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Haiti sun ( April 17, 1960 )

Digital Library of the Caribbean Duke University Libraries
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: April 17, 1960

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00259

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: April 17, 1960

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00259

Full Text

JlSHIP STRIKE

NORWEGIAN 'TROLLA' CREW
S.' "Trolla," a stern engine Norwvegian freighter, rammed
.' ..' her way onto a reei one milFe East of the.narrow and decept-
** a- ive entrance channel to Cap Haitian's Port at 4:15pm Thurs-
.. day at the height of rough and swift running seas.

At the right is President Dr. Francois Duvalier who celebrated his birth- Crew of the 3,000 ton motor coast- case any of the life boats pulling
day this week on April 14th. Pan American Day and spent a quite er- abandoned ship with the except- for the shore capsized.
day with his family. Talking here with the President is the new British io ran okef Troaseptain HEAnd 2 f SEAf-
Ambaessador, Mr. Gerard Thomas Corley Smith who presented his an anxious and constant 24 hour
letter's of credence at the National Palace this week. vigil on the distressed vessel and Lunwitz (the American Manager
keep salvage rights in Companyof "Plantation D a u ph i n" the
keep salvage rights in Company largest Sisal plantation in the
L a ine's B Ph hands. World and sited near Cap Haitian,)
in 3 g Incoming tides on Thursday night stated that rough seas were runn-
La al l lJ U k lifted the' stricken vessel off the ing over the reefs as the crew ab-
reef, believed to be the same reef andoned ship and this prevented the
OLD MARKET MOVED TO NEW SITE struck 400 years ago. by Christoph- Pilot boat or othbr assistance from
I' er Columbus in his Flagship Santa
With paint stih glistening wet a pretentious sign went Maria, moved her a kilometer, and
ulp 'before the square enconmpassming the La 'Saline Market impaled her once more on yet -an-
on 'Saturdlay last anmoubding the erection of a Bus Terminal, other reef of the chain lying at the HAITI'S- VIL
to 'be sponsored by Texatoo Ca-ribbean jnc. 'entrance of Cap Haitian's harbor.
No sooner had the earth been La Saline's market system is one An eye-witness report, was given
rammed around the foot of the of high efficiency that has built its of the incident by a northern resid-
sign's supports than out came the intricate pattern up over a period ent, Don Lunwitz who flew over the
market's occupants, and with ferv- (Continued on page 3) Trolla and acted as observer in


enti demolition, uown came me
flimsy shanties and "boutiques"
that for. many years have been
built and rebuilt in the area' to
serve as one of the city's vital
markets.
Besides serving as a market, La
Saline was a main landing and dis-
.tributioa,_centre .forthe.. charcoal,
planting and bananas brought in
by the coastal schooners to be dis-
persed from the area, crammed
with crazily angled- lean-to's pack-
ed'together like the proverbial sar-
dines in the can. But, by Monday
of this week a'vast swathe had ap-
peared desecrating the area sit-
ed adjacent to the Cabotage Wharf.


ON OTHER PAGES:

Editorials Letters............ 5
Building For Chauffeurs........ 6
Medico Program For Haiti..... 8
Haitian History, Art, Sex....... 10
In Haiti This Week.... ........ 14


NEW U



"By. Christmas 1961, if the cont-
ractors complete their schedules,
Dr. Francois Duvalier will be able
to travel from Port-au-Prince to
Aux Cayes over an asphalt high-
way," was the ostentations state-
ment of portly lawyer Peter H.
Clayton, Vice-President of Meiss-
iner Engineers Inc. made during an
.interview this week.

"To make the present road pass-
able, it is our hope that at the end
of the first portion of study the
':'Development Loan Fund (DLF)
Swill advance loan money to make


.the present road passable; this
will facilitate the movement of
equipment and will open this main
highway to traffic cutting the
- travel time from the present im-
posilble 36 hours to 6 or seven."

Clayton pointed out that Meiss-
er Inc.. is not a construction com-


Performing a nassal operation is Dr. Dorian Venn, South African
M.D. serving at the $biweitzer Hospital at Deschapelles. He is to be
married on April 23rd to another South African, Mrs. Mina Williams.
(See Story on page 4)


Villa Manrese, three storeys of
pastel shaded concrete .surmounted
by a gleaning aluminum cross, is
a graphic culmination of tthe skill-
ed work by the Canadian Jesuits;
for from the planning and drafting
stages to the fitting of the last
water, pipe, all was done by the
Jesuits and 125 Haitian workmen.
The Jesuit congregation first
came to Haiti in the 18th century,


SSAFEI


going to the aid of the Norwegin
vessel.
Loaded with 2,000 tons of. Coffee
fe0tn-lHonduraS; Costa Rika and "
Guatemala, the Trolla, under chart-
er',by the Royal Netherlands Steam-
ship Co., was calling at Cap Haiti-
an, ,to lpad scrap iron when- she
struck the reef. The incident was
described by Official sources as be-
ing a the result of 'a navigational
error.
' It has been reported by the .Nor-
wegian Honorary Consul in Port-
au-Prince, Mr. MacGurk, who-spoke
on behalf qi ,he Norwegian Con-
sul, that q-'members- of Trolla's
(Continued on page 16)


LA MANRESE


bringing with 'them what is today
Haiti's top export Coffee. Some
70 Jesilts came to the North and
today are buried there .
.In 1953 the Jesuits returned to
Haiti and amoig them., -was the
Rev. Father AntobnidPoulin, a live-
ly middle-aged ..a.n with smiling
countenance, "whod was' invited to
take o%'er the direction of the
(Continued on page 2)


LTRA HIG HW A Y FOR HAITI?


U.S. LAWYER

STATES IT COULD

BE DONE BY '61


pany but professional engineers
whose work takes the form of stu-
dies .and complete plans for cons-
truction works which are perform-
ed by contractors. Their aim with
the Port-au-Prince Aux Cayes
highway is to divide it into "por-
tions", each to be competed for
by road building constructors.
Meissner Inc. estimate that the
study involved for the new high-
way will take up to 9 months and
Clayton stated that it is hoped to
have the survey for the first por-
tion completed, in 2 and a half
months. This first portion will be


used at the basis for a request for
construction funds from,.the DLF.
When interviewed on Monday Pe-
ter Clayton said, "A special con-
tract was signed today with the
Haitian Government for the design
of the road from Port-au-Prince
to Aux Cayes. This contract is-still
subject to ratification by the Dev-
elopriment Loan Fund in Washing-
ton; the fund that is advancing
Haiti $300.000 as a loan for the
study and design of the Southern
Roadwork."'
Clayton continued that the con-
tract was signed by him with Hai-
ti's Ambassador to Washington,
Ernest Bonhomme and attested by
the Minister of Public Works, La-
martiniere Honorat. at the Hotel
Riviera on Monday. (The contract
was taken with Clayton when he
left Haiti on Tuesday morning for
Chicago.)
(Continued on page 4)


Malssner's Oayton (left) with' Democratic Majority Leader, Senator
Lyndon Johnson and Republican Senator Kenneth Keatings at a Wash-
ington party.


PRESIDENT'S BIRTHDAY APRIL 14TH


I--.



At,'











I:


Il t. w









PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI No. 37 Avenue Marie-Jeanne CITE DUMARSAIS ESTIME

OLXII SUNAY No. 23


%


I


1










t HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY, APRL 7th I96


VILLA M
.(Continued trom page 1)
Grand Seminar while other memb-
ers of the J6suit congregation went
to Quarter Morin in the North.
Father- Poulin was born in Notre
Dame des Pins in Canada, his anc-
estors being one of the original
nineteen families to immigrate to
Canada, some three hundred years
ago. The Poulin fa mi 1-y, said
Father Poulin, is now one of the
most numerous in the North of


The

.Startini
U.S.A.
Stride c
the fin(
.fully I
YOU
and el
care!
person
61w0-


ANRESE
Canada and when, in 1927, a "get-
to-gether" gathering of the Poulin
clan was held, 10,000 people bear-
ing that family name showed up
at the celebration.
Today Father Poulin is Superior
of Villa Manrese but he Is more
than that for it 'was he who, with
practically no experience previous-
ly as he readily admits, designed
the beautiful Manrese edifice. As
an example of his bubbling pers-
=


Y ut.le impressive Centre foyer and stairivay of Villa Manrese,
I Haiti's first Retreat House.


onality, when asked how the sit
for the retreat was chosen Fathe
Poulin rephed with twinkling eyes
"I walked in the hills of Haiti fo
5 months to find the right locat
ion."
When Father Poulin came to Hait
in 1953 he was helped considerably
with his plans for a retreat foi
Haiti by Sujperior Father Richar
who at that time was in charge
of the Grand Seminar. Father Ri
chard is now back in Canada and
is superior at a retreat house ii
Montreal.
Choice of Villa Manrese's s it e
was apt for the retreat commands
a magnificent view of the entirety
df Port-au-Prince and directly ov
erlooks' the Grand Seminar a few
hundred yards down the hillside
Five months work was. involved in
drawing up the plans for the Villa
from the time of the purchase of
land and. although the Villa is no
mean building construction, only a
year and a,half's work was require
ed to bring it to completion. "
GFFT FROM CANAblAN JESUITS
,Father. Antonio Poulin was, in
Quebec, Canada, Superior of, a rqt-
reat house also with the name Vil-
a Manrese and Haiti's retreat is
a gift from,the Jesuit corigregatidn
and friends pf the Canadian Villa
Manrese. In Quebec, stated Father
'Pulin, some 4,000- men eriterdd re-
treat in the Villa of which he was
Superior per year.
Villa Manrese takes it name
'from a little town in Spain for it
was in a grotto nearby this town
.where the founder of the Jesuits
Saint Ignace of .Loyola, spent sev-
en months in meditation and writ-
ing a book entitled "Spiritual Ex-
ercises." This book is now used in
all Jesuit retreat. houses throtigh-
out the world. At the time the book
was written its author: was- still a
lay man.


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HERAUX TOURS-
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SOUTlERLAND TOURS-
Exposition


e IMPOSING BUT NOT LAVISH est ,Bruno Duplessis, S.J., during
r Built on a massive scale but a conducted tour of Villa Manrese-
s, without pretentiousness, Villa Man- last week. "The rooms are not
r rese is three storeys high, each meant to be used for more than -
t- floor having wide tiled verandhas three days at a time." Altogether
and high ceilings. Looking from the there are 66 rooqis available in.
i drive up to the portico is 'an im- Villa Manrdse for people in retreat
y pressive sight for the whole build- with an additional 15 rooms for the
r ing appears to sweep straight up priests, fathers and personnel.
d endlessly. Each of the rooms used by pers-
e Approach to the front entrance ons in retreat is equipped with bed,
- is made by a long sharply ascend- table and chair and a wash basin
d ing .flight of wide concrete steps, while others, are further equipped
n surrounded on each side by gard- with shower and W.C. All of the
ens. The foyer fronting onto Port- rooms have the imitation of Christ
e au-Prince Bay is both spacious-and in them together with the new Tes-
s well designed and gives entrance tament and prayer books.
y at the rear to. -a vide staircase On the second floor is the chapel
- leading to the second floor. for .those in retreat. Entrance to
Also at the reqr of. the foyer is the beautifully appodtted chapel is
a large wall mural which attracts gained by a wide doorway and a
n foremost attention u p o n ..-entering' (Continued on page 16) -
a the entrance foyer. Painted by '
f Haitian Artist Castera Bazile the R
colorful primitive style mural de- OUSEy threeFO bedroom two bth-
lowicts a Holy ene with figures androom house located on the- Laboule-
Thoer road five minutes from Petionville
hnd are nothing but rooms for rent. For infofmatiohn call
and more oos here," stated Pri- 3922 or 3332 or call at Haiti SuzC


-AF
4 g




4 .,
SBanana 6Psiae Down.Cake .
S TOPPING .


GREASE SIDES OF PAN

S Cream -together -
S1" 1 OCup brown sugar
S' e third cup butter ,

SPREAD MIXTURE OVER BOTTOM OF PAN

Place sliced bananas in this mixture. Dot with
i maraschins cherries.

-BATTER

Cream together
One third cup shortening
1 and a quarter cup sugar

Add
S2 beaten eggs

Sift together
1 and 'a n 3hf sup oake flour
A half teaspoon baking powder
3 qunaters top soda
A half Itdp salt

< Add alternately
< 1 cup mashed bananas -
A half cup sour milk 4

Add
S- 1 top vanifa

Pour into prepared pan. Bike at 385 degrees F
for 50 minutes.
4


4 Turn out on cake rack to cool.



Before serving fill center with 1 cup sweetened
t whipped creame mixed with a half cup mashed
S baanasa .
S_ ... 4.', .


/ '


PAGE 2


/
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first and foremost -. a.K- .
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7' '!'-%,'Z . . . .- -.- -., -,- -;,- -Q- w


I









AY, APRIL 17th, 1960


H HAITI


SUN"


Texaco's New Bus Terminal

LA SALINE RESIDENTS MOVE TO CROIX DES BOSSALES


(Continued from page 1)
kof 150 years and as such must not
bie,treated lightly nor believed that
it js a system that can be simply
replaced. It is "a most important
function of the Haitian society and
a'ust be. respected.
L. EVEQUE INQUIRY
Engineer and planner of the new
-'La Saline project, Louis Leveque,
i--ls done just that as inquiry this
veel showed; he has made a com-
':plete survey of the population in-
&,h iting the area on which Texaco
- tends to build.
-With the help of the Haitian Sta-
,tistics Bureau, Leveque has made
ia complete census of the people,
what trade they engage in, how
'long they have lived in the area,


number of children, whether
these children can read and write
and whether or not these same
children attend school.
The area where Texaco intends
building is made up of two types
of vendors. Those closer to the


boulevard are abulatory and cc
to La Saline each day to sell ti
wares. These people have b
moved to Croix des Bossales wh
the engineer has had the land b
dozed and made sanitary. Zot
for the various charcoal, man:
and banana vendors has been
tailed, arrangements have. b
been made for the placing of p
ies and seventy nomad pigs h
been placed in a large pen.
Second type of La Saline inh


- 'VrI~rw1'n


.-. URA."NE E PL W.WINTO ECONOo UEI
U ,ER A O ft EXCELLENCE
Le rwAuacag U)VAMnR

G.!AQE iaRE f t

I nc
.* awm~gwi~w'Sam* CfMmEm


e, -


ome
heir
3een
here
ullU-
ning
gos,


itant are those who resided in the
area, dealing in trade "from the
sea sand, gravel, salt and nat-
ive woods. With Texaco advanced
money the Government of Haiti has
constructed 140 apartments behind
the present Cite Simone Duvalier
to which they wilU add' a market
and a road to the sea shore where
a dock foy coastal shipping 'is to
be built. Later this month the mer-
chant residents will be moved to
new quarters and will be'able to
carry on their old ti'ade.


