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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00257


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Full Text






S Weekly
Every-_
Sunday


'! un

ithaul^^f^B ^^^^^ Sunt^^^^^^ ^^^^^


- VOL XII SUNDAY, APRIL 3RD, 1960 Port-au-Prin ce, HAITI No. 37 Avenue Marie-Jeanne CITE DUMARSAJS ESTIME No. 21


SEDREN
WORKERS

THREATEN'
I MASS STRIKE

The -Administration of SEDREN.
S.A. stake that for the past four
';. months they, have been having
i "trouble" ivith the Miners Union
and, that a Commission appointed
by the Minister for. Labor is. work-
ing orf a satisfactory solution of
the, litigation. *

-An. interview this week revealed
that' threats to strike have been is-
sued and problems remain upsolv-
ed.. "Despite the hikh salaries paid
by the t company, salaries which
are in general higher' than those
paid by other. organizations in
: Haiti .

"An incentive system enables a
miner working for SEDREN with
. a basic salary of 120 dollars per
month to make anything up to 400
dollars per month by means of bon-
us if he produces enough to war-
ant such' bonus. Chauffeurs receive
135 dollars per month.
'The Government has taken the
; problem in hand and is dqing all
that it can to arrive at a mutually
satist a c t o r y- understanding. The
Miners Union thought it a good
idea to menace SEDREN several
times with a strike during the 4
month period if 30 carpenters and
Masons, who have terminated the
wdrk for which they, were tempgr-
arily employed, were not reinstat-
ed in their respective jobs.
"One thing the Union should un-


(Continued on page 3)


Second Tragic


Shipwreck hi


7 Days


"Express," a Baitian coastal
schooner floundered' and s an k
off the coast of Haiti Wednesday
bringing the current storm's dis-
aster total to 2 ships within sev-
'en days and well over'a score
of Haitians drowned.

[On. March 22 the J.C.D., a co-
astal sailing vessel, ran into a
, severe storid and sank off "Gros-
se Pointe," some 20 miles off
the coast of 'La Gonave. Her
Captain, M.' Lexius 'Andre, four
crew members and..- w em an
passenger managed to make*
shore but 8 persons were drown-
ed.

Wednesday's tragedy occurred
when the "Express" ran into a
storm which has been lashing
the countryside and particularly
northern Haiti with heavy rains
and high winds. The schooner is
reported to have sunk off Trou
'Cochon taking with it nine
passengers.

River drownings were also re-
corded last week. Messrs. Ger-
flieu and Thomas, residents of
L'Asile, were drowned in the Ri-
vier edu Serpent while further
unverified r e p o r t s circulated
that several drownings' had oc-
urredi in the Artibonite River.


SEq














S SKIMMING ACROSS Port-an-Prince's Bay this week the 72 foot' gecan
r acing yacht "Escapade" displayed its graceful lines and the speed that
has carried her to victory in several major American yacht races. Escap-
4 ade and her crew speut just over two days in Port and sailed for Miami
where she will be a starter in the Miami-Bermuda race commencing
4 on June 18th.


OBITUARY
Mrs. Schermerhorn
A Friend Of Haiti

The sudden death in her sleep of
Mrs. Howard F. Schermerhorn of
New York occurred at her New York
home on March 27th.
Mrs. Schermerhoi-n was a friend
to many children of Jacmel and the
people of Haiti and she inaugurat-
ed in Jacmel a project to issue
help and assistance to" underprivil-
edged children. During the Provi-
sional Government period (1956-57)
she was known' as an avid letter
writer and her interview with Gen-
eral Leon Cantave was subject to
.topical interest in Haiti.


"A s t r o n g protest against the
barbaric acts perpetrated in South
Africa against our African broth-
ers," was issued by the National
Union of Haitian Students ajd front-
paged by the local newspapers on
Thursday.

The students of Hati (the first
Negroe Republic in the world) stat-
ed in a, letter addressed to the
Prime Minister of the Union of
South Africa, Dr. Verwoerd, and
handed by the students to the Brit-


THE GRADUATION CEREMONY held in Cap-Haitien last week for grad-
uates of the Pote Cole Nursing School inclined the presentation of a
gift to the laureate, Miss Arlette Antoine (at far left.): Making the pres,
entation is Minister Carlo Boulos;. in the centre is. Directress of the
School, Miss Paulette Debrosse and applauding are Major Robert Bazile


and Pr. Georges Nicolas. (See


No Beards For D. R !
All males afflicted with the des-
ire to grow a beard are firmly ad-
vised to conduct 'the cultivation of
their bewhiskered faces in the com-'
fort and safety of their homes -
without doubt, a dwelling place
preferable to a Latin American
prison.
Beards' are. a subject on which
globe-trotting Australian Peter Pin-
ney can speak with strong author-
ity and the following conclusion
can be based on his experiences
alone: Beards are not a desirable
adornment when travelling in Lat-
in America. Pinney, writing from
Tortola, makes, this clear in a let-
ter to the "Sun" this week.

(Continued on page 16)



Floods Wreck Havoc
.In South
20 HOMES IN SOUTH
Twenty homes were destroyed by
flooding river waters that hit the
the small locality of Roseaux in the
South, according to news received
here this week. Over the past


Story page 16)


Haiti's U. S.

Ambassador Returns

Ambassador for Haiti to the Unit-
ed States, Ernest Bonhomme, ret-
urned to Poit-au-Prince on Friday
afternoon of this week for a "series
of ,consultations with the- Govern-
meht and the Easter vacation.


FOR WORLD
REFUdEE YEAR
Haiti will join with 70 nations on
five continents on April 7 in the
simultaneous issue of "postage
stamps commemorating World Re-
fugee Year.
Two years of negotiations and
planning with Governments and
their Postmasters are climaxed by
the issue of the stamps an idea
which has caught hold since in
June of 1958. Iceland begdn the
first country to sign up for the
scheme.
In all, 160 stamps will be issued
with many of the participating coun.
tries contributing more than one
design, diverse in their execution


month continuous heavy rains have as the peoples who have produced
struck the legion and last week the them but all bear the same theme:
river's flooding resulted in 'the des- World Refugee Year.
traction of some 20 homes: many It is hoped that at least 100,000,-
families lost their possessions and 000 dollars will be raised through
are reported to have neen left dest- the plan, the funds from which will
itutr. go to alleviate the plight of refu-
*


ish Embassy in Port-au-Prince,
that they wished to ."manifest their
solidarity with the students of the
South African Union against the di-
rect menace to world peace made
by the recent massacre of negroes
in South Africa. .
"The Haitian students, in symp-
athy with all peoples.on this earth: .
who fight against oppression and
tyrahny, cannot remain indifferent
in face of these barbaric acts, ex- ',
ercised in defiance of the" laws, to
suppress the rights of manifestation 4
and the principles of th'e equality *
of races as proclaimed by the chart- '
er of the United Nations."
Expressions of sympathy to the
bereaved parents of the victims
were transmitted in the students'
letter in conjunction to the prqtbst
and the letter was handed to the
British Embassy Thursday morn-
ing: The- National Union of Haitian '
Students further expressed a hope
that, "Our Government take the
necessary measures to put in act-
ion machinery that will end these
barbaric acts that threaten world -
,peacq."
STUDENTS LETTER TO IKE
Also under written condemnation,
by Haitian students are the U. S. .
incidents opposing black students
and "their white comrades." In a
letter undated and published Fri-
(Continued on page 15)

SUICIDE-FOUND
HANGING IN TREE
Suicide was committed by an
unidentified. Haitian mal e,
thought to be a chauffeur, at ap-
proximately 6pro on Thursday
this week.
Passersbye received an 'unen-
viable shock on the Delmas Ro-
ad, the 4-lane highway from the
City to Petionville, when they
came across the unknown body
of the deceased hanging by the
neck from the bough of a tree.
The corpse was removed to the
Morgue of the General Hospital.


gees throughout the world. The
plan was originated by Cornelis
Brouwer iNetherlands) of the staff
of the UN High Commissioner for
Refugees.
Haiti's stamp features a member
of the Red Cross holding a wound-
ed refugee in her arms with the
Red Cross insignia in the back-
ground. Of the one gourde 35 cen-
times type, Haiti's stamp is im-
printed with the words: Republi-
que d'Hait, Avion, Croix Rouge
Haitienne, gourde.


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STUDENT OUTCRY


Sharpeville Massacre And
U. S. Treatment Provoke
Students Letters


Haiti Contributes Stamp


H S RIENNE
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-A&A.2"" SU-Y ARL46,w


GRAND RUE ON
ASKED TO
"FACELIFT"
, HEIR STORES


An invitation was issued
week by the Municipality to
ers of buildings and busine
on the Grand Rue to facelif
establishments by a general
ening up and' the -addition o
signs. Correspondence has be
changed' on this subject b
the Public Works Minister a
Munici p a I i t y of Port-au-I
which, on this occasion, can
the law of 1948.

HAITI INVITED TO
ATTEND ARTISANS
S IN ITALY
Haiti has been invited to'
S ternational Artisans Sale Fail
held in Florence, Italy fro
24th of April to the 14th 61
This is to be the'24th fair h
the International Artisans a
;',-. participating countries have
Soaked to exhibit displays o
re.sective Ceramic Arts.



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A.'l'3 Da.. d&0
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M -COND



'.' 250. LB


o Complet "C
|SPANAnMA
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STHE RESTAUR,



IS- OPEN DA]

A SPECIAL LUP






AND .$

The menu is

C,:


OWNERS TAO ANNOUNCES


FISHERY EXPERT

REPLACEMENT
id this
o own- FAO has selected Mr. Bourgeois
'sstnen to replace Mr. Martin Routh ias
t their fishery expert of the United Na-
bright- tions Organization in Ha it i. tVLr.
f neon Bourgeois, who is expected in Port-
een ex- au-Prince at the qnd of May, has
between been helping with the development
nd the of fisheries in Tunisia and the -Mid-
Prince, die East.
apply

- 54TH ANNIVERSARY

FAIR OF "LE MATIN"

the In- Le Matin, the morning daily
r to be newspaper, celebrated the 54th an-
m the niversary qf its founding on April
f May. 1st. Le Matin has recently taken
held by on new vigor in its old age and to
and all Director Franck Magloire and his
e been. staff the "Haiti Sun" extends its
f their felicitations, and b e s t wishes for
its continued success.


