<%BANNER%>

Haiti sun ( April 24, 1960 )

Digital Library of the Caribbean Duke University Libraries
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: April 24, 1960

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00260

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: April 24, 1960

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00260

Full Text




















p. e n to' *e ta ehrn a Ula na HAte p tIn o* se .8led l b ue er* n E JMARSA1$8 :E T Ee d- O i'Db Lo
r n e.c.d- ,- ~p, .i .a*nr.r; sesden ga.snioal .-rror ,, .it ,e* u.f-
!T 7, "




















a adatlIna. P ....1aly^ae 1 Nprwepeat a rotta
.1n, .Ii .,. -- a ; g ":.e a ge J amr.l 1 IeT..








~ited,". staedhtlelfb s Ichor oran rdbru hodnw as on boa11 miioa.e0 ,1uW
-Jh.". igt two"" "' i aci .',ti.-d b. s.













T, oie n Aor e da.d the wa ee ust atin .t thr .t ain c mm a ine n h a rg e h "eg "

t o. .ip .to i e e; a a :- -n inh co e r .teda c a "ett ;to Ca -).l.n- 0th e m iutd e s ,t -" -- al t ie o ~,"W '
t walhen disturabd stabted that act ersu dic g astrucdttehe r dded -a ns o ay Ias hateisaed rrecove Hranor ahis to d.phes prl ad ser
'.ar Arss 1th.en c"I: sa g tr g, d l theaim sf" r "4o o': wd F-atdr t h Rb yal 'n..,ded-'erndeo b i tem.. r.




Hein famed the doo rf g t de t hat a proed inh aC w otrp a eed intold bthe
it 7i A itdpeand as d wa ss of bo ot.








a t h e c h u r c e t he w e te A IT E D pHev e n t c o ra t e ti o o o*a a t o pa e )(n ti nue d o n p ag e o2
r Fo H i v N e T H
N" I e ,













THaneg forced tthe d or he t fteeora t uPion e ed t h pnrceng Ihi ay e Fn':'
(Continued 0 .! 14) - L .. .. f I a dur. .g.a cg,,-'e"'. 4, an "w ."i.ig-








thG ch u h ofe, no. ... ee Leon byy to te p st o ..ac oi . t ,have.. a Log ..i., ,-








JthA CSe s t l e aa f c r' bsto tat s h ough a thatgh ia aioery ce. ,..' tura : h e ad ai.ig ..o n head -







o n e at an d o n ecr i t C ac ihi c haua t e d rr eea w a s o f c nrt h e oa boa t fs t ea p Hw ak i t ia n m e si d
.u.a D u mer sC hsas t i m ed we-d' e 's telm o f'at h e. s. ..to. . . ..

te1m) t m t...t h a o r p ef se a.d .nt-l a.i, . ,ac lus -. ., e ntl. a-..ewe."





-helrsd.t o the Rt-au-Pit end tothe tests aod 95 a st hi ,Sanratng aeigut) O r oe r f e rm er
-,, ...e FD. Th y. . .. .. w a gr.










a"o e :loed- b omm wsheek 'is ony t he.Se sI eon thae
(2 Par e w b f a it ot ba r p H ",' sai






















-t o stae Ppl oe i nt e Ct c e a f lontr er %



es *en tlo- d wa teaf de n in e r ay t to'""na da"" (C iueon ag o)
i n a i val of a is band.c pits au thenticiy ) -V a qhre d as e_ e y__h man effot
B--a-Twoadn no is Duvlinr the I~ rf called, o a HArtitic whthma o W ke' Lof e .h
.'eh hots tep anp.' In Aprilmoft1955a s t orane lory etluisr Rbatl e s'k s60ns, ....












are pto -h b l.c-o me by. cot w a hi fe ." a toge se and ht i -eam adot' pm .. se .- -
t ihe o or oai n t a le ie o t i ndtte o sd oi e lsa n o er A w. te i n k t a ill aeie -e i rew -At. 0 i F"r i de o d
.. ..e bee n e waChief ofs. F n- anua LIFhre fm ag e th am, w iadt hers e if.e oa d ani oite, .rvm e Wanle-












sa, d olt lag ed eivlhnos rm b a ta i et ntred. o finkte rainerk. (A a0n tem ploee of thenteyoor- b f "i
no nio oth Are AdeePorces and. the ide-faed Stadgd arinat warto rad san .\iner hs at-rm an hendgs h oer bone
DNaTiona palace ban o of pisou tre g mr is. ) .. af thr ued asee, huma n fo r i.bo o.
-iToed,". Mgstatedgwlat in the riddle cNi'e To C. -Haitin wt 6berinmdet'inmlive.. -i













Cn al i partiay complete e Whafer i bneroing contruchedary ho GEY otUD of p a an d s er
the night two men -acdonrpl[shed be32 'e wit thme oto oder12 ft G r.uesie tead Ms F ntdz i t e ise ha tgd
tau eeosthe. church the week j .,














fhe same S d tb e 2', .WIe ooNLY he r.at l yo ut hlrfiah h e aoe .nh aeter pe a 2 or3ear. i S ria r h s. ere .i .a a d hod.

hMao H operation G ives Nodae Lif To Haip Gl

















Cnto~than tab al d F ab nd welon AulaBo atit(a Fas a besisiud Sas N ow fro'en f ully C ure
to! s teal.ehots and i the ngre at er. chek a .h tr a nnio ne e h earth er at. os reS.Ted a esoy' pr
'h i ta n owe er ..o 'to eoue- Dre.. Gro. suggest to t "heash parents tat Canal warotep s v M a .



















ray surgery' ond tihe. Tplh~ne ev- Face' 'donatedt 'by o mai but honptly aftere perhaps 2 or 3 year
'ats c umro-tsis." '- a'- a h:aldisclosuge "h posesd te qphant flared fnt.

Cha t Fa bi nisno be n odn bu thrd -an i] ,a aer age bh at ,. .. poaduc red in fe. thea n
Thavsi r l fe Cnogsa longerdobe by red to hatas u p are s ofat her danta was b ot epnive and r





















the candongent l h Orhiahion u tat Cheat was ntuneoing no r mally rare andr tev ip thed of.S h ne.
tee heayundT e es e althouth ith special
hour ch'peratisrFon piay andtoa r mgentosa heart speciatost vey wel
h.wamingra,.e aknown on H ai.' a- Dr. GerardGrs;






















,mancay. Cha"a ,._ ,sts foowd~ .dn obo,,usa-nataes ptaeonts bothfer lty. tat






















an.a- their daughter d r not lved aer
human chi "y reet --ithe t dasme.s.srtef istrfock..by'























46ghter of Claude and Murrs'agoelle carried either -or n
)Laguerre) Fabius, residents of Port Radiography tests and Carigr- aa i nte hhose L L o ea-o hipn Santab, Mariaen t over 400 Teas.

.'.'.. ,oau Prince. During periods of sick- aC reans, all of which only confirmed'ea t eat contro(ers oy r t N o k. He t
ness the child was treated by Dr. tEstime..e original diagnosis. (Continued on page ) Is at the far left.),








"H AI T'I


SUN SUNDAY APR-L, 24th 19

SUN "' 'SUNDAY APRIL, 24th 1964..


REEFED


(Continued from page 1)
the agenf,t "but the rough seas run-
ning at the time and the force 7
wind (one point higher up the scale
would have made conditions storm-
y) made observation very difficult
and the Captain decided to turn
back to sea and wait in safety for
the pilot boat. It was as the turn


"TROLLA", the Royal Netherlands
palled on a Cap Haitien reef.
I


LOSS"


was being made that .the Trolla
struck'hard on the reef."
"Just as the ship struck the out-
er reef the polot boat could be
seen coming out from Cap Haitian
Bay but he turned back when he
saw the Trolla strike. After the
initial strike the wind and back-
wash pushed the ship round until


Steamship Co's freighter, firmly inm-


'Festival'

Banana bpsiae Down Cake
TOPPING -

GREASE SIDES OF PAN 4


Cream together
J'' 1 ..LIp brown sugar 4
One third cup'butter

SPREAD MIXTURE OVER BOTTOM OF PAN,


Place sliced bananas in this mixture. Dot with
maraschins cherries.

BATT ER' '


Cream together
4' / One third cup shortening 4
S. 1 aaild a quaTter ccup sugar ,


4 Add -
.2 beaten eggs


Sift together
S1 and a baf cup cake flour
4 A half teaspoon baking powder 4
I 3 quarters top soda 4
A half top saht '


Add ,alternately
1 cup mashed bamnas
A mhaiF cup.sour milk ,,.


Add
1 top vania


/ Pour into prepared pan. Bake at 385 degrees F
) for 50 minutes.



Turn out on cake rack to. cool.



'Before serving fill center with I cup sweetened
whipped creame mixed with a half cup mashed
banan .


^^^0* 0* *00 00 0* *000^


SHIP DECLARED "TOTAL


the forepart also was impalled.
"During the night ship came over
the top of the reef and despite the
sea anchor dropped to hold her,
drifted gradually back until she
struck on a second reef the reef
she is now stranded on."
First move when the Trolla ram-
med the reef was to lower a life
boat with 15 crew members to row
ashore and seek help. In describ-
ing this phase of the incident the
Royal Netherlands Co. agent stat-
ed, "We had two sick crew memb-
ers onboard. One had Malaria and
the '.other Rhuematic fever. They
were placed in the life boat to go
ashore together with the two ship's
stewardesses and 11 men to row
the boat, including myself.
"The row ashore took an hour or
so and it was very rough going
with the row boat- full of water
most' of the time, but there, were
no incidents and the water was
warm." The shore was reached but
the pilot boat officials stated that
a wait till morning would have to
be made as the weather was to
rough and nothing could be done
in the dark.

Heavy swells persistently prev-
ented the salvage work, being car-
ried out by Lloyds of London, from
attaining any success. The salvage
tug "Rescue" of the Merritt Chap-
man and Scott Corporation, New
York which arrived from Jamaica


U.S.- GRA
HAITIAN
The U.S. Govern


during the weekend following the ed to accord sc]
incident was impeded in its work Haitian cadets for
by the choppy seas. tico next July. The
"The backwash and constant tide rently attending th
change made it impossible for the emy at Freres,
divers to stand' and it was hope- their projected U.
less for them' to continue trying- in the principal. U
to carry out their work, said the centre will 'last
agent. "'Weather .conditions would months.
not be right for survey and' salv-
age work until next. September and so the ship must
by that time it will. be too lat7 a total loss."


NTS POR
CADETS
iment 'has decid-
holarships to 44
training at Quan-
e cadets are cur-
ie Military Acad-
Petionville, and
S. grant training
.S. Marine Corps
an expected two


be given up as


Y PARADE
(3)-End of the, parade and the op-
ening of the Industrial and' Artis-
ans Fair by the President in the
Place d'Italie. I


MAY DAN
(Continued from page 1)
the rural and' urban zones, mot-
or vehicles and floats decorated
by the Departments of Agricult-
ure and Work, and .Commerce &
Industry.
E-The President will decorate
a worker and patron with the Na-
tional Order ot Work 'and a grand
planter with the Order of Agri-
cultural Merit and transmit the
titles of "Bien Rural de Famille",
to several peasants.
F-FoUoving this will be the
reading of the list of persons de-
corated with L'Ordre .National du
Travail and the Ordre du Merite
Agricole with the beneficiaries of
the title "de Bien Rural de. Fa-
mille."
G-The, hoisting, of the Ndtional
Bicolors and executing. of the Na-
tional Anthem.
H-Hoisting of the flags of the
21* Latin American Republics and
the playing of the Pan American
Hymn.
I-Speech of (a) a representat-
ive of \the workers, (b) a repre-
sentative '.of :th'e employers and
(c) a message from His Excell-
ency the President of the Repub-
lic.


"WORKER'S LIFE.. ,
(Continued from pOge .),
Reynolds officials state' that the
cooperation in this trying to save
the young man's life has been out-
standing from the Sanitorimup
(where the -last pint of blood type
A Negative was obtained. for the
injured worker,) "to' t h e Airforce
Chief who opened an airfield at 4
am Saturday morning to p e r m it
Reynold's pilot Henri Wiener to 'fly
with the desperately needed' blood
to Miragoane.
* Cables were -despatched by- the
American Embassy and -U.S. Nav-
al Mission to Guantanamo Naval
base in Cula for blood and serum
and'pilot Wiener ahd Cdptain West
os the USMC flew'to take. delivery
of the urgently' required blood, yest-
erday morning.


SHELL WORKER
TO STUDY
*IN LONDON
Mr. Villefranche of SHELL left
Wednesday for London -by air toQ
attend a, course of instruction -in
London. Mr. Villefranche is the
fourth Haitian member of this
great International Company to at-
tendc a course in Europe. We wish
-him the best of luck and a fruitful
stay.


1. '


Sure! Daily!,Py DC-8 Intercontinental jet!*


Day and night flights?


Take your, choicW! First,
/' and Economy cl


las's too!


Fast? Save hours! 9 miles a minutes


S ,Relaxing?



Comfortable too? [


9

'p


And how! Noiseless... no vibrations!



Extra roomy chairs, fully reclinable!


Sounds good! h I.JFly KLMI'.



E. &' G. MARTLIN S.A. Rue des Miracles
AGENCE CITADELLE Rue Roeu
MAGIC ISLAND TOUBS Rue du Centre
HERAUX TOURS Exposition
SOUTHERLAND TOURS Exposition


* From New York to Amster-
dam v.v. Starting April.


r s. F
rTHI WOULD oil

KLM
oarn guzz


PAGE 2


A-A speech by the Minister of
Work.
B-A speech by .a member of
the Committee of Commerce and
Industry for the organization of
the National Fete of Agriculture
aid Work.


Non-stop jet flights on. KLM?