II- .
been Texaco Caribbean Inc., builders
iriv- of the impressive parking lot, rest
iave room and service station on Place
Geffrard, are adding to their list
hab- of construction works with their
new "Gare Routiere" Bus Ter-
.- minal which is to be fully equipped
with all garage facilities, Texaco
Gasoline pumps and products and
parking for 65 "Camions" -r Bus-
es. For years it has been the pract-
ice of camions plying between the
City and the outlying country area
to park at nights around the Rue
du Quai and La Saline; with the
completion of the bus terminal
there should be ample room for the
camions in the park- and far more
room for street Engineer and
Constructof for the Terminal is
Louis R. Leveque.


all. 'Texaco's Bus Terminal will have
Waiting room -and toilet acilities
,,' .- ,, ., .,. i.. J for both men and women and will
--- ,---- further provide a time table for
arriving and departing camions.


Behind the sign


announcing Texaco's scheduled Bus
rapidly cleared La Saline area.


Terminal Is the


lC~~ -4


MOVE OVER THE ROAD


Permission has been I
given the settlers ot La Saline to
move into a new area just across
the road the square that was
to have been the site of the Croix
des Bossales Market.

This iron frame puncturing the
skyline with beams and more beams
is a perfect example of something
that was not to be; for the Croix
des Bossales market was never
completed and its weighty iron
beams are scattered around the
dock area, behind the Customs
House and even behind the City
Hall. What is to become of this
massive structure is unknown.


But it is known that there was
a general meelee on Monday mor-
ning back and. forth across the
road dividing the Croix des Bos-
sales and La Saline as' Marchands
stripped their, stores of -goods.

Bourette--men did a rdaring and
continuous business piling their.
barrows high with timber and mer-
chandise and moving swaying piles


Texaco's Modern and Expansive Parking Lot, Rest Rooms and
Service Station on Place Geffrard.


of goods across to their new loca-
tion. No agitation or concern .was
evident concerning the change and
the Marchands were inclined to be
philosophical about the shift to new
residential and business quarters.

USED TO PROCEDURE
Many times in the past the La
Saline area, with its flimsy wooden
houses so tightly knit together,' has
been subjected to roaring out-
breaks of fire and the whole area'
is generally accepted as ti fire
trap. When these conflagrations
broke out, as they so often did.
firemen would isolate the fire from
spreading to the town by cutting
fire breaks through the jumbled
maze of housing and then stand


back and permit the shanties to
burn at their leisure.
*Those that remained when the
fire died were usually swiftly des-
patched with fire axes and the aid
of the squatter tenants. But, no
sooner had the firemen rolled up
their hoses _and headed back to
the station than out came lumber,
hammers and nails and the next
thing a new shanty town and mark-
et would spring up, It looks as. iA
this time La Saline's clearance
will 'be a permanent one.
Croix des Bossales Market,
where the new market is rapidly
springing up,j derives its name
from the slave days as the wozrl
Bossales means a newly arrived
slave.


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. -. '

* .- PAGES


A ;*, -




... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. ....... .. .
?~4.- o:2


"HAITI


SUN"


SUNDAY, APRIL 17th. 19860


Doctor Dorrian Venn, accomplish-
ed M.D. from South Africa serving
at the Schweitzer Hospital in the
Artibonite Valley, is to be married
on the 23rd of this month in Des-
chapelles to Mrs. Mina Williams.
In June of last year Dr. Venn
added his valuable assistance to
the Larimer Mellon founded hospit-
al in Haiti's Artibonite Valley and
since, that date has made a name
for himself in that area as a mast-
er, surgeon and a man with winning
personality and character.

Born in Pretoria, in South
Africa, and of English 'descent, Dr.
Venn, now in his 40's, received his


ENTRANCE
$2.00 PER PERSON


medical training in Cape Town,
London. and Edinburgh. A fellow
of the Royal College of Surgeons
of both London and Edinburgs, the
South African M.D. practiced for
a time in England and Johannes-
burg (where he specialized in Ur-
ology) before paying two visits to
Dr. Albert Schweitzer ip Lambar-
ene, French Equatorial Africa.
It was while at the jungle based
hospital that Dr. Venn heard of
Dr. Larimer Mellon's hospital, na-
med -after Dr. Albert Schweitzer,
in Deschapelles and he wa simpres-
sed to. the extent that he wrote
applying for a position which he
received.


.- ".--. -- r .. ...---.


On the 23rd of this month Doctor Dorrian Venn is to be married to
Mrs. Mina Williams in DeschaDelles, in the 'Aribonite Valley. Dr. Venn
is a master surgeon serving at'the Albert, Schweitzer hospital and is.
also a keen fisherman and yachtsman. The South African couple will
honeymoon tn San Juan and the Virgin Islands before returning to Haiti.




MARIE JEANNE
AIR-CONDITIONED
STRAW-GOODS FACTORY

134, Rue du Centre
PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

SHOES HANDBAGS HATS

HAITIAN RECORDS FRENCH PERFUMES

HAITIAN CERAMICS

15 Years Experience in Handicrafts.
P.O. Box 975 Open Every Day
From 8:00 a.m. To 5:00 p.m.


MAKE AN OUTING TO.


CACIQUE


BEACH CLUB


AND IBO


BEACH


MANAGERS:
Paul & Nancy BAUSSAN


South Africans 7o Wed At
Schweitzer Hospital


Predictions Of
Cayes Road
Surveyors ,
(Continued from page 1)
N- '
"As our design work is to be
done in portions, and we are guar-
anteed to complete the first' por-
tion in 140 days, we are absolutely
confident that our study will warr-
ant the DLF advancement of loan
funds for the actual construction."
Mr. Clayton estimated that the fin-
al cost would be in the region of
$6,000,000.
Allocations of the road building
portions, said- Clayton, could be
made to a number of company
through a building system and .us-
ing as many local contractors as
possible.
The Chief Engineer of the Meiss-
ner company Mr. .W a I s h jeeped
over the highway from Port to Aux p
Cayes on Sunday last with two loc- 1
al engineers who are in the com-
pany employ, the journey took them
36 hours according to a cableseint
to Clayton from Aux Cayes by en-
gineer Walsh on his arrival. "
Clayton further stated that Meiss-
ner Inc. plan to open an office in
Port-au-Prince in Mais6n, du Cana-
da and that their engineers are
expected to arrive here next- week.
Peter Clayton 'stated that he had
attended school in England' and
France and that he is a qualified
lawyer. "Our company was chos-
en because they made the most
thorough proposal to the Haitian
Government.
"When the Development Loan
Fund announced the competition for
the job each company submitted
their proposal to the Haitian Gov-
ernment; our proposal was handed
in last November qid 1,000 man
hours went into its preparation.
"As I told the Haitian T.V. aud-
ience (in a short, speech on Mon-
day -night) this initial loan and the
subsequent loan for construction of
the essential highway represent a
new high in relations between Hai-
ti and the U.S."
Clayton continued that this would
not be the first overseas job for
his company, (the company is 12
years old and is run by Mr. Robert
C. Meissner,) as they have worked
in the past in Sierra Leone (Afri-
ca) Mexico and Spain. He hdded
that the company is currently per-
fbrming some $200,000,000 worth of
work in thd United States.
Vice-President Clayton concluded
saying that Meissner Inc's employ-
ees number 250 engineers, about
50 of whom will be working on the
Haitian project.,
Clayton said that he is going to
propose after his company com-
pletes the first portion of the road
survey that an application be made
to the DLF for a special advance
of $150,000 which could be used to
put the deplorable present highway
to Aux Cayes in a temporary im-
proved condition which would red-
uce travel time by 30 hours, and
facilitate the movement of the sur-
veyors and contractors road build-
ing equipment and open the road.
He believes that this could be done
by local contracting firms.


-..'





+ + ," : P O 'T P R I C E S U ,P
." ..... : i~ -"., -4A


Yes the new Dadlani Store on the corner of Rue du Bonne
Foi is surely a "Little Europe" stocked with fine nierchand-
ise from all over the world with emphasis, on Indian Prod-
ucts. "Little Europe" also means Free Port Prices. -


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3, Rue des Fronts Forts
DISTRIBUTOR .
WI L LI AM N A R R


PAGE 4


Mrs. Mina Williams and Dr. Venn
knew each other in South Africa
and last year while making an ov-
erseas tour Mrs. Williams called
for a visit to Haiti liked it and
has been here since. The wedding
ceremony, on April 23rd, is to be
held in the home of Dr. and Mrs.
Larimer Mellon at Deschapelles
and the honeymoon in San Juan
and the Virgin*Islands.
Dr. Venn intends returning to Hai-
ti with his wife and working at the
Albert Schweitizr for "another
couple of years." His wife is ex-
pected to continue performing so-
cial work at-the hospital as she
has done since her arrival in Haiti.
I


ENJOY THE SUN AND- SURF
AND THE EXCELLENT FACILITIES
OFFERED BY OUR RESTAURANT.


AND SNACK BAR


CACIQVE


I





- .' .. ,I


SUNDAY, APRIL 17th, 1960


. .


S IUTN "


- PAGEK


.8. "1 HAITI SSUN
T'HE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sundky Morning.
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERN AR DIEDERICH
Gerant-Responsable MAUCLAWI.LABISSIERE
MEMBER OF THE INTEI-AMERICAN. PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1950"

11" PROBLEM OF OROIX DES BQSSALES MARKET
.-.
A M"uicitpal "probleni. child" has 'been bought to the
.centre odf attraction again with ithe displacing of La Saline's
hMirchands. moving out to make way for -Texaco's Bus
Teitaial's construction, who ,have miade a change of loc-
S:ation and rapidBy ensconced themselves in the shadows of
lie indomlpelbe skeleton. -- the Croix des Bossales Market.
iThis eye eatidhing enmwle of '~p utting off today what can
be done in the Par distant future" was begun. during the
a0 'yst otB Pat d E. Mag.oire regime and stands still dis-
pfl;aying rusty iron beams engirding an empty ldell mounted
S-on very expensive pilings. At the end of the Magloire reg-
ime came the end of Croix des Bomalles but not to the mess
F- left behind.
Beams by the thousand, sate,- bits and pieces of ion and
Todfing materials lie scattered around the unfinished build-
-..;g, w'hih locatimri is perhaps excusable, but, these odd as-
rt- nts of building frame, and material are also strewn
S around the streets, wp the whbif, behind the Customs Hquae,
I:ad eventehBid the City' HaL

N..- 1 b with the, m hkef people moving back intq the Croix
'" des Bossales "market 'area the question may well be asked,
S'-"O_ n' one blame these. poor. folk 'from using-a little.of .the
,building materials in the market for addition to their palm
.-fonded stores and homes?" -
Originaefy the market was estihmaed to havd a,finaf cost, of
$600,000 to date $600,000 down the drain. The tlnie hae
come to farce up to the Tadt that something 'has to be done
with. the rusting edifice and will Oroix des Bossales event-
S ual1y get a market?
Maybe one of: the generous oil companies-could weill make
V a fine service station out of it or complete it to its' present
design a market for-Croix des Bosales'



-JEAM DESTINE COULD HELP


We are pleased to learn ,that -our, celelbbated' artist, Jean-
Leon Destine, will-be 'home shortly 'for a visit. He will be
-ariving 9n Monday, the 18tIh of April viauthe "Oristobal"
of tdie.T m"Line. .. .

,- -- is hoped that the officials of tihe T-ourist Bulreau- will
Stake advantage of-riD'estine 's tak here -to request -his
technical dIasikaxlt some.TIne*t.thbireogtaihies for the.
SNational Folldofique Tr"oipe, whiff. founded for the Haiti
Internationial EMposition ifi 1940. 'his troupe would un-,
dioubtedly benefit greatly .from the experience of this inter-
Snationally acclaimed daaier-chorcographer. .
.


IF, YOU WANT THE
PAR X CELL E NC E '

S.IN SERVICE, CUISINE AND
if* ATMOSPHERE THEN
ACCEPT THE WARM
,- -.
S" WELCOME AWArEING
YOU AT TE "

l|OIi-s q eya



DI N-E AT THE


uis ue ya

HAITIAN AND AMERICAN
CUISINE -
ONLY A FEW MINUTES FROM *
.- TOWN N PETIONVILLE -


.


Caribbean Construction Co. S-A.
Buildera Of The Militavy City
Gen. Manager: Gerard.THEARD
W hone:3955, P; 0. BO .-.284


ii


FIRST CLASS PASSENGER


TO-w -- -
!O.


EWW.ORK
.WEST 4th STRET ok
y k Doys direct toi enter of Nw York
on ii Y sdire American Flag Cruise Ships.
Cl A ". CON CRISTOBAL
SSaings NMondays and Frid s -

BVERY CADO1 OUTSIDE wrIipuAhS&LO
.ou-oDoONTILED WMM 0POOL-
250 i. S G. AGoo E -


Ask about rorund-rip sea-af tickets.
complete accuse "nrmao only r

ANAMA STEAMSHIP LIE
Ru AbP Lincoln Telephone 3062


"- :. ., should be foremost, a- venture which
-is satisfying .bo to t' venture's
'w.wers "and it 'customers.
Notv let's look at it. fro the
customer viewjioinLt The owner .of
lf e WIn tea T.V.-st- and this does notapply
SHa's n r EE Ato Haiti- alone, expects to be able-
1j' pw. a smooth running progr-
ROOM FOR TV'S MPROVEd aNT.e am, a. -program f' interest aqd in
r rpronouncing 'that interest he or she
Dear Sir: --expects to p en ertin ,
Television is a household 'word -expects tobe kept entertainedfor
and Nationaly fervor in iay a full eveningg, every evening.
of the World and no doubt in the There"i-s nob.deying that TELE-
near future Haiti's network TELE-'ILAI has, since its inauguration,
HAITI will be inundated with avid .presented many programs of both
viewing fans by the hundred, a des- human and topical interest; BUT,
tr-ble factor for that TV 'Astion. the network and it is a well-known
Unfortunately thereis aljvays that fact that. many people take great
significant word- BUT, anid Hai- deljglft in viewing advertising,
ti's television at present does not therefore to keep people's interest
fall into.an "excluding" category, up.in television. advertising would
Naturally there are s e r a.I it not. be advantageous to. spread
things that TELE-HAITI wants the. medium throughout the even-
from its presentation of -television., ing's'program instead of disrupting
things that -are essentials. in all certain tograms at crucial morn-
forms of business and include a exits (for the viewer anyway) and
smooth running venture, a profit- displaying not one but anything up
able venture and increased custom- to 5 adverisements." of varying
er participation etc., plus, and this length' one after the other. Sec-


- NHIISO


IN HAITI SHOP
-AT


FISH ER' S .