PASSENGER SERVICE -

SjpUIU WC


,YORK '
To


'24th sito. EE,
to the center i O w Yo k
Americon Flag .GA OSbp
4. CRISTOBAL
IMndays and Fridda '

,,,,.-ONi a .G'SALON
s. sCAGELLO.1 I j

roind-iiP sea-r tickets.
curSte inormati onl fro
STEAMSHIP LI .I







erch oir0
ANT OF

THE HAITIAN FAMILY

ELY EXCEPT MONDAYS'

NCH IS

OFFERED AT, MIDDAY

FOR $1.75

2.00 A LA CARTE

prepared by Albert Barcilon

Of Switzerland.


FAREWELL
RECEPTION FOR
PIERRE LAMBERT
-Vice President of Haiti Cement,
Mr. Pierre Lambert, who departed
this week for Europe, was given,
a cordial reception at the Cabape
Choucoune which -was attended by
Cabinet merrbes, General Pierre
Merceron, French Ambassador Lu-.
ci'6e Felix, contractors and lead-
ing businessmen.
Haiti Cement has an output of
90,000 sacks (of 30tbs weight each)
per month and employs. 120 work-
ers.

CANADIAN CHARGE
D'AFFAIRS ENDS
HIS POST IN- HAITI
Mr. Fulgence Charpentier depart-
ed from Haiti 'f6r his homeland this
week accompanied by Madame Car-
pentier after serving 3 years in Hai-
ti as Charge d'Affairs for Canada.
During his residence in Haiti Mr.
Carpentier made many friends and
was a respected Diplomat and he
and his wife were tended several
receptions prior to their departure.


SEDREN PROBLEMS

(Continued from page 1)
derstand is that there will be drast-
ic reductions in the construction
labor force with equal increases in
the mining, milling, electAcal and
surface crews. There will also be
new types of operations and the
Haitian operators ,will have to be
trained by Canadian, English or
American specialists. Under su ch,
working conditions SEDREN's ma-
nagement must have a flexible ar-
rangement with its employees and
the bonus system must be at the
discretion of. the SEDREN Admin-
istrators."
SEDREN is wholly owned by Con-
solidated Halliwell Ltd., of' Cana-
da although British, and Anerican
companies have an important int-
erest in it. It has been suggested
that stock-holders are showing con-
cern at the current problems, and
are seriously considering closing
down the entire operation tmuntil such
time as a definite arrangement is
reached.
"SEDREN is going -ahead, with
many projects, such as the, const-
ruct.on of a whbarf and its 'aligned
port installations and a dam which
will contain several million gallons



-
SW~ISSWAC


FOUNDED


,CITE


of water needed for the .proper op are taken and an modern hospital
eratin'g- of the nill -- a~id if inter with.six beds will soon replace the
ferences prevent the company troia present clinitm wvich_.ot orly" takes
terminating thet i- jecs iii tini~t care of the employees. but also of
it will be detrimental to the int- all the peasants. living in and ar-
erests of all involved. found "Terreneuve.
S "The local Administration -of SE-
"The most modern equipment is DREN is confident that the Govern-
being..used to penetrate the tunnels ment in its intervention will cert-
for the exploiting of ore -and will mainly help .everyone cdhcerned in
greatly facilitate the work. of, the arriving' at a just. and satisfactory
miners.- Sound security measures solution."


'IF YOU WANT THE 44
S PAR EX C EL L E,N C E''
4 IN SERVICE CUISINE AND -
ATMOSPHERE THEN
ACCEPT HE. WARM
WELOOIME AWAITING '
SYOU ATTHE





., D.INE A'T TH E 4




HAITIAN -AND AMER CAN
SCUISINE'-
S QN *A 'EY MINUTES ROM
TOWN IN PETIONVILLEE
., '' e'* ^* *, 'G '0^ ^ 0 ^'0


ACT OF


I' .


DUMARSAIS, ESTIME '
Phone 2603


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tn"


Caledonian Insurance Co.


IN 1805 AND INCORPORATED BY
THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT


ROh YCHEANE AND SONS

- AGENTS FOR, HA JT I
15 AVE MARIE-JEANE


S SUNDAYAPR rd., "
.'; : .
'SUNDAY, AkPL 3n(.,. 1SKB
i, r' .i ^ i' '" '* ,- *


" A A A


PAGE 2


M AJ J ( $10 N









'"HAITI SUN"


All


,were. .wu.ose waU cnevta y accom i
Span underdevelopment, I i m it e d
`_" means, and a poverty of resources.
I have a very real debt of gratit-
u de to those Haitians who took me
in and did their best to make my
work fruitful.
pI was an outsider, and my know-
Sledge of Haiti remains, at best, ru-
S' dimentary. Yet I feel I learned a
-.few things perhaps not generally
known to city people, to the plan-
: ners, and the higher social classes.
Apprehending those things involved
F learning Creole 'as best I could,
making friends in the country, liv-
ing among people far from Port-'
au-Prince and, as much as possib-
le, on their terms. The anthropol-
ogist's "method," after all, comes
down to being little more than pa-
S.:.. tience, tolerance of discomfort, wil-
lingness to listen, and inquisitive-



ll -. "


-the word is inaccurate and off-
ensive- are the ones who can learn
best how eventually to contribute
to the solution of national probl-
ems. No amount of expert advice,
tours of Scandinavian cooperatives,
scholarships to English agricultur-
al colleges, technical training
courses in the United States, or
foreign aid will succeed in crack-
ing Haiti's problems, I believe, unt-
il Haitian can communicate with
Haitian, regardless of the barriers
of birth and breeding. I 'have no
right to preach, since we Americ.
ans are still struggling with the
same kinds of barriers. But I think
we have been lucky to go" farther
than Haiti,- partly because our her-
itage -at least outside the South-
has been less bitter, less bound by
tradition, more democratic.
In a related connection, I was
j


ue nnHaitian people tuiuu u on c an-
not ignore the very important re-
search of such scientists as Remy
Bastien and Jean and Suzanne Cam-
haire-Sylvain); that most a frop-
ological information is coawentrated

ASTA TO HOLD
REGIONAL MEETING
HERE IN MAY
Mr. Bernhardt Kirkegaard, Vice
President of the Midwest Chapter
of the American Society of Travel
Agents, arrived in Port-au-Prince
per Delta Airlines last Saturday ac-
companied by Delta Sales Repre-
sentative Miss Frances Niles of I
Chicago, Illinois.
Here to check on our local tour-
ist facilities and meeting places
to be used for the May regional
meeting of ASTA, Mr. Kirkegaard,
an. officer of the Ford Travel Ser-
vice of Chicago has also been ap-
pointed as Chairman of the Arrang-
ements Committee for the May
meeting.
The two visitors stayed in Port
for two days and were guests at
the Villa Creole Hotel.

PANAMA LINE PANAMA
CANAL COMPANY
The SS "Cristobal" of the Pana-
ma Line arrived from New York
at 7:00 A.M. April 2nd., 1960 with
the following passengers who des-
embarked at Port-au-Prince:
Mrs. Lawrence Braymer, Mi s s
Maryse Buteau, Mrs. Eve Fischer,
Mr. & Mrs. Alvin Fross, Miss Bar-
bara Guillet (2 Yrs.), Mrs. Augusta
Hartwell, Mrs. Cicone Herivaux and
1 child tYrs.), Dr. Roger Kerni-
sant, Mr. & Mrs. Auguste Magloire
and child 6 Yrs., Mrs. Paulema
Paul, Mrs. Joyeuse Point Du Jour,
Miss Verna Schade, Mr. & Mrs.
Herbert B. Strauss. Mrs. Marie An-
ne Xavier.


are many roads to the truth, they


- SUNDAY, APRIL 3rd., 1960


eavfly in Ahe fields of vaou, folk-
Haitians Must Communicate -H "l music and dance, with
only a few prized studies on econ-
omics, ethno-agronomy, marketing,
PROFESSOR MINTZ WRITES OPEN LETTER TO HAITI marriage and divorce, social class,
education, etc. And most striking
of all, hardly anyone seems to
Cambridge ness. In view of what I did learn, struck by the really remarkable think these lacks should affect 'the
gland I was struck by the remotness of amount of planning which seems rate and character of planning. In-
most educated Haitians from the. to go in Haiti, day by day, by gov- deed, the paradox is heightened
iederich lives of their less privileged count- ernment agencies, Vaited States ag- enormously by the willingness of
lITI SUN rymen. Of course, as a foreigner, encies, international agencies, and many Haitian intellectuals to hold
Haiti I was able to make friends and private planners of various kinds. forth on any of these subjects, bas-
to behave in ways that would pro- What struck me was not the amount ing their observations on a three-
hree months since I bably be very difficult for a Haiti- of planning itself enough this is day trip to Jeremie, made in 1344,
Bre I spent nearly a an intellectual. In such situations, quite remarkable- b u t tha It so or on a childhood amongst the bour-
g anthropological re- foreignness can be advantageous, much of it appeared to go on in geoisie of Gonaives. The dangers
hat I have had some rather than a handicap, the absence of concrete information in this situation will be apparent
my impressions, I And yet I feel deeply that Haiti's of all kinds. One could not avoid to anyone who gives it a moment's
ate an opportunity to fundamental problems will not be noticing, for instance, that the 1950 thought. That forei g n planners
, as well as to ex- solved u n til Haitians themselves Census is unfortunately not yet ful- should be even more disdainful at
ks to the many peop- are able to communicate freely and ly published; that Haiti lacks an t i m e s of careful descriptive res-
me in my studies. with dignity across the barriers of adequate cadastral survey; t h a t earch (for instance, learning Cre-
Haiti in a period of education, class, color, language, the figures on crop acreages are ole) is no excuse.
iglonal unrest, and I and habit of mipd. Those educated for the most part guesses, that I have taken the liberty of being
uit to carry on field Haitians who have learned to mix there exists no complete study of frankly critical in these regards,
y. But the difficulties freely with their social "inferiors" marriage forms and family life of Mr. Editor, because though there
i h ins t l ..l. .EE.n. ..