4 lb J6


1


I










." IF : 4 "-.
.I-SPENSE ;.- D T UAITS PEOPLE : .
April 29th comesupon the cal- e Ba rt National ditri of blind anda detail ablancli igidus centres and wofrkso lor iqe is. to: b ld at:
'endar as a Friday--it is also the Port-az-Priice. ic;" aIl-servig th aitian people. the blind and handicapped. *" -' .tfie township. '.t Sundayi'
"' '. ad "- 1. '_ .,
d y that the "Armee du Salut" One day a friend of the Guillau- .Leader of the Salvation group in ..- 1st there is.tto be,,.at:am,
the Salvation Army celebrates .its' mes stated that they were the' Sal- Haiti i 'S ior,:Captain acques Eg-. The programme set forth for the ening of a new. centre.in
-. 10th anniversary. From that date ovation Army, a. statement -.which, gir 'roin, 'Lausane.. fi.tze.aiia 10- th anniversary for. the members aw iandtom 'ark the r i.
to Tuesday May 3rd the Salvation prompted the missioners' to seek.married'and the fathertof tW litle of'the .Salvation Armyin Haiti is' and' at 7pm an ariiversary eet
Army will participate in a progr- affiliation with'.the Salvation -Army; girls. *Capta Egger has spent two as -folows; April 29th, the arrival ing, at St. Martin, Port-ance
am to mark 10 years of giving This they did and when *only one terms of service'in l diti of a total of CoJonel John S. Stannard, M.B. aon Monday May. 2nd .spe 0al r,-
S .of 9 years, to date: (wherhis .sec- 'Te tdral 'Commander for. ices ard to be .held' tr. oftcers
S. on d term finishes he will have been Central erica and' the .Caribb- only. The -anniversary ..,o din.
.i;, . "' here 10 's.'. '.. ean and MVrs Sta rd, (Colonel will culminate on. .'es.lay Ma?.3
.Captain Eger E aide .'frm .his ha previously visited' Huti c.on in- with a courtesy t.sit to th.e B. !tsh
duties whtch keep..'him mo ng spec'ion '' ours" i'i 'ecet years.) Aixmbassador. and the departue, ofl
rom one 'ed of. the Island to 'the Co :eil open air se*rv- Colonel and M rs. Jo t
April 30tl, 5pm, R Colone an Mrs.r John .S-......
.other consistently, also .performs -
Sd a w dental 'work-,' soc' al work
V. A, started in' 1952. Since the' almbul-
ant', dental clinic was formed Capt-
aid Egger and his workers have
S- :.ektratded an unbelievable total. of
a n 20,000 ,Haitian teeth which the Ds n- A
tist;Captain 'explained by stating,
That quite contrary to populaiI
c&nceptfion the Haitians have, in
many. iistances, very poor tee th." t
S. Many. afid diversified are the ex-
amples of help rendered in Haiti
Sby. the Salvation.. Army but the ex- '
lip! arriple .of" Pierre, a Soung man from
the Ari haie district, is typical. Ii
The young man at far right, Pierre, is- one of the maiy. rehabilitated Some dine ago Pierre was discov-
Haitians helped by the Salvation Army in Haiti which celebrates Its ere by theArmy lyingin pain in
a hut with a disjointed leg which -.:
* 10th anniversary on April 29th. Pierre, since the mending of his sever- he stated had been put into place p'".
ely fractured leg, has been working at the Laferonnay Centre for the again. A check by the Salvation .. "
blind run by the Salvation Army. Army member present however s', .,..l,.
,__ showed ,that the leg was far from ,L.. .
Sa beirg back in place' and she asked
spiritual and social welfare to Hai- year ater; a band of Salvationists Sister Joan of the St. Vincent's '
tj's people. arrived in Haiti they were greeted Handicapped School to take.a look O "O
The Army's first -contact with at the airport by ihe Gizillatimes atPierte '" ', ,. ,b,,
Haiti came in 1949 when the Na- and 515" Haitian people seeking en-
tional Headquarters in New York rollmnent in the Army. Sister Joan graciously did so with ,. ... ...".
received a cable from evangelist Today the Salvation Army numb" the result that the suffering youth .. '' '
and Mrs. Carrie GUillaume who ers in Haiti between six, and seven was placed in her clinic and later 'i-.U S P OLMS
for 8 hard years had conducted a hundred members; 9 corps centres,, sent to the Albert Schweitzer Hos- I :. *
"mud, wattle and tin" shack known 20. outposts and first aid centres, pital in t h e Artibonite Val II e y,.
as the mission "Christ for all" at .day-schools, a workshop for the where eaaminatidn showed that he '. .
was suffering Nom a double fract-
Pierre was operated on and then
returned to Sister Joan's clinic and .
PA R EX C ELLE N E later transferred .t the Salvationr
Army Rehabntation Centre "Cla]- 0, '
IN SERVICE, CUISINE AND re-Heureuse." ', THEY`HVE .PU.


ATMOSPHERE THEN
ACCEPT THE WARM
WELCOME AWAITIIN
YOU AT THE


Puisqui

DINE AT T-H


G



Eya

IE


Quisquey a
HAITIAN AND AMERICAN
CUISINE
ONLY A FEW MINUTES FROM


4'
4
4
4
4
4


1'
!
It


~Qw~oeooeoooooe


t You know '
It's a really fine
| Scotcb when it's
JOHNNIE
WALKER



j JOHNNIE WALKER
Born 20-Ps2 going strong


ow


PREETZMAN-AGGERHOLM,


'At his parents agreement Pierre
was taken to the blind centre run.
by the Army but his leg still rem-
ained unsealed and painful and
once again he was sent to the
Schweitzer Hospital for further
treatment where finally after hos-
pitalization and medical treatment
lie was pronounced well and return-
ed once more to the Blind centre
where he now works in the cent-
re's workshop. This is an example
of the .Army's work and the cooper-
ation between the various organiz-
ations working in Haiti for the bet-
terment of the Haitian population.
Since its inauguration in Haiti
the Salvation Army has worked with
will and to mark their worthy ef-
forts there are several centies
scattered around the country
where help is dispensed to the peop-
le and their children. Centres now
number nine and are sited at Port-
au-Prince, Fond des Negres and
Morisseau; Laferonnay, Arcahaie.
Gros Morne, Moulin and Mapou.
These centres serve as schools, rel-


* W gight c". ges, with customs probleit '.l ;\.lO 4
s op La Belle ,Ceole tias made it. os ,lfet.tb '
li quor pur.hated abroad, particularly In HAqti4t 00
to your, home, in most cases at prices cheaper thi
can bring it through, accompanied by,.all ypuri-t*
... .' rc" .' .- ''4 ; :'


-. r s wiat yon Smr : '
ON A CARTON OF FIVE BOTTLES .
SN.Y. Del. Our N. .*,,
Price* warehouse Home**
1. Bell's' Special Reserve Whisky. $32.20. $13.50 $16.50 A
2, hanky Bannister Finest .
Scotch Whisky 29.90 13.50 1B.50"!
3. J, & Rare Scotch Wi:isky 33,00 .13.50 16.50 !
4. Baltantine's.Scotch Whisky 32.35 13.50 S16.502.
5, Queen Anne Scotch Whisky 31.45 t3.50 -.16.50"
6. Gilbey's Spey Royal Whisky 31125 13 50 0
7. Black & White Scotch Whisky 3200 13.50. 16.50. .1
8. John Jameson *** Irish Whisky 29.90 13.50;'. 16.50:"]
.9. Canadian Club Whisky. 31.50 19,.'. !
0O. Beefeater Gin ., 28A5 t11.-0,'f'14,
11. Cherry Heering .; ', 4425 21.0 -2.
12 Drambue .. 46.00 -.
frjHarvey's Bristol Cream Shiny 3:1 1- 2lWt <2


r--^ /y^/w^y ^/^-1--

PORI-AU-7 11111. fHAITI W I.



F EXQUISITE OF SE TED
Designs iRm .Rush
AND SUPERB FAA AND FAMOUS
- Quality .-"sea SoodsA &&L Sisal.
GRAND RUEm. kLt e ac IeCfia in 11.c.S. PHONE : 6 4


41
10


4


U.n ---


Mo


._ ,0=


I-! I


DISTRIBUTOR




S-'( ~.


"HAIT1


SUN"


SUNDAY APRIL, 24th 1960


IN HAITI THIS WEEK
(Continued from page 14)
is a paradise for those who have reached the age of retirement and
is spending a relaxed holiday at the Oloffson.
Guests at the El Rancho this week are Certified Public Accountant
Alien N. Danziger, of New York, his wife Beatrice, son Sabin, 17, and
his 15 year old daughter Margot Ann.
George S. Sinski, a flight engineer of New York, is spending a holiday
in Haiti with his family: Dorothea, his wife, his two daughters, Cather-
ine 14, Diane 12, and his 2 sons. Jeffrey 9 and George Jr. 5. The Family
are staying here for 10 days and are guests at the Ibo Lele,
New York Attorney A. F. Racolin is visiting Haiti with his wife Dina
and daughter Barbara. They are guests'at the El Rancho.
Jacob Adler, a salesman from' New Jersey, and his wife Norma and
Manager Julius Adler and his wife Arlene of New York are current
guests at El Rancho.
Ann Margaret Watts and Wanda Louise Smith, two Canadian school
teachers, are visiting this country for the second time and last week
made the trip to Cap-Haitien and the Citadel. They are guests at the
Hotel Plaza.
(Continued on page 16})


ST. MICHEL On Monday April 18th, 9 days
DE UT L'ATTA YE after the affair of St. Michel, the
DE LATTALA bocor- Demeran and the third ac-
(Continued from page. 14) complice were arrested by the pol-
'the account of a "bocor" (witch ice of Gonaives. The "witch Doct-
doctor) named Demeran. Pierre or" denied all knowledge of the
under further questioning revealed attempted robbery and even made
that the "Maitre-tete" of this hoc- the following bonnee parole," "Col-
or was Ti Jean. onel, moin ce charlatan, mais si'm
PURPOSE OF ROBBERY te besoin fait you affaire. coni ca,
Transferred to Gonaives the pris- ce' pas vagabond ca 'taprend."
owner Pierre shed further light on ("Colonel," I am a charlatan but
the breaking and entering by tell- if I wanted to make an afair ike
ing the police, "I acted for Dem-
eran Delan (the bocor) together
with two others: one kept watch REEFED SHIP DECLA
outside the church while I and my
brother S'i mpreus entered the
church. (Continued from page 2) 1
"We had been instructed to steal Trolla was carrying .in her holds,
the holy hosts, holy water, and sev- (which are now 8 feet under wate
eral statues of saints together with from the radeck, 50erica tons of Coffrts, 20ee
the cross. It was Simpreus who from Central American ports, 200
climbed onto the altar and when tons of Mahogany, 26 tons of hon-
the tabernacle collapsed we fell ey, and 350 tons of pitch blend. The
with it." heavy seas smashed open the hatch
According to Pierre's confession of No. 3 hold and scattered much
the bocor Demeran Delan lived at of the lumber over the Cap Haitian
Dessalines and when asked "Who beach line and so to prevent water,
is this bocor Demeran Delan call- spoilage and at the request of Cap
ed Ti Jean?" Pierre replied. "He Haitian's Prefect, Louis Durand,
is a well known personality in Des- the Trolla's perishable foodstuffs
salines possessing an automobile were handed out to hospitals and
and a business with an air of pro- the needy in, the Cap Haitian area
sperity; it is true that in the dom- where floods recently wrought sev-
ain of his 'profession' holidays are ere damage.
unknown." The Norwegian ship's Captain.


that it would not be vagabonds
like those whom I would take.")
The Catholic daily La Phalange
stated in its article that it is hoped
that this affair, already well hand-
led by the police, will arrive at a
triumph for truth and justice.
"The bocor is a dangerous indi-
vidual to society and above all it
is this type that exploits the suff-
ering, masses of an underdevelop-
ed country incapable of defending
themselves.'


ARED


"TOTAL


LOSS"


Karl Stensland and six officers who
kept an vigil aboard the ship to
keep salvage rights in Company
hands departed for Norway yester-
day along with 19 crew members
who arrived in Port-au-Prince from
the North on Sunday morning ab-
oard the SS Cristobal.
Norway's Honorary Consul in
Port-au-Prince, Mr. Edward Mac-
Gurk motored to the North on Fri-
day for the "clear-up" of legal pap-
ers with Haitian Authorities and an
Insurance representative who arriv-
ed' in Hlaiti from Norway last week.
It, is hoped to' close the case on
the ill-fated Trolla, chartered by
the Royal Netherlands Steamship
Co.. at an early date.


AIR FANCE SERVES
OVER 225 CITIES IN 76 COUNTRIES
FOR THE BEST TIME YETAIR FRANCE JET


Caledonian Insurance Co.


FOUNDED IN


1805 AND INCORPORATED BY ACT OF
THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT


RO Y CHEIE7 AAD


AGENTS


SONS


FOR HAITI


15 AVE MARIE-JEANNE

CITE DUMARSAIS ESTIME
Phone 2603


'~1.


-- MgAmu,


uoteaij
ENTEkTAINM


Dance Wu

EVERY NIGHT WI
4 PIECE BAND FR


SSpecial!
TUESDAY 7:00 TO 8:80 P.M.

GET TOGETHER

THURSDAY 7:30 P.M. TO 1:30 A.M.
DANCING DINNER
THE ROMAN
4 7 PIECE BA
QOUR YEILOPHONIS'
ATTRACTIVE AND DELICIOi
SATURDAY 9,3Q P.M. ITO 3:30 A.M.
,4 MUS T!! I

Gala Nght
4 DA CING IN A RE.
THE GREATEST SI


"OUco0

[ENT PROGRAM..


ine

TH A LOCAL,


OM 7:00. TO.. 9:30


Spec


PUNCH BOWL


UNDER THE ST/
[IC ROOF-GARDE
ND STARRING
T MICHEL DEG
US BUFFET ANT


EAL EXCITING
FOW ON THE


A
L


une :




Dance:

EXOTIC
SP.M.





