce- :
< adding. This would all be toppel.off with aPt.o^ill.itP is in P :li .-
it Haitian coffee.
SHatan coffee. Mrs Frances IV-ullen L ave.
Aside from hotel night lfe, Petidnville possesses a night ubl on October-10th'.for amonthl' J
a ue In the West Indies, the CABANE CHOUCOUNE, a build- Boston where -.he .will get '-
ig of bamboo shaped like an. Inverted ie-creip 'cone.. q t-e ... w.grand-. '
Sxterior looks lkei the chlerfs hut in an African v but the da o, She pla
Lerior contains a large, anobth dance floor we re a g Do be at eschapell e
chestra pla -the uikal meringue." .. -,.- ..-- -
ban -,-'P p :-. -;
COMPLETE DINNER A LA CARTE: $4. gminee- at ODVA, from 30 days .. -
SPECIAL ENTERTAINMENT: 7le'gatio9to :bachelorhoordT -
Mids]" end-th~vr ....` th ei
THURSDAY & SATURDAY EVENING years ede s.-"e:-: h 1 : 1












A ND S U PER B ijA N D FA M O U S i i; i r i i1 -'i i-: "-*11 '-- i
q.aalilte.- nA^ SMd, sisaL Sere t.ta t at

t *: pl orb I .
tPORTAWVU flu nca~i H AM-- ,r

SGRANDRUE ec PAN TAL dgpHO HOTES RESTU: :


bT,.:-lu i T -" wo i-i
AND SUPERB AND FAIi6Ub
Quality. -'ifsejmn n" -- Sis & Served xcwlsvat t
GRAND RUE AI t..B e f.dit *xavin .Stbres v. .PHONE: n HOTELS & RESTRAURANTS & BYCONNOISSEU,


-- L- .-:-3,;tM!..<----' E-14 _








s inOay o CBER T th, 1960


'M


.' *1-AJ I T S UN"


IN- HAITI T:HIS.WJK IO TSjiQ' M '
(Continued frm -page 3) J 1 TAX *EVIES


.normices".of the Ford Foundation. They are staying at the Hotel
Oloffson. Hamilton and Merle have been recommended here by
Mr and Mrs Neil Chamberlain who visited Haiti last year.
..Executive Louis Davidson and his Haitian wife, former Alixe
Ancion, came back this week from a- four week vacation in -jhe
United States. Lou Davidson was also working on his .contract
with the Haitian Government to build a Shopping Center here.
...Prominent Haitian- Contractor-builder Gerard Theard has greet-
ed here early this week importer David Shore from Florida and
is 'wife Esther, and their-son Melvin, a Salesman from New
York'aid his wifd 'rene. The Shores are staying at the Beau
Fivage Hotel.
...Mr Edward D,-Shermann, Honorary.Consul of Haiti in Boston
announced the arrival of Mr and Mrs Harry Nelson from Boston.
The Nelsons are described by Consul Sherman as very promine.it
in social, charitable and business circles in Boston and NeWi,
England. The'Nelsons who are arriving tomorrow onboard of the
Cruise-ship SS Nieuw Amsterdam and WVill spend a few hours-in
Port.- ; .
...Cotifere :J;oseph Thevenin flew lo Quito. Edua-or this week
' attend a -seminar. on Journalism. He will spend a few: weeks
broadd, Joe is a.lawyer and a staff member of the French speak
ig Newspaper Le Nouvelliste.
..M.r Alfre'd Vieux' ccorflpanied by her son in law Jean Fou-
lard and Miss France Prospgri flew to Washington, D.C. tli.
,eek. She went to visitrher,;atIghter- Mrs. Guy Douyon and will
cl a consultation from an American specialist.
...La.wyer Wesner Lahens werit to Paris via Washington this
-ek with a scholarhip,.from the French Government. He wil
study for six months at-tbe School of Economic Organization foi
e under ,ddvelopped, countries in Paris.



T -T
1 : : T-:E N T I O N 1 1


AT THE



011 :Z>D V 4


SALES C0UNITER.