PI

University of I
Cambridge, En
.,i:7 March 1960
Mr. Bernard DI
'. Editor, The Hi
:: Port-au-Prince,
.,.Dear Sir:
SIt is now Ui
left Haiti, whe
Skull year doinj
search. Now th
time to sort
would apprecia
L- describe- them,
S..press my thank
S.e who helped
I came to I
considerable re
iifound it difflem
.work efficiently
h.m ni h


DALRI ALIst
WORLD'S MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE


RUE DANE DESTOUCOIS-POT AU PINCE--TI 3451


WMMSa *,. imAS


DISCOVER THE FASCINATION

OF HAITI


Through Its Postage Stamps

For complete information in Haiti

Stamps and other details which will be

furnished you free of charge, write to

P.O. Box 723 PORT-AU-PRINCE


American Proprietor of the g
ery store "Food Fair", Mr. Ro
Mance, appeared before the T'
nal of Correction on Thursday :
ning. The owner of the store,
ablished on Avenue John Br
bought before the -Court for q
ioning on charges pressed by
Brunet.


groc-
)bert
ribu-
mor-
est-
own,
u i, t- .
Mrs.





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.. .
'" .' i


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Petionville
featuring
The Smart Saturday Night Club

LA RONDE
9p.m. Until Late Closing
The El Rancho Duroseau
Orchestra
Dancing Nightly Except Sunday From 7pm
THOSE WHO APPRECIATE
THE BEST DINE
AT EL RANCHO HOTEL
And always superb cuisine


Lunch Dine Have Cocktails

By The SEA-SIDE

-00-


KYONA BEACH


-00-
DEEP-SEA FISHING EXCURSIONS

Swim, Spearfish, Snorkle, Water-Ski.*

And Sail In Safe Coastal

Waters From Kyona

-00-

HAVE YOUR PARTY AT KYONA


:PAGE

must a, I believe, end d.' ::
in the same direction. I do-no :
mean to impugn In any Way -the
unquestionable sincerity of those I
met who were working toward thfire.,
eventual welfare of the Haitian peo-'
ple. My desire to speak candidly .;:.-..
is born, you may be sure, of my
deep admiration for the Haitian.
countrymen, my sincerest wished.
for the Improvement of their Jot,'
and my gratitude to them all for
the help they so freely gave me.
Yours respectfully,
Sidney W. MINTZ.

'FOOD FAIR' PROPRIETOR
APPEARS BEFORE COURT


M-


*


ar .. -





AE4 I


More Beard Troubles For Pinney


AUSTRALIAN CAUSES


(Continued from page 1)
Now in his 13th year of "on the
road" ex-Sydney, Australia resident
Pinney paid a brief and colorful
visit to Haiti in early February of
this year with intriguing stories
of the predicaments and strife that
his beloved facial adornment (a
lark and bushy beard) has unwitt-
ingly led him into.
Up to the time of his arrival in
Port-au-Prince, Pinney's beard had
caused the arrest of its owner on
numerous occasions in Cuba five
times in one day and had bought
about threats of indefinite terms of
imprisonment; but, undeterred the
widely travelled "Jack-of-a'll-trad-
es" from Australia arrived in this
country resplendently clad in his
third beard.
'. 'Haitian Police added Pinney's
name to their charge sheet the first
night of his Haitian sojourn yes,
once again he could thank his beard
for having him arrested. On this
occasion he decided to walk from
the -Airport into the City; this was
not allowed he was told and at the
same time officials eyed his beard
with pondering suspicion. After a
long discussion involving the whys
and wherefores Pinney decided to
take a taxi and did so.
Then around 8pm he ventured
obut for a beer and what happened?
His beard proved a fatal attraction
and he was picked up for question-
-ing. Pinney stated at the time that
the Gendarmes treated him very
politely and after two or three
.hours he was released still with
i his beard, but no beer.
Peter Pininey has suffered many


STIR IN DOMINIC AN REPUBLIC


inconveniences through his addic-
tion to beard including being mis-
taken for a Barbudo, but he maint-
ains, "Beards have noble origins
and are traditional appurtences of
Kings and Zealots. But, from be-
ing long regarded as a symbol or
badge of rank of religious leaders,
prophets and men of royal blood.


there is now danger of their being
debased to the more unfortunate
role of a political epaulette."
When Pinney left Haiti, still with
an insatiable urge to travel, he
was last seen heading in the dir-
ection of the Dominican Republic
still with beard of course) and
from early February until this


week not one solitary word was
heard as to his whereabouts or -b
what fate may have befallen him. C
t
But this week a letter arrived at q
the "Sun" from no less a person- y
age than Petter Pinney safe, M
sound, and now a resident with his r
wife and child in Tortola, Virgin l
Islands, and still featuring a mas- t
sive expanse of beard. s
Needless to say Pinney did not
travel to his present address with-
out running into "beard trouble" d
and the following is set forth as
written in his letter and gives apt
and vivid description of the wand-
erer's latest adventures:

"I was in the Dominican Republ-
ic for about five days. On arrival
the Immigration people took me to
one side and issued straight ins-
tructions for the early removal of
my beard: the plane was still wait-
ing so I told them that I would
think it over.
"I found the City pleasant enough
and the folk friendly, though there
were few who cared to be seen on
the same side of the street in
company with a barbudo. The cools
picked me up (of course) for walk-
ing across a bridge, a sufficient
excuse for them, and for an hour
I let the game roll without trying
to convince anyone of anything inI
particular as I was curious to see
what would happen.
"Finally the Police contacted Im-
migration and when those boys
found out that I was still in fill
possession of my beard, after hav-
ing been in the country four days,
things rapidly began to happen. I
was taken to Immigration and ques-
tioned as to why the offending
growth survived.


(N JIO Y


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PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI.


Pinney in Haiti


I, we


II


Main OFfice
in PETIONVILLS

,giriciaip Gas-Statiot,
's hoot disionce from citt
PETIONVILLE Hotels.
None: 743
/'67 t


" ,s
ITI SUN


I


* -*.-*.'i*.-~., ~"*"9~.~


WN A rXIM A


SUNDAY, APRIL 3rd., 1960

"I declared that my beard had
ieen put in its proper place by
God, that as a member of the Aus-
ralian Orthodox Church I was re-
[uired to wear a beard at least one
'ear out of three in honor of the
Messiah, and if they wanted to re-
move my beard they would be ob-
iged to remove me with it. And
hen. I -added, what a delightful
story that would make for the for-
eign press for surely in the an-
nals of political crime there has
never been a case recorded of the
deportation of a harmless tourist
merely for the wearing of .a beard.
w
"To this they replied that either
I,. or the beard, or both would have
to go. As it ,was I was. overdue in
St. Thomas where Al (Pinney's
wife) was waiting for me, so I
chose to leave the next day and
can only presume that I would-
have been hustled on a plane and
deported had I not left on my own
accord with the beard."
And so, Pinney has added anoth-
er chapter bought about by his in-.
separatable beard. For the time
being he is residing quietly in the
Virgin Islands where the authorit-
ies don't seem to bear malice to
beard bearers; but, if Peter Pin-
ney moves on to pastures further
afield be will no doubt collect fur- .
their incidents for future memory
that is while he still wears that
beard.
The English Oxford Dictionary
gives the following description of -
a BEARD: (noun) Hair of lower *.
face (excluding usually moustache,
sometimes whiskers); etc. Per-
haps within the next few years the
following abbreviation may be ad-
ded: Pinney-beard travel -(see
incidents.)


I







- SUNDAY, APRIL Srd., 1960


n.
H AITI SUN "