PARTY


ARS ON


ROTTES
PD SHOW





ATMOSPHERE .
ISLAND! -


.' U. - - ~'O'~ ~ *'~'* -~ -,


PAGE 4


M- 11


SAxt


1


-T-- A -- -1 1-


Is
e


e
Ll



t


. I








w UNDAY APRIL, 24th 1960


'i.siw^wws>i-?i,Nii!EiaiaeiiM


H HAITI S.UN
THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDER!CH
Gerant-Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
A MEMBER OF THE [NTER-AMERIAN PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1950


PERNICIOUS ROBBER OF ILATI'S FERTILITY

E~adh and every violent downpour of rain that has hi.t
Por't-au-JPrince this 'week h'as 'left in ilts wake irrevocable
: reminders and evidence of the country's greatest depredat-
or Erosi'on.


But .how many city dwellers as they carefully guide their
polished shoes round the thick d'elpo'si'ts df soil 'left in the
- city t.reets following 'heavy rain ponder 'as to where all
this "'annroyance" comes from in such magnificence?
Unfortunately the answer comes from a stark reality; all
that soil whidh consistently flows across the thoroughfares
or is washed out to 'be lost 'at sea is 'the stolen loot from t'he
Republic's moumitain farms 'fertile, rich top soil. P
There is an old. and popular song 'which rhyme's, "'Every i
-time it rains you know it's pennies from heaven." Every
time it rains in Haiti its dollars downn the drain Rain, the
pernicious 'robber, persists with each cloud burst to sweep
tons of valuable and in many cases irrepla'cealble soil away
from its mountain farming sites, 'a 'process which is getting
worse and worse as each year passes. t
As with all problems. large and small, something 'has to
be done. Each time the soil lying in the streets h'as to be u
cleared by the Public Works Department with 'barrow and t
shovel it (osts -a lot of money, time and labor. 'Could not e
this money and labor 'be more fruitifuily employed in a 'camp-
aign to r ep'lace that which has 'been disappearing with
frightening rapidity for years in 'Haiti, Trees? s
It is acknowledged 'that nothing stops erosion like plenty t
. of trees, something that this coumitry has very little of. It
is we ll within the bounds of feasibility to inaugurate a reaf-
foresbation 'program 'to bring out 'the ceasation of this want-
on soil waste.
A second 'theory h'as 'been advanced 'by a source who sug- .
gests 'that the projected road to Cayes, if following the
present route out of Port-au-Printce, winl b3 a constantly
recurring victim of slides, floods 'and 'the running off of
vilbal soil. This source &suggests the routing of the road
tihaough the ,lowest foothills; canals 'on the upper side df
the highway could 'then 'become contour canals to collect
'and dispose of excess water 'without losses of soil.
The 'problem 'lies not just in Port-au-Prince but country-
wide and the conservation of soil is one of our needs equi-
valent to that of education.


















PHILCO TROPIC 103
INTERNATIONAL G-BAND RADIO
Listen to the High-Fidelity brilliance of this Philco master model and
you'll think you're in the studio, so keen and clear is every programme.
But that's only one of this model's many fine features; others include:
Complete short wave and standard broadcast reception on 6 Bands.
Fascinating 'long-low' styling-fully 2ft. in width-with rich walnut
finished cabinet,
High-Fidelity sound from speaker network of duo-cone front speaker
and dynamic side speaker.
Separate bass and treble audio controls.


F2 -0-M


FIRESTONE INTERAMERICA Co.

Radio Pleasure
NOW ENJOY HI-FI


REPLY TO
"BEWILDERED"
An authoritive source has furn-
ished ug \\ith "information forming
a reply to publication by the "Sun"
of a letter signed "Bewildered"
and concerning prices obtained by
ODVA for their recent tomato


C


biggest gamble, a special situation bable average gross revenue at the
does exist now giving favorable farm of $500 per acre or better,
odds for' such winter produce from sold and the money in the bank
Haiti. within 6 months. Tomatoe yields .
"Other competition for Haiti in in California are much higher.
the winter vegetable line comes "Winter tomatoes as a calculated
from Mexico and Jamaica, but alth- gamble have tremendously better
ough Mexican labor is cheaper, the average odds than the one-armed
Artiborute has advantages of cheap-. bandits. The favorable odds will
er transportation to New York. The obviously increase with detailed in-
winter climate in the Artibonite is struction of personnel and experi-
more favorable for tomatoes than enced organization at all stages."
most parts of Jamaica.
"It is well known that tomatoes
come to maturity in 150 days as HOUSE WANTED
compared to Coffee and Cacao Wanted to rent by July fifteenth
which come to maturity in 4 to 5 for indefinite period unfurnished re-
years. Therefore although the day sidence three bedrooms, two baths,
to day market for winter vegetab- modern plumbing, modern Kitchen,


les is more risky, the year to
year gamble is much safer.
"Staked tomatoes in Florida show
employment of 626 man hours i80
man days) of labor per acre pert
crop; that is something that Haiti
could use. Gross sales in Florida
reach from 2,000 to 4,000 dollars
per acre.

"Mr. Winters pointed out that a
yield of 4 short tons, or 8,000 lbs
per acre is within reason ,or a pro-


hot water throughout, garden with
shade trees. Place Boyer is pre-
ferred artist wife could use studio
In conjunction.
Reply: HAITI SUN.


HOUSE FOR RENT
Lovely three bedroom two bath.
room house located on the Laboule
road five minutes from Petionville
for rent. For Information call
3922 or 3332 br call at Haiti San.


crops. The source of the following
eply was given full information
by USOM representatives of the
Development Loan Fund of Wash-
ington in Haiti an organization res-
pons:ble for disbursements of the
DLF's loan to ODVA.)
"USOM also administers the
Technical Cooperation or Point IV
program which has been paying
for most of the technical studies
leading to the development of an
industry to produce winter tomat-
oes, cucumbers, peppers and other
produce for northern markets.
"Mr. Lee Winters, in charge of
the Point IV program, readily
made available the following det-
ailed data: Prices at the New
York market where garden prod-
ice is auctioned off varied from
$3.50 to $11.50 for a 60th crate of
tomatoes in other words about
6-19 cents per pound. Point TV fig-
ires show the cost of getting the
tomatoes from the packing shed to
he market in New York, including
shipping containers, land and ocean
transport, U.S. Customs charges,
brokerage and all, comes to a tot-
al of 9 cents per. pound.
"The tomatoes which hit the auc-
tion market at an unfavorable' time
at 6 cents per pound obviously lost
money, but. the tomatoes which
sold for 19 cents cleaned up. The
first year's -shipments were consid-
ered as an exploratory operation
but the average came out on the
prohtable side, excluding develop-
nent expenses borne by Point IV.
**'The strongest competition in
past years came from Florida tom-
atoes, but the Miami Herald of
Tuesday April 12th stated' that
5,000 acres of winter tomatoes op-
erated by B & L Farms in South-
ern Florida have just gone out of
business.
"Reason given for this was a ser-
ies of years of damaging weather;
plus floods, freezes, winds, and
damp weather causing tomato
blight. The Artibonite Valley does
iot have freezes and in the winter
tomatoe season there is a minim-
uin of liability from floods or hur-
ricanes."
The "riter continues that, "Alth
ough all agriculture is a gamble
and winter vegetables perhaps the

tr** ^ ^^^iM^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^*^ ^ ^ ^


'HAITI SUN"


AT


FiSH ER'S

HAITI'S LARGEST FREE PORT PRICE

SHOPS AND MAHOGANY FACTORY

1) GALLERIES FISHER ACROSS FROM NEW U.S. EMBASSY

2) ART & CURIO SHOP FISHERS ACROSS FROM CUSTOMS HOUSE


SAVE UP TO 60 Per Cent ON IMPORTS
AND BUY HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS
STRAIGHT FROM THE FACTORY
ON THE RUE DU QUAI
(AM. .XP. AND DNDERS CLV ACOU aWT)


A PAGE 5


..W.n -- m 2 --l ..1 ...... - r" r- "- i ". .


Wi-


WHIT A


-.



BESSAMATIC
BRpUn

,v C A CAMERA S AT fill 'I IRT I'llirl.'.





RUE. BONN E FO
OSRAI fPhone. 2390
Rm ono. S.I RN AIR-CONDITIONED




IN HAITI SHOP










"HAITI


SUN"


SUNDAY APRIL, 24th 1960


HAITIAN
(Continued from page 1)
er to Haiti's shores o ily to be ripp-
ed aprt on the Cap Haitien reefs.
Sea Diver approached the task
fully equipped with .100,000 worth
of underwater detection gear in-


eluding electronic scanners capab-
le of detecting metals hidden ben-
eath the surface. In addition the
Sea Diver carried 2 small glass
bottomed boats and it was from
these two tiny craft, the Reef Div-


SANTA MARIA'S ANCHOR GOES TO U.S
GOVERNMENT HANDS OVER RELIC TO SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTE


er and Wee Diver, that Link and
his assistants searched for long
days along the floor of the compar-
itively shallow depths.

-Rough seas during that April
month made the task treacherous
and several injuries were sustain-
ed by the Sea Diver's crew. Sea
sickness played its part too and
disappointments c a m e without
pause as time after time what ap-
peared to be anchors turned out,
upon bringing them to the surface.
to be mere metal fragmentations
or parts of side wheels etc. Anch-
ors were found however, 9 of them
altogether and each one from vary-
ing eras of mariners but until April
15th. 1955 the Santa Maria kept
her anchors hidden.

Then on that day came success.
An almost indistinguishable shape
encrusted with hundreds of years
of coral encrustations was bought
to the surface and the 2nd anchor
since the ship went down was re-
covered.

Naturally Edwin Link and his
crew were elated but their joy was
short lived for no sooner had the
anchor been bought ashore and ex-
amined than Professor Luc Dor-
sainmille, head of Haiti's' National
Museum which contains the first
Santa Maria anchor discovered in
the mudflats of Limonade in the
mid 19th century, disclaimed the
find and said it could be anything
but an anchor from Columbus' ship.
The professor based his publicly
made opinions on the visible fac
that Link's anchor was some three
feet shorter than the Columbus
anchor in the Haitian Museum
(this anchor stood nine feet tall)
and further the discovered find
lacked a ring which was intact in
the original and pertained to anch-


WOUVEAU ET
DIFFERENT




9N5M CHAUSRE


S-7o am-atogri de la band aw
ulement donne une traction et
'cur"it supplementaires. Un ingn
'dispositif de silence r6duft les dif6
rents bruits d6sagr6ables do pnb
landis que la construction 16gere ,d
Super-Cushion Sans Chambre a
'1t d'absorber les cahots de t1
,e. Vous aure; moins de pness .
atf.1.. moins de de lais parce queo
ion Grip-Se~I exclusivew
Goodyear 6limine pratiqumeO e s a
on Abaelle.





* ~ OaDm mulC. Sm m


ors of that period. So claim and with coral than the original anchor
counter claim flew until in June had been on its discovery. Where-
of 1955 a visit was made to Haiti as the first anchor had been found
by an acknowledged authority on in mud flats where rust'etc. was


Sea Diver and her owner Edwin A. Link (Inset)


anchors, Professor Mendel Peters-
on, a specialist on the history of
anchors and Head of the Depart-
ment of Art and Industry at the
National Museum of Washington.
After a long and careful exam-
ination Professor Peterson stated
that he was convinced that Link's
discovered anchor was indeed a
member of the anchors carried by
the Santa Maria. In explaining the
difference in length between Link's
anchor and that of Haiti's Museum.
anchor the professor stated that
the latest anchor find had been
broken and three feet of its length
snapped off the top. This missing
section also explained the lack of
a ring he added.

Further weight of evidence was
given by the fact that this second
anchor was far' mor e encrusted


practically negligeable the second
find was that badly corroded that
only a thin strip of metal remain.
ed of the original anchor inside
the oxidised metal. This bore prove
of the age off the anchor, said the
Professor just at the shape of the
made opinions on the visible act
anchor proclaimed it to be genu-
ine.
So Edwin A. Link's find was ac-
cepted as genuine and he left Haiti
professor, just as the shape of the
to continue the tracing of Columb-
us' trail throu g h the Americas,
while the newly found anchor lay
in state at Cap Haitien.
In February of this year Presid-
ent Dr. Francois Duvalier gave his
permission for handing over the
anchor to the Smithsonian Instit-
ute in Washington where it will
join other great exhibits of world


history. On behalf of the Haitian
Government Prefect Louis Durand
handed over the anchor during the
ceremony on Thursday to Albert
C. Slaughter (the Director of Pote
Cole who acted on behalf of the
U.S. Embassy in accepting-the an-
chor. He in turn handed to Ed-
win A. Link, the discoverer of the
anchor, the historical relic for
shipment on the Sea Diver to San
Juan where it will be placed on
a jet and" delivered to the Wash-
ington Institute.
The ceremony was held at a site
not far from where the first Christ-
mas in the New World was celeb-
rated in a house constructed from
timbers of the wrecked flagship,
and many members of the Cap Hai-
tien community attended including
Colonel 'Rene Florville the Military
Commander of the North.


-.. .




JOSEPH NADAL & CO.
Distributor


Sensational


THE AMERICAN VEHICLE, IDEAL FOR HAITI
It is the "LARK" manufactured by STUDEBAKER-PACKARD Corporation.
Neither large nor small or rather, large and small at once
Offering all the advantages of large cars, 6 to 7 passengers,
Stability, Comfort, Power and all the advantages of the small car
Low fuel consumption (30 to 32 miles on a gallon.
Easy to drive, length reduced
Reduced Prices, in spite of its great luxury
Ideal for Haiti


THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE AGENCY,
Place Geffrard, Phone: 3216 or 3929


S. A.


GARAGE RUE DES CESARS PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
Ask also for a demonstration of the Pick-Up and Trucks
Their saving of fuel, solidity, power and capacity are
already universally known.