HAITI'S LARGEST FREE PORT PRICE

SHOPS AND MAHOGANY FACTORY

1) GALLERIES FISHER ACROSS FROM NEW U.S. EMBASSY

2) ART & CURIO SHOP FISHERS ACROSS FROM CUSTOMS HOUSE

SAVE UP TO 60 Per Cent ON IMPORTS
AND BUY HAITIAN HflNDICRAFTS
STRAIGHT EROM THE FACTORY
ON THE RUE DU QUAI
(AM. EXPR. AND DINERS CLUB ACCEPTEp)


S


'T. . "LA~U 1
Jl %;P ILiA- L. IA


ond sorepoint and '-perhaps. .-Ihe-...
worts can be called repetition. -
No one., ino one with 'discerning. '
ta te that ig, wants to be subje -died
to seeingthe same show .-2 mr 3
times and unfortimately this is -
happening with -all to annoying re-.-
uilarity. This is made worse by the
indisputable fact that these films.
are 9 times out of 10 of consider-
able length and serve ultimately no
purpose other than annoy .to -;
screaming point the person watch-
ing television.
Of course the T.V. can easily be
switched off, but, the customer does
not spend hundreds of dollars buy-
ng a T.V,. set he is not going to
use and it is certain the company
sponsoring the- network does not
want to be without viewers; which
state means only one culmination
- no T.V., -
REVISED OR NOT TELEVISED.
* *


Dear Sir:
. This week I saw something on
the wharf of Port-au-Prince that
will probably interest you and your
readers: a knock-down gasoline
tank with the Lollowing marks in
big'red letters: ESSO, PAP IAITI
MADE IN HOLLAND. Esso buys
its heavy, equipment from Europe
where it is cheap... Delightful!...
Especially when you consider that
Esso is an American company, and
that, whenever we get a loan from
Uncle Sam a prime requisite of the
loan is that we, must use SOLA-
MNENTE expensive machinery and
expensive "technicians" from U.S.
A.. Even cement had to be Ameri-
can made for the Peligre dam.
* When you consider that European
machinery, European steel and ce-
ment are much less' expensive and
just as good, and when you see in-
credibly rich Essd pinching penn-
ies to please its stockholders while
we are sweating out our blood to
please Americans...' (come to think
of it the stockholders of Esso et al),
I can only arrive to this conclusion:
ESSO is rich enough to buy cheap-
ly from Europe, and Haiti is too
poor to buy anything but expensive
stuff from U.S.A.
SDISGRUNTLID
HOUSE WANTED
Wanted to rent by July fifteenth
for indefinite period unfurnished ie-
sidence three bedrooms, two baths,
modern plumbing, modern Kitchen,
ho. water throughout, garden with
shade trees. Place Boyer is pre-
ferred artist wile could use studio
in conjunction.
Reply: HAITI SUN.

SEEKS POSITION
Execntive Secretary bilingual;
mastering French -English; long
.experience office businessi steno;
speaks Italian; seeks full or part -
time position. '.
Write P.O. Box'294, Port-an-Prlne.


4


.


V


S"'A TT


1 .1


J.









PAGE 6


"HAITI SUN"


New Building For Chauffeurs Union Will Aid Work

$6,000 Needed For Completion


An ambitious project tb provide 250 ,members with Union
Headquarters was commenced on the '1st of May, 1959 by
the Association of Tourist Guides and Chauffeurs. To be the
firet of its kind in HIaiti, the Union building will, on its
ccnp4letion, help the Association members in their work
and -assure the members' children a chance fbr an education.
President of the Republic, Dr. Francois Duvalier laid the
cornerstone of the mhauffeurs and Guides projected build-
ing on that May day of '59 at a site 'mid-way along the
Harry Truman Boulevard that borders tUhe waterfront.
I'"


.' I


Ei&ttatl~QcM. lUAadrA;t&trlntm.s.UL.l


Union Headquarters on Blvd. Harry Truman

PRESIDENT PLACED' for the pot'ring of the concrete
CORNERSTONE roof but, its completion is still
Since the day the President lay forecast to be many months away
the building's cornerstone a year because the Union lacks the ne-
has almost passed and block walls cessary funds to briting te edifice
now outline the building's shape to fruition.
and preparations are being' made $4.000 have gone into the building





. C


norVEAU UT
DIFfUREST
pO dia
usonapmI


CHAMBER








uleme dorinune me traction eat
6 curit-suapplementaires. Un ing6eneI
-" 'srpositif de silence rduit tes diff
Sts.bruits desagr'6ables du pneve
andis que la construction 16gare dMi
'Super-Cushion Sans Chambre kitt
-permit dtabsorber les cahots do. la
outs. Vous aurez moins .de pneus .
lat. -tf moins de dIlais parce-que tla
onsruction Grip-Se.aI exclusive
oodyear limine,.pratiquemenfe -
revaisoni habitelles. .- '


i i
.1






A'. V.,


*.i000AO ,EAR_7
m e -- ees alumR. 3o3M3r W as
Ame ssamt sumos ,cemf l


to date and it is estimated that a
further $6,000 will be necessary to
finish it. Although a concerted
drive has as yet not been made
for funds the Union has received
help from many scources and all
250 members of the Association
themselves contribute regularly to-
wards compiling the necessary
$6,000.
Many. American tourists driving
along the palm lined Harry Tru-
man Boulevard have asked their
drivers about the project and have
contributed donations, as have a
number of the city's tourist shops
including La Belle Creole, Kurt A.
Fisher's, Carlo & Fritz Mevs, Mr &
Mrs Linge (Jane Barbancourt) and
Linda's Guest House.
Cooperation has also been exten-
ded to the Association by differ-
ent Government agencies who are
aware of the role "played by the
chauffeurs and guides in this coun-
try's tourism. The land on which
the building is rising is a grant
from' the-r Government. which has
also recognized the' Association as
a Public Utility.
MEMBERS MONTHLY DUES
Du es amounting to one dollar
each a"re handed in by
the 250 mem-bers of the
Association and' at the
height of ihe season when tourist
agencies hire the guides and chauf-
feurs for package travel tours, each
of the guides allots 5 per cent of
his take to the Union's building
[und. Part of this 5 per cent goes
towards building construction and
the rest to an equally worthy fund
a welfare:, und to serve in em-
-'rgency for any members taken
sick or involved in accidents.


Three of the meri behind the buil-
ding's creation, Association Presid-
ent Henri Merceron, Maxo L. Jo-
seph, in charge 'of construction,
and Samson Laventure head of
warehousing, explained this week
that the Chauffeurs and guides new
building is linked to the develop-
ment of tourism in this country and
actually reflects tourist trade. They
stated that one "booming" year
would easily see the building com-
pleted. These three" men state that
although in its present stage of
construction the building is "not
exactly handsome," by the time it
is finished it is expected to be as
imposing as any of the present
edifice's fronting Harry Truman
Boulevard.
The main auditorium for the new
building runs almost the entire
length of the construction and will
upon completion serve as a mo-
tion picture. cinema And a form
of classroom for the chauffeurs
and guides who will be given spe-
cial lectures oh history, English,
civics and other subjects important
and pertaining to their work. Onion
meetings and elementary classes of
education for the 'members child-
ren will also be held in this audit-
orium.
WILL PROVIDE CLINIC TO(
At the. northern end of the build-
ing it is planned to have a clinic
which will be conducted. by one of
the city's foremost Doctors.- The
administrative offices are also to
be sited at the northern end of the
structure as is the planned com-
fort station.
Architect for the job -is Claude
Carrie and., engipeeiing work. is be-
ing carried out by Claude' Riviere


while a Unipn member, Anis Ca-
zeau is- acting as construction boss.
The Union heads pointed out this
week- that many workers and tran-
sport drivers are assisting with the
project and thereby eliminating
,many expenses and cutting prices
to cost. I
The aim of the Association for
Chauffeurs and Guides is a.worthy
one. The 250 Union members will
be able to improve themselves,
Learn more about their respective
jobs and be able to give their child-
ren at least a basic education.


CENTRE
Founded


D'ART
1944


Exclusive agents:
Alix,. Amiama, Armand, Bazile,
Benoit, Bigaud, Blanchard, Desro.
siers, Domond, Duflaut, Hyppollte,
Joseph, Leontus, Leveque, LIautaud,
Montas, Nornnil, Obn,. Pierre, -St.
Brice, Stephane, Turnler,- Vital,
many others.
17- Rue de la Revolution
From Pan American
in town nde ,block toward
bay, half block to left.
Open Monday through
Saturday
9-1 3-6 -Phone 2055




sei s


Sensational


THE AMERICAN VEHICLE, IDEAL FO R HAITI
It is the "LARK" manufactured by ST UDEBAKER-PACKARD -Corporation.
Neither large-nor small of rather, large a nd small at once,
Offering all the advantages of large cars, 6.to 7 passengers,
Stability, Comfort, Power and all the advantages of the. small car ..
Low fuel consumption (30'to 32 miles on a.gailon, . ..
S. .Easy to drive, length reduced "
Reduced Prices, in .pte of ts great luxury
Ideal for Raiti -
S .. .'


THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBJLg -AGENCY, S. A.
Place Geffrard, Phone.: 216 or: 392 -.-.,

GARAGE RUE DES WEABS -. PORT-AUPBINCE, HAEI
Ask also for a demonstrationLbf ..the ick-Up and Trucks -'
Their saving of fuel- soliditr, kpow.r and capacity are
I already universally Inown.
..:


'-. - -


4'


, ;, SUNDAY, APRIL 17th,


2 !






J" bA, .. ~ h -. .
..$AY^ -AIPU 1.7th-, if6


"o..o; T ~ ;^3 -,-'-



Shopping

in Haiti

I't is getting so that people are
Staking vacations ds -muh to.
S shop as to play golf, lounge in
;he sun or just rela_. And, i.-
ron.det when' you consider, the
.' savings to be had through Free
S Port-Shopping. A couple who
normall.. might'spend !500 o
Christmas gifts finds they can
Sib.uy'he 'same gifts, in f re-port
shops, ai savings upto 60%lof.
IU. S. prices. S6,.for, the $250
S 'or so they save, they enjoy
'-t wonaerfug vacations in. Haiti





"ull o -the I -"' "de
Sied. ierc .landise. Io N



h~e~s:- .h-u 'i eres, a. n-made '
lvoe, .hFrench Perfu es, Ca-t
n ?erlaps, the-mLost famous free-
iglyport snd in the world is La
Brele moreole. oca shopping c-he

-iter mterchan dinary shop. Cs

wa;che -" m Patek Philippe,




O. e gag. lysse Nardins Tissot,
Silver, aFrench Perfu t es, Ca-




: nras, Liquours andem a eem -'
Su-gly zeiless. arry of native.





.. tandicrat make La Belle
B' U e mores. a s hopping cen-




S terthan ordpps inary shop. Crystal.
Ssier res.that o fne brancan duy
in. -watches e Pateir Philippe,
-Omega, Ull rtysse Nardin, Tissot,




S -onsivar a tripJager e Coultrei

t :k ot-at discou nts of 50% of La
a.nd- j*" .nb iionder tHat It




Belle Creole is amoiti's. The
.... ie applies in China, Crystal.,




























ad perhaps ret -very fine brand
is representhed. Before buad-
I an exensie r'wa it- might
vertisgbe well wort.- your time to





he consid a tripnues to pursue a po-it
vigorous promotion to incre tourism
as-..': p perhaps another reason for







ri. Am ong the most popularity
f ~ ,ree-port shopping. His ad-
r-'.., ,.vertising inesupport of travel



shopping nations appea related in most
thlea ding U. S. publications and bot-
e continues to pursuagne a po- any



tlicy of.. be coopelebrating with tra-
anni vel agents inr there various a



hproneymotions to increase tQ.-
rism. Among Athe mostas popular
ouled his- effort has created
the practice of sedcious of the









advantages of traveling-ato-
sh' The stoe champagne told any





two monthbe celebrating sale offwedding
Sanniven greater discountso be on a
,;';This year e a. Belle Creole is







moutself celebrating a 10th an-andise.
S verydsary and A Nusitems wihasll



doubled tohis efforts to visi-e
touth e world consci doubts of thou-
= d shop. The store will arld a




-' Everyday exclusive aitiems will
be selected to be sold to visi-













.... tors at prices that will as-


Haiti, richer, in a way, than
'- hen they went away.
a'-:.


.. ." rA., T .sn. "


' ~.. ^ ' ." ~"- .. l- -. . .. -.%. '. : .! -"' E;;- .= '
"" " "* " '-.-*: .'. " - - . "-' "" " *^ -"" "' - '.s.'* *- "" "
. ..1., :- j.-... -... .-,.. .
:.. -.., : |~~...A R ........- ,.. ,-.. -.... - ....... .

.... .. f -b ,J.

-enA
"-'"" ---= A ." ,. ,. .
: '.-:-:" "T!. ... IP lqm e-l ^ 11 ,U.ri'. -


I


HANS BANStNs, GEBG.
DRAGSTE0, OENSE. -,



SThe Finest .f FRANCE.
ItALY. AtSTIA.

LALIQUE, BACCARBAT;-
ORREFORS,
WEBB & CORBETT,
VAL SOLAMBERT.,
STUART, LEERMAN.


IT ALIAN TELOE. -


Si PRJINGLE, BALLANTNE,
BERN .HARD ALTMN
-- LUISA SPAGNOI. .



' DANISH SILVE,
GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY .f
and BRAZWAN GEMS.


HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS


VooDoo Inspired





Native-Inlsuled
SPOr SHIEMTS


SCULPTURES


Fcstory Outlet
MAHOGANY
- The Beat.


1UflJOX CANNON O

.., 1 ?',,' '. . . r

ROYAL DOULTON, *.



HARVEY'S,BRISTOL
CBEM, An FRENGC.
DANISH a nd.
SPANISH LIQUIEBU.