.. ant from Montrie where the hosp- roneously printed the name wrong
SHAITI SUN il was sited. ly of the locality as "tete .de
H I I S NWhen news 'oi the invaders land- chien."
'nTHE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAP .aing reached the settlement, it was A READER. "
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning obvious that the numerically weak -
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH garrison, whose duty it was to pro- USOM HELPING HAITI
Germnt-Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSUER tect the hospital, could not with- Dear Mr. Editor,
MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN. stand the pressure or assaulting My compliments to the "Haiti
STABLISHED IN 1950 WRONG DESIGNATION brunt of the assailants. Sun" on its coverage of the ODV4k
ESTABLISHED IN 1950 [ Dear Mr. Editor,
STer is aditteo w hsoi The hospital was ordered evacua- difficulties.
V There is a o little known hiLstorical ted and Doctors, assistants, the sick, Concerning the reports of the Par-
THE SHARPEVILLE MASSACRE she on the Island of "La To refugees, and the soldiers all mov- liamentary Board of Enquiry on
Stue". which when referred to by ed to a cave sited sortie 12. miles ODVA's activities so m e personal
S Little eidtion is necessary concerning the abarity Geographers, is wrongly designat- away from the hospital at the east- background knowledge might be
he h evie re a forigh ago in w h an This is a geaph eer end of the land. This cave valuable to them. To start a new
:of the Shrpeville Masaere a fortnight ago in Whih an Thiisis a geographical error. It was spacious enough to accomod- industry and especially an agric-
estimated 70-90 Africans were cruelly slain and more than appear on the maps at the north-ate the refugees and its na-row cultural industry involves financial
200 ded eastern end of this island and entrance made it easy to defend risks ordinarily not self-evident.
he lod d cr hb e rP should be referred to by its prop- against attack. Included in the risks are the haz-
The blcodshedding carnage wrought by the 'Boer Police er name "tetes chretiens."arsowetrptthtai
with pistols, rifles and Sten guns on he 20,000 'Africans at Here are the historical facts. This the pursuing troops realized ing of unskilled labor, cost of ship-
-the Shairpevile police station (28 miles southwest of Johan, When, in the early part of the 19th as they also realized the reckless- ping and materials, transport, spoil-
neburg), g in retaliation against the hackles im- century, in the ranks of the Frenh ness of a frontal attack. Enough age, marketing, and finally last but
-,neburg) pa d in s o ae n e h expeditionary forces sent to subdue men were sent to the top of the not least the collection of pay-
S tte hated pa ok system tuned South Afica Haiti (then known as Saint Domin- cave to drop dry wood and grasses mets.
and was deplored throughout the -World. gue) casualties were running high in front of the cave's entrance -
Condemnation and disgust can be the only result of this and beginning to tell and success then the heaps of wood and grass Much of this must be trial' and
I. barbaric alct and although a little ate, it is gratifying t in favor of the French troops loom- were set alight. Those inside who error with unexpected losses. It
note that S the firdt Negroe Republic in the world Haiti necessy provti ea ospame feared suffocation came out into takes strong financial and. courage.
ntathe open and were immediately eous backing to start an industry
has joined with the redt of the world in deploring the mas- care for both wounded soldiers and shot while those remaining inside of this nature and Haiti is most
K.- sabre wihith resulted in such a tragic loss of life. sick civilians, succumbed to the smoke. fortunate to have a good friend in
n. Thursday, "A-strong protest against the barbaric acts Just across the. Strait from the .. the USOM an organization will-
ei. pet rted y South r it African brothers," mainland lay out of reach an Isl- Not o n e Frenchman survived mg to face these hazards and still
-; in South A ica against ou Arian e," and where only a well organized the ordeal and to this day their push forward. What other entity
:was issued by the National Union of 'Haiian Students in hostile .force could land and main- bones lie in testimony spread ab- could furnish such financial back-
Sa. letter addressed to the Prime Minister of the Union of tain a foot-hold. This Island was out the floor of the cave. As one ing and face such risks?
South Africa, Dr. Verwoerd 'and handed by the students to thought to be an ideal site for the stands upon the threshold of the Once established the Government
. th British Embassy in Port-au-Prince or transmission section of a hospital and such grotto, the sight of skulls and more and USOM still have the problem
a building as swiftly erected at skulls make a lasting impression of guiding these industries into pri-
Montrie. hence the name "grotte tetes vate endeavor rather than socialist-
Meanwhile the fight went on bet- chretiens". ic enterprise.
':ween the two contending forces on Maps of La Tortue have all er- PRO BONO PUBLICO.
-[ HANDICAP WEEK IN MAY the mainland and the French _
h"I" WEEe ,, troops holding the town of Port-
"Week for the Handicapped" -an annual week of con- .roop holdi vden t to e T orn- 4 j jl n ,,
Sm..-? -*T ,. .-de-Paix were drven out. The corn- ljcMjb llM f l liO f t "8
1: .tribution 'to provide funds for tihe aid 'and rehabilitation manding officer of the victorious w ...
t. of 'Haiti's crippled 'and maimed- has been held each year native army decided to cross the KEM-GLO LOOKS AND WASHES LUKE BAKED ENAM
siabe 1951 and this year will be 'held from May 28 to June wintl tossed angry waters of the
0i.1 channel (ten miles wide) and cap-
ture the newly built hospital toge-
On Thursday of this -week the Association Haitienne Pou:- other with its inmates and such
la Rdbhabillitaition des Handicapes, an affiliate to the Inter- other fugitives from the war area
national 'Society for the Welfare of 'Cripples, held a meeting as had crossed from the mainland
at St. Vincent's School to plan this year's "Semaine des seeking safety.
Handicapes." This year's week for the handiceapjed is being Boats were sorely lacking so the
plaaned well ahead in anticipation of making it an unpre- native army put together small i-
B su e te kess. bamboo rafts (pripris) propelled
II lPhe Association was formed to help crippled children, es- by crude, short, home made padd-
les. With spirits high, the men of
ially those from the provinces. With linmited boarding the invading res slowly sailed
abilities ,available at 'St. Vintenits 'School for the h'andicap- towards their goal. Their undertak- '
the Association set up a boarding home on Rue de la ing was full of risks but sustained l -
S vtlatin a home for sixty maimed children who attend by their vim and determination st mie n eMiraciwH h
0'01hoo1 and rEceive tnre'ajtient at 'St. Vincent's. and by putting forth strenuous eff- IU*lU A H0MS. *
Sorts, they rode the rough and roll- ALL WOODWOM
As the home has no fixed monthly subsidy 'Handica.p ing waters of the Tortuga Strait
Week' provides 'a means of aceumu'l'ating funds to run the and landed safely on the Island at JOSEPH' NADAL Agents
.ahme. Bafl's and charity artist shows and raffles have been La Vallee a harbour not far disi-
planned by the Amsociation and already neat collection box- ^. ..- 4 -. -., -
es have appeared in Hotels and public places. The boxes ..-r. sm .. ur
comprise a donation receptacle and EUSSO donated lighter I ( )11 II A\ I 0 (I S1 II
il.uid with the catching slogan, "Take a little give a I E It. YJt L/
.i.tfle." C
c^Boxes for the contribution were arranged by Shannon
Yaralbough and are constructed of mahogany, surmounted A Distinguished Hotel In The Heart Of The City
ib. a photograph executed by 'Emmanue Racine a crippl- .
ed boy, symtod of the need for monetary aid in the camp- Conveniently Located To The Shopping District
--a4gn to help the crippled and hwandiiapped of Haiti. H Wt
-- -All Air Conditioned Rooms with Private Baths and Hot Water


You -know
Sit's a really fine
Scotch when it's
.JOHNNIE
WALKER



JOHNNIE WALKER
Born J 120-still going strong

EETZMAN-AGGERHOLM, DISTRIBUTOR


HA


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New Pool Terrace with outside Bar and Swimming Pool

Air Conditionned Bar Unsurpassed Cuisine Finest Service >
LPPY HOUR" EVERY THURSDAY Y

FROM 5:30 TO 6:30 p.m., INFORMAL GATHERING

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From 7:30 P.M. To Midnight With Floor Show

UNDAY NOON CREOLE BUFFETS '

AT POOL TERRACE
,t ry


*--1^
.X
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.. "1..'


. ....^




' ". i ;




* '. "*';;
,,.,- *;


a's. A


PAGE


& iinl_





................................................................ .' :A~t"
...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4 ~
0; ........................................................................


SUNDAY, APRIL


3rd.,. 1960


Master Surgeon-Snook Fisherman

SOUTH AFRICAN M.D. SERVING AT SCHWEITZER HOSPITAL DOES NOT AGREE WITH RACIAL POLICIES
PERSONALITY OF THE WEEK Medical Colleges insist on a corn- Anderson's description of the hos- the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Originally he had planned to build
Master of all phases of surgery, plete and extensive general train- pital here." the Artibonite. his hospital near Africa's Congo
keen Snook and Game Fish fish- ing before a surgeon moves into Dr. Venn is kept fully occupied Dr. Venn and Mrs. Williams, both River, but, he switched to Haiti
erman, and a man with an avidity the field of surgical specialization." during working hours and performs of whom are divorcees, intend because- of its denser population
for yachting, these are some of His fellow Doctors at the Schweit- as many as 60 major operations spending their honeymoon in San and its acute medical needs. Cbn-
the attributes of Dr. Dorrian Venn zer Hospital in Deschapelles all re- per month. In the spare moments Juan and the Virgin Islands and structing the modern hospital took
who in June of last year joined the mark on his accomplished manner of leisure he likes to relax with a then returning to.Haiti and the hos- nearly two years out in July of
medical staff of the. Albert Schweit- in handling all forms of surgery game of tennis now and then but pital. Since her arrival in Descha-- 1958, the Mellons, then with a staff
zer Hospital in Deschapelles, Ar- but Dr. Venn puts it down to his his favorite occupation is that of pelles Mrs. Williams has been do- of four Doctors and a Laboratory
tibonite Valley. English training and states, "It has fishing and of late especially Snook ing social work and both she and assistant together with the Mellons,
Dr. Venn is one who makes no come in very handy." fishing. He maintains that the Ar- Dr. Venn will remain at the hos- opened the doors of the hospital and
pretences and gives his reasons for VISITED DR. SCHWEITZER tibonite is a fine scource for fish pital for another "couple of years" went to work.
joining the Larimer Mellon found- On two occasions, .at the request and describes the Snook as a game on tourist card extensions. The original funds for the build-
ed Hospital by stating, "I am no of Dr. Albert Schweitzer, Dr. Venn fighting fish, and also a very edib- ARTIBONITE HOSPITAL Mellon himself but he states that,
missionary, I am not over religious, made the long journey from Johan- le one. The Albert Scweitzer Hospital, "The hospital has now grown be-
but, from a medical point of view nesburg to the Albert Schweitzer The Doctor had not heard of the founded by Dr. William Larimer y ond our means bnow grown be-
I am interested deeply in people Hospital in Lambarene, French E- Snook until he came to Haiti and Mellon, Jr. under the Grant Foun- yond our means but we sil.. give
.., 1..wha t JtLweJcan-OurannualM


who are in need of help."
Aside from his vast knowledge
of surgery and his skill in the op-
erating theatre, Dr. Dorrian Venn's
personality and character have won
him many friends at the Schweitzer
I Hospital, a fact which can be sum-
med up by the statement of one
of the South African's fellow Hai-
tian surgeons, "apart from his per-
sonality he is an accomplished sur-
geon and he is a pleasure to work
with in the theatre."
Born in Pretoria, Capital of South
Africa, and of English descent, Dr.
Venn, now in his 40's. commenced
his medical training in Capetown
South Africa where he received his
primary degree. He then underwent
study both in England and Edin-
burgh and at the conclusion of four
years was made a fellow of the
Roypl College of Surgeons in Lond-
on and Edinburgh. .
For a time Dr. Venn practiced
in Ldndon and then returned, to set
up .practice in Johannesburg where
: .be specialized in Urology. It was
'*hile studying in England that Dr.
Venn received his thorough train-
ing in all -fields of surgery. This
he. explains by saying, "English
:"i '


quatorial Africa to perform surgic-
al work in the jungle hospital. His
first trip was made in 1957 and
the second the following year, both
visits being of a month','s dulation.
It was while on his second visit
to the Equator based hospital that
Dr. Venn met the famous photo-
journalist Erica Anderson who was
visiting the hospital with the inten-
tion of making a film on its- acti-
vities. having just arrived from Wa-
rsaw. She talked to him about Dr.
Larimer Mellon and his hospital
in the Artibonite Valley of Haiti,
a hospital also named after Dr.
Albert Schweitzer.
So impressed by Miss Anderson's
description of the Deschapelles hos-
pital was Dr. Venn that he wrote
to Dr. Mellon asking hinfi if there
were any staff vacancies. And so
in June of 1959 he arrived in Haiti
from Johannesburg and moved to
his new position. "I did not have
to leave South Africa because of
any racial prejudicies, but, I did
not agree with all principles nor
see eye to eye with some of the
policies in South Africa. Also I
don't like practicing in the City
and was very impressed with Miss


being unable to identify his first
catch of one, bought a comprehen-
sive book on fish varieties. .His
top catch of Snook has to date been
an eight pounder but he says that
they go a lot heavier and he in-
tends to keep trying.
Next to fishing, yachting takes
up a large part of Dr. Venn's leis-
ure time and he recently acquired
a small sail boat from a resident
of .Gonaives which he intends to
alter to his own specifications.
While living in South Africa and
England the M.D. gained consider-
able sailing experience.