PAGE 6


47








SUNDAY AP




Doe


FRIL, 24th 1960


four


Shopping

in Haiti

It is getting so that people are
taking vacations as much to
shop as to play golf, lounge in
the sun or just relax. And, no
wonder when you consider the
savings to be had through Free
Port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they can
b.uy the same gifts, in free-port
shops, at savings up to 60% of
U. S. prices. So, for the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
wonderful vacation in Haiti.
Perhaps the most famous free-
port shop in the world is La
Belle Creole. located in the
heart of fascinating Port-au-
Prince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable- wonderland
full of the world's most de-
sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
ches, Cashmeres, Handmade
bags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
meras, Liquours and a seem-
ingly endless array of native
handicraft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
sider that one can buy the
world's most famous Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
guet-at discounts of 50% of
the U. S. advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
Belle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be well worth your time to
consider a trip to HAiti.

Al Noustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhaps another reason for
the surge in popularity of
free-port shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
licy of cooperating with tra-
vel agents in their various
promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tle of free champagne to any
visitor to Haiti who happens
to be celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niversary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts to make
the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
.even greater discounts on fa-
mous brand merchandise.
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
sands of tourists this year will
come home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
when they went away.


" H AT TT


0 ,

Iu


b -3 UL'N I'f.I 7


S T NT p


I Al .


--- LeCeaeieaon



-A ---- ..... ........


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER
P. 0. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI





AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS


MINTON, WEDGWOOD.
ROYAL CROWN DARBY.,
ROYAL COPENHAGEN,
ROYAL WORCESTER,
ROYAL DOULTON,
ROSENTHALE, SPODE,
AYNSLEE, COALPORT,
GUSTAUBERG.



GEORGE JENSEN,
HANS HANSEN, GERO,
DRAGSTER, GENSE.



The Finest of FRANCE.
ITALY. AUSTRIA,


LALIQUE, BACCARRAT;
ORREFORS,
WEBB & CORBETT,
VAL SOLAMBERT,
STUART, LEERMAN.


HAI


VooDoo Inspired
JEWELRY




Native-Insunred
SPORT SHIRTS


OMEGA, PATEK PHILIPPE,
JUVENIA TISSOT, BOREL,.
AUDEMAR PIGUET,
JAEGER LE COULTRE,
ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO,
ATLANTA, STUDIO,
VULCAIN.


KISLAV,
ENGLISH
ITALIAN


DOESKIN,
ANTELOPE.


PRINGLE, BALLANTYNE, |
BERN HARD ALTMAN.
LUISA SPAGNOI.




DANISH SILVER,
GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY
and BRAZILAN GEMS.


TIAN HANDICRAFTS


SSCULPTURES


Factory Outlet
MAHOGANY
- The Best.


GUERLAIN, LANVIN,
CARON, CHANEL,
RAPHAEL, PATOU,
BALMAIN, WORTH,
REVILLON, VIGNY,
CARVEN, LE GALLONN.
FABERGE OF PARIS,
JEAN D'ALBERT,
JACQUES GRIFFE
FATH, .PIGUET.
.CORDAY,

MINOX,. CANNON



ROYAL COPENHAGEN.
ROYAL DOULTON,
HUMMEL.



HARVEY'S BRISTOL
CREAM, All FRENCH.
DANISH and
SPANISH LIQUIEURBS





RAFFIA BAGS
& SHOES




HAITIAN MUSIC
- Collector's Itenms


Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS

World Famous RUGS & DRAPERY
Haitian RUM BARBANCOURT


9+


Have us send gifts to your friends in the U. S. A.
without affecting your quota.- See us for more information.


I


- "'- . .- . . ,


PAGE 7


0


lk Al








"HAITI


SUN SUNDAY APRIL, 24th 1960


Haitian
(Continued from page 1)
children. When she tired however
she would squat on her haunches
- a position which signified for
the specialists a form of heart
trouble.
Claude Fabius decided to send
Chantal to the States in the comp-
any of her mother who was travel-
ling to New York to visit her par-
ents there, Mr and Mrs Laguerre.
Immediately after her arrival in
New York Mrs. Fabius contacted
a heart specialist who after an ex-
amination confirmed the diagnosis
of Dr. Gerard Gros and suggested
bringing Chantal back for another
visit to him in six months time;
fortunately the U.S. immigration
authorities granted visa extensions
of sufficient duration to allow Mrs
Fabius to contact the New York
Doctor again.
While in New York Mrs Fabius
was visited one afternoon by Haiti-
an Dr. Roger Pinchinat, a very
close friend of hers and a specialist
In Cardiology. She told him of the
little girl's heart trouble and im-
mediately becoming interested in
the case Pinchinat decided to pre-
sent the child to his eminent teach-
er, Dr. A. Kahn. Before being able
to do this however Di Pinchinat
had to complete a lengthy inside
tour of the U.S.A. for compliment-
ary studies.
Eight months elapsed during
which a number of examining Doc-
tors had not reached agreement on


Chantal's case and by this time
Mrs Fabius was feeling discourag-
ed and had decided to return to
Haiti with her child. Providence
stepped in at this point and with
only four days wanting to Mrs. Fa-
bius' departure for home Dr. Pin-
chinat came back from his tour and
made his first visit, a visit to see
how Chantal was.
Mrs. Fabius explained that npth-
ing had improved since the previ-
ous date of the Haitian doctor's
visit and that she was all but ready
to leave for Haiti, but, the doctor
told her that Dr. Kahn was in New
'York at that very time and that he
would try and get an appointment
for Chantal immediately.

Early next morning Dr. Roger
Pinchinat advised Mrs. Fabius that
Dr. Kahn had agreed to see the
child and within the next few hours
he did so. This examination was
the start of yet another series of
exhaustive tests for the little four-
year-old and this gruelling series
included some 10 Cardiograms tak-
en at the Jewish Hospital at Pros-
pect Place, Brooklyn, New York.
One of these tests ,and the most
important, necessitated the introd-
uction of a delicate electronic ins-
trument through a vein in the fore-
arm to the heart to localize the
disease. After this test Dr. Kahn
was absolutely sure that surgery
was necessary and indeed imper-
ative within a month.


URGENT COMMUNICATIONS
NEEDED
This rapidly approaching date for
the operation meant that Mrs. Fa-
bius needed to be in constant con-
tact with her husband at varying
hours day and night. By normal
communication this would have
meant enormous expenses but fort-
unately Dr. Roger Pinchinat one
evening happened to meet with a
relative of his, Raymond W. Scott.
a ham radio operator with the code
signal HH2RS. Dr. Pinchinat ex-
plained the situation to Scott and
he immediately promised to help
by means of amateur radio.
Next morning, the day signalling
the beginning of Haiti's Mardi gras,
HH2RS contacted 2 other ham op-
erators, both of them in Haiti -I
W2AWD (Janine Smith) and W2A-
KD (Ludwig Leaf) to w h o m-he
explained the situation and both op-
erators immediately placed them-
selves at his disposal. Two days
after the arranging of the amateur
radio operators who had expressed
their willingness to help, Mrs. Fa-
bius was able to talk to her hus-
band Claude by phone patch com-
munication. He expressed great
surprise on learning that the oper-
ation was to be performed at the
specified date and was perturbed
when his wife told him that some
7 and a half litres of blood were
required for the operation, an am-
ount of blood that would cost a
lot of money. Twelve Haitian peop-


le living in New York had contact-
ed Mrs. Fabius and offered donat-
ions of blood but unfortunately the
quantity they were able to give was
insufficient and more had to be
found.
FREE BLOOD


Chantal Fa
the operate
minutes th
to Haiti v
for words
had been
heart surge


GRATIS SURGERY a pattern
Haiti's Red Cross, an association described
to which Mrs Fabius is an active January 2i
member, interceeded with the Ame- performed
rican Red Cross and the missing of this typ
17 quarts of blood were supplied. Jewish Ho!
Then at this stage came further On the S
heartening news. Dr. A. Kahn stat- thy Ameri
ed that the operation he was to hospital lei
perform on Chantal would not be operation a
charged for by him, the 3 nurses, her to corn
or the other theatre assistants to facilitat
a truly wonderful gesture. recovery.
Only problem now facing the Fa- On Sund
bius, was the outcome of the oper- day after t
action the nagging worry that it lapsed wit
might not be a success, but both were held
parents were confident in Dr. Kahn But Chanta
and he assured them that the op- ly a short
eration would indeed be a full suc- ion was
cess. The day before the operation hospital ro
HH2RS contacted 7 more New York the hospiti
ham radio operators who readied is now per
themselves to stand by to signal Claude. F
the hospital's result of the operat- eternal gr<
ion to the anxiously awaiting par- Dr. Kahn,
ents in Port au Prince. hospital in
On Friday morning April 1st science, al
word came through Port-au-Prince uted to si
that Chantal was in the operating Fabius.
theatre, where she had been since 7
am., and that the operation had
commenced. So full of emotion
was Mrs. Fabius that she could
not speak to the operator who sig-
nalled the news.
Seven-and-a-balf hours later little


Child Saved...


VOIUlI S-iAY 1 Off{HAlliceiI








AMERICAN EXPRESS AND DINERS CLUB CREDIT CARD HONORED -




FRE E: Human Min|

SPerT Day (24 hss)
GPlus 4 per Mile


Road Maps Ml OPEL


PICK-UP AND .
1'Volkswagen Kabriolet

INFORMATION

UIEEIKLY RTE w 00 AVAILABLE AT ALL
DELIVERY FROM HOTELS .e ee AVAILABLE AT ALL
$35,.- ,.- l-k v. ..

Phn1 8 per. Mile ^LEADING HOTELS


Air Ports A XLL RRTES INCLUDE

P.i- s RS.OIL.INSURRNCE

FOR RESERVATIONS, HOAD MAPS AND SUGGESTED ITINERARIE8, WRITE OR CABLE

AVIS CAR R 1v7ALS

P.O. Bex 602
PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI.
^^^.^*^^..^^^^**^^.v^v^^v^-,-,^ ^^^^^r^^<^<^^^Hil

'S .?S S --'4'*' N '. 4. 4 4'NC j j -* - - -4v-r


PAGE.8


abius was wheeled from
Ming theatre and within
e hams from New York
were buzzing the longed
that Chantal's operation
a complete success. (The
gery performed followed
exactly the same as that
in Match Magazine of
5th 1958.) The operation
on Chantal was the first
e to be conducted at the
spital.
aturday morning a weal-
can woman visiting the
earned of Chantal Fabius'
and spontaneously invited
'alesce outside New York
e a rapid and pleasant

lay evening, the second
he operation, Chantal re-
h pneumonia and fears
for the little girl's safety.
al pulled through and on-
8 days after the operat-
walkink around in her
lom. Chantal Fabius lell
al on Good Friday and
rfectly alright.
Fabius has expressed his
latitude to Dr. Pinchinat,
the staff of the Jewish
New York and medical
I of whom have contrib-
ave the life of Chantal


k








.N.AL, t 1960 iTQ T -i- fL-i. -


PERISONAulN i Ou THE WEEK


Languichatte

Titled "King of Laughs," trade marked by ludicrous three-
quarter length trousers, a Radio and T.V. star and Author
and Newspaper Publisher all tie up into one tall Haitian
personality Theodore Beaubrun, better known in Haiti
as Languichatte.


7





Theodor Beu,, '. '
.''









4. ,







Theodore Beaubrun


Or perhaps he is better known
by the other alias that lus audienc-
es have festooned him with; Haiti's
Fernandel alias Bob Hope, alias
Konig des Lachens. No matter
which appellation is used they all
pay tribute to the comedian who
since his first performance in 19-10
has induced lus bel espnt to thous-
ands of Haitians and audiences ab-
road.


Picture a tall well built efferves-
cent man in his 30s impeccably
artied in dark suit with bell
bottomed trousers mid-way up his
shins, a more often than not crum-
pled hat clutched in a never still
hand. and an unceasing flow of
humorous repartee and you have
Languichatte.
Languichatte, to use the most
common of his alias, was born in


Now Television


Port au Prince in 1920, the son of
an engineer father and dressmaker
mo t h e r. Languichatte, together
with his 3 sisters and brother, spent
his youth living in Avenue Oswald
Durand, close to the football stad-
ium and received his education first
from the Petit Seminaire and then
the Lycee Petion.
MlISNOMER LED TO NAME
In the early days of his acting
career Theodore Beaubrun wrote a
sketch and was looking for a com-
ic name to take for himself, fin-
ally deciding on the name Alcius.
While toying with pencil and paper
he was disturbed by a young wom-
an calling at the house to ask his
mother for some leaves with which
to make a form of tea said to be
suitable as a sure means of ridding
one of a cold.
These leaves were known as Lan-
guechatte leaves because they res-
embled the tongue of a cat and
busy with his pencil and paper
Beaubrun accidental wrote down
Languechatte and on the point of
erasing it took a second look and
found the name appealing.
'It was no good like that though,"
he explained. "as the word's ex-
planation %was not to good so I
simply inserted an i." Thus the
first of Beaubrun's many alias
was inaugurated. Radio Haiti feat-
ured a broadcast in 1940 of Lan-
guichatte in a comic sketch with
a partner George Karacha. a Syrn-
an now living in Venezuela and
from that initial performance the
Haitian comedian rapidly endearr-
ed himself to his audiences with
his rich creole punctuated with com-
ic disperstions of creolized english.
Writing his own sketches and to


Sta.


date 35 theatrical dramas Langui- Francois Di
chatte has never altered his stage brun's grou
style of dress, neat but never gaudy a public uti
or pretentious and in giving an ex- Now at t
planation for the elevated trousers "the Moliei
comments, "Well a man always chatte is ke
likes to show off good socks so I ion. Every
make sure that my socks are on pm. he app(
permanent display." nel 5 -. I
Comic and dramatics are not Fritz Mevs
Languichattes only stand points. Factory).
For a period of 2 and a half years these shows
(1947-50) he toured the U.S. and milcar, and
Canada with an American folklore He also ha
group in which he danced the typ- "Beaubruno'
ical dances of Haiti. Also he makes ion where s
a trip each year to the States to edian himself
perform in festivals, day from 6
Languichatte, who states that he for these 1
is the only Haitian who lives by the usually one
Theatre in Haiti, has travelled to ical comedic
many foreign shores to display his The smile 'w
talent including a trip to a theatre ed that all
congress in Greece in 1957 (visit-
ing also on that tour Rome and
Pans.) he has also been featured
on the front page of German news- FOR RENT
papers Large new
The first appearance by Langui- (altitude 370
chatte in Port-au-Prince's Rex The- on 3_ acres o
atre was in 1952 and on that first Living roo
occasion all tickets sold out the bedrooms, nm
first morning of their sale. Since bathroom, se
then he has appeared in this same garage, fire
theatre many times, each time to ed porch, he
larte audiences. ervoir 30,000
DECORATED 3 TIMES Address: P.I
In 1953 the erstwhile comedian Port-au-Prin
received a decoration for work, The
Order of Travail with rank of Che-
valier and a further Order of Tra- SELL
vail in '58 with Officer's rank. Then Old Ameri
to add to his decorations came the In Haiti At
Honor and Merit award with rank Box 151
of Officer conferred upon him in Rue Delmas
1959 Only last month President Perion-Ville


r
iuvalier recognized Beau-
p by special decree as
lity.
the top of the theatre,
re," of Haiti, Langui-
*pt busy by his profess-
Saturday night at 8:15
ears in a show on Chan-
Tele-Haiti sponsored by
(The National Shoe
Starring with him in
are Mrs. Magloire A-
Luce Amaris Savain.
ias his own little theatre
' in the Palmiste sect-
hows starring the corn-
lf are given every Sun-
:30pm to 8pm. Charge
theatricals, which are
of Languichattes typ-
es, is 20 and 40 cents.
reathed comedian stat-
classes attend these
(Continued on page 10)



house at FERMATHE
0 ft.) partly furnished,
of land;
m with dining area, 4
laidsroom, pantry, hall,
servants quarters, 2 car
plaee, open and cover-
it and cold water, res-
gall.
O. Box 605,
ce. Phone 3738.