RAFFIA BAGS
& SHOES




HAIflAN MUSIC
- Collector's Itena


Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS

SWorld Famous RUGS & DRAPERY


Haltian RUM BARBANCOURT


it


Have us send gifts to your friends in the U. S. A.
without affecting your quota.- See us for more information.
t*eIOW

\t~~~l' MA \ ^JLO


i .


v _r -W An -or MFW iv W-- A! ft - M- -mm -Ar-- --k it" 4MJ-


------- -' .- .-- -






".. .A..





.FEE PORT_ SHOPPING-,.CENTER

..P.0 -.Box 676,. pORT-A-.P1R..INCIE. HAI ,







KMINTON. WEDWOOD, 'OMEGAt PATEK PHIPE, G

ROY"'AL- COPENHAGEN,- AUDEMAR PIGUET, P PAO. '
ROYALWORCESTE,. JA GER L UL ALINOTH
pYAl oN, ULYSI NARDIN, RIVO BEVION, VIGla?
OSENTHALE,P ATANTA, STUDIO, CAVEN,: LE, GALLION
S . AYNSLEE, CoA.PORr, VL.CAIN. FABE GE O, PAIS.
""GUV TAU' EaG. < ", .'' . J. 'EAN D'ALBERT ', ,,

. ,- ". '- ' 'G U E T .
GEORGE z-N C DT.'







PAGE 9


"HAITI SUN"


Medico UndertakesMedicalService Pgr
Shipping $100.000 Worth Of. Drugs For Haiti
Washington, D.C., April 13 Me- The program was described as team. .Thy are Doctors Giraud of duty. This part.of the program Dr. Berman emphasizedcthat the .
dico (Medical International Cooper- following the pattern set or MEDI- Foster, of University of Maryland is to begin January, 1961. 'mmediate objective of the progr-
ation,. Organization), a voluntary CO by one of its founders, Dr. Medical School Hospital; and Arth- Irf addition, MEDICO .is to con- am is to reach.ill. people in Haitiid
agency 'designed to provide Amer- Thomas A. Dooley in Laos. The ur B. Cecil, chief of surgery, -Mem- duct surveys of indigenous diseas- with a -high level of.,surgical, and .4
ican physicians, drugs and suppl- key to its success lies in the fact orial Hospital, Easton, Maryland. es and nutritional deficiencies.:aiim- medical care.. e touched on a few .4
ies for newly developing lands that American physicians. volunteer Dr. Schwyzer is to remain at Je- med at- lessening ..the"nimpact of items takein-fromasi su y,he made.
where they are critically needed, their -services to bring direct med- remie for a year. The others are these conditions which' a-re-a hajor. of the medical- needs m.tin .?.',
has undertaken a broad medical ,ical 'treatment to areas where there to remain there for shorter periods, cause of the: nation's critical "Less pia vi.:percent of.. the'
service program for -the Republic are no physicians available. MED- during which replacement recruit- health problems. MEDICO will also -pepple': t acessit. or any.,
of Haiti at the request of that gov- ICO has established hospitals and ing will be conducted. cooperate-with other agencies. ini'medical attdWW .jadonlyabout
* eminent. clinics or support programs in Asia, the control "f epidemic and ehdem-. one percent getminiA.
South America, .Africa an dthe Mid- The American team will augment ic diseases as wel~ as in effort:pital service during an entire life-
The plan was jointly announced die East. the present Haitian staff at the to introduce wider sanitation mieth- tiie'" .he said. ""Diseases I .saw
at a press conference today by W hospital ods -..- .-. ,the hospitals, included tetanus,, '
representatives of the Haitian Gov- The first step in. the project is A shipment of hospital' supplies Initial- financing for the project. typhoid, gangrene, malaria, tuber-
eminent, H, E. Ehnest Bonhomme, the reorganization under MEDICO. and drugs, valued at $100,000, leav- was made possible through a $100,- closis,.diabetes and cirrhosis. Mal- *
Haitian Ambassador to the United direction of a' 100bed hospital in es New York April 15. MEDICO 000 grant made by the' Public Wel- nutrition 'was very prevalent.
States was previously selected'but Jeremie- in' the densely populated will start the Jeremie .project in fare Foundation of Virginia. It was '"Bringing. American medicint' .t
was unable to attend .and Dr. Ed- lower peninsula of Haiti. When op- June.- announced by the foundation's pre- meet this.enormous problem on a
gar F. Berman, Deputy Secretary rating at top efficiency, the hosp- -. .' sident, Mrs. Claudia Haines Marsh. voluntary, 'non-governmentals -b- a ,-'.s
General of MEDICO. ital will- serve' a population of ,"In another and later phase, 'phy- Drugs -'and hospital. supplies made is an unusual and important :stoep:-
S90000. -. sicians from Johns -Hopkins Medic- available to MEDICO!!,hospitals are in 'creating .uhderstanding between
As outlined at the conference, al School will cooperate with MED- donated by American pharmaceut- the peoples .of Haiti and the Uniitod
MbEDICO is to organize and staff Personnel of the .first -team to ICO 'irf a teaching program at a "ical houses'. .- States." -.
consecutively all district hospitals staff the Jeremie Hospital have al- postgraduate ldlel at. the VUnivers- A cooperative agreementt between D.--Berman said he 5thoug'it th
nm outlying parts of the country ready been recruited. TheS are; ity of Haiti .in Port-au-Pripce to MEDICO' and CARE has been made Haiti program might give, MEDICO'' :
with American volunteer- physici- Doctors Mararet .gchwyzer, of St. assist Haitian- physicians in -acquir- to, facilitate .shipment'. of supplies experience and t precedent' tex-. '
cians, nurses, technicians and ad- Paul, Minn., specialist in' internal ing' latest technical -skills. These ; to Haiti',. CARE will. also provide tend its uriiqueIservied s.tp'jewly .
ninistrators. MEDICO will also medicine and pediatrics; and Re- trained' physicians will eventuallyy warehouse .space r fo equipment in emergent Africanc areas. wher. en- -
services satellite clinics with a mo- nold Lighston, Jr., Baltimore, Md,, staff- the district hospitals.. Port-au-Prinde' and supplemental tire nations are rio1 without rmed- .'
bile. unit operatilig from eAch bos- g heral. 'practicioner; nurses Shirl- The Henry Ford Hospital, Detr- food for hospitals and out-patient ical equipment' ad"ipersonneL.'
pital. ey Ward, R.N. of Baltimore and oit, "Michigan 'is ,cooperating- with departments served by MEDICO.- 'Haiti's Minister of Health: .
Hospitals will be supplied by ME. Shirley Wolfe, R.N., of University MEDICO by- sending a surgeon and. -The Haitian representatives' said- "As .Minister. of' 'Health-, want
DICO with urgently needed equip- of lMaryland;, and George' Buck, of a medical man to stays for two- that, President Dr. Francois- Duva- 'to ex. ess my sincere appreciation .
ment' for- operating- rooms, laborat- Miteola, L.I., hospital administrat- month intervals in the district hos- lier. had endorsed the -'program 'of MEDICO's aid to thee'Republic.' '
-' ones, pharmacies .and .wards. The or. pitals in Haiti to work and teach which will be. carried" forwr. with WJs ,Exoellency, President Duvalier,
S organization will spi a 'steady flow Two other 'physicians have been? at these institutions. So far, 12 phy- the cooperation .of Hedalth- I sti is awaig- 'w-ith ..,much interest. -
of medicine iand antibiotics. tentatively scheduled to join the sicians have signed u for this tour Caflo Boulos; .... .. : '(Con.tin ed on p ag-e
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Report Made by rooms. The-laundries, supply roams drugs are almost unavailable. Een tremendous popular tio den a nlly- e blood f
Dr. EDGAR ~. RA. .- and record -rooms ae -improvised.: the basic pharmaceutical chemic- with. limited mAiedical facilities.- malariA is- done. So of tehe
Dputy Secretary General The latter is almost non-existent als are difficult to obtain. Pharma- PERSONNEL-: - -' saes 9-.o! e ,: -
Sof MEDICO Toilet cosistf outside facilities. cists are- ptesentin .three hospit- -Most of te hospitals, are manned nu-se. Mal do t Hae
The following is a condensed ver- In *4Ast of the district hospitals als. ... by an Administator, and in the equipment to- s a. lBe atl.U
Bp o of Dr. Berman's survey and lighting depends upon hospital gen- HOSPITAL SERVICES: smaller institutions the Adminis They have actually .noa cmuS '
-aon Haitian medical facilit- drators. There is hardly enough From the amount .f work done tar and the Chief of Service are in. with th outside.worid .pothe.
es The survey was made in Dec- el.ettricity in these-regions for de- in each department in- these seven one, with .one to four physicians tha getting their shor supply
ber 1959 to help formulate -a pendable service. There is no phone outlying hospitals, I would .say that -tundeb him. The -young physicians drugs Wnc!a month.-.- :
d medical service program now communication -in any.of these cit-:less;, an one percent of- Haitians are the ones who have finished SANITATIONAD PUBLIC
beg undertaken at the request of is in which the hospitals are tlo- get even minimal hospital service, their internship .and -must do a HEALTH
te Haitian Government. ated. : during their. entire lifetimes. ., twoyear-stint in the rural areas. Sanitatior iri all oi the rural' Vi-. :
this survey every major med- .bPRATING ROOMS: The wards of- the hospitals are They are sent to one of these hos- ages is almost nop-existent. :Een
instiTuEion THE EsAIG ROO The ward t heho st aret
Sistittio Was~inspected tog- These are equipped so that sur- rather well takpn care-of..The lin- pitals or to a smaller health dis- in some of the cities such as Gon-
with 30 percent of mnor .- gery can be done,, but only the most ens are clean and the usual iron pensary. Half. of the young physici- aives, St. Marc and Petit Goaveb .
Specln emphasis was pl- essential. The instruments .are in- hospital beds are in .existence. The ans, affer/their two-year rural stint, the water supply, is not safe. Jere- .
e. r aunation of seven t dist- adequate for any major surgery adult patients are mainly the eld- leave Haiti altogether. mie, Cayes and Cap. Haitien are
o- aol n e os p s at St, Mare, (but his could easily be "supplemen- erly, most with gastro-intestinal di- The communication .between hos- better fi this respect Most of the
S. mve a Haichi Pe- ted). Most of the operating tables, seas6s tuberculosis, a nd varying pitals, or even between cities,, is' villages haveno wells. Water corn-
Say and Jereme n are adequate but. some- are anti- forms of nutritional disease. There alinost impossible except, by road, es from contaminated streams..
diatedh, a Gomber om dispensaries equated with necessary change of is, a fair amount of malaria and which takes hours or days. Each SUMMARY -
pdeovwerie t red positions impossible).: The operating typhoid fever seen in the wards. hospital-has at -least one jeep, .but.. Other thansthe two major pnv--
A personelwere visited m lights are simple, most of -As tp. surgery, there .are Very even if it were running it would be ale institutions (The Albert
'UOSPITALS: them- battery operated. Some of few surgical., casbs in the wards. impossible .to transport an ill pati- Schweitzer and Reynolds .Hosp-
..$-The major hospitals range from the hospitals have anesthetic mach- The average' 100-bed hospital does ent from these. hospitals- to a major itls) and- the University Hosp-
.0 toA410 beds. The smaller ones ines that are usable, some anti- approximately- four major pnd 16 one withoutfgreat trauma. ,, ital, themedical services,to av-
,range from 80 to 105 beds. The quated; mine have none at: all and minor cases a month. The average Most of the physicians receive- erage people in Haiti are mm-
t-bWuildings-are rather well construce- use only the open drop ether tech- major operation .is the appendect- approximately $150: a month in imal. -.
d -df masonry, but tropically opn unique. omy, Jernja; ovarian cyst, and oc- these hospitals., The young doctors 2. The district hospital physical
'to the:weatherexcept.for shutters. THE LABORATORIES: casionally a hysterectomy. The oth- inthe rural areas get -$120 a month,, plants are. adequate however,
There is. no'-screening in -any of Most of the labortoriesare equl- er operations are of a minor nat- and -the nurses get $60 a month. equipment, supplies and tr4n-.
tihse hospitals. The -grounds are pped with microseppe, some anci- ure. Of- the seven outlying' hospitals, This, compares to the. average pay ed administrators are limited.
.,-rather well kept and the 'interiors ent but usable. Very few of the Cap Haitieri does the most. Most for the individual -worker' n Haiti 3. There is little organization co
are fairly clean. The kitchen facil- laboratories can do serologic tests; of these ill patients. walk or go by- that runs from '35 to 40 cents a day. munication among dotors.
i.:-ies are usually in a separate some can -do blood chemistries, mule or camion to reach some, of DISPENSARIES: 4. The health center dispensalies
Sbuilding..on the grounds, with simp- Some of the -unitss do malaria these institutions. -During the trip of the kmuall vill- need refurbishing
lae. wood and charcoal. stoves. The smears. None of then except the -, The. outpatient service sees front' age health units were visited, some 5. The medical school andhoaspt-
:food for patients is the average major ones do-typhoid tests. A few 25 to 40 patients a day, prescribing of which had a Jew beds for extre- -. (Co nu'ed on page 10)
.-native food, with no special diets, hospitals have technicians. minimally and doing practically no i.ely- ill patients. -Most. of theseis-- ; :
!-' The water.supply is usually furnish- THE 'PHARMACIES: diagnostic' work. A nurse usually pensaries are no more, than a small SELL -YOUR !COINS
-ed-by a hospital well and not con- .The pharmacies are poorly runs this. Some minor .emergencies sliack with minimal diagnostic fa-
sidered safe. There is very little equipped. The important ready-for- are itreated'atC these outpatient clin- cities (such as blood count or ur-- Old American & Haitlan (lalin
.-boiling or other purification of use drugs such as antibiotics are ics. ie analysis) or nond and only a In Haiti At U.S.A.- Prices
.rinlking water-' in the hospitals. usually in very short supply. -Sup- There are many areas, especially minimum of- drugs of a very basic Box 151
Some-hospitals have small numb- plies of. antimalarial drugs are in the southern peninsula and the nature. In these, the physicians REe Delmas 28
.ers. of semi-private- and private short, and the antituberculosis extreme northwest, where theie, are spend three' hours a day working. Petion-Vlle -



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S- History Ar ts.. .x -
pblic of Haiti ed .fro "I M er, otauPrinc U H a tz i
a-i December Te vI publish a Title p e Of Republic's Tranations
the Constitution as it appears in the original. Kaleidoscopic View OfRepublic's TranforN nations