During the Second World War Dr.
Venn was Senior Medical Officer of
the South African Air Force sta-
tioned in Italy. On April the 23rd.
Dr. Venn.is to be married to Mrs.
Mina Williams, also a native of
South Africa. He and Mrs. Williams
knew each other in South Africa
and last year Mrs. Williams visited
Haiti during the course of an ov-
erseas holiday and decided to stay
here. The wedding ceremony is to
be held in the home of Dr. and
Mrs. Larimer Mellon, founders of


nation (Grant is mhis wuife Gwen s
maiden name) in 1956 at a cost of is over half a million dollars and
maiden name) in 1956 at a cost of. this comes from contributions by
$2,000,000, at Deschapelles in the .indduals and organizations.
Artibomte has continued to flour- indiiduals and organizations.
Artibonte has continued to flour- Dr. Mellon, assesses the increase
ish since its inauguration. in the number of patients treated
Dr. Melloa first thought of be- Continued on page 10)
coming a Doctor in late 1947 at the .pag
age of 37. At that time he was
living with his wife and children LE CENTRE D'ART
rn his ex ansive ranch in Arizna I


(Larry Mellon is the scion of the
Pittsburgh Mellons.) One day when
looking through a copy of LIFE
magazine he came across a picture-
story on the life and work of Dr.
Albert Schweitzer and "his jungle
hospital and that was the comm-
encement of TMellon's medical car-
eer.
A letter to Dr. Schweitzer asking
advice resulted ini ar eight page
reply in which Dr. Schweitzer told
Mellon, "Just how to proceed." The
Mellons moved to New Orleans and
Larry entered Tulane Medical Un-
iversity. Seven years later he re-
ceived his degree and immediately
commenced searching for a suitab-
le site for his hospital which was
to based on the methods of Dr.
Schweitzer.


Founded 1944
Exclusive k'gents:
Alix, Amiama, Armand, Bazile,
Benoit, Bigaud, Blanchard, Desro-
siers, Domond, Duffaut, Hyppolite,
Joseph, Leontus, Leveque, Liautaud,
Montas, Normil, Obin, Pierre, St.
Brice, Stephane, Turnler, Vital,
many others.

17 Rue de la Revolution
From Pan American

in town one block toward -
bay, half block to left.
Open Monday through
Saturday
9-1 3-6 Phone 2055


Sensational


THE AMERICAN VEHICLE, IDEAL FOR HAITI
It is the "LARK" manufactured by STUDEBAKER-PACKARD Corporation.
Neither large nor small or rather, large and small at once
Offering all the advantages of large cars, 6 to 7 passengers,
Stability, Comfort, Power and all the advantages of the small car
Low fuel consumption (30 to 32 miles on a gallon.
Easy to drive, length reduced
Reduced Prices, in spite of its great luxury
Ideal for Haiti


THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE AGENCY,
Place Geffrard, Phone: 3216 or 3929


S. A,


I .
GARAGE RUE DES CESARS PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
Ask also for a demonstration of the Pick-Up and Trucks
Their saving of fuel, -solidity, power and capacity are
already universally known.


I. Ill


AflI 6a


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wnLI wL e t can. U-m.JL Cu IU. J UUagAE


'


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i








SUNDAY, APRIL 3rd., 1960


"HAITI


-PAGE.-?


SUN"


o Your

----.. -

Shopping

In Haiti


It is getting so that people are
.' taking vacations as much to
shop as to play golf, lounge in
the sun or just relax. And, rio
wonder when you consider the
savings to be had through Free
Port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they can
buy the same gifts, in free-port
shops, at savings up to 60% of
U. S. prices. So,- for the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
wonderful vacation in Haiti.
Perhaps the most famous free-
S port shop in the world is La
k Belle Creole. located in the
heart of fascinating Port-au-
Prince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable wonderland
";. full of the world's most de-
sired merchandise. Swiss.wat-
ches, Cashmeres, Handmade
bags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
S Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
S meras, Liquours and a seem-
o,. ingly endless array of native
handicraft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
.- sider that one can buy the
world's most famous Swiss
. watches Patek Philippe,
" Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
;'- Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
.- Borel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
guet-at discounts of 50% of
the U.. S. advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
Belle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be well worth your time to
consider a trip to Haiti.

Al Noustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhaps'another reason for
: the surge in popularity of
free-port shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
1aa leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
licy of cooperating with tra-
vel agents in their various
--. promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
:' tie of free champagne to any
visitor to Haiti who happens
'to be celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
,:. itself celebrating a 10th an-


niversary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts 'to make
the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
. two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
mous brand merchandise.
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
-tors at prices that will as-
.tound them. No doubt thou-
".- sands of tourists this year will
come home from vacations in
SHaiti, richer, in a way, than
.when they went away.

a..


'a


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER
P. 0. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI





AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS


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ROYAL CROWN DARBY,
ROYAL COPENHAGEN,
ROYAL WORCESTER,
ROYAL DOULTON,
ROSENTHALE, SPODE,
AYNSLEE, COALPORT,


GUSTAUBERG.



GEORGE JENSEN,
HANS HANSEN, GERO,
DRAGSTEIU, GENSE.



The Finert of FRANCE.
ITALY, AUSTRIA.,

LALIQUE, BACCARRAT;
ORREFORS,
WEBB & CORBETT,
VAL SOLAMBERT,
STUART, LEERMAN.


OMEGA, PATEK PHILIPPE,
JUVENIA TISSOT, BOREL,.
AUDEMAR PIGUET,
JAEGER LE COULTRE,
ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO,
ATLANTA, STUDIO,
VULCAIN.



KISLAV,
-ENGLISH DOESKIN,
ITALIAN ANTELOPE.



PRINGLE, BALLANTYNE,
BERN HARD ALTMAN.,
LUISA SPAGNOLI.


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GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY
and BRAZILAN GEMS.


HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS


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JEWELRY




Native-Insnired
SPORT SHIRTS


SCULPTURES


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CARONM CHANEL,
RAPHAEL, PATO..
BALMAIN, WORT



REVILLON, VIIGNY. .
CARVEN, LE GALLIO%. .
FABERGE OF PABI ,
JEAN D'ALBERT,
JACQUES GRIFFE
FATH, PIGUET.
CORDAY,


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"HAIT1 SUN"


.


.1


.CONSTITUTION OF THE REPUBLIC OF HAITI 1957

SECTION 4
The Technical Grand Council and the Bureau of the Budget
Article 107.-A Technical Grand Council for National Resources and
economic development shall be instituted. It shall be an independent
agency whose members shall be appointed by decree of the President
of the Republic.
Its functions will be determined by law.
Article 108.-The Bureau of the BMdget, which shall be responsible
directly to the Chief Executive ,shall be charged with preparing, in
close collaboration with the PFermanent Secretary of the Technical Coun-
cil for National Resources and Economic Development, the State budget
and with seeing that it is put into effect. The Council must also make
every effort to develop the national economy by integrating the public
receipts and expenditures with the general plans for the economic dev-
elopment oa the country.
Article 109.-The Judicial Power shall be exercised by a Court of
Cassation, .Court of Appeal, and the Lower Courts, the number, organiz-
ation, and jurisdiction of which shall be regulated by -law.
The President of the Republic shall appoint the Judges of the Higher
and the Lower Courts. He shall appoint and remove the officials of the
Public Prosecutor's Office at the Court of Cassation. the Courts of
Appeal, and the other Courts, as well as the Justices of the Peace and
their alternates.
The Judges of the Court of Cassation and the Courts of Appeal shall
be appointed for ten years and those of the Civil Courts for seven years.
Their terms shall run from the time of their swearing in.
When once appointed, the Judges shall not be removable by the Ex-
.* ecutive Power for any reason. However, they shall be subject to Articles
124, 125, and 136 of the present Constitution and to the special laws
." giving the reasons for which their duties may be terminated.
Article 110.-Disputes over civil rights shall be within the exclusive
jurisdiction of the Courts oa Ordinary Law.
Article 111.-Disputes over political rights shall be within the juris-
diction of the Lower Courts (tribunaux), with the exceptions specified
by law.
Article 112.-Commercial disputes shall be referred to the Civil or
Peace Co rts in accordance with the Commercial Code.
Article 113.--No jurisdiction for legal controversies may be establish-
.-- ed except by law.
... Article 114.-Land Courts, Labor Courts, and Children's Courts shall
be set up, the organization, number, location, and functions of which
shall .be determined by law.
Article 115,-The Land Courts shall have temporary functions. Their
: functions shall end as soon as the purposes for which they have been
- set up have been achieved.
Article 116.-As'an exception, each Land Court shall take cognizance
o disputes relating to surveying, the registration of property, real
estate, real property rights, and possessory actions solely in the region
for which it has been set up.
The Courts of Ordinary Law and the Peace Courts shall retain their
competence in the disputes over which they have jurisdiction by law.
Article 117.-The Court of Cassation shall not rule on the merits of
cases. Nevertheless, in all matters except those submitted to a jury,
( when, on a second appeal, even on an exception, a dispute arises between
.. the same parties, the Court of Cassation, accepting the appeal, shall not
','.- 1 order remand but shall rule on the merits, the sections sitting in joint
es.,lon. In such case, the court shall sit with a majority of Judges who
did not hear the case in the first instance.
When the appeal is from an injunction, from the order of an Exam-
S ining Magistrate, the decision of a Court of Appeals rendered on the
occasion of such orders, from final sentences of Peace Courts, or deci-
slons of Land Courts, the Court of Cassation. accepting the appeal, shall
pronounce judgment forthwith.
Article 118.-The office of Judges is incompatible with any other sal-
aried office.
Incompatibility because of blood relationship or relationship by marr-
iage shall be regulated by law.
The law shall likewise regulate the qualifications for Judges in all

Article 119.--Court sessions shall be public unless such publicity
endangers public order and morals. The Court shall rule in such cases.
Cases concerning political or press offenses may not be heard In
camera..
Article 120.-All decrees or judgments shall state reasons and shall
be pronounced in open court.
Article 121.-Decrees and Judgments shall be rendered and executed
In the name of the Republic.
They shall contain an enforcement order. Notarial acts shall be put
ni the same form when it is a question of their enforcement.