YOUR COINS
lean & Haitian Vni1s
U.S.A. Prices

S28


SUNDAY APRIL, 24th 1960


"HATTT ITN"


rh *MMw flb









"HAIT1 SUN"


1li


SUNDAY APRIL, 24th 1960


SThis is TITLE VII and CHAPTERS 1 & 2 of the Constitution of the
Republic of Haiti as translated from "Le Moniteur", Port-au-Prince,
Haiti December 22, 1957. The "Sun" will publish a Title per week
of the Constitution as it appears in the original.

CONSTITUTION OF THE REPUBLIC OF HAITI 1957
TITLE V11
PUBLIC FINANCES
CHAPTER I
State Revenue and the Budget
Article 138.-The public revenues or finances of the State are obtained
from taxes and other charges, and the agricultural, industrial, and com-
mercial resources deriving from enterprises of the State and from its
credit institutions.
Article 139.-State and communal taxes may be established only by
a law.
Laws instituting taxes shall be in force for only one year.
Article 140.-Direct taxation is based on the principle of graduation
and is calculated according to wealth, %ages, and income.
A tax (impot) is a State levy proportional to the wealth of the
taxpayer, whereas a charge (taxe) represents a flat rate on the price
of a service rendered.
Article 141.-The monetary unit of Haiti is the gourde.
The law shall fix the fineness and weight of the gourde and of any
small coins that the State has the power to issue as legal tender
throughout the territory of the Republic.
The National Bank of the Republic of Haiti, the charter of which is,
established by law, shall be vested with the exclusive privilege of issu-
ng gourde notes.
No currency may be issued except by virtue of a law determining
Its use and fixing the amount.
In no case may the amount be exceeded.
The State must orient the monetary policy in order to create and
maintain the most favorable conditions for the orderly development of
the national economy.
Article 142.-No tax privileges may be granted. No exemption from
or increase or reduction in taxes may be granted except by law.
Article 143.-No pension, bonus, subsidy, or allowance chargeable to
the Public Treasury may be granted except under a law proposed by
the Executive Power.
Article 144.-Holding a plurality of salaried State positions is strictly
forbidden except in secondary, higher, and vocational educational ins-
titutions or in the case of professorships in a higher educational instit-
ution or more than one position as technician in the same field.
Article 145.-The budget of each ministerial department shall be di\id-
ed into items and sections and must be voted on item by item.
Transfers of funds are strictly forbidden.
No sum allocated to one item may be credited to another item and
used for other expenditures except by a law.
The Secretary of State for Finance must, on his personal responsibil-
ity, pay every month to each nunisterial department only one-twelrth
of the amount provided for in its budget, except by decision of the
Council of Secretaries of State in special cases.
The general accounts of receipts and expenditures of the Republic
shall be kept by the Secretary of State for Finance according to an
accounting method established by law.
The administrative year shall begin on the first of October and end
on the thirtieth of September of the following year.
CHAPTER II
Agencies for the Administration of the State Revenue
and the Control of Public Expenditures
Article 146.-An autonomous agency known as the "Audit Office,"
charged with the administrative and jurisdictional control of all State
expenditures and revenue, shall be set up. This agency shall be cons-
ulted on all questions relating to public finance legislation and on all
draft contracts, agreements, and conventions of a commercial or fin-
ancial nature to which the State is a party.
Its organization and functioning shall be determined by law.
Article 147.-With a view to exercising strict and permanent control
over public expenditures, a fifteen-member "Parliamentary General Ac-
counts Commission," charged with reporting on the administration of
the Secretaries of State in order to enable the legislative body to give


PAGE


Harman describes the various
types of folk music he has record-
ed in his travels around he Carib-
bean, how it is found in rare plac-
es and under unique circumstance
in such places as Puerto Rico, (in
the cities of San Juan and Maya-
guezi Jamaica and Trinidad.
The Caribbean "tape" hunter
(Harman makes a practice of re-
cording music of the Caribbean on
a tape recorder) pays homage to
the "driving intensity and savage
complexity" of the Trimdadian
drummers whom he calls "incred-


hole in the end and tapped simult-
aneously with a stick for addition-
al rhythm. Since each tube prod-
uces only one note, from deep bass
to mid-range, there is not much
melody, but the rhythm is fantast-
ic.
"It starts with a basic repeated
note by one blower, which is then
elaborated by syncopated puffs
from the other until the contrabass
enters and the sound is like an in-
toxicated hurdygurdy. We record-
ed -it, but few people outside of
Haiti find it commercial enough
to put on records."


or refuse discharge, shall be elected by secret ballot.
Three certified accountants at most and some clerks to assist in the
auditing may be added to the Commission.
Article 148.-Every year the legislative body shall pass upon:
1) The statement of receipts and expenditures for the preceding
year or years;
2) The general budget of the State containing the estimate and
the portion of the funds allocated to each ministerial depart-
ment for the year.
However, no proposal or amendment may be introduced concerning
the budget without a corresponding provision of ways and means.
No change may be made either to increase or to reduce the salaries
of public officials except by amending the pertinent laws.
Article 149.-The general accounts and budgets provided for in the
preceding article, accompanied by the report of the Audit Office, must
be submitted to the legislative body by the Secretary of State for Fin-
ance not later than fifteen days from the opening of the legislative
session.
The same shall apply to the annual balance sheet and transactions
of the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti, and to all other accounts
of the Haitian State.


HOTEL


M.ONTANA
PETION.VILLE


WEEKLY ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM:
TUESDAY: 7:30pm. to Midnight Creole Buffet under
the Stars on the Terrace with excellent Dance Band.
At 9:30 pm.-'Meringue Lessons by Lavinia Williams.
WEDNESDAY: 7 pm. to 8:00 pm. Complimentary get-
together Punch-Bowl Party.
FRIDAY: 7:30pm.to lam.-Gala Dinner-Dance. in Cocktail
Lounge. Show at 10:30 pm. No cover-charge.
EVERY NIGHT: 7:00 to 9:00 Cockltail Hour with native
Combo.


What Folk Music Hunters Found
In haiti
"The hunt for folk music is pretty ible" and then moves on to the
much the same in the Southern music of Haiti with the following
United States of America, rural paragraphes:
France or in my own territory, the "The drumming in Haiti, on the
Caribbean Islands;" states Carter other hand, is just as sophisticated
Harman, writing for the New York but its expression is benign, and
Times in an article published by gentle, and extremely subtle -
the Times on Sunday, April 17th. most voodoo rites today are no
"The music is buried, and in ord- more savage than a church ritual.
er to ferret it out the hunter must On a music-gathering expedition
do some digging. But, where much there, I heard about a strange com-
of the world's folk music must be bo called "vaccine." It is appar-
sought from the aged and the sec- ently of recent invention but it
luded, before it is either forgotten could have come from the African
or buried in the avalanche of civi- jungles.
lization, many of the Caribbean "It consists of six men, each with
types are being created faster than a different size bamboo tube which
they can be collected." is blown like a trumpet through a


.'..- :- .. .., :,y= .-: a.


Slul A&----


LANGUICHATTE...
(Continued from page 9)
shows and the theatre is generally
packed.
Now a resident of Impasse Beau-
boeuf, Languichatte has more than
his theatre interests to keep him
busy. Since 1944 he has been pub-
lishing his little weekly newspaper
"Razoir" which he fills with hum-
orous literature and political
sketches. Added to this Theodore
Beaubrun is also engaged in a ra-
dio weekly internal propaganda
program for the Tourist Bureau
which impresses the importance of
tourism to the people of Haiti.
His plans for the future? Lan-
guichatte would like to be in the
movies and hopes to travel abroad.
to the U.S. and Paris to learn the
technics of movie directing. His
ultimate aim is for Haiti to have
its own little movie industry.
Meanwhile the popular Haitian
comedian drives his busy way ar-
onud the streets of the capital in a
Hillman car which with the passing
of each day gets a little more run
down through giving too many fri-
ends, of whom he has ample, rides
and distributes his bubbling humor
wherever he goes.


IAPA
SCHOLARSHIPS
INCREASED

The Inter American Press Assoc-
iation Scholarship Fund, Inc., has
announced establishment of a new
journalism scholarship of $2,500.
The new scholarship, to be called
the IAPA-John H. Perry Newspap-
ers Scholarship, was donated to the-
Fund by John H. Perry Jr., Pres-
ident of the Perry Newspapers.
Robert U. Brown, President of
the Scholarship Fund and Publish-
er of Editor & Publisher, said the-
new scholarship "is further evid-
ence of interest in the IAPA's schol-
arship program and the valuable
contribution it is making to hem-
ispheric understanding through the
ever-increasing number of scholar-
ships awarded each year."
In just four and a half years of
operation the IAPA Scholarship
Fund has awarded 39 scholarships
of $2,500 each. They go to North
American graduate students for a
year of study in Latin America,
and to Latin American journalists
or journalism students for a year
of study in a U.S. or Canadian Un-
iversity.
The Scholarship Fund is support-
ed with voluntary contributions
from IAPA member publications in
North and Latin America.

SEEKS POSITION
Executive Secretar y bilingual;
mastering French English; long
experience office business; steno;
speaks Italian; seeks full or part
time position.
Write P.O. Box 294, Port-au-Prince.


LE CENTRE D'ART
Founded 1944
Exclusive agents:
Alix, Amiama, Armand, Bazile,
Benoit, Bigand, Blanchard, Demro-
siers, Domond, Duffaut, HyppoUte,
Joseph, Leontus, Leveque, Liautaud,
Months, Normll, Obin, Pierre, St.
Brice, Stephane, Turnler, Vital,
many others.
17 Rue de la Revolution
From Pan American
in town one block toward
bay, half block to left.
Open Monday through
Saturday
9-1 3-6 Phone 2055









SUNDAY APRIL, 24th 1960


"HAITI


The Caribbean Tourist -Associat-
-ion has just completed its first
summer report of a study of the
-characteristics of the visitor to the
Caribbean. Within a few months,
the second half of the report will
be finished which will include the
winter visitor.
The summer data is based on
3500 interviews conducted last Aug-
ust at six major air terminals of
Cuba, Jamaica (2). Puerto Rico.
-Barbados and Trinidad.

The results show 55 per cent of
summer visitors to be under 35
years of age. with 82 per cent und-
er 45. 60 per cent are men, with


of the tourists to an individual isl-
and or country had been there pre-
viously, 46 per cent four or more
times.

Of the 3500 persons reporting, 71
per cent came from the U. S.
A. with the remainder from neigh-
boring islands and countries. The
number of destinations varied with
15 per cent of Cuba's tourists hav-
ing been elsewhere, while 77 per
cent of those in Barbados had vis-
ited other places in the Caribbean.
The objective of the Caribbean
Tourist Association Study is to est-
imate the true size of the Caribb-
enm visitor market by determining


a predominance in Cuba. Jamaica the percentage of multiple destin-
was the only resort with more worn- ation tourists. The final report will
en. visitorss during the summer. be submitted at the Ninth Annual
8~ per cent visited the Caribbean Meeting of the Association in June
for pleasure, and 57 per cent vaca- at St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands.
tioned in the area before with 88 The survey is being conducted by
per cent coming by air. 10 per cent CTA Member, Child & Waters, Inc.