NTITUTION OF TH REP LIC OF HAITI 19 W sinerely believe hat more we k w bout the of government admiistraton
history of a country the better we are apt to appreciate theycould Ao was to -try, o opy
TITLE VI -the best they- could the par..aM..ent. -..'...S
THE A N TRATIVE SYSTEM .its people and to understand its comportet.. W e. ahal try tem c e h
SA r to give you a rapid view of tie most importaent- a sapectr of insfatirios oth e et-masters. To- :
.m CHAPTER our histoIand our ct.r. o rebuild a .a.rtiallj destroy co--..-,
Commncal and Prefectural Institutions ou, h a h. .o a" :o-' .
Technical and Administrative, District. Councils BY FORTUNE. L. BOGAT er 6, 1492,.. and believing thfiat:e. h prttit bydi e tibiliTMi;
And Administrative Councils of Rual Sections H aiti is one of the two .smallest had reached- the Indies; Colutmbus of tb e leaders. A' igeA wa
Article 129.-Al commune shall be autonomous. This autonorm y shall Republi, s ,in Latin America. It is called Indians .the inhabitatns,f. tbsolte qecssas to t 4-.
S. an, underdeveloped country, where the Island. Ii--fact.-the ab gi nals. y ob Natihon aga
e gulated by law. i find most of the. political, had some resemblances 4thS i enhial rtb of thFe nc h
-Article 130.-Any commune the, revenues of which are insufficient w os o. t p-.ta .h .- -ilr
Article 130-Any commune the. revenues of which are insufficientsoial and racial passions that the American ndian. These ,proud- In- aso tom in order in the int-
Sor, an autonomous administration may be united with the nearest corn- world confronts. &t sdianst called. Arat aks died eri l .
mune to become a ward quartere) . This country waa discovered by promptly -phder the cruel trea t
article 131.-Communal Councils shall be elected for six years, and Christopher Columbus on Pecemb merts of .thea panisir Masters &nd pro ica TURMOILS ,
S fightilng ir d..edm. a ond. were graatim o. a _to
Their members may be re-elected any number of times. Frtne L. Bogat, a frequent dually re b neoe snath Haiti as estimated'athe popu400,
The number of members of the* Communal Councils shall be fixed contributor in the past-of artie- ed pns varie s, parts f A iet ai-t Which made it 4very 0 .
bylaw. - Tbr to they 'S islo y provedd .to b 'more resista eep a- large Army and- toe.:'-
To ae e3- m embnaleusre-ofCommunala Coube n crlecteo.oei inecary,.."r.. in -the Hatm firm. oe e ru.
To be.elected a memberofa Communal Council, it is necessary(General Mor istb- and.teacious tlanthe. Indians sufficient labor supply a
--- , .- S .. .. ,, l .. .. In .1691, .Spall. .ed to Frnceb
.i. 1691, .S -edded to rance time That situation- becazl m i -
To be wa Haan; trs I i s- oun tt ant Westenpart of -the Island by emic,,I and -for over .a caenr-l A'
2. .".To beitwenty-fiveyearsold;. r II ously .written. about HaJtt Treay, ol.yswick. Working 12 country was ..plunged- iit l .
S3. To enjoy civ, and political rights; a s -stoms. arle hours a e Atl k-slacks es made revolutions, -'urisings anoucal d
4. To be an owner -of real property in.the om neor to practice me ag of Haiti the;' chest colony of Fran- turmoils. In- 1915. .-aferaterle
Sa trade or a profession there; , ed b the.... ,i" and r ce and its .mos reous--possess- "Ephemeral Goei-
.5. Tq have resided at.least five-years,in the commune.', Iited in severe i local newspap ..... c-i .I -- the -bef rein o f" b"i m :--e ...
I = .. | .' '- '. n p. " .,-The, cruel tretmenL laume Sam .who.was killed'd~uring" ,-
A -Technical Subcouncil .of -hree members, appointed by 'the Pres-, er. ,,' French colons inflicted to the black-, the revolution- that caiiehis gov. .
. Ident:-of the R.epublic, shall assist each Communal Council.. In .' following r;ticleog- slae, raisedd them to revolt, and ernment away .theUS arif -
-.' Each rural- section shall be governed by an Administrative Council ppa a lec tre he bloody, decade which followed cupied 'Hai-ti 'm July 1915t
"-e ba o-u l presentation- -to -Ane A issocnatholl " H dti "r Juy "1' th->
..headed b leader o ecommuneand set up to improverural ving ri Wo brought total tiqtory .. the Haiti-: August .-134, .years. .
.. .. . .. ,. . ... .. o.sets iorua o ume Ai u - - -- '
.- conditiori.an o raise the social moral, and intellectual level of the tstoffthe. H n lead wee e ei pationf Hati b h
peasant. Cooperative, community, .and -basic-educgtion systedqs, as .well portat assets of Haiti's history illiterates, and had practi ally. c aan n..maitn. ce" -
pera vmd.h cotuz :- .lea. ' .-. ..praca-yiart.era be,
asa the dstabishmennt of 'smahU loans or' fail irsand craftsmen,. will help a nd theciure training in the complex mechanisrmirted'th.t' .hor .o
Sto achieve these' ants. ' .. -. '. the.rga .iatioi :of. a modern title:
A Communal Concil may -be dissolved only.. in. case of duly- proved- ' r --: :--' '- -'
dreli-tion o ddt, or.. .. u. -. ointments n l#- basis of merit Maid aptitude, jobl retention guarantees, ( tinued on' l
dereliction of c duty, t embezlement, or faudulent admistration. _traser, suspension,- and termination of. eryic, the 'dte of .the -. .
: 'In Such case, the President of the Republic'shall setLup athree-memb- eni'd ..- a .. '. .
ernment agencies and appeala against, measures.a:ffcti hem.
er "Comnnunal Coinmssioi". to look after the.interests of the -commune .n old n lit-i al asts pariuln Secreteries oa Staate, n.. .. .
until l the-neXt 'elections... 1 ;.. ,. ; Stte,._..el,. ..5_i PrI. u i cutor, Am.ba- "i"t

ricle32 --heCoim al .Cohe uil, all manage .itsinds o r thesdos, t Priate Se o Presi t of e cand
S .eclv bnefitof the cor ity andshall sbmteties Ge al Directos -e icef tovea ramentesGe ialarr General GovermntAgen pa
authorities &.detailed and documented report on its management. ... .. -'
inelded'in the care.r. Civil Service...
SIt shall appoint its officials and employees .w4tout, the intervention .. .n.clded in.the-ca Service officials -and- eploye.. .i t- y eat
.- . ... .... "- Article- 137.-'-Civil Serce .officials, -and. employees a re .foridden to -.- hum
Sany bther authority. st or to. give-up their positions- collectively n co ry
'-It shall:draw- up its- tax-. rates- and other levies to be .submitted as g il a u theigeneral mobilpttion of .ve o-y Drena o Bol :
a bill for enadtnenr, into law; to the central authorities whio may. make Ta rat fn.o
S. enact. ino law the central authorities, who may mak ences may be decreed in the event. of national danger r serious Secretay St for Public
Such ehianges therein-as they may deem necessary disorders il Health'-.-
.. : ......* .... . ., .... ... .. ..... disorders, su'c as ileg'al or. politica general .sgral -strikes. -,'-A- '. '" -. '-* ;- ". -.. - -
S Article 133.--The office of Prefect shall be. established in the depart-_ a .., o .c a .. general s e Republic .-oHati.
'- ents g.... necI .. *..n i the d i t .ri. By virtue of the Military- Service Law, a general mobization order US. State Department
T Ps.-. eand. essary i he districts. r. r may be: issue by the Executive -Power in the event of -serous cl. am' plead -to note that You-
; Te Prefects are-/-iil officials representing .the Executive Power ders .. ..:-' '.- reached an agre pent with
-'-.. .;. ,d . . .. . .tlv.. -. discord er .,.- --. .,. '..' .: g r m e t -
-'t -. .6e lt 14'etiter of Health for the ME-.
The law shall determine their powers and their place of residence. -: D i health prog which
In each prefecture, .Technical and. Administrative District Councils," '. ,.' will 6eW& in early Jupe. Let- me.--
'':eaed6iy te..Prefect and composed of specialists taken from the Civil express again w hat you fire-ady,
kmow frorn-our previous discussions
: Service ists, shall- be set up .to supervise. the Communal Councils of Os my enthusiasm for MEDICO s
.the piecture... project and our desire to cooper;---
These' Tedhnical- and. Administrative Councils sliall look after the pol- ate, with MEDICO in all pdossib
S', iticdal, administrative, economic,, social, and' cultural, interests of the ways: make it a success,. Pjl.se -''
'ommunes win their jurisdiction andi shall prepare. or coor inate mfel free t. call op me for .an
7 assistance I can render in this un-
deivelopment .plans. and programs and make sure that they are fu-ly a, '.
executed -by. the "Technical Subcouncils." '- ,
Article 134. -Th' law shall determine the- functions and powers of Wil mA. Wieland,-.Di ector



Article 135--Civil Service' officials and employees .are ia the service i lon
o: .:" the Stete and 'not".t ay specific political faction CiThey my:a not


Stakeadvanlage' of their positions to engage in electloneeria f ffairs
q T he M o-, -em n"e .a W a I, '



A.- cle 136.--The law shall regulate the Civil Service, particularly S f Medical .
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.the meentirementa for admission into e Seaniee, upnoeuns wandtapp-




little a cod be a first zgate
.WEEKLY EN.tTAINM"POGAM h g r m und t. e f re
I-'^ lf3S S^ 3 v '^ s TUESDAY: 7:30pir. to Midhight (redle B et- under 4*aa 0?. thydaiincesslop
B 1the r Starson the-Terrace wlh excellent Da e Band 6 Coimupicabons if in betwe
o Atn9e 30 itad to iiriegrLiiw th
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Wt_ .EVED IDA T:. C70 .t."o ?:00. o.. lour i. C.n.,o"at,.iib.









'DAY, APRIL 17th, 1960


" HAI TI


Histc
*' (Continued from page 10)
ri.army, the reorganization of some
apartmentsnts such as: Public
Works, Finance, Public Health, Ag-
:."-nculture, etc. It is however to be6
-~.deplored that nothing was done by
the occupants, to eliminate illiter-
i-.cy, or to explore the natural re-
O urces of the Country in an effort
to arrive at its gradual industrial-
ization. That was a very serious
"-omission.

:- Since the revolution of 1946, we
have been slowly working towards
.a better understanding of our pro-
|blems and "the unification of our
'-.efforts. A renaissance of Haiti has
started, plainly expressed by our
S.art, our writings and our efforts to
be recognized by the rest of the
.world as a Nation with the same
.aspirations as all those Nations
:. who are fighting to improve tihe
standard of living of their people.
Our slowness in attaining our goal
is due in part to the fact that after
our victorious lights against the op-
pressors -the French Masters- the
country was in ruin, and we had
to take certain drastic measures
to guarantee 'the perennial of our
independence. These m e a s u r e s
Which were necessary at the mom-
ent, practically deprived us of the
technical and adm i n i s t r a t'i v e
"frame-work" indispensable to ach-
ieve 'the development of the count-
ry. .Another great,-handicap is the
fact that we were left with a! third
of the most mountainous part of the
Island -f of which 75 per cent are
hills and about 25 per cent plains,
swamps and deserts. This will give
',an idea :of the almost insurmount-
.* 'able obstacles we had to face.
Qur social pattern presents cert-
*.' .


wry Arts
ain complexities due in part to our
languistic and maybe to a certain
religious conflict. Contrary to what
many people keep on repeating we
do not have a Ewo-cell society, but
a standard one where most of the
known classes are duly represent-
ed.

GROWING MIDDLE CLASS
To a growing middle class be-
long a great, many of our profess-
ionals, doctors, writers, poets, en-
gineers, artists, leaders, musicians,
lawyers, some laymen, etc. -In that
middle class you will find the cham-
pions of a native culture based on
Haitian realities. That new cult-
ure which 'is our real one, is sup-
planting our alleged French cult-
ure. We can say that etymological-
ly speaking in that middle .clasA
.are the members of our real elite.
'Our peasantry,. the back bone of
our economy,' ig mostly illiterate
and exclusively creole, speaking.
The members of this interesting
class of our society is often called
"moune morne" or mountain men.
As in Africa the peasant women
do the trading and walk miles to
the markets. A few of our remark-
able leaders and professionals em-
erged from the peasantry. The soc-
ial mobility of the peasant is great-
ly limited by poverty-and lack 6f
schooling. It is however, a great
mistake to believe that because the
pe'asnlts are generally illiterate
they are not interested in what is
going on in the country. Illiteracy
does not prevent them from think-
ing. In fact they often think with
more logic than most of the so
called educated or intellectuals.
There is also a "proletariat" -
sort of an 6v'er-flow of the rural


And Sex In Haiti


population towards the cities. They to supply, his immediate needs and
are the laborers, the stevedores, his. fadrily's. The gradual industri-
the hired hands, the ditcidiggers, alization of the country and the ex-
street cleaners, etc... ploitation of its natural resources
Through an- arrogation of "nobil- are therefore of vast importance.
ity heredity" some mulatto fam- Left with the negative attitude
lies with enough means to live on of the slave towards work and the
a bourgeois' level, called themselv- positive attitude., of the French
es "Aristocrates". This is of course Master towards the acquisition of
an anachronism. superfluous, the Haitian however
Haiti is a Roman-Catholic count- likes to work and can become an
ry. There was a law in the Colony excellent technician when properly
that made it compulsory for the supervised. He is also rapidly over-
French-Master to baptise his slav-
es. However Voodoo is still con-
sidered the, living cult that aided
the Haitians in their fights for free- GIVE YOUR
dom and independence. Through a
strange phenomenon that folk re-
ligion has identified itself with Ca-EW
tholicism. That semi-fusion can be R
explained by the increasing adopt- ".
ion' of the portraits and images of
the Roman Catholic Saints used in
the hIoumforts or Voodoo' Temples
too represent the Gods of Voodoo-
ism. Many other cults are repres-
ented in Haiti, and all enjoy the
equal protections of our laws
Haiti, one of the most densely
populated countries of the World
has a very poor semi-colonial eco-
nomy based on agriculture. An in-
tensive expansion of our agricult-
ure will certainly help, but will not 'A
bring much prosperity because of TWICE as
the limitation of our cultivable soil TWI.C Es
and also of the division and redi-
vision of lands. On his small plot. APPLIED TH E W W
the peasant produces just enough JOSEPH NAF


coming- his aversion for team-.
work: .
Haitian r a'c l-a 1 coriflict started.
when the children of the white M& -'
er with his black mistress were
raised by the French father/'with'
great affection, and often sent to
France for their education. When
the colon was not married his 'mu-
latto son inherited his wealth. These
colored boys were legal equals of
the whites but not 'social equals.
(Continued on page 12)


ROOMS THE


BMAUI Lf
LER-iEK4ERN walfl
DAL Agents


Planning



SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION



FORYOUR LAND?