This ls CHAPTER ImI of the CONSTITUTION of the Republic
of Haiti as translated from "Le Monlteur", Port-au-Prince, Halti,
December 22, 1597. The "Sun" will publish a Title per week of the
Constitution as it appears In the original.


Article 122.-The Court of Cassation shall rule on jurisdictional dis-
.'utes in the manner prescribed by law..
It shall take cognizance of the facts and the law in all cases of de-
cisions rendered by a Military Court.
Article 123.-In a dispute and on its referral, the Court of Cassation
*hall rule on the umcontutianality of the laws, the sections sitting
in joint session.
An appeal on grounds of unconstitutionality shall not be subject to
any requirement concerning bail,, fines, or fees.
Interpretations given by the Legislative Chambers shall be applied
to the matter without retroactive withdrawal of the rights acquired
by previous final Judgment.
The Courts haMll apply pubUe administrative orders and regulations
only in so far as they are in conformity with the laws.


HOTEL


MONTANA

PETION.-VILLE


WEEKLY ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM:
TUESDAY: 7:30pm. to Midnight Creole Buffet under
the 'Stars on the Terrace with excellent Dance Band.
At 9:30 pm.--Meringue Lessons by Lavinia Williams.
WEDNESDAY: 7 pm. to 8:00 pm. Complimentary get-
together Punch-Bowl Party.
FRIDAY: 7:30pm.to lam.-Gala Dinner-Dance in Cocktail
Lounge. Show at 10:30 pm. No cover-charge.
EVERY NIGHT: 7:00 to 9:00 Cocktail Hour with native
Combo.


Iil


LES PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUES
HAITIENNES

SH LACE GEFFRARD
- P PLACE GEFFRARD V_-


PAGE 10


' .


'MASTER S

(Continued from page 6)
each week since the hospital's be-
ginning as "very rapid." The hos-
pital now has 101 beds -(There
were 50 when the hospital opened )
and 95 per cent of the time these
are filled to overflowing. In some
cases it is necessary to put two
children into the one bed.

The number of out patients treat-
ed each week, states Dr. Mellon,
numbers approximately 1,000, equi-
valent to that treated last year.
But, a vast rise in expenses has
occurred in the utkeep of the hos-
pital for a number of reasons. The
number of X-Rays taken has in-
creased twofold and there is this
year a 50 per cent increase on
the number of operations; although
the number of hospital beds avail-
able remains the same, the numb-
er of patients increases all the
time with the result that the more
patients there are around the hos-
p i t a I, the higher become weekly
expenses.

"I have learnt a few tricks which
help a lot," states Dr. Mellon.
"There is a high a high rate of
Inguinal Hernias in this area and
so every now and then we hold a
'Hernia week', that is we wait unt-
il there are a large number of
hernia cases and then we do them
all in the same week this helps
to keep the high overhead down."
There is also, states Dr. Mellon,
a high ratio of Tuberculosis and
Spinal Fusion cases and these too
are treated on "special" days.


SURGEON SNOOK F

With such a high operating rate
outside assistance from visiting sur-
geons and Doctors is welcomed at
the Schweitzer Hospital and many
members of the American medical
faculty come to the hospital during
their vacations to give their serv-
ices free. Among those surgeons
in the past who have paid all their
own expenses to lend their skill at
the hospital has been a Plastic
Surgeon. All these people have
come to help, says Dr. Mellon.
"They certainly don't come here
for pay."
STAFF INCREASE
From an original staff of three
doctors the number of doctors and
surgeons has grown to ten, includ-
ing three Haitian,- Doctors, and a
dentist. Nearly one half of the nur-
sing staff is composed of Haitians
and as Dr. Larimer Mellon says,
"We are gradually becoming Hai-
tianized." -

Dr. Mellon continues, "We have
to make this a regional hospital,
we would rapidly find ourselves
snowed 'under with patients if we
took people from all the surround-
ing areas of the valley. Those who
fall outside our area receive their
medical attention from the dispen-
sary-hospital run by the Board of
Health." People in the perimeter
of the hospital some 400 acres
%with a 50,000 population pay a
hospital fee of 2 gourdes. Patients
around the perimeter of the hosp-
ital's scope are accepted however
and are charged 3 gourdes.
These charges constitute a new


ISHERMAN

system (under the old system' t
charge for all patients was
gourde) and include the medical
consultation, and necessary X-Ray4
laboratory work *and medicationi.:4I
"Under the previous system,4
says Dr. Mellon, "Patients were|
given a prescription, which they
had to pay for themselves. Bui
many were too poor to do so and
half the time they walked around:
with the prescription sitting in
their pockets unfilled.
"Now, the patient pays an initial
cost which is a little more but in
return he receives all necessary
medical treatment and the best in'
medicines." Medicines constitute a.:
large expenditure on the part oq
the hospital but a big money-sav-h
ing is made each month -$15,000--:
by the use of drugs and medicalr.
equipment sent to the Schweitzer-;
Hospital each month free of charge
by the Medical and 'Surgical Relief:;
Association of New York. "This.
saves us more cash outlay thanrL
any other item," states Dr. Mellon.:
Dr. Mellon and his wife, both di-:
ciples of Christ, still exchange lett-',
ers every month with 85-year-oldci
Dr. Albert Schweitzer in his jungle.
headquarters at Lambarene.

OUTBOARD MOTORS
FOR SALE
I new 35 H.P. Evinrude bigtwin:.
I Used 1956 30 H.P. Lark with
Electric Starter and Long shaft.
Phone: 3781
DICK FORGHAM
BRASSERIE DE LA
COURONNE, S.A. -
For details contact:


-ARDOZO GARDENSi
ALMOST EVERYTHING THAT X
GROWS IN THE TROPICS
TROPICAL ORNAMENTAL.
PLANTS. ..
PALMS ROSES TREES
SHRUBS, CACTUUSES .
HOUSE PLANTS
EVERGREENS
ORCHIDS *

LANDSCAPING
Route HOTEL MONTANA
Petionville.


SUNDAY, APRIL 3rd., 19 w















,:A cuiui, -gsu w-impany, hoping to. grow prosperous
om f'ish. hiding 'and the Itbua= in the waiters around Haiti,
m found Omt a basib truth: there is no incentive like money.


Using such diverse elements as
ls ed refrigerators," a boat pur-
sed from the Haitian Coast
Guard and an 81-year-old man with
Children as one of its agents
"i young company has' begun to
.;lke' its first steps. Guiding these
eps has. been Martin Routh, who
_as just completed a five year ass-
i ent in Haiti as a Food and Ag-
nculture Organization (FAO) Tech-
m cal Assistance fishery officer.
i':"The main difficulty has bee n
B t up to now the Haitian fisher-
man have -found it very hard to
rket their fish", said Mr. Routh
an interview in Rome. "There.
:;are. very few paved roads in the
country --the rest are jeep or mule
tracks- which means in the semi-
*4 tropics, that fresh fish never gets
.:ut of the coastal villages." What
fish they catch beyond their own
nf..needs, they salt and sell to profes-
s-ibnal trading women, known as
::f.adame Sarahs, who come on don-
'J. -eys over the mountains. These
S.womrien pay the fishermen five to
:r seven cents a pound for their fish,
."',uand often buy on credit, rather than
'cash. If a fisherman had luck and
m.made a good catch, he still might
1' easily find difficulty in selling his
*-f:ish. Under these conditions, it was
.no wonder that the fishermen were-
Skit bothering to catch more than
enough for their family needs," Mr
Routh continued.
:MONTH'S SALARY IN TWO DAYS
"The new company offered

" :.,FOR RENT:
(Chemin des Dalles)
-. Six large rooms newly built with
.-.wailting room and bathrooms.
Ideal for business offices, or-com-
5' ipanies, also for two separated ap-
'. artments.
Address No. 29 Chemin des
Dalles or Phone 5032.