DISCOVER THE FASCINATION

OF HAITI


Through its Postage Stamps

For complete information in Haiti

Stamps and other details which will be

furnished you free of charge, write to

P.O. Box 723 PORT-AU-PRINCE


be
de
in
"i
tri
or
at

de
al


Haiti's Pseudo Beggars
There are 2 kinds of "pseudo times it takes the most impertin- First he will ask you for money.
eggars" young men running ent form and asks straight out, No money? then he will ask
desperately around the town, look- "Ban 20 cob sous rou." That last you for a cigarette.
g minute after minute for the one is particularly dangerous be- No cigarette? then he will ask
client charitable" who will con- cause it is hard to determine wheth- for a match.
ibute to keep him from starving er it is a statement resulting from
r to help him achieve the realiz- a well versed scene or that of a No match? then "what time
tion of his well-planned demand, really exasperated and desperate is it?" but in the purest and
It is true that just a few of these man. most formal of demands, that is to
desperate young men, with the eyes Of course with these two sect- say. "Barn ou ti l'heu sous rou?"
ways livid and devoid of expres- ions one works to the prejudice of "Give me a little time on you?"


sion, are sincere. The others have
built up their story on any subject
that is pitiful, and of course espe-
cially on the famous "three days
without food."
Sometimes it is so well orchest-
rated that the person being "bes-
eiged" needs to be in possession
of the keenest of Hollywood sens-
es to detect their play The eyes
battle to stay open, movement
comes from the most strenuous in-
ner effort possible, the mouth per-
forms horrible contortions and the
voice, coming from depthless cav-
erns, is slow and seems almost to
fade away as it tells the most dis-
tressing stori ever heard.
The story varies according to the
technic; sometimes it starts from
asking for an old shirt or a pair
of trousers to end by the tradition-
al "Eh Bien failt' barn ou cinq
sous rou, pou m'al pran ou ti ba-
gaille" then again it may start
right out with a "Oum gain trois
jou sans manger", climaxed with
a nice crisis of tears. At other


the other for most of the time a
pseudo miserable may ruin the
chance of a veritable sufferer who
has been without a piece of bread
for days.
Both any way are shocking to
meet because they revive the feel-
ing of pity that any noble heart
resents when faced by such a lam-
entable scene. Of course with these
two kinds) described we tell only
of those who can walk and talk.
for in the category of illness and
infirmity the shameless imposters
who inspire such disgusted repugn-
ance are better avoided and not
mentioned.
But, there are more jovial ones
.- the ones who take pleasure in
begging tyes, there are these char-
acters who can always find a little
joke to start their' performance
with) and these are the specim-
ens with the smile on the hps and
rags on the body who refuse to
defeated. His aim is to take some-
thing from you in any way and
lie will take it


LES PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUES
HAITIENNES


SHE ouTIA
4 PLACE GEFFRARD .


Planning



SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION


FOR YOUR LAND?


~- -~--- U


It will pay you to patronize the man with


the yellow CAT* Machines


If you're one of the many farmers who have signed up for conservation
measures in a watershed program, you'll want to choose with care the man
who digs your ponds, builds your dams and terraces and clears your land.
Check his work record and his equipment. Ask your neighbors and friends.
They'll recommend the man with Caterpillar equipment. He's the man with
the know-how, who expects to be in business for a long time, who is a good
neighbor and businessman. He can do the best job for you because he has
the best equipment It will pay you to patronize himl


..ouCATERPILLAR*.DEALER)
_$ l, l*E1M- 01-~ Ilm'k ql a t


MA'RICE BONNEFIL Manager of The Haytian Tractor Co. Chancereges


60 PER CENT OF SUMMER VISITORS
TO CARIBBEAN ARE MEN
-35 YEARS OF AGE-


SUN"


' .." .. :'..


PAGE 11


L >


-


' ..I .. ..t


* .









PAGE 12


Tele-Haiti Weekly Schedule -- -


MONDAY APRIL 25, 1960

'6:00 pm-Test pattern Music
( Records
7:00 pm--Evening General Progr-
am Schedule
7:03 pm-Weather Report
7:06 pm-Album Tele-Haiti Pa-
noramic scenes of every-
where
7:25 pm-Cartoons and Kid Com-
edies Children's Pro-
gram
7:45 pm-Telenews 1st edition-
Review of the da:y's ev-
ents.
8:00 pm-I Spy ,17th episode) -
"Copperhead" (English
version i Narrator
Raymond Massey
8:30 pm-"Les Petites Histoires de
notre Histoire" Every
Monday, at- -the same
time, Max Bissainthe
presents an interesting
short story on the sub-
ject of the History of
Haiti. This show is spon-
sored by Charles Dejean
& Co.
8:45 pm-"Industry on Parade" -
Review of the latest ach-
ievements in the Ameri-
can Industry.
9:00 pm-Telenews 2nd edition
Summary of the late
news
9:05 pm---Shell Kerosene Sqlejl -
Demonstration by Marie-
Florence Roy
9:10 pm-Telecinema
10:00 pm-Close of Program N:.
tional Anthem

TUESDAY APRIL 26, 1960

6:00 pm-Test pattern Music
(Records)
7:00 pm-Evening General Progr-
am Schedule
7:03, pm-Weather Report
7:06 pm-Cancer Society precs",-,
a live program with Dr.
Chevallier
7:26 pm-Cartoons and Kid Com-
-edies Children's Pro-
gram
7:45 pm-Te'enews (1st edition
Review of the day's ev-
ents.
8:00 pm-Westinrghouse Sho',% -


"Frankie Lame"
8:30 pm-Foreign Intrigue: The
"Mountain Climbing" -
Starring James D a I y -
Brought to you by Haiti
Trading Co.
9:00 pm-Telenews 2nd edition
Summary of the late
news
9:05 pm-Telecinema
10:00 pm--Close of Program Na-
tional Anthem

Wednesday APRIL 27, 1960

6.00 pm-Test pattern Music
I Records)
S00 pm-Evening General Progr-
am Schedule
7:03 pm-Weather Report
7-15 pm-Album Tele-Haiti Pa-
noramic scenes of every-
where
.7:30 pm-Cartoons and Kid Com-
edies Children's Pro-
gram
7:45 pm-Telenews (1st edition)
Review of the day's ev-
ents.
8-00 pm-Westinghouse Sho w -
Western Theater- "K i d
Rides Again"
9.00 pm-Telenews 2nd edition
Summary of the late
news
3-05 pm-Shell Kerosene Soled -
Demonstration by Marie-
Florence Ro3


pm-Telecinema
pm-Close of Program Na-
tional Anthem


9:10
10:00


THURSDAY APRIL 28. '60
6:00 pm-Test pattern Music
-. Records)
7.00 pm-Evening General Progr-
am Schedule
7:03 pm-Weather Report
7:06 pm-Album Tele-Haiti Pa-
noramic scenes of every-
where
7:2G pm-Cait ons and Kid Com-
edies Children's Pro-
gram
7 45 pm-Telenews i.st editions
Review of the day's ev-
ents.
.X00 pm-P a r i s Precinct 16th.
episode "It's Up to You"
Starring- Claude Dauph-
in & Louis Jourdan iEn-


.~. --
3.,. t ruASS PASSENGER SERVICE


I.


PORT-AU"PRICE
TO

NEW YORK
WIS! 24th 511"'T
Only 3% Days direct to the center o New York
City . modem Amerkan Flog C r-r I I-ShlO
ANCON CRISTOBAL
SallingS MondayS and FridaW

Y .Y CAIrK~0M WTM PRVATh A
O11DOR TILiD SWoMo POOL
250 L.9DAGOG ALLOWS


glish Version)
8:30 pm-The Florian Zabach
Show brought to you
by "Li Maison Lelio
Batlly"
9:00 pm-Telenews 2nd edition
Summary of the late
news
9:05 pm-Shell Kerosene Soleil -
Demonstration by Mane-
Florence Roy
9:10 pm-Telecinema
10:00 pm--Close of Program Na-
tional Anthem

FRIDAY APRIL 29, 1960

6-00 pm-Test pattern Music
iRecords)
7:00 pm-Evening General Progr-
am Schedule
7:03 pm-Weather Report

7:06 pm-Program of "Education
National"
7:30 pm-Cartoons and Kid Com-
edies Children's Pro-
gram
7:45 pm-Telenews 1lst edition)
Review of the day's ev-
ents.
8:00 pm-Travel Films Various
sites of the world.
8:15 pm-"Pour Vous Mesdames"
(Cooking Show)
A:30 pm-The Ford Show The
Adve n t ur e s of Robin
Hood: "The High Land-
ers", Starring Richard
Greene Followed by
the Adventures of Flash
Gordon "Deadline at
Noon,,.
9:30 pm-Telenews-- (2nd edition)
Summary of the-late
news. -
9:35 pm-The Shell Show
10:00 pm--Close of Program Na-
tional Anthem

SATURDAY APRIL 30, 1960

6:00 pm-Test pattern Music
(Records)
7:00 pm-Evening General Progr-
am Schedule
7:03 pm-Weather Report
7:06 pm-Album Tele-Haiti -- Pa-
noramic scenes of every-
where
7.25 pm-Cartoons and Kid Com-
edies Children's Pro-
gram
7:45 pm-Telenews (1st edition)
Review of the day's ev-
ents.
8:00 pm-"A Vous New "York" -
with Pierre Crenesse
8:10 pm-The Languich,atte Show
-Hilarious sketch, star-
ring Languichatte -
brought to you by "-Fa-
brique Nationale de
Chaussures".

8:30 pm-The Westinghouse Show:
Star Performance "Story
of Erhily Cameron"
9:00 pm--Telenews 12nd editions -
Summary of the late
news
9:05 pm-Telecinema
10:00 pm-Close of Program Na-
tional Anthem

SUNDAY MAY 1st, 1960

2:00 pm-Sign on Presentation
afternoon's program
2:03 pm-Special Children's Prog- -
ram
3:00 pm-Newsreels a n d Docum-
entaries
3:30 pm-Nobbe & Bondel s
Show Conrad Nagel
Thea t e r: "Blakeman's
Bottle"
4:00 pm-Weather Report
4:05 pm-Telecinema
5:40 pm-Telenews Review of
the day's events.
them.
6:00 pm-Sign off Nationai An-


Yes the new Dadlani Store on the corner of Rue du Bonne-
Foi is surely a "Little Europe" stocked with fine merchand.-
ise from all over the world with emphasis on Indian Prod-
ucts. "Little Europe" also means Free Port Prices.


I' ~~I~iiibmi~; ii


B. F.*Goodrich


SILVERTOWN TIRES

Designed to give you the bet

po sible service at no extrgwpp

Se" the.,m

TIRES, TUBES, BATTERIES ANIq
ACCESSORIES FAN 'BELTS,
CONVEYOR BELTS
3, Rue des Fronts Forts


Ask about round-trip a-dfr tkdr cts.
Cmp let accUrr ma 'IntformaoOnly. fto

MtMA STIAMSHIP LI.
Rue Abrhmb LiUncOl T.pbone 3062


9


f ez .-


IlNns lllvHa


Ir







SUNDA YAPRIL, 24th -1960


Returning to his studies "Zuoz" in Engdin, Switzerland today is 1joe
Lungwitz, son of the Manager of Plantation Dajuphin and Mrs. Don
Lungwitz, Joe is (at the left) accompanied by his school pal Frank
Seyfert. In the Fort Liberte sqpall power boat race last weekend Joe
took second place coming home behind his father. Here Joe and his
friend inspect a 175 pound spotted Jewflsh caught by Luls Schatini.
ART DISPLAY W ANwnTD TO RENT
ART DISPLAY Single Amneriqcan ,resident wants
Now on display at El Rancho to rent, modern, bungalow
Hotel paintings and sculptures of type house in the Petionlille, Gros
leading Haitian artists fr olm the running water and unfurnished.
'-famous collection of the Red Car- Morne area. Prefer 2 bedrooms,
-pet Store Petion-Ville Please reply to Haiti Sun, P.O.
Box 433.


Petion Savain
Enguerrand Gourgues
Charles Obas
Bernard Wah
Marcel K. Wah
Jean Elis Coachy
Andre Dimanche
Joubert Duperrier
Roger Francois


MAIN FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR
BUILDING SEDREN
Rue Americaine
Phone 2020


WASH IT! SCRUB IT! You cadt mar its Matchless Beauty!'
Its GUARANTEED washable .

BSIJPER


THE FINEST FINISH FOR WALLS AND MATCHING WOODWORk


JOSEPH NADAL Agents


LePerchoir

THE RESTAURANT


IS OPEN DAILY EXCEPT


MONDAYS


A SPECIAL LUNCH IS

OFFERED AT MIDDAY

FOR $1.75

AND $2.00 A LA CARTE

The menu is prepared by Albert Bareilon

Of Switzerland.


~~1.


NEW TRIUMPH HERALD .: REY ,Ls CO.
KELNOTES ECONOMY, '

At yoling'-g to pot'i-issued this
,*week the Reynolds Haitian Mtining
Co. has its first pineapple crop in
sight of fruitition, in 2 or 3 months.
The crop, normally 10 months from
planting, will yield mature fruits
in 14 to 15 months and fruits pl-.
most as large as the average Ha-
waiian fruit which requires 18 to
Severe road tests conducted over sports car. It is offered in a' four 90 months to mature.
a gruelling 12,500 mile test drive seater sedan and a two seater The reports state that prelimin-
from Cape Town to Tangier result- coupe. (The coupe has an optional ary figures have shown that the
ed recently in flying colors for the rear seat for 2.) Standard equip- Miragoane fruit average 3.2 ounces
sleek Italian styled Triumph Her- m e n t includes heater-defroster, of pineapple per month 14 per
aid, radically new British offer on which will probably be excluded cent more when compared to, the
the foreign car market now avail- for Haiti, windshield washers, foam 2.8 ounce average per month, from
able in' coupe and sedan versions rubber padded seats, washable pineapples grown in Hawaii. The
in Haiti. vinyl upholstery, twin sun visors, quality of the pineapples is said
Independent suspension on all and directional signals, to be the same. The report con-
four wheels provides comfort, stab- Triumph's sedan model is power- cluded that there are still probl-
ility and safety, and more import- ed by a 40 horsepower engine, ems to be faced by the Reynolds
ant for prospective Haitian owners cruises comfortably at 65 m.p.h., Mining pineapple growers.
a smooth car preserving ride has a maximum speed of just over
over the roughest of road surface. 70 m.p.h., and gives an economic-
The new Herald is 153 inches in al 40 miles per gallon. Selling price S P E C I A L
length on a 91 and a half inch in the U.S. (at East Coast ports
wheelbase and is manufactured by of entry) is $1,999 for the sedan C I T A D E L
the makers of the Triumph TR-3 and $2,149 for the coupe. T R I P


MAJESTIC AND MARABOUT L K S WA EN
BABY BUS
H HOTEL ALL INCLUDED:

SITUA\'ED ON PETIONVILLE SQ JARE 3"
PLEASANT AND COLORFUL
ATMOSPHERE I'HI-S RATE COVERS:
EUROPEAN OR AMERICAN PLAN a) Round trip transportation bet-
IF REQUIRED ween hotel in Port-au.Prince
Sor Petionville and Cap-Raitlen;
MAJESTIC AND MARABOUT ( b) One night 1st class hotel 'd .
A S OF R SPE ALRATES comodation in Cap-Haitien and
FOR -s meals;
LONG RESIDENCE c) Trip to Milot and exoursion
to the


WHAT MAKES A WEDNESDAY NIGHT SPENT 4
AT THE


Bacoulou Club
SO EXCITINGLY DIFFERENT" FOUR WORDS,
4 THE
FAMOUS BACOULOU 4
VOODOO DANCERS
BUT THAT IS NOT ALL THAT IS OFFERED. BY


C I T A D'E L
Departures from Port-au-Prince
every Wednesday and Sunday
morning, returning following day.
MAKE YOUR RESERVATION AT
j HOTEL DESK OR

RAYMOND REMAIN
MAGIC
ISLAND
TOUR S
RUE DU CENTRE
Port-au-Prince,
HAITI
Tel.: 2078


0.,M New! Sensational!