-I


- .1.


~~OIL


It will pay you to patronize the man with


the yellow CAT* Machines

If you're one of the many farmers who have signed up for conservation
measures in a watershed program, you'll want to choose with care the man
who digs your ponds, builds your dams and terraces and clears your land.
Check his work record and his equipment. Ask your neighbors and friends.
They'll recommend the man with Caterpillar equipment. He's the man with
the know-how, who expects to be in business for a long time, who is a good
neighbor and businessman. He can do the best job for you because he has
the best equipment. It will pay you to patronize himl


OUR CATE RPILLAR*DEALE,
{*.CrpdlW B-d C mTe bkgiamnd Trardemaks ctd CiMr pdIw Ir. C

MAURICE BONNEFIL Manager of The Haytian Tract or Co. Chamnoerelies


SUTJ N "


I. I :


12


AGE. 11



_. ,,.\


P'i' o mr...hp o t
)L "O '*ttal pri mtnc e V 1n)









Served exaCmwsm/ at Haiti's Leading
HOTELS & RESTAURANTS & BY CONNOISSEURS
THROUGHOUT THI WORLD


'. .' '









"HAITI SUN"


-: ... '_^ ...-.: .
-- -s.'- . :.
SUWDY, AL i,90


SUNDAY, APRIL 17t04:1960-


History Arts And Sex I


(Continued from page U) Creole' words are Frencl," which
Later gn they became a minority makes it very easy for a foreigner
which identified itself with the white who knows Creole to revert to
colonists. They were however fin- French. Creole syntax is part Afri-
ally compelled to join the black can and rather closer to English
majority in its struggles for free- syntax than to French. All Haitians
dom and independence. With- the speak Creole, even if a practical
.evolution of the masses, and the joker pretends not to, formerly to
growing power of our middle class, speak Creole in society or to a
-the last vestiges of that conflict ;is stranger was frowned upon, but not
disappearing, now days. We are often asked if


ATTITUDE TOWARDS
FOREIGNERS
The salient feat of our racial con-
flict is that despite the cruel treat-
ments, the oppression and the abus-
es endured by the Haitian during
the course of his history, he has no
prejudice against the foreigners
worth talking about. The Haitian
attitude towards t h e foreigner is
the reflection of this latter's' attitu-]
de towards us. Naturally no matt-
er who they are, we like some peop-'
le better than others.
NATIONAL LANGUAGE
In Haiti the national language is
Creole and the official language is
French. We say that Creole is a
language -and not a corrupted
French. Why should it be, when
Spanish is not called a corrupted
Latin. Creole is a colorful and sav-
ory lariguJge, in 'which abstract id-
eas are expressed by. poetic imag-
es, sayings and often with compar-
isons. More than 80 per cent of


the French the Haitians speak is
the same' spoken-in France. We
talk the same French with a "cert-
ain intonation": some 'local expres-
sions due to Creole influence will
probably create in the far future
a lively and less rigid Fyrench.

If" -fr.. 0


Experience has proved that the
education of the people in Creole
would be the shortest road to the
complete alphabetisation of our
rhasses, and reverting to French
would be very easy. There is a
Creole section in the Educational
Department. but no Creole brtho-
graphy has yet been definitely ad-
opted.
SHAITIAN SEXUAL PATTERN


This condensed expose of our
history and culture would .be un-
balanced without a brief synthesis
of our sexual pattern. People all
over the world have to a certain
degree a sexual conflict, but only
those with an open mind can


WHAT MAKES A DAY NIGHT SPENT
ATTHE -


Bacoulo:u Club

SOEXCITINGLY DIFFERENT? FOUR WORDS,
THE .

FAMOUS BACOULOUr
VOODOO DANCERS,
BUT THAT IS NOT ALL THAT IS OFFERED BY
S 4 0 0


Designs f .Rush
AND SUPERB a AND FAMOUS
^ Quality.g-^^ oo ol&m" Sisal.
GRAND RUE uin4t e ta ctC & esM i .& 6 PHONE :2.634


~~a0k~krac~kra0roxe
jr W ~ e 'C 'C 'C 'C' C 'C N~ C 'C %C'C.C'CNCN ~S'%CNCNCNCNSC


,-. "Hotel Chouco


a ENTEkTAINMENT PROGRAM


Dance


W Wine-


EVERY NIGHT WITH A LOCAL

4 PIECE BAND FROM 7:00 TO 9


Special! Spec
UESDAY 7:00 TO 8:80 P.M.

GET TOGETHER PU CH BOW


7:30 P.M. TO 1:30 A.M.


line

... .


Dance

, EXOTIC "

:30 P. M. .' .


iaII


L PARTY


DANCING DINNER UNDER THE STARS ON
THE ROMANTIC ROOF-GARDEN "
7 PIECE BANDI- STARRING ..,
OUR YELOPHONIST MICHEL DEGROTTES
ATTRACTIVE AND DELICIOUS BUFFET AND A SHOW
SATURDAY. 9:30 P.M. TO 3:30 A.M- -
A MUST!!!

Gala Nght,
-- ANCING IN A REAL EXCITING ATMOSPHERE
THE GREATEST SHOW ON THE ISLAND!


4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Ft
4
4

4


From< S M MwSSBZM<

:, .
FN F55 -".

i-A


n Haiti

freely talk about sex,, a subject
which does not tolerate lies, and
mediocrity. There is, in Haiti, a
double moral code: as far as Sex
is concerned. One is based on the
Western Christian world principles
and the other on our African herit-
age of" polygamy. As in Africa, to
our peasant polygamy is an.-econ-
ornic necessity. It provides him
with the necessary hands to cultiv-
ate his plots through his .wives.
and her children. Undoubtedly the
number, of wives depends. on how
much land he has. Possibly people
are riore-erotic in the tropics than
in the temperate or northern count-
ries. This is a biological question
for which there is a casual answer:
In the tropics the days are gener-
ally long, it is always warm, there
is a' profusion of light, and that ex-
tra light acts on the eyes ..and
through them. on a certAin part of
the brain, and through the brain
on a particular gland called pituit-
ary. This gland produces hormones
which .stimulating effect is carried
by the blood stream. It would seem
'that those who live in the tropics
are equally affected by that phen-
omenon. On the other hand, we
should not under-estimate the in-'
fluence of an exotic vegetation, the.


--L. ML -J1-- JLTI
,p. i I I .


. --'


-r




I' $
K


I'
IA





[1:
I

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AZ.


S. '.' - .


L *
ePrhor


.1S "* : R

EXCEPT .MONDIAYS

,IS "' '. ".- -


THE RESTAURANT

IS OPEN DAILY-

A SPECIAL LUNCH


-r


4. -
U-F-s.- -.
S F -
~. -
.t~ -.* -- -... ---
~ *,:-&~-* F.


PAGE 12


-. OFFERED .AT MIDDAfY

,OR. 1.75 -r A
.. 1 '5 " " " J-a
AND $2.00 A A CARTE-

he menu is prepared by Albert Barcilon

O of Switterlandu -
j ..* ' ',- -~ ," "*V "'' :,,' -


P-


wl


11


A


&,


/


I


harmonious mingling of the.sound-'-
of water falls, of the rain, of the ..,
insects, of the breeze caressing the' jI
bushy trees; all. that give us the
sensation of floating in. an atmog-.-
phere of love, music and poetry.
.'We hope that this, synopsis of our-,
history will clarify. sogne of our-
complexes and give a plausible ex-
planation of a few of pur ambival- .*
ences. You will .'pobably be .in a
better- position to appreciate the
fact: that the greatest desire..of the
Haitian People is to live. in peace
with .the. rest of the world. To"work,
to learn, to progress and' to be..
happy are-the dominant. factors of
our -emotional life: We ate a proud
people, some times too proud and
this is why we often prefer poverty, -
priations than comfort without di-
gnity. We are however greatly obs,':.-
sessed with the multiple problems
we must solve before realizing our-
dream's for a happy and prosper
ous Haiti. .

FOR RENT
-Large new house at' F.RMATHE.
latitudee 3700 ft.) partly finished,
on 3 acres of land;:. f s
Living room witli dining area, 4.
bedrooms, ntaidsroo, pantry, hall,
bathroom,. serivait- quarters, 2 car
garage, 'firelace, open and cover-
ed poreb, -hot and cold .water, res--
eroir 30,000 ja-U.
Address .P.J.&-BoX 605, .
Port-au-Prince. -"- Phone 3738.
. .. -









SUIiDAY, APRIL 17th. 1960 ~tT4ATTT QIINT'I


% I ".T'A T T T Q T..7TV I 7


National Palace For Asta's Opening Session


250 MEMBERS


HERE IN EARLY MAY


The Salle des Bustes in the Na- convention will be introduced to the
.tional Palace is to be the venue for President of the Republic, Dr. Fran-
the opening session of 250 memb- cois Duvalier and will also be wel-
-ers of Mid-West Chapters of the corned by Government Officials.
.American Society of Travel Agents. ASTA's 250 members will be
At this time (Monday May 2nd.) guests at various city hotels and
the participating members of the on April 30th approximately 40
members will arrive in Port by
3 NEW WEATHER Delta Airlines. It is expected that
the balance of the ASTA members
STATIONS FOR will arrive via. Pan American on
PORT-AU-PRINCE Sunday May 1st.
To be established shortly in Port- First reception for the visitors
au-Prince, Cap-Haltien and Cayes will be held under the auspices of
are three- new meteorological stat- the Haiti Tourist Association at the
ions which will be basically used Cabane Choucoune from 6:30pm to
for the purpose of detailed weath- 8:30ptn on Sunday evening. At 10
-er observations. am on Monday morning ASTA's
The new stations will function 250 members will go to the recept-
under the control of the weather ion by the President and for their
service at Damiens and it is esti- first session. On the same day at
mated that equipment for the new 3:30pm they will hold a joint ses-
meteorological stations will cost in sion at Cine Capitol.
the region of $4,000 largely con- 27 members of the group are ex-
tributed by the Technical Assist- pected to depart Tuesday at 8am
ahc-e program. by COHATA to visit Sans Sbuci Pa-
St. Martial College is the site of lace, the Citadelle and Cap Hai-
the only existing weather station tian's hotels. The remaining memb-
and this, is of small proportions, ers will stay in Port-au-Prince and
'The new stations will be under the will be conducted on a shopping
charge of a Frenchman, Mr. Roger facilities tour and of the mahogany
" ,Grappe of the United Nations. factories; commencing at 9:30am.



NEWWAYTOBUY I


[ YoUR FAVORITEL
,:. -





S..... ique 'n.new .se'vicr, ,vi(ded l ,l . .!Cr .
-savyou till Iio nUI ankd efery.,; '


IV U Pin TJ %Q ON STATESIDE
AW U ""'*r ,TINGS





IO n NFu.Dw FICsT
I'~D D P UP ~~5.


NO CUSTOMS


I ', ,


This group will also visit Cacique
Island, Kyona ,Beqch, the Marine
Gardens and Boutilliers (in the aft-
ernoon.) The Haiti seminar will be
held on Wednesday at the Capitol
Theatre with representatives of the
Capital's hotels, shops, and travel
bureaus to participate in an open
forum with the visitors on quest-
ions pertinent to Haiti's tourism.
In the same afternoon the ASTA
convention group will hold a closed
meeting at the Haitian-Anierican
Institute. -Thursday 'will see the
despatch of another group number-
ing 27 members to Cap Haiden
via COHATA and a program of
shopping, sightseeing etc., similar
to that of Tuesday arranged for
those remaining in Port.
On Thursday evening at the Hot-
el Ibo Lele a gala dinner will be
given the 250 visitors, a dinner
sponsored by the Minister of Infor-
mation and Coordination and Mrs.
Paul Blanchet. Formal dress will
be required for this event."

HAITI INCLUDED
IN DELTA
"DREAM PACKAGE"
Delta Airlines 14th annual
"Dream Vacation" package tours
will this year cover 13 resort areas
including Miami Beach, the- Flor-
ida Sun Coast, New York, Washing-
ton, New Orleans and several cit-
ies of the Caribbean.
This was disclosed at the promot-
ion program ceremonies held and
launched on April 4th by Delta Air-
lines in Detroit, Cincinnati and
Chicago. Wcal participants to. the
Delta ceremoniesin the U.S. were
Dr. Rhindal Assad of Villa Cre-
ole; Robert Baussan of Ibo Lele,
Ben Shindler of El Rancho, Pierre
Chauvet of Agence Citadelle, and
Antoine Herard who 'was recently
appointed Attache of the Haitiant
Tourism Office in Chicago.'

FOR SALE
1960 Volkswagen only done 4,000
miles.
As new, with Radio, insurance
paid up till November. Owner leav-
ing Haiti. Buyers please contact
Rex Simon c-o La Belle Creole.
A Bargain!


1'

*~ 1A0~
,*-,.**.'.. .4..4.