P E C I A L
: C I T A DEL
T RIP

-V OLKSWAGEN
BABY BUS
ALL INCLUDED:



$35

,HIS RATE COVERS: .
..a) Round trip transportation bet-
ween hotel in Port-au-Prince
'or Petionville and Cap-Haltien;
b) One night 1st class hotel ac-
...... comodation in Cap-Haitien and
3 meals;
_!:. c) Trip to Milot and excursion
to the
S.. T A D E L
Departures from Port-au-Prince
'every Wednesday and Sunday
Smorning, returning following 'day.
'-. AKEI YOUR RESERVATION AT
HOTEL DESK OR
SRAYMOND REMAIN

I S L A.N D

K. 0 TOUR S
". RUE DU CENTRE
-. Port-au-Prince,

Tel.: 2078


10 cents a pound for fish. In one
instance, the fishermen, in two
days, collected 1,200 pounds of fish.
Their previous production was 300
pounds a week.
"A schoolmaster, recruited by
the company to use.his spare time
buying fish, netted nearly the equi-
valent of his month's salary in two
days of fish buying. And his com-
mission was one cent a pound."
Mr. Routh of Canterbury, Engl-
and, was sent by FAO, at the re-


quest of the Haitian government, to
make a general survey of Haitian
fisheries and proposals for fishery
develQpment. He decided on two
main lines of approach. First, to
try and develop a large scale ind-
ustry for fish like tuna, to bring
animal protein into the people's
diets, and second, to help the small
fishermen improve production by
developing their fishing methods
and providing them with a market.
These aims were in accordance
with the Government's policy new
enterprises.
Since Cuba,_ Haiti's next door
neighbor, was landing some 12 mil-


..... .H- T SUN


fishing
AGENT


lion pounds a year of tuna, mostly
of bonito and albacore, Mr. Routh
thought that these fish could also
be found in the. waters around Hai-
ti, although the local fishermen
were not fishing for them. On Mr.
Routh's advice, the )Haitian. govern-
ment chartered a Cuban bonito boat
with a skelton crew and the fishery
officer went out and tested and
plotted the tuna grounds to be ex-
ploited. These grounds, not only
needed to have, tuna, but they also
had to have bait fish and small
harbors nearby. The harbors were
important for the bonito season
runs from April to September -
the hurricane season in Haiti.
"We got the noat a second time


PHILCO TROPIC 103-
INTERNATIONAL 6-BAND RADIO .. ;, ,
Listen to the High-Fidelity brilliance of this Philco master, model and
you'll think you're in the studio, so keep and clear is every programme.
But that's only one of this model's many fine features; others include:
Complete short wave and standard broadcast reception on 6 Bands.
Fascinating 'long-low' styling-fully 2ft. in width-with rich walnut
finished cabinet.
High-Fidelity sound from speaker network of duo-cone frdnl speaker
and dynamic side speaker.
Built-in antenna.
Separate bass and treble audio controls.






FIRESTONE INTERAMERICA Co.
Radio Pleasure
NOW ENJOY HI-FI


'Volli







ffzEi.









ASSELLAD

BRRunf








[wo6
[nbl4


. SUNDAY, -APRIL-Srds,-1960 .-... ...


HOUSE-WIVES,
BUSINESSMEN,
HOTELS AND
RESTAURANTS,


TAKE, NOTE:
Here is important news: Tomatoes at 25 centimes a pound!
At the Sales Office of the ODVA on the corner of- Rue
du Centre and Rue des Cesars. You will find the Tomatoes
ofthe fine superior, quality U.S. No. 1 Grade A at the econ-
oniical price of Gdes 0.25 the pound.


e,;Ave vt te.hblj ti crr


SAVE lUP TO 65%o
05% O


N STINGS
STINGS


NO LUGGING.-..


NO OVERWEIGHT .



NO CUSTOMS PROBLEMS






FOR YEARS NOW TOURISTS HAVE BEEN PLAGUED: W1 TH
CARTING LIQUOR THEY. HAVE PURCHASED, with over-.
weight .charges,- with customs problems. In. one fell .
swoop La Belle Creole has made it possible to have.
. liquor purchased abroad, particularly in Haiti, delivered' ,'
Sto your home, in most cases at-prices cheaper than ydu .
can bring it through, accompanied by all your- other .
purchases. '


Il/res ,widt 'yo. Sarme
. ON A CARTON OF FIVE BOTTLES


1. Belt's Special Reserve Whisky
2. Hanky Bannister Finest
Scotch Whisky
3. J. & B. Rare Scotchfhisky
4. Ballantine's Scotch Whisky
5, Queen Anne Scotch Whisky
6. Glbey's Spey.,Royat Whisky
8. hna & White Scotch Whisky
.8. John Jameson *** Irish Whisky
Flo. Piefe ,^J .. t,,


N.Y.
Price'
Pd320
$9~2-1


Btf. u1
warel
$13


- *4 ,
house Home.
.50 $16.50

3.540 Is-. 0
3 .5 o.: 6.0:


p -i .W^j~^^y^^^ 3


Haitian Fishing Inai y F!o
81-YEAR-OLD WITH 53 CHILDREN SERVING .AS


WITH A


BESSAMATIC


V9 C A M E R A S AT FHll.l: I'IMI 1'111 1.SI




U OE .f fA it- Sfl
RUE BONNE FOl
Phone. 2390
Manage' ;S.KAI-N AIR-CONDITIONED


... 4.'


-PAGE -n l




.
to demonstrate the commercial po- ,
sibilities" said Mr. Routh. "Alth-
ough we were operating at the 6d
of the season we caught nearly
tree quarters a ton of bonito. a
day. A very simple fish drying sta-
tion was set up at -Mole St. Nicolas,
the bay where Columbus first land-
ed, and the dried salted fish were-
eolo tp the Haitian people."
FIRST MOTORIZED HAITIAN
FISHING BOAT
The new company, which wanted
to go into fish marketing and coll-
ecting, asked Mr. Routh for his ad-
vice. First, they fitted out the 45ft
boat bought from the Coast Guard
-the first motorized boat ever to
(Continued on page 12)


-- -v


I


L.








,AG 1 SNDYAPRL r,, r~


'Ecapade' Visits HAITI
72 FOOTER TO COMPETE IN MIAMI-BERMUDA RACE


Well-known in Pacific racing cir- citing yachts. Dickson is well known
cles and currently "training" in as a sailing master and has captain-
Caribbean waters for the Miami- ed several winning yachts of oc-
Bermuda yacht race on June is the ean races. He is also a Staff Com-
"Escapade" owned and sailed mander of the Los Angeles Yacht
by Baldwin M. Baldwin, California Club.
Ph~ianthropist and scion of the Bal-
dwin land owners of Newport, Cal- Other members of the crew are
ifornia. Howard Wheeler from New Port,


The sleek 72 foot, yawl rigged
yacht, painted sea-blue and shining
from stem to tern tied up at the
Casino Pier on Wednesday morn-
ing fdr a two-and-a-half day visit
to Haiti.
Baldwin holds a strong position
in American yachting circles and
competes in several big races each
year and g.-nerally cruises when
not competing. During the Second
World War he served as a memb-
er of the United States Air Force,


California, and Lyn Brandt, from
Melbourne, Australia. Lyn was pick-
ed up by the Escapade in Jamaica
recently and will sail as a crew
member as far as Miami. He has
been "touring" for several years
now as a free lance writer and
"Jack of all trades," and next year
has arranged to journey back to
Australia from Europe by car.
Fifth and important member of
the Escapade is Stuart Newcomb
also from Newport Beach and cook


stationed in England, and was a for his fellow crewmen on the yacht.
noted flyer. Newcomb's talents are apparently
The Newport, California register- many according to his ship mates
ed yacht carries a complement of who state that before joining up
6 and is skippered by Bob Dickson with Escapade (he sails with her the
of New Port who has previously year round) he was an accomplish-
made two sojourns.to Haiti on vis- ed Meterologist. Stuart Newcombe


however was to modest to further
the subject.
Serving as medico on Escapade
is Charles S. Jamison from Pasa-
dena, California. Jamison has pre-
viously paid six visits to Haiti when
serving with the U.S. Army in San
Juan, Puerto Rico. Now semi-ret-
ired he was a former economist
with the Far East Command dur-
ing the Korean War and at the con-
clusion of the Korean activities
spent some time as a special con-
sultant to the U.S. Army.
Last time Jamison visited Haiti
was in 1942 and he was very.inter-
ested to learn of changes in the
way of life and especially new buil-
dings and landmarks From Haiti
the Escapade and her crew sail
to Miami to make final preparat-
ions for the Miami-Bermuda race
in June. Once that race has con-
cluded however there will be no
rest for Escapade is entered in
the 3,500 mile ocean race from
Bermuda to Sweden scheduled to
commence on June 30th.


HAITIAN FISHING INDUSTRY...
(Continued from page 11). the problem of marketing the fish:.
ish commercially in Haiti- with Up to now, fish marketing con-L
fish commercial, in Haiti- With editions in Haiti have been far from'
an insulated hold and small refrig- hygienic said Mr. r nFoism.
eration unit, besides the gear ne-coered with flies, were sold in
cessary- for bonito fishing. Then, to en markets and even in the cap-
assure themselves of a continuous ita hygenc, fishmonger shopse ca-..
source of a variety of fish, they or- taln- enly fishmonger shops set known.
ganized the fishermen in the scatt-ng ony sh were not known.
ered villages and began to collect ROCK LOBSTERS NEW EXPORT'
fish from them. This Api'il, the corn- "The new company has already.
pany plans to have its first go at opened three fish shops, one of
the tuna. which is particularly well equipped,
To collect the fish, the company in Port-au-Prince, Haiti's capital.
have established eight centers on All are clean and fitted with refri-
the northern, coast of Haiti's south- gerators." continued Mr. Routh.
ern peninsula. There, their agents The company at present brings in-
have started buying in fish offer- roughly 3,500 pounds of fish a week,
ed them by the local fishermen, and this will increase as further-
storing the fish in discarded dom- centers are opened up and the com-'
estic refrigerators packed with ice pany's newly acquired cold storL.:
treated with antibiotics in the most room goes into action. They start-;
modern style. The company's one ed exporting rock lobsters, or craw-.
boat has made regular rounds to fish, to the United States only last:,
deliver ice and to pick up the year. Now the company exports.
catch. nearly 1,000 pounds of rock lobster'
tails a fortnight crawfish which.
Now the new group has obtained formerly had been left in peace:
a loan from the National Bank of by the fishermen."
Haiti, and a second diesel driven Which means that Haitians, like-i
boat has been put into operation. Joseph Fremont, 81, fish agent,
This will enable the company to with his one cent a pound commis-.
set up further collecting centers sion, can provide better for his-
and permit fishermen in other out- children, all 53 of them, from the-
lying areas to sell their catch more oldest to the youngest, aged six:.
profitably. But there still remained months.



Caribbean Construction Co. S-A.

Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD

Phone: 3955. P. O. BO.. 284


VID


44


DAVID WRLLY TRLRMRS

would be happy to be

lr honored J byoup

Sisit at



&Iana? Qert


WRLLY


I 1ti* mostexciting FREEPORT STORe
/ ..t.-^ -n~p..w*"* *--Aln.xll


RND


iti5 mostfamous MAIoqRnlj ThCTOR9


* JjeadedJ 3c3tgs

* UtacaLrn. 0les

* CcGhmerve Sueaters


c~erLj~.