38 JEWELS

AND JEWEL ROLLER BEARINGS

On Sale At: Canape Vert

Aux Cent Mille Articles

Dadlani's Maison Orientale


rri n n n n X
GIRARD -PERR EGAU


.. .^ ^ .


g.


"HAITI


SUN" "







PAG1. 14


"HAITI SUN"


IN HAITI


TnISl WEET


AS RECOUNTED BY AUBELIN .JOLICOEUR


William Greenberg, an Electronics VIP in -Brooklyn, his charming
wife Evelyne and the Greenberg's daughter Sally spent three days vac-
ationing in Haiti this week and decried the fact that tne. left Haiti till
the last of their tour, not giving them enough time to see all the Island's
attractions. Bill had to return to work and Sally, a captivating 18-year-
old, had to resume her courses in Psychology at College. Sally displayed
a great interest in Haiti's paintings, sculptures and dances. Before the
trio left Haiti they were joined at the El Rancho on Tuesday by Bill
Greenberg's brother David, also in the Electronics business in East
Brunswick, New Jersey, his wife Sara and their two daughters Arlene
6 and Ellen 5. The David Greenbergs arrived in Port on board the
SS Victoria.
Mobil Oil man George D. Johnstone of Los Angeles, California," ac-
companied by his wife Margaretta and daughter Dorothy spent several
days in, Haiti this week. Dorothy is employed by the Douglas Aircraft
Corporation at Long Beach, California and the tall red-head, an avid
cha cha cha fan, had no difficulties picking up Haiti's Meringue.
San Marino, California resident, Cedric Scott, an Insurance Broker,
stopped here for a three day visit with his attractive wife Susan this
week. During the course of their Caribbean tour the Scotts decided to
pay a visit to our shores which entranced Susan's parents' Dr. and Mrs.
Robert Sher, not long ago to the extent thpt they intend paying another
visit next year. Susan Scott,, a talented sculptor herself, was very im-
pressed with Haiti's art works. .
A visit was payed to Haiti this week by Julie Ermer who stopped
.. here en route' from Miami to Puerto Rico. Of Hungarian nationality,
Julie is now a resident of Canada and is studying this year at the
University of Puerto Rico. Her flair is languages and she speaks perfect,
S Hungarian, German, French, English, and Spanish. That is quite some
.- st
S'" Peggy Mitchell regained her smiles again this week when her. lost
S luggage was retrieved and returned to her by dynamic Assistant Man-
ager of Delta, Claude Beaufils. A personnel interviewer at the office
of Avis Olsen hi. San Francisco, California, Peggy .is on her second trip
here. in three years. While in Haiti Peggy is a guest at the Oloffsoni and
chanced to meet an pld friend Elsie Clare (Eddie) Marwedel of Morello
Travel, San Francisco, who is sojourning in. Haiti along with Louise Han- f
S ord, 'Advertising in San Francisco, and Pat Mulligan, Advertising, New c
'York. The gay party are staying at the El Rancho.
Barbara Heatley and Gail Murray, two students from Flushing, New
York are really enjoying their Haitian visit and are staying at the .t
C Riviera. They were joined by their mother here Friday. l
A two weeks vacation is being enjoyed here by Lorraine Friedman, r
iDetroit, Michigan, and. Joaht Goldberg, New York. The young ladies r
are being escorted round the town by Rene Chauvet.
Hotel Manager Larry Friedman and his wife Muriel, Coral Gables, a
. "lorida and 'liene and Harold Kane Accoutant of Florida, are staying bI
.' at the Oloffson. Larry Friedman is the manager of the Dorset Hotel l
in Miami Beach where he will be returning with his wife after a 7 day d
visit to Haiti. Charming Muriel is a delightful dancer. l


Church 7 heft And Assault


and found the tabernacle lying on
the floor with a man hiding behind
the pulpit.
Father Manic immediately went
off in search of help 'while Father
Gemble tackled the intruder and
held him struggling on the ground
and in the Priest's own words, "he
ha time to bite me on the .right
forearm and deal me a .knife blow


I


(Continued from page 1)
tabernacle open the thieves took
the "ciberne" containing the sacr-
ed hosts but not content with this
one of the men set about climbing
the altar and attempting to take
the great cross down from over
the tabernacle.
ed the fran to lose .his step and
Beine very heavy, the cross cauc-
he stumbled under its weight and
fell on the altar steps carrying the
cross with him in his fall. The
cross evidently struck him a sev-
ere blow on the head and the noise
together with the resulting thive's
cries of pain woke up the church's
cure who rushed immediately to
the church.

Entering the church the cure was
just in time to see one of the thiev-
es making his escape while the
second was just recovering from-
his fall and blow on the head and
was struggling to his feet. The cure
rushed at this second intruder and
managed to get a grasp on him
only to receive a knife stab in the
stomach seconds later fortunat-
ely one which later proved to be
superficial and not serious.
Despite his wound the cure man-
aged to hold onto his assailant and
with the arrival of help the "host
thief," being armed, was sent to
the Gonaives police.
"This sacrilege and assault on
the church and its cure has arous-
ed in St. Michel as in all the Gon-
aives area considerable emotion
and concern, as did the. host theft
from the church in Bourdon, Port-
au-Prince," stated the La Phalan-
ge. "This kind of sacrilege bord-
ers on superstition and is accom-
plished by criminal hands which
are only instruments, of the true
responsible who are still at large.
The "guilty" has 'been released."
"The responsible of these 'jeure'
de vols' which repeat themselves
rom time to time should be rigor-
ously punished."
DETAILED REPORT
The sacrilegeous breaking and
entering of the St. Michel de L'At-
alaye church on April 9th was el-
ucidated with more precise infor-
mation in Friday's edition of the
newspaper La Phalange.
According to La Phalange t h e
cure of the. church was awakened
.t 2 am on the morning of 'the 9th
by P. Manic who told the cure, P.
e Gemble, that he had heard a
oud and suspicious noise from the
direction of the church. The two
nen rushed to the church, entered,


events of the year...the
Eucharistic Congress in
Munich, the Passion Play
in Oberammergau, the
Olympic Games in Rome,
industrial fairs, art exposi-
tions and music festivals.

Fly to Europe the modern
way... by Pan American
Jet Clipper*,.. and cross
the Atlantic in just six
hours and 25 minutes
And with the Fabulous
Pan Am Holidays you can
enjoy, from beginning to
end, the grandeur of the
Old World.


r


/. I.-'









I.

'1


* Savetraveling time...
make reservations on Jet
Clipper. Visit your Travel
Agent or Pan Am.



E S


WORLDO'4. MOST EI


PERIMIUNCD ALINB


M DAfES NiOUHi-m AU IMUCS-UUM


mom.


0 WIFU


'Pinky Kravitz, Sports Director of WLDB a radio broadcasting stat-44~.f A.A./ .,,/a,,,.sss .. as a _a a a s-s, ,
o6r in Atlantic City, New Jersey, is spending some time in Haiti and4
gathering material for his'program. Accompanied to Haiti by his wife, i'[ II C A I I II
Janet, Pinky has already interviewed several Haitian officials. The l ) % A 3 / u III. .
Kravitzs have met with honeymooners Salesman Saul Cohen and his 4
wife Pat, who celebrated her birthday here on the 19th, Textiles manz ,
Herb Weiss and his wife Carol of New York, and Lawyer Franklin Kral A D
and his wife Bernadine from Chicago. A Distinuished. Hotel In The Heart Of The City
Dermatologist John D. Butler of Detroit, Michigan is spending three 4
days here with his "seduisante femme" Charlita. Dr. Butler has been Conveniently Located To The. Shopping District
recommended to Haiti by a young Haitian now resident in Detroit, Dr.
Musset Pierre-Jerome. < All Air Conditioned Rooms with Private Baths and Hot Waterr
Richard Van Claar, in the New York 'book business, is sorry be is 'h
unable to spend more time in Haiti than his projected 7 days. He says< New Pool Terrace with outside Bar and Swimming Pool
there is just to much to, see in that time.
Alan Morton, Mens' Clothing Business in New York, accompanied by< ir tonditionned Bar Unsurpassed Cuisine Finesi Service
his wife Mildred and daughter Meredith are current guests at the Villa
Creole and were sent to Haiti by D. Sherman, Honorary Consul to Haiti H A P "Y H O U R EV ER Y T H U RSD A Y
in Boston, Mass.' .
Back in Haiti as guests of Natan and Mirtza Abramovitz are Financier4 FROM 5:30 TO 6:30 p.m., INFORMAL GATHERING
Sacha Armanik and his wife Rena and Contractor-Builder Julius Bagdan t
who is to become a resident in Haiti. D IN N ER D A N CE E V ER Y FRID A Y =
Guest at the Majestic Hotel is Choreographer of the Metropolitan .
Opera Zachary C. Solov. He's travelling along with Miss. Brix Von lberg '
Dennison, Buying Manager for a Department Store, Scenery Designer From 7:30 P.M. To Midnight With Floor Show
lir Children and a Professional Photographer.
Retired businessman Charles Bernhard Garfinkel has found that Haitii SU N D A Y N O O N CREO LE BU FFETS

(Continued on page 4) 4' y -, ...-,., ., /,',- v .' 'v*.v ,' ,' -




. .-._' ..1 :- : -, .: ,:.:': -;^:


SUNDAY APRIL, 2% .i .

in the thorax before help ar .,j "s
A guard arrived at the scene' W.
the would be thief and *asai
was conducted to the police' iepo' '
for investigation. Upon being qeist.
ioned the man admitted that ..his
name was Antoine Pierre and tUat'..f.-
he was 4 resident of Dessalines.'..'
Pierre carried, on his story by ltatbi
ing that his raid' on the. churh-'I
had been aided by two accomplicms.-
and that the trio was 'acting otW
(Turn back to phgp.


a


EURO PE 19 G




R! r ~DoonW't miss the great







SUNDAY YAPRIL, 24th 1960


a


'-HHA'ITI S


MEDICO'S AID TO'
tiJoseph report HAITI STARTE
The new system of cooperation
between MEDICO, CARE and the
Haitian Ministry of Health has re-
ceived its inauguration with its
first largp consignment of medical
supplies valued at $66,486. This
equipment is to moved within the
'Lj Reservoir" is the name of a chic new restaurant opening next next week t6 the Jeremie Hospital.
month in Bourdon. Jean-Clagde Hollant who graduated recently from MEDICO, (Medicql International
.CorieIl University Hotel'School with a Bachelor of Science in Hotel ad- Cooperation Organization) a volunt-
ary agency designed to provide
minisfration is the proprietor. The, new gourmet's establishment will spe- American physicians, drugs and
cialize. in French,. Ainricariand Haitian cuisine... May 15th the Christ- supplies for newJy developing, lands
lan Brothers will celebrate the 100th apniversary of the death of their where they are critically needed,
-foundert Jean-Marie Robert de La Mepnals. In four years they will obs- has undertaken a broad medical
ervel a century since they arrived in Haiti... Mr 'Gerard Vital is attend- service program for Haiti at the re-
ation centre "Claire-.Heureuse."
ing the conference 61 French Line agents on the island of Tobago... It is planned by MEDICO to or-
]Robert Pignol of the Casa Labburdette in company .with agent Jean ganize and staff all district hosbit-
Claude Nadal. visited clients of the French firm in Cap Haitien this als in-rthe' outlying parts of the
week... '.lichelle -Fouchard entertained royalty Saturday night... county' with American volunteer
*doctors, nurses, technicians and
according fo Le Join Thursday Lieutenant Bazin reported his car stol- adcrinistrtors. MEDICO will also
en. That newspaper commented "Les Chevallers de Nuit" does not even service satellite clinics with a mob-
respect members of the Armed Forces... Nicol Rouchon de Rougemont ile unit operating from each hospit-
has been named to the Haitian Embassy in London as stenographer'... al.
Mgr. Albert Cousineau A chbishop of- Cap-Haitien left for his native Can- The first onsignm of supplies
ada. He is expected to be abroad for several months... Ambassador Ernest the SS Lifana and consisted of a
Bonhomme returned to Washington this w.eek... Jacqueline Derose daught- total of 156 cases of' medical equip-
er of Mr. and Mrs. Rodolphe Derose wed Joe Louis at St. Gerard Friday ment and drugs, penicillin, liquid
night... The section of Adult Education reopened the Illiteracy Center soap, nurses uniforms, bandages,
-vitamins, sur gical instruments,
at the National Prison Wednesday under the direction of Saintuhlen Sa- vitains, s u laboratory equipment,
blon... The fiancailles of lovely Josette Fils-Alme to Doctor Gerard De sterilizers, X-Ray units and equip-
Catalogue was announced at a party at the home of Colonel and Mrs. ment, delivery and operating tab-
Henri Fils-Aime Saturday night.... Brasmlian Ambassador and Mis. Jaime les and a large consignment 'of nu-
-t. '7 f n A -,.fft at their BoRnrdon residrince Thurs- trients (food supplements.)