YOU WILL FIND SUPERIOR QUALITY BLUE
BONNET RICE EVERY DAY
A IIIMHLY VITAMINED RICE -
SSOLD BY 5ACK ,OF 100 POUNDS
AT THE FOLLOWING PRICES:
Blue Bounifet Grade-A $10.50 or 52.50 Gdes
Blue Bonnet Grade--B 859 or 42.50 Gdes.
Blue Bonnet Gade 5.80- or 29.00 Gdes.
Discount of $.30 cents or 1.50 Gde. by 1001b sack on
y purchase made directly from the Rice Mill at DE.
EAUX (Artibonite Valley).
Discount of 4 per ceit on purchases of 20 sackA or
lore .of rice.
TO BUY ODVA RICE IS TO BUY
HAITIAN PRODUCED RICE
TO. BUl HAITIAN PRODUCTS IS TO
HELP -DIRECTLY IN STABILIZING
THE ECONOMY OF THE COUNTRY


EVERY FRIDAY IT'S THE


-. a
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OtMNEIIAUmW

S1ANS CHAUSRU


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' ,. .- .. .



F ~. .' ,,
-.'. .
..-.. ... '. .''. ,.
., '* ,, }'^
[. L.. ..** -"-''l .


THE NEW VOODOO DOLL
Declared inoffensive by the
U.S. Dept. Of Public Health
WASHINGTON, D.C.
Order through Mascptte Atelier
P.O. HPx 57
Cap Haltien (HAITI)


oe SANS- SIUf l
8 P.M. PUNCH BOWL AND: DINNER
TERRIFIC FLOOR SHOW
5, 5 PER COUPLE INCLUDING DINNER


Lo profile am6itor6 de tla ban A
r6ulemenf done une traction ot mur
s6curite supplementaires. Un ingM su
dispositif de silence r6duit les diff*.
-reits bruits d-sagrables du pne.
tandii squ le .construction t6g&r dJ.
Super-Cushion Sans Chambre ld,
permit d absorber les cahots de ia
route. Vous aurez molns do pnus &
plat. et moins de d6lais parcel que la
Construction Grip-Seal exclusive do
Goodyear 6limine pratiquement lea
crevaisons habituelles.



.o00tEAR
i no S ai u m- "w-on
dM ~jWM VA no 0 la"


'U


.- -I--- .--A.. .
" ,: ". .-"." ,:: j .: .;-.. -.. ..."." :.-' :: .f .b..L .-.. .: ,.,'. .. '4


M ri.'' ............ ------ -


I


leaned and announced by tie
official Government organ "Le
Moniteur" on September 26,
190, the new taxes and decrees
formulate the first changes in
tax and law policy dince early
January of this year. Covered
fully below the six decrees cov-
er in their main points:
I-A 32 dolar tax on foreign
airplane tickets and a 50 cents
(US) tax on all domestic airline
tickets.

--A further tax rise of two
cents (US) on gasoline bring-
ing the 'per gallon price up to
47 cents (US).
3-A new code of law for for.
eign residence which includes a
15 dollar applicationand consul-
ate'fee, a 10,000 dollar bank de-
posit and in some cases a 1.000
dollar share- purchase towards
the airport.
I-A new definition of nerch-
ants. and trade liberations and
restrictions.
5-A new purchase tax on the
book, of application of licence
which will now cost 5 dollars.


j
:r.
..1.. I i. i:


Mn-


PAGE 1.
PAGE 19:i


IF


)








PAGE


By KITTY KINGSTON

If you were a Haitian you
would have heard of "Zo."

This is the stage name of
quite a personality who comes
from Port au Prince, Haiti -,
Mr. Charlemagne The Salnave,
as his card says "Artist andl
Speaker of Haitian Language
over the Radio Stations 4VYM,
Carillon and Caraibes."


"Zo" C. The- Sai


MOVADO
i, Q^ .a

SON SALE AT MASON ORIENT

AND LITTLE. EUROPE


It seem
"Zo" is
spread in
Caribbean
mer column
gently inl
magne T
known as
.view and
loved rad
below:

PERS
MEE


FOR EVERY OCCASION

-SHOES
S ,. .. .

FAMOUS-. '
.-... -
.,'-~ .":.-.,1-- ..7"-
t." .. :,2 .. "t. ...'.;. -: ". :..' .,;'2 :: .," .. -' ":9g. ,-r .. : "-.'-,' """ '-': : .'''' %; .. ;. ,,; ., -. ; .<," ,: '7/. : ,,


20
.. .*: ...:. .-. -; Y 7




.. .... Y,. r ..-.. ,
*."-..A! .*..-vi.