R
V


DISCOVER THE FASCINATION

OF HAITI

Through Its Postage Stamps

For complete information in Haiti

Stamps and other details which will be

furnished you free of charge, write to

P.O. Box -723 PORT-AU-PRINCE


A


FOR YEARS NOW TOURISTS HAVE.BEEN PLAGUED WITH
CARTING LIQUOR- THEY HAVE PURCHASED, ,with over-
weight charges,- with customs problems. Iri one fell
swoop La Belle Creole has made it possible to have
liquor purchased abroad, particularly in Haiti, delivered
'to your home, in most cases at prices.cheaper than,you
can bring it through, accompanied by all your other
purchases. ,


Ie red's Oicfht Vyou Sir',
ON A CARTON OFfIVE BOTTLES


N.Y.
Price*


-Del. our N.Y.
warehouse


. Your
Home**


1. Bell's Special Reserve Whisky $32.20 $13.50 $16.50
S2. Hanky Bannister Finest !
Scotch Whisky 29.90 1350 16.50
3. J.-& B. Rare Scotch Whisky 33.00 13.50 16.50
4. Ballantine's Scotch Whisky 32.35- 13.50 16.50.
5. Queen Anne Scotch Whisky 31.45 13.50 16.50
6. Gjlbey's Spey Royal Whisky. 31.25 13 50 16.50
1 7. Back-&.White Scotch Whisky .. 32.00 13.50 16.50
8. John Jameson *** Irish Whisky 29:90 13.50 16.50
9. Cmnadia' Club Whisky 31.50 -19,50 22.50 ;
t tetfeatr'GtI :... --.;.28.45 11.50 -...450.
; ..... ; ,*::- .... jM, .00 .-- M o;7
|l3HAT.t ,. M50.3.s, :. 50 ..
V fetm!^ J^^^~,^^J.--.- ****-^..*-^- *^'^ *.?* w ^


SilH IDIT IL SANS CIIJCII


A Distinguished Hotel In The Heart Of The City

Conve;niently Located To The Shopping District
All Air Conditioned Rooms with Private Baths and Hot Water

New Pool Terrace with outside Bar and Swimming Pool

Air Conditionned Bar Unsurpassed Cuisine Finest Service
"HAPPY HOUR" EVERY THURSDAY Y

FROM 5:30 TO 6:30 p.m., INFORMAL GATHERING

DINNER DANCE EVERY FRIDAY

From 7:30 P.M. To Midnight With Floor SAow

SUNDAY NOON CREOLE BUFFETS

AT POOL TERRACE

,, ~rv/ *t ~ s v~v~^ r/ ^'vs^vv~^ .


-a-
.;. o. ..



















BESSAMATIC


. AM E RA S AT FlI.): IIIRT Iillt4


SI*X

RUE aONNE FOi
Mang., :S.KRIN Phone: 2390
AIR-CONDITIONED


SUNDAY, APRIL 17th, 1960




A'" I .,. ,


"HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY, APRIL 17th, 196


IN HAITI


7BIS WElR

AS RECOUNTED BY AUBELIN JOLICOEUR

Le Nouvelliste publisher Max Chauvet 'and wife canine proprietor of
the chic, Rue du Quai- Haitian Craft shop made their modern Babiole
'Vlla the rendez-vous of the "beau monde" last Saturday night. The
occasion was Janine's, birthday and the party is now history. Elsa Max-
well would have congratulated the hosts for their lavishing entertaining
from the floral decor to choice food and meringue music of Raoul Guil-
'laume's orchestra.
Mr. Edward D. Sherman and his charming wife steamed ,into Port
last Saturday on the SS Stella Polaris on their 19th visit to Haiti. Hon-
orary Consul in iBoston, Miass Mr. Sherman departed Thugsday night
aboard the SS Mauretania leaving a wealth of friends and a check for
the Cancer League behind him. During their five days in the Capital as
guests of Dr. and Mrs Rhindal Assad of the Villa Creole the Shermans
went to the National Palace and presented President DIvalier with a
portable tape-recorder: were entertained Saturday night at Cabane.
Choucoupe by Mr. Ernest Bonhomme, Haiti's Ambassador to Washington
and Monday night presented the Cancer League with a check of $500.
Wednesday they played -host to numerous Haitian officials and friends
at the Villa Creole and then took in the Bacoulou show. Mr. Sherman
a steadfast friend of'Haiti is known for his assistance to Haitian students'
in Massachussetts...
Manager of the Resort and Travel Department of the Boston Globe,
Harold J. Delaney, is making his first visit and business trip to 'Haiti.
On an assignment for the Boston Globe, Mr. Delaney has met with offi-
cials' of the Commissariat National du Tourisme and is staying at the
El Rancho.
Two New Yorkers and, guests at the El Rancho are Mr. Alvin, Hersk-
ovitz and his wife Eileen of Troy, N.Y. Alvin is Continuity Director for
WTRY and during his ten day stay in Haiti intends gathering material
for use on his program. ls wife Eileen is Radio and TV Director for
Goldman and-Walter Advertising Agency.
Landscape Architect Virginia Nichols of Seattle, Washington is enjoy-
ing a 7 day sojourn in Haiti and is staying at the Hotel Oloffson.
A group of Sales Representatives of the Supreme Liberty Life Insur-
ance Company led by Agency Director John F. Morningand Fred Aven-
dorph and accompanied by their wives arrived in Haiti this week. They
were welcomed to Haiti by the Director General of the Commissariat
National du Tourisme,. Mr. Jean-Jacques-.Honbrat and a party in their
honor was held the same evening in the El Rancho Hotel by Southerland
'Tours. The Sales Represqntatives spent two days at Castel Haiti;.
Producer and Director of motion pictures, Andre de la Varre, made
his second visit to Haiti this week. Mr. de la Varre, who works for
Burton Holmes Travelogues of Chicago, made a film on Haiti during
his first visit here 10 years ago and is back -to make a second film.
Since his arrival herb De la Varre has met with officials of CNT. He
* is an Academy Award winning cinematographer and director and is
an outstanding figure in the travel film world as well as an accompl-
ished globe-trotter. Andre de 'l1 Varre has spehr a 17 year affiliation
with- Warner Brothers and has also worked wuth MGN. Doubtless his
scheduled film on Haiti 'will be- of great interest.
On Wednesday at the Bellevue Club.,8,trophies were awarded to Haiti's
16ading Bridge players at the conclusion of an individual championship.
The Haitian League of Bridge, with Herman Gerdes, President, Charles
Noisy, Treasurer'and Henry Reiher Jr., Executive Secretary is very
Excited over the prospective visit to Haiti of Charles H. Goren, one
of the leading Bridge players of the world and a former World Champ-
ion. Goren has one the U.S. Championship many times in the past and
J'- (Continued on page 16)






You know p

it's a really fine

Scotch when it's.
JOHNNIE
WALKER




JOHNNIE WALKER
"' Born 1 520--mill going strong


PREBETZMAN-AGGERHOLM,- DISTRIBUTOR


MONDAY APRIL 18, 1960
6:00 pm-Test pattern Music
(Records)
7:00 pm-Evening General Progr-
am Schedule
7:03 pm-Weather Report
7:06 pm-Album Tele-Haiti Pa-
noramic scenes of every-
where
7:25 pm-Cartoons and Kid Com-
edies Children's Pro-
gram
8:00 pm-I Spy 16th episode -
"Burning of New York"
(English version) Narr-
ator Raymond Massey
8:30 pm-"Les Petites Histoires de'
notre Histoire" Every
Monday, at the same
tim e, Max Bissainthe
presents an interesting
short story on the sub-
ject of the Hisfory of
Haiti. This sfow is-spon-
sored by Charles Dejean
& Co.
8:45 pm-"Industry on Parade" -
Review of the latest ach-,
levements in the Ameri-
can Industry.
9:00 pm-Telenews 2nd edition
Suminary of the late
news
9:05 pm-Shell Keiosene Soleil -


Demonstration by Marie-
Florence Roy
9:10 pm-Telecinema '
10:00 pm-Close of Program Na-
tional Anthem
TUESDAY APRIL 19, 1960
6:00'pm-Test pattern Music
(Records)
7:00 pm-Evening General- Progr-
am Schedule
7:03 pm-Weather Report
7:06 pm-Cancer Society presents
a live program with Dr.
Chevallier
.7:26 pm-Cartoons and Kid Com-
edies .- Children's Pro-
gram
7:45 pm-Telenews (1st edition)
Review of the day's ev-
Sents.
8:00 pm-Westinghouse S h o w -
"Frankie Laine"
8:30 pm-Foreign Intrigue: .The
Hostages Starring
James Daly Brought
to you by Haiti Ttading
S .Co.
9:00 pm-Telenews 2nd edition-
Summary of the late
news -
9:05 prh-Telecinema
10:00 pm-Close of Program Na-
tional Anthem

WEDNESDAY April 20, '60
6:00 pm-Test pattern Music


(Recqrds)
7:00 pm-Evening General Progr-
am Schedule
7:03 pm-Weather. Report
7:06 pm-Album Tele-Haiti Pa-
noramic scenes of every-
where
7:30 pm-Cartoons and Kid Com-
edies Children's Pro-.
gram
-.:45 pm-Telenews (1st edition)
Review of the day's ev-
ents.
8:00 pm-Westinghouse Show -
Western Theater: Stage
Coach Outlaws
9:00 pm-Telenews 2nd edition.
Summary of the late
news
9:05 pm-Shell- Kerosene-Soleil -
Demonstration by Marie-
Florence Roy -
9:10 pm-Telecinema
10:00 pm-Close of Program Na-
tional Anthem '


THURSDAY ,APRIL 21, 1960
6:00 pm-Test pattern Music
(Records)
7:00 pm-Evening General Progr-
am Schedule
7:03 pm-Weather Report
7:06 pm-Album Tele-Haiti Pa-
noramic scenes of every-
where
7:26 pm-Cartoons and Kid .Com-
edies -- Children's Pro-
gram
7:45 pm-Telenews (1st edition)
Review of the day's ev-
ents.
8:00 pm-Paris Precinct (15th-
episode) "Bookkepper"
Starring: Claude Dauph-
in & Louis Jourdan .(En-
glish "Version) -.
8:30 pm--The Fl or.i an Zabach
Show brought to Wou
*.' by "La-,-Maison Lelio
Bailly"
9:00 pm-Telenews 2nd edition
Summary of the late
news
9:05 pm--Shell Kerosene Soleil -
Demonstration by Marie-
Florence Roy


9:10 pm-Telecinema
10:00 phm-Close of Program
tional Anthem


- Na--


FRIDAY APRIL 22, 1960
6:00 pm-Test pattern -' Music
(Records) .
7:00 pm-Evening General Progr-
Sam 'Schedule
7:03 pm-Weather .-Report

SUNDAY, APRIL 17th, 1960
7:06 pm-Program of- "Education,
National"
7:30 pm -Cartoons and Kid Com-


I -c A : /New! Sens


Cr,..
-** : .*


edies Children's Pro-
gram
7:45 pn--Telenews (1st edition)
Review of the day's ev-
ents. -
8:00 pm-Travel Films Various.
sites of the world.
8:15.pm-"Pour Vous Mesdames"
(Cooking Show)
8:30 pm-The .Ford Show -. The-
.- Adve rit ure s of Robin.
Hood: "Carl6tta", starr-
-ing Richard Greene -
Followed by the Advent-
ures of Flash Gordon -
"Breath of Death"
9:30 pm-Teleiews- (2nd edition) -
Summary of the late--
news.
- 9:35 pm-The Shell Show
10:00 pm---Close of Program Na-
tional Anthem

SATURDAY APRIL 23, 1960'

6:00 pm-Test pattern Musi -
(Records) .
7:00 pm-Evening General Progr-
am Schedule
7:03 pm-Weather -Report
7:06 pm-Album Tele-Haiti Pa-
noramic scenes of every-'
where
7:25 pm-Cartoons and Kid Com-
edies Children's Pro-
gram ,
7:45 pm-m-Telenews'--- (1st -edition)
RevieW of the day's ev-
ents.
8:00 pm-"A Vous New York"
with Pierre Crenesse
8:10 pm-The Languichatte Show
-Hilarious sketch, star--
ring Languichatte -
brought to you by "Fa-
brique Nationa le, de
Chaussuires" -
8:30 pm-The Westinghouse Show:,
Star Performance: -"Aw-.
Ard (IDA Luping)
9:00 pm-Telecinema
10:00 pm--Close b6f Program Na-
tional Anthedi

SUNDAY APRIL 24, 1960


2:00 pm-Sign on Presentationm
afternoon's program
2:03 pm-Special Children's Prog-
S ' rain -
3:00 pm--iewsreels 'an d Docum-
entries
3:30 pm-Nobbe & Bondel's
Show' Conrad Nagel
Theater: Dear Evelina
4:00 pm-Weather Report
-4:05 pm-Telecinema" "
5:40- pm-Telenews-' Review of
the day's events.
.6:00 pm-Sign off National An-
them.

national! .


38 "JEWELS




AND JEWEL ROLLER BEARINGS.


On Sale At: Canape Vert


-Aux Cent Mille Articles


Dadlani's Maison Orientale


.r>


PAGE 14


Tele-Haii WeeklMy Schedule


I


I


-. -- .. ._ ` . :'-.t. .;,.* -..l.^"5
'r "? k "- '.


I









SUNDAY, APRIL 17th, 1960


IN HAIT- THIS WE19K
(Continued from pige 1)
is now competing again for the Wdrld Championship at the Olympiad
being held in Italy. Mr. Goren, whose visit has been arranged by Mal-
folin Feiner a current and annual visitor to Haiti together with his
.'ife, will arrive in Haiti on the 15th of June.
Mr. Deran Hintlian, President of the Deran Confectioning Co., Cam-
;bridge, Mass., arrived this week as a guest of Lou and David Scharf
-of the Haitian Manufacturing and Specialty Co.
Three lovely girls from Nlew York arrived in Haiti this week and are
:staying at the Ibo-Lele; they are Frances Coonan, a social worker,
I-.Noreen Coughlin, a high school teacher and Barbara Suter, a secretary.
SProminent American Lawyer ,Milton Pelakoff was welcomed herd on
.-. -Monday of this week by his colleagues and friend, noted Haitian Lawyer
Georges Baussan Jr.; Milton is a stockholder in the Ibo Lele Hotel. He
-w: as the Guest of Robert and Tamara Baussan in company with Real
-.Estate man Lloyd Handford and his wife of San Francisco, and Manu-
facturer Albert Dannenbaum and his wife of Philadelphia at the Bacou-
.<.lou Club on Wednesday night.
Prominent Social worker Julian Greifer and his wife, Philadelphia,
are paying Haiti. a 2 weeks visit. Mr. Greifer is Director of the Neigh-
.borhood Centres in Philadelphia and being mentioned in Alexander
King's first ,book, and reading mention of the Hotel Oloffson in the
.American author's second book, he decided to visit, the. Oloffson and
r ;he And his wife are currently staying at that Hotel and in the room
'. :-occupied by King when hp visited Haiti.
Honeymooners Eugene apd Vicki Pinzer arrived here last Sunday
'.for a ,seven day visit. Gene is a Chemist from New York. The yoting
.";couple are visiting the country in company with Louis and Carolly
:.Gluek of Kalamazoo, Michigan. The party is stayihg' at the Villa Creole.
Albert'-Peppis, retired from the Liquor Business in Mount Vernon,
:,'. New York, and his wif eare -in Haiti to see the beauties of this Island
Described, to them by Janet Stern, a Public Relations extended for Haiti
in .Detroit -and also visiting Haiti with.her husband Lewis and her 2
children, Romna and lMark.
"Is it not wonderful to be in Haiti"- said beautiful Gloria Mason to
.-r. and Mrs. Edward D. Sherman of Boston as she marvelled at seeing
the bunch of tourists sunbathing by the Villa Creole Hotel's pool surr-
ounded with flowers. "I left a snow storm in Chicago and rushed down
-here to rest. Here I am in the paradise again." Mrs. Mason. is a' Travel
t. Agent, she is staying two wi'eeks at the Villa Creole.
Here to spend his Easter vacation with his lovely fiancee Therese.
.Marie Noustas is Mr. Ivan Aurel Kovacs, of Budapest, Hungary, and
New York. Ivan who studied economics in Paris and Budapest now
attends Fordham Business School and will be graduated in June. He
., is a Member of the Advertising Club and Alpha Delta Sigma, National
.professional Advertising fraternity.
Internationally known Psychiatrist Dr. Ralph David Rabinovitch of
rDetroit Michigan is currently visiting the Country with his wife, formerly
Sara Dubo also a Physician, son Mark 12 and daughter Margery 8.
". The Rabinovitchs have been recommended here by Mrs. Carolyn'See-
r'; feldt,- a Good Will Ambassador of Haiti in Michigan. They are staying
S-vtwelve days in Haiti.
-y .Professor Bill Trembley who spent some months here three years
Sago with friends Artist Ernest Martin and Merchant Wolfgang Crasshl
-is now introducing Haiti to his friends Gerald A. Richardson and his
.: charming wile Ann from Portland, Oregon and Bill is Assistant-Director
.- of the Institute of Caribbean Culture at the University of Puerto Rico,
Jerry Richardson is Consultant for the Bureau of Employment Security
at Puerto Rico and 'his wife. Ann is a Teacher at the University of
Puerto Rico. They are guests at Pension Tourdot.
Investment Banker Frederick M. Fair from Pennsylvania and
Puerto Rico is on his fourth trip here with his lovely wife Claire Lois.
:'They're traveling along with Executive George H. Shields IH of St.
SLouis, Mo. and Puerto Rico and his wife Geraldine and also with Exec-
:-utive Raymond Julius Burmeister. They are current guests at the.
Hotel Oloffson.