Sloali Fnermont hosteULI d a jto uuii. a. a.... -. .------.
day night to toast the inauguration of the new Capital "Brasilia, The
fourth burglary of Chez Carlos on the Exposition was accomplished
Tuesday. The burglars got away with an estimated $800 worth of
swag... The Bacoulou troupe is offering a festival at the Rex Theatre
May 2... Gabjby Jean-Charles passed away in her sleep in the small
Mexican town of San Miguel Eade where she was the toast... he Ben
Bigios are off to Miami for a fortnight vacation.., Gladys Bogat is over
from 'Miami.
This weekend stopped here from Caracas en route to Miami Ronald M.
- Chumaceiro in the Liquor, business in Caracas and his gorgeous wife
Cora Luisa. In addition to their native tongue they speak fluent French
and English. Cora Luisa and Ronald have plans to, come here for a
-visit soon.

HAITIAN MURDERED TELE-HAITI RAFFLE
IN o MIAMI Tele-Haiti held'a grand festival
An ex-resident of Port-de-Paix, last Sunday afternoon terminating
Andre Toussaint, has been arrested the station's raffle of a Westing-.
for the murder of Joseph Estime house Television set which went to
in Miami, Florida, according to lucky winner Jean V. Riboul. Sun-
Le Matin of 'Wednesday 20th, The day viewers were able to attend
newspaper stated" that Joseph Es- the festival by switching on their'
time was a hairdresser by profes- sets and an entertaining afternoon
sion and had worked at his craft was provided with music by Jazz
in. Miami for many years as a Raoul Guillaume to which teenag-
well known 'and respected man, es- ers danced and Haiti's Bob Hope,
pecially by members of the Haitian Theodore Beaubrun alias Langui-
community. chatte gave one of his comedy per-
According to the report Estime fo-rmances. Even the elbow bend-
was assassinated by a blow deliv- ing at the bar was televised.
ered by Toussaint with a rock to --
the right temple. Estime is said
to have died from the blow before and charged by local authorities,
an ambulance could deliver him to said Le Matin, and will go before
a hospital. Toussaint was arrested a court for trial. -.
In.s


OUTING TO


CACIQUE


BEACH CLUB AND IBO BEACH

ENJOY THE SUN AND SURF
AND THE EXCELLENT FACILITIES
OFFERED BY -OUR RESTAURANT
AND SNACK BAR


CACIQCJE


MANAGERS:
Paul & Nancy BAUSSAN


'I


JUDGE L. D, MICHEL
INJURED IN
ACCIDENT
With siren screaming an ambul-
ance rushed out of a cross street and
collided with a car driven by Jud-
ge Luc' D. Michel, killing one of
the ambulance men and seriously
injuring Judge Michel at 10:00 pm.
Sunday last.
It appears that Judge Michel was
driving his car, with 2 children as
passengers, along Rue Dantes Des-
touches and was crossing the in-
tersection with the green light
when the ambulance 'came out of
a cross street before Maison Fire-
stone at speed and struck his car.
Having .just transported injured
from an auto accident at Croix des
Missions to hospital, the ambulance
was making its third trip for injur-
ed when it collided with the Judge's
car. The 2 children in the car es-
caped injury but Judge Michel is
reported to have been seriously in-
jured and one of the ambulance
men was killed.
The ambulance at the time of the
accident was travelling out of ,town
to pick up the remainder of 14
injured passengers from a taptap
licensed No. 7638. on the Port-au-
Prince --v Croix des Bouquets run,
which had turned over into a ditch.


I. .


MARIE JEANNE
AIR-OONDITIONED
STRAW-GOODS FACTORY

134, Rue du Centre

PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI.

SHOES HANDBAGS HATS
HAITIAN RECORDS FREN'H PERFUMES

HAITIAN CERAMICS

15 Years Experience in Handicrafts.%
P.O. Box ,975 Open Every Day
From 8:00 a.m. To 5:00 p.m.


HOTEL


Petionville
featuring
The Smart Saturday Night Club

LA RONDE
9p.m. Until Late Closing
The El Rancho Duroseau
Orchestra
dancingg Nightly Except Sunday From 7pm
THOSE WHO APPRECIATE
THE BEST DINE
AT EL RANCHO HOTEL
And always superb cuisine


MAKE AN
m


ENTRANCE
$2.00 PER' PERSON


Lunch Dine Have Cocktails
By The SEA-SIDE

-00-

KYONA BEACH


-00-
DEEP-SEA FISHING EXCURSIONS '*

Swim, Spearfish, Snorkle, Water-Ski
And Sail In Safe Coastal
Waters From Kyona
-00-

HAVE YOUR PARTY AT KYONA


UN" .PAGE 15.


FOUR-YEARS-OLD
ROAD IN BAD
CONDITION
Four years -ago a highway from
Cap Haitien to Fori Liberte was
constructed by the Dutch company
Bohamo at a very "plump" cost,
stated the newspaper Le Jour this
week. Today that highway exists'
in name only.
Le Jour stated that the asphalt
had long since disappeared and
that for some time the roads small
bridges had been collapsing,, mak-
ing the road particularly danger-
ous for potential travellers.
An appeal was made by the news-
paper to the Engineer of the depot
of the North for more precise det-'
ails 'concerning the special' service
of "Entretien et d'Amelioration" of
the highways' o( the -Republic so
that assistance could be bought to


M. V. SVEADROTT

'Expected to arrive in Haiti on
Sunday was ,the M.. Sveadrott, a
528 foot cargo vessel from 'Balti-
more, which will stay. in port for
a period of seven ,days.
The Sveadrott is carrying a. car-
go of 280,000 bushels 'of wheat con-
signed to the Minoterie, The Cai-
ibbean Mill Inc. The cargo comes
-to Haiti under a the barter arr-
angement between, the flour mill
and tle Reynolds Mining Co.
Members of the press' have been
invited to meet at the Minoterie
Monday afternoon to inspect the
operations of the mill.


this vital area; an'area vital for
its economy and its labor populat-
ion the labor population of the
'North 'East.


m






PAG1A iI THAITI SUN"


SUNDA YAPRIL, 24tf- 1960


Israeli Artist With Feeling
MIRTZA ABRAMOVITZ'S PAINTINGS PORTRAY HAITIAN WAY OF LIFE


"Mirtza's paintings are as much
a surprise to me as they are a
delight," said the great American
writer Irving Stone when he rec-
ently viewed Mirtza Abramovitz's
works in slides.
"When I was in Haiti a number
of years ago," Stone visited Haiti
in June, 1955, "I bought some 6 or
8 Haitian paintings which I liked
very much and it seems to me that
Mirtza has captured a great deal of
the Haitian spirit in her paintings;
the coloring is particularly fine
and I think authentic but, what
I mostly like about then is their
sense of pure Haitian vitality."

Irving Stone is convinced that
Mirtza's works should ge placed
on the New York market as he is
sure that her canvases would sell
particularly well. In giving ,a res-
ume on her first introductions to


painting Mirtza stated the follow-
ing:
"My desire to paint arose when
I made my first trip to Europe
in 1947. In visiting the art Muse-
ums in Italy and France, I became
thrilled at watching, admiring the
master-pieces left behind by the
Masters, something in me got in a
state of excitement. I felt that I
qould paint, but how, since I had
never learned before. Back to Is-
rael and I took an Art teacher.
She was a young Italian woman
who explained to me the genesis
of the art, how it developed with
the different practices arid disci-
plines from the Renaissance to the
Modernisme. And when I went back
to the art museums a few years
later I could more or less penet-
rate the feelings qf the artists,"
said Mirtza.
Four years ago in Jan. 56 Mirt-
I


. BUSY PAINTING
works depicting H


SHOES



FOR EVERY OCCASION


za, whose name in Hebrew means
"energetic", decided to achieve
her ever present desire. of expres-
sing herself. She went through all
the dread of a novice with brushes
and oil. She mostly sketched. The
naivety of her works then made
her laugh. But she noticed that she
was progressing with every piece
of work. she did. After a few months
of groping, her disposition to paint
got a new fuel as several painters
who saw her works said that she
had a tremendous sense of colours
and that she. should take a course,
some others said that she should
keep painting the way she felt and
shun courses.
But she wondered how she cold
express what she was feeling with-
out technique.

Then 'she decided to take courses
in painting and started working on
sculpture. She soon found .out that
the teaching was drawing her back
from her growing Ifeeling. After
her father passed away in 1957 she'
Gave up painting and for two years
she played piano, for energetic
Mirtza had to express herself one
way or another.
When she first came here in July
1959. she was thrilled at the beaut-
ies of the sceneries and the peop-
le, afd she started again to paint.
In such an inspiring country Mirt-
za worked restlessly. She realized
that her technique was being dev-
eloped, in working. In Israel she
never dared paint people.' Here she
has conquered the fear of failure
that welled up in her. She achiev-
ed in her paintings of the Haitians
remarkable likeriess, she caught
something of their inner spirit, her
body perspectives are most attract-
iveM she displayed an amazing
zp- f amtnm fo a intp who


Sin her studio is thd talented Mirtza Abramovitz. Her s en, anCuuI ,uf 0 paint-v,
had been reluctant about approach-
taltian life have been described as "Fiveand authentic" g ortrait. She was captivated by
the expressions in the .features ol
the Haitians.
Born in Rehovth, Israel she had
Inherited the idealism of her father
For all kinds of French who emigrated from Russia. She
orally kinds of French perfumes has been educated tinder the cares
ViSit Haiti's Smartest Indian store of her father who combined many
Select your favourite perfume talents he gpayed violin. was
Stage actor and did work on the
from our large Collection farm. Mirtza has worked on the
farm with her father, she has been.
JEAN PA TOUi~in communion with the nature, she
has developed her sensitiveness in
CHRISTIAN DIOR watching closely the laborers, the
people who strove. She feels, she
We offer you the world's famous experienced the 'dra# of nature.
offer you the world's famous Her feelings bring'heri close to Vin-
brands at free port prices cent'-Van Goh who is her favorite
GMaster. Like Van Gob, she is aware
LE GALION that "feeling is a great thing with-
CAR VE7 out which nothing can be achiev-
CARVEN ed.


NMitza Ilin who married a prom-
inent man of her native Israel Na-
tan Abr-amovitz, Honorary Consul
of Haiti in Israel has a 16 year
old son, Danny. Her elder sister
Zfira Ilin is a well known painter
io Israel and Europe and she has
exhibited her works in some of the
best Galleries in Paris. She has
never learned how to paint. She
became interested to paint when
Mirtza brought back home the'not-
es she took from her visiting the
art museums in 47 and while Mirt-

ing Zfira lead the way and she had
already made a name for herself
in .this field when aided by Natan
r she encouraged Mirtza'to paint be-
cause, she said, Mirtza had more
talent than her.





\-


Here in Haiti. Mirtza's. talent has
grown enormously, she became
aware that the artist as a creator
has only one commodity to sell, his
time. She dedicates herself to her
art. She works to develop her tech-
nique, she works.to get a new cause
of joy, of happiness for every paint-
ing she made is .like a new born


child, an event to her husband Na-
tan and son Danny from whom she
got the unquenchable 'desire to d
better and better. Mirtza who
mostly impressed by the empres-
sionists has her, art at heart. She
carr show a good fifty paintings
her next exhibit.
By Aubelin JOLICOEU


-IN HAITI THIS WEEK
(Continued from page 4)
Among the Oloffson's guests this week are Financikr-Broker Geor
A. Harben who is here in .Haiti for a 10 day visit and PRO IPublic R(
nations Officer) Marilyn LeVine. George Harben is a friend of the famo
Haitian dancer Jean Leon Destine who arrived here this week to gi
renewed force to his art which has won him recognition through
the world.
Two teachers from Chicago, Valerie Richer and Adrierine Levine t
ether with Marilyn Juda, a statistician from the Bronx and Doris J,
over visited our shores this week and, keeping the local boys on the
Advertising man E. Stanley Goldman of Plainfield, New Jersey
visiting here with wife Virginia, son.Richard and daughter Sue. Rich
17 gives lot of fun to the guests of the Villa Creole in playing guit
by the pool's side.
Lady Engineer Norma Schlissel here on her second trip brought h
sister Renee and her husband Alvin- R. Porte Merchandising Manag
for Norman, Craig & Kummel, INC Advertising and, their tw? chil
Steven 6 and Ariel 2. Norma is also accompanied by Miss "Alice
,wood, teacher David Silverman and Dr. and, Mrs. Alan Epstein.
party is staying at the Tbo Lele.
Miss Rosemary Clark is guest here of Mr. and Mrs. Merriam Jon
of the Pqint IV Program (Agricultural Division). ,
Miss Diana Therese Letourneau a home economist from Chicago
spending a 3-day vacations in Haiti. She is guest at the El Rancho.
Mr.' Georges A. Florin. President of Prouvost, Lefebvre & Co. Inc
(a wool business) of Boston has spent two days here with his beauty
wife. The French couple was travelling along with Mr. and Mrs.
Wattine from Paris. They were guests at Ibo Lele Hotel.
German writer Dr. Peter Schmid and two German Cameramen Car
sten Dierks and Gerard Niewadomski are making a film here for the
German T.V. in Hamburg.. The cameramen are guests at the Montana4
Hotel.
Here as guest of the Costers of Oloffson Hotel is the famous America
Writer Robert Marks, author of The Horizontil Hour and the celebrated
Author of the Profiles in Esquire Magazine.

Caribbean Construction Co. SA.
Builders Of The Military City
Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD
Phone: 3955. P. 0. BO.. 284


STHE WORLD


FAMOUS


LANVIN NINA RICCI

CARON.

CHANEL

RAPHAEL

etc... etc...
MILOT


KAMANJUA JLU OL OL A-1h e.