'"'t ___:""__'_" 'HAIT YJS N -.-:. Y :'





ON RADIO AND STAGE FOR' 37 -EARS 'h. o t: h at '' the fh6 .oser o i ''
SBACK FROM AAICA- i annivrsa een on ad h' tle
-BA K FROM AAI A oistart a-secoiLdaiidr-e alieadyad thit altogether he hirs '
s that Haiti's famous Twinkling from under his bu- told me his stdry. He-hIas' plans for the iaiding aat a dozen records.
t aryarin .'r.,,, ..4 .n ...tid,.he'zo.of t tal e. .
having his pretsge shy, greying eyebrows "Zo" 30 year in .radio an i betodre i thouasid. .net bo. al-t "e n .
other islands of the that spoke: on thestage. 'This e tou d create bocks .mad henethe.d y fe,
Jamaica Daily Glea- was during the oedltf- sit reay -0o. ma.e i i 2i
nist Kitty kingston re- When he a -forced osg avble b
.. .hen he ..i.;,,- .',." M
he Salnave better t*and plays.and poetryA he oao nt-tm nths P ris h
o n he e- 4 e United-State o 7 y AIotad.37 talking years on to sing -ana hiso
comment on thebrter- and -here he started c tageanradion e behind betiuiltp
lo personality appeals hi songs nd poetry n ia o a he as t first ge -ere ca w
alect Creole.- Md over h radio in New York dgrmg .nO tth
dialect'," .. the occupation. He -is the com- ing days. b
.- ... "ned to-Haiti as he said "to edu- .. ...a ". -
ON ADI AD :TAE FR YARS -: :..i, owt :he;' ~t fiS'ih~ .is .oii: U, rh' .......r4


iONAL MENTION I
T HAPPY "ZO"


'cate, my people through the
p Creole," pe -p

One thing Mr,- Saipave".says I-..,." ..a
'e looked for in Jamaica, and :.- 4 .. ..
no ldn't find was a palalle t-o I -'t--"
K is own factory. in Haiti wvh re
he products Banana Flour. On ,. --
vacation here for .a month, ahe, .. .

imensely." Kitty Kingstori o r \r' '
iously ,enjoyed Zo ,as hiave
thousands of Haitian rhdio list-
ave .ners., yo'nmg and did,' fr i. -
,ast 3 0.yeu's.
vacaionM S
Zo has now returned, from- '
maice- but he left b eh i nd a b: t famous sistership" s Af"ON : 01lST .
strong Zo remindeer" in tm!e foirmB
of tapes of his program on Ra-. '
Jio Caraibes, CaRiUon and' 4V-
YM. These con#st of. the :bappy '
melodious'- VONa & 9

ingi hsrad io-
W2ie In R gstoFM -,W ...I
himself-and
-eommetatorink -g ''''H'i | 7'' \. *


to Hsaidts. th a*i t
.' < 4.nd i'teI a a
,,M I
Famed Z hi r iced
his activities to a dl~ On. the,
Cul de Sac plaid at Taraarifi
iSanto stands school that iasn usa yon aM0
built -by the radio aino unces for Friday, arrive 8.A Mi
rural children and turned over i Itn
to the Darniens Aicualture De-. wset -ithi St,.ti:
apartment on Octob"r 28,.;1959--
"Quisqueya Banana Flour isI e-
anotherZo achievedm ent and; it .
is this .ndustry which led. lim I .. -- MQrn .melcdrliagshlp Sero,'
to the building of s schools ,for DE IU r- qndtq IPi are
Haiti's children: (ie -day two, E : 6t: Stdwith 'i:v tefbatv Amid-:
years ago a cainionette, carry- SEA-AIR FAR ES ip rcohii 'd;.nid .ing Sa
S ing a. load of.Zie'se anana flofdr., ..7* : atcorfmodates.all p seigers. t-,
knocked achadoa d o ma. 10% oductioa from one;ay, one -itting. Open air tile E.wirn,'
Sknoke ad a t c ga oman Steamrer fares w n uew ifN m ing- Pool. S acios 'romen'ade
down and broke ier log. .' -'* '.
i .' air tr.ai dsporta tiob inoppodite Ieck p;lys Ms ft, -of oiu-
He took :he woman "to. her .ireSi-n.' S ':,i* g-gaf doo 6r'ts e k-B al i
home in Taimarin San toon the a'Io ace2 Ibs r lo. ni oktail" r i 4
C- de SPe plja-nM it was er' ---- anci-g.- '. ::,
that he dLscove-red dozens' of -,"'o l Ai-or '-
childrEn with no schooling faci-.
16 e He decided to erect- PA5 4J& a-" sIN
school for the childrenrand "A '
lad "habitant" gave hi-nm t -' U.tE A-BE AM L INC N EL;. 3062
laknd necessary. Contributions
o.d fn.mds to blUd ie school" ol
were requested b., Zo -over his *. -
radio programs and this result ---
ALE ;ed in s:tRicient mohev to bu -
roofinig materials and concrektt ..
blocks.


-----m




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