MAJESTIC AND MARABOUT

HOTEL

SITUA PED ON PETIONVILLE SQ JARE
4 PLEASANT AND COLORFUL
ATMOSPHERE
-EURO'PEAN OR AMERICAN PLAN
IF REQUIRED
MAJESTIC AND MARABOUT
ALSO OFFMR SPECIAL RATES
LONG FOR


W
hi
U
in


,..(


Yerda Wolff left for the U.S. to
attend a legal secretarial course.
Mr. and Mrs. Eugpne Saurel are
travelling 'to NeyW York today to
visit with their son Jacques who i-
working with the United Nations.
This. will be their first air frip ab-
road and they are making the mosf
of it.'They will spend two months
motoring around North America
with Washington an'd Montreal the
high spots of their tour.
"Fortune L. Bogat tells this week
how he 'was surprised 'by the un-
expected visit of a grey hair gent
who was his occupation time fri-
end. Roland Wright who left Haiti
some thirty .years ago as a Q.M.
Sgt. in the -USMC returned -on a
tour of the West Indies as a retired
Major w-ith his wife. Wright told
Bog he was amated to see -how
the City had spread out over the
surrounding hills. Bogat and Wright
were former roommates during the
,O.A. .
Rudy Tippenhauer flew to Miami-
on business Wednesday.
*. *
Esso Manager Alfred Spillett left
for a spring vacation in his native
England Thursday accompanied by
'his wife Gladys and daughter -Da-
phane. The Spilletts 'expect to be
abroad two months..

Karine Burgers is visiting her
prospective -in-laws in Oregon. The
loyely -daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Tony Burgers will wed Dick Fisher
next month. Dick came to 1-aiti
with the International Edgineering
company who have the DLF job
of completing the irrigation of the
Artibonite Valley. -


ThE


I


Bi-






Bul

KEROSENE
HIGHEST
ECONOMIC.
" SOLE I



USE THE



HIT ALSO (
,AND FIGH

(Kero


ant event coming off in the nqar

SPECIAL
C I T A'DE L
TRIP
By
VOL KSWAGE N
BABY BUS
ALL INCLUDED:


$35

HIS RATE COVERS:
a) Round trip transportation bet-
ween hotel in Port-an-Prince
or Petionville and. Cap-Hattlen;
b) One night 1st class hotel ac-
comodation .in Cap-Hlaitien and
S meals;
c) Trip to Milot and excursion
to the
C-I T A D'E L
Departures' from Port-au-Prince
every Wednesday arid Sunday
morning, returning .following rday.
MlAKE YOUR RESERVATION AT
HOTEL DESK. OR
RAYMOND. REMAIN
M.A GIC
ISLAND
TOURS
RUE DtJ CENTRE
Port-au-Prince,
HATI
Tel.: 2078


- j Kt F"!A.%V,
LES PLUS BELLE MOSAIOUS
HAITIENNES


I. P.ACE GEFFRARD *

- "... '


JOSEPH NADAL &
Distributor


e Fuel Of The Modern


Haitian Household



Dats Better


Ohts Bettesz


ms Without Smoke

"SOLEIL IS THE FUEL WITH THE
CALORIC CAPACITY AND IT IS MORE
4L THAN CHARCOAL. NO. WASTE WITH
L AND THE RISK OF FIRE IS REDUCED
CONSIDERABLY.

KEROSENE S 0 L E I L FOR THE KITCHEN,
AND FOR LIGHTING, -

CONTRIBUTES TO SAFEGUARD THE FORESTS
T EROSION OF T H-E HAITIAN SOIL! -

sene Soleil Is A SHELL Product)


11-liEu ~ 4 q~p~q~A ~ -~ *-~* *~ ~* "~ ~ ~ -


.1 .8 .. - "" . -. . . .".


tftiteis tiof itei(st~daIn'theMis .
SUGA QUEEN ASKED TO. C ET ers .
IN ""MISS UNIVERSE" important event is signified. by
Haiti's. Sugar Cane Queen of the according to Official Miss, Universe wedding bells: for--on- an as yt :
Vorld, Miss Claudinette Fodchard, photographer, Peter Fland.. unannounced da te, .tlaudinetfi Is .
as a strong chance for the Miss Fland was in Haiti this week tak- to be married to Walter IH. H.
universe Contest slated for open- ing pictures of Miss. Fouchard for Fischl, a merchant of Regenib hrg, -
ig on July 4th in Miami, Florida, the cover of the American magaz- Germany.
ine, "Ebony," and was accompan- -
BEACH COMBER ied by Miss Frieda De Knight.
But, it appears that Claudinette
a mornevn o m era n anllyv imnr [


otoe ^


'BsW-591 R8<*8& 10 <19 19 i414?^S?^S0


II


^-.0h, -- -.. l I










PAGE 16 "HAITI SUN" SUNDAY, APRIL 12th,


(Continued from page 2)
flight of stairs. Mauve tinted shad-
es cover each of the chapels wind-
ows. The Chapel has an air or ser-
enity that is evident throughout the
entire Villa. (During retreat peop-
le are forbidden to converse with
one another aJthough talk is per-
mitted after dinner and supper for.
brief periods.
The priests and brothers have
their own quarters and a well ap-
pointed .meeting room and library
and also -a chapel of their own on
the third floor for prayer. Next
door to the library, is a print shop
where printed matter can be easily
turned out by the competent broth-
ers. It is significant that all the
Jesuits at Villa Manrese are skill-
ed in some form of trade; all the
electrical fittings and plumbing
and kitchen equipment was instal-
"led by them.
y Ample space has been devoted
to the large kitchen which is staff-
ed by Canadian Sisters of the Char-
ity of St. Louis of Quebec the
same congregation that takes care
of the Grand Seminar and other es-
tablishments here in Haiti.
All the aluminum sinks, table
tops, and warming cupboards were
made in Canada by brothers 'of the
Jesuits religious order arid the mo-
deren kitchen leaves nothing to be
adsired. K itche n. cupboards are
made from the three-ply used to
smooth the ceilings of the Villa's
interior as are the table tops and
chair seats:
A large dining room for- people
in" retreat adjoins the kitchen and
is well furnished with long tables
'and chairs which .were constructed
.-' .'b the Jesuits. The Jesuits have
their own dining quarters which
although very simple have evelry-
'/thing ,that it necessary. "Nothing
here is ulterior of stands out as
expansively built," stated the Pri-


est Bruno Duplessis, "Bdt every-
thing is ample for us and has sav-
ed much' in the construction cost."
Another feature of the Jesuit's
skill and initiative is the spacious
laundry built by them at the rear
of the first floor. Three huge tanks,
constructed in Canada by the Jes-
uits, catch all the rain water from
the roof and this provides an ab-
undancy of water for washing pur-
poses. The laundry featuresin ad-
dition a laundryy lift" of sizeable
proportion built by one of the
Jesuit brothers.
Special rooms have been set as-
ide for the ,reception of guests and,
these are fitted with couches and
tables and chairs. These' are to be
used by visiting priests and broth-
ers from the country areas making
short stays in Port-au-Prince.
ALMS OF THE RETREAT
"The spiritual life is equally as
important as the material and in-
tellectual life and we therefore'give
people the right instruction on all
the important subjects of life,"
said the Rev. Father Antonio Pou-
lin when speaking of the aims of
the Villa Manrese. "We teach them
of such things as a love of God,
of their neighbor and justice."
Retreats at Villa Manrese, there
are 2 retreats held each week, are
of 3 days duration and during that
time mass is held every morning
followed by 6 instructions per day.
After instruction the people go to
their rooms to meditate and as
Father Poulin states, "The time
passes' so quickly that people ge-
nerally want to stay an extra 2
or 3 days."
Retreats- are to be held at the
Villa for 10., months of each year
and it is usual for people to make
only. one 3 day retreat per year al-
though Father Poulin says', "There
are many people who express the
wish to come back for a second
1


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visit Haiti's Smartest Indian stoRe
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Haiti's Villa Manrese


SARDOZO. GARDENS
ALMOST EVERYTHING THAT
GROWS IN THE TROPICS
TROPICAL ORNAMENTAL
PLANTS.
PALMS ROSES TREES
SHRUBS, CACTUSES
HOUSE PLANTS
EVERGREENS
ORCHIDS
LILIES
LANDSCAPING
Route HOTEL MONTANA
Petionviile.


FOUNDED


IN 1805


Lionel Fouchard Weds
Denise Magloire


time in the same year, but, our
problem is finding room for every-
one and at present we have a leng-
thy waiting list of Haitian people
wishing to enter in retreat." Five
dollars is charged for the 3 day
retreat.
Since the Villa opened on Nov-
ember 20th, 1959, 1,300 people have
entered in retreat last week 56
women entered and this week 62
men. The inauguration of Villa
Manrese was held on November
25th; the Feast Day pf the Christ
King and the ceremony was atten-
ded by Bishops and many Govern-
ment officials. ,
' There are now 14 Jesuits serving
in Haiti.- 5 at the Villa Manrese,
2 in' Quartier Morin and 7 at the
Grand Seminar where the Haitian
priests are prepared.


SHIP WRECK
(Continued from page 1)
crew were saved and are now in
Cap Haitian although no- details
were. to" hand.
THOUGHT TO BE HOLED
Absense of telephone communica-
tion with Cap Haitian, in the North
has prevented full details of the
Trolla"s plight from being known
but it is'believed that, the vessel's
bow and forward section ate under
water and that she is holed. 'Mean-
while her Captain and 2 Officers
remain on Watch on board in com-
pany with the Norwegian flag still
flying from the stem and the rem-
nants of the crews' washing.
An employee of the Royal Nether-
lands Steamship Co., Port-au-Prin-
ce, Mr. CQ H. Fabius flew to. Cap
Haitian on Friday to inspect the
stricken coastal vessel and he will
join _Mr. Van der Linden, the Ins-
pector of the Netherlan'ds Co., Port-
au-Prince, who happened to be vis-
iting Plantation Dauphin at the.time
of the incident.
Marinie Authqrities in Port-au-
Prince believe that with the aid
of pumps and modern salvage me-
thods .it may be possible to save
the sterp engine Trolla.


Lionel Fouchard, the eldest son
of Judge and Mrs. Daniel Fouch-
ard, a former Haitian Navy Lieut-
enant and now a diesel .engineer,
was married to Denise (Babu) Ma-
gloire the daughter of Architect and
Mrs Auguste Maglpire at a cerem-
pny held at the St. Pierre Ccurch,
Petionville at 6:30pm on Saturday
night.
Best man for the wedding was the-
bridegroom's father, Judge Fouch-
ard and the bride's Aunty, Mrs.
Adrien Castera, was Matron of Ho-
nor. The ceremony was performed
by the Cure of Petionville, the Rev.
Father Jafrre ,who wds assisted by
Father Brisson.
30 young girl students at the
bride's' 'Petionville Kindergarten -
diessed in white Organdie with
pink Satin belts- were the maids
6f Honor. ''
The bride ldk6d stunning in a
white Organdie creation of Mine.
Simone Denis- of Sassine -Couture.
The wedding dress was ankle
length' and drawn ,in at the front
with short sleeves and an .Italian


AND, INC ORPORATED BY ACT


OF


THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT

ROhY CHLNET7 AND SONS

AGENTS FOR HAITI
15 AVE MARIE-EANNE.

CITE DUMARSAIS ESTIME
Phone 2603
s -


THE WORLD


FOR EVERY OCCASION


Tin


FAMOUS.


neckline. A long train complete'
the beautiful dress and the bride.
wore long white gloves.
The newly weds are honeymoon.
ing. in Boutillier.

GERMAN DESTROYED
VISITS PORT
FOR EASTER

The German Destroyer "Z 5" 1
dropped anchor in. Port-au-Prince.
Bay' on April 15 for a .two day visit
to Haiti, and an Easter weekend
ashore for. her complement of .A k
Officers and 248 sailors..
"Z 5", under the Command
"le Capitaine de Fregate," Albcht'
Obermaier and First Officer, Kkug,-"'
is the second German Navy vessel'-'.
to visit Haiti in some 20 yeais. Du-..';.
ring the month of September,. 1959'ir
the German Destroyer- "Z 2" 'ai&,
a brief visit here. The -German -
crew members on that, initial visit.
were delighted with the .country and '
the 'hospitality extended them by-
the German Colony here,


Caledonian Insurance Co.


S P .. .. ...


SUNDAY, APRIL 17th,


PAGE 16


. ...-


"HAITI SUN"