DiCILaos


*. fitcges


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Ot-alarmn. .gev)elyu


* Atornmteps


ORT PRICES


PORT-AU-PRINC
LH A ITI


S



'4
-I,


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TRADE
MARK
k a. Ai


--IT FREE P
Grand'Rue No. 342 .


, .*''I-.. '.


SUNDAY, APRL 3rd., 1 ..
sumDAY', APRIL 3rd, ."6


PAGE 12


i


SUN"


- -' ~ -- ,,,h


"HAITI








S-
UNDAY
APRIL 3rd., 1960


"
HAITI SUN "


-Lovely Diane Abitbol, daughter vet of the Agence Citadelle and his I
-Of Textile Tycqon Isaac Abitbol and novelist wife, Marie Chauvet.
L4 his wife brought here a fortnight Also visiting with the SS Home- s
:' ago three "Sweet and Twenty" of ric were Electronics Engineer Ted
her girl friends from New York: Schneyer and his wife Elaine, Plum- m
'-They are Judy Kern, Jill Meckel- bing businessman Julie Friedman I
burg and Bonnie Frindel. The four and his wife Ellen and Richard I
"charmantes demoiselles" made the Taylor, President of an Office Sup-
.':gayest parties here since the carn- plies Firm and his wife Helen. The
rival's ended and livened up all the party made a gay sojourn to the i
k places they went to, enjoying the Casino and promised to come back
iBaiti's "joie de vivre." Mr. and for a longer visit to Haiti.
SMrs. Isaac Abitbol. Ben Abitbol Manufacturers Harold Osrow and
I and Mr. and Mrs. Victor Mansour his wife Frances of Long Island,
have acted as Chaperons. As every N.Y., and Textile man Dan Davis
good thing must come to an end.. accompanied by his wife Elca of
iSthey are leaving today. Westbury, N.Y., also came for a
.- Advertising man Martin H. Lan- short visit to Port-au-Prince on-
dey and his wife Stephanie of Bos- board the SS Homeric and enjoyed
'- -ton, Mass. are currently visiting the "joie de vivre" at the Interna-
's here. They are guests at the Oloff- tional Casino.
s'--son for ten days.
Tennis Champ Jean Claude Ar- Norma Carr and Ruiz Stephen
niand is back from a trip in New (of Stephens Brothers) introduced
'York. to Haiti this week, Miss Mollie
Investment Ban k er Herbert L. Saltzman, John Fowler and Bertil
Stern of ALLEN & Co., New York Bengtsson Sales Manager of the
.City was greeted here this week North American Markets for Vol-
by Arthur I-aas, President of the vo Automobiles (AB Volvo. Gothen-
Caribbean Mills Inc, and Mr. Stern burg Sweden.) The party were
is part owner of the new Abattoir. guests at the Villa Creole Hotel.
Mr. John Nagel, an Executive Franitz Bazelais, son of retired
.of Needham, Louis & Brorb.\ Ad- Lt. Colonel Max J. Bazelais, is re-
vertising Agency, his wife Eliza-' turning here this week from the
Sbeth and their two lovely daughters, 2nd Armored Division of the U.S.
Diane and Joan arrived in Haiti Army at Fort Hood, Texas where
last weekend for a two-week visit, he has just completed- his basic
'The family is from Chicago. Illinois. training. Frantz will spend a two.
S Mrs. Nagel, who showed a great weeks vacation with his parents.
interest in Haiti's art and fash- Mancito Kouri, Don Juan in Ca-
ions, is the Head of the Lake For- dillac, left Port for Miami and on
est Travel Service. Diane is a col- indefinite length of time last Mon-
i lege student and Joan, a pupil at day. Word has it that there were
High School. Ian Mellon. younger some teary eyes at the Airport.
son of Dr. and Mrs Larry Mellon Anna Marie Beaulac, in transit
.of the Schweitzer Hospital is show- here this week en route to her home
ing the country to the girls. in Miami, was very impressed with
All the woli whistles circulating Haiti and plans to return for a va-
the town this week can be attrib- cation within a month. Anna works
uted to the arrival back from two as a model.
.' years in West Virginia of glamor- Dietetician Gladys Dominique ar-
ous Colette Rouzier. Colette spent rived in Haiti this week from a
two years studying secretarial work six month trip to Europe.
in Virginia and returns to Haiti American Economist Clement C.
| speaking fluent English. Velay and his wife Fanny are guests
-'1. Visitors to Port when the SS Ho- at the Hotel Choucoune. Mr. Ve-
.'.meric stopped here this week for lay is a native of Paris.
a brief visit were Mrs. A. L. Sim- President of the Agricultural
...... .mons, widow of the late A. L. Sim- Biologicals Corporation (A.B.C.) ir
"Z..-mons, founder of ASTA and owner New York, Ed. Wegman and Hal
of the largest travel agency in the Stern, Director of Research for A
-"U.S. as w1l as one of Haiti's best
-."'friends in the Tourist Trade. Mrs.
'.Simmons, whose husband died a 4
', few months ago, was travelling al- 4
ong with Mr. and Mrs. Harry Coop-
er of New' York (nicknamed light
horse) is a golf professional and -
: '-member of the Metropolis Country
Club and was elected last year as
Member of the Swanky Hall of 4
Fame an institution consisting 4
of twenty-three members. The party 4
were the guests of Mr. Pierre Chau-




iA F






HAS
1 < ,


B.C. are here on a seven d
They are guests at the Ho
son.


day visit..
tel Oloff-


Miss Sylvia Levinson, a social
worker in New York, and Belle
Kleinman are currently visiting
Haiti and are staying at the Villa
Creole.
U.S. Government worker in Wash-
ngton, D.C., Franck Collins is vi-
siting here with his wife. They are
guests at the Hotel Oloffson.
Manufacturer J. Gene Hochfeld- ,
errand his wife Patricia together
with Edwin Tasch, also a Manu-
facturer, and his wife Evelyn ar- '
rived here this week for seven days
in Haiti, they are staying at the
Oloffson.
Maqcolm Freeman, a Dentist from
Cleveland, Ohio, his wife Ruth and
their daughter Catherine are guests
at the Villa Creole.
Commercial Artist Sacha Estept-
an and his charming wife Maryl-
ui of St .mi- Mq- df1 E rnf ir


J u -M l. Lous, mIo., anLJU ll ce
Shanoff are currently visiting Haiti
and are guests at the Ibo Lele
Hotel.
Dan Cannold, in the Electric Cab-
les business in New York ,is being
introduced to Haiti this week by
noted Haitian Dentist and owner
of the Gift Fair Shop, Dr. Carl
Mews.

BROTHER MALOV
OFF TO LEARN
BOAT BUILDING
IN CANADA
The Rev. Brother Malov left Haiti
on Tuesday for, Canada where he
will conduct a study into the con-
struction 6f small boats.
Travelling on an ICA-Point Four
Scholarship, Brother Malov i.a
Frenchman) will do his research in
Quebec and Gasper Bay with the
intention of finding the most feas-
ible and easiest way to build fish-
ing craft.
When he returns to Haiti later
this year, Father Malov will pass
on his knowledge to pupils from
- the coastal fishing communities at
the Reeducation Centre at Carre-
l four. Brother Malov departed on
his trip with a farewell from Fath-
I ers Smith and Brother Benilde of
L the small .boys' town.


MAJESTIC AND MARABOUT 4


HOTELS 4
SITUATED ON PETIONVILLE SQUARE 4

PLEASANT AND COLORFUL 4


WKVWS TW UW^MitW-U WaaaWon


SIn Haiti This Week


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MAJESTIC AND MARABOUT

ALSO OFFER SPEOFAL RATES


FOR
LONG RESIDENCE


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"HAITI


SUN"


SUNDAY, APRIL t.,.


' ."' .,9 .. .'. ... .... *. .. ... : ,,




IPRT PRICE SNOP
, ,


9 -~


-~ -~-~


Yes the new Dadlabi Store on the corner of Rue du Bonne
Fol is surely a "Little Europe' stocked with fine merchand-
ise from all over the world with emphasis on Indian Prod-
ucts. "Little Europe" also means Free Port Prices.


(-i
NgOUVEAU KT




pAgMS CHAMB-RM


L jiofil amlior6 do ta ban&
'roulement done ne fraction eo
fcuritA'mupplementaires. Un hignimmm
disposifif do silence r6duA les
rents brWhs d6sagr6ables do um
andis quo .i1 construction Xgare dI
u/per-Cushion Sans Chambreo .1
uermif d'absorber les cahots do
oute. Vous aurez moins do pnoms i
lat, et momins do dIlais parce quo llI
instruction Grip-Se.al exclusive d46
oodyoar 61imine pratiquenae _*.
'crevasons habituelles.


.4 o oEARt
ee~~mens e mases aw -- E W -


MARIE JEANNE
AIR-CONDmIIOiED
STRAW-GOODS FACTORY

134, Rue du Centre
PORT-AU-PEINCE, HAITI

SHOES HANDBAGS HATS
HAITIAN RECORDS FRENCH PERFUMES

HAITIAN CERAMICS

15 Years Experience in Handicrafts.
P.O. Box 975 Open Every Day
From 8:00 a.m. To 5:00 p.m.


Haitians Attend White House


'CURRENT'


CONFERENCE ON CHILDREN AND YOUTH FOR ELECTRICITY


Four members of the Haitian
community are currently attending
the Golden Anniversary of the
White House Conference on Child-
ren and Youth being held by 7,0M0
delegates in Washington, D.C.
Every 10 years since 1909 the
President of the United States has
called a White House Conference
to discuss problems involving the
young and this, the sixth of such
conferences, is being attended tas
representatives of Haiti) by Sister
Joan Margaret, who runs the St.
Vincent School for the handicapped
and is attending the conference in
connection with Haiti's forthcoming
"Handicap Week," Madame Fortu-
na Guery, Dr. Gerard Leon and
Joyce McCalla.

Subjects at the conference cover
the consideration of a range of pro-
blems regarding children and young
people, including those which youth
feel to be of primary importance.
There are exchanges of informat-
ion and ideas about techniques,
programs, and plans for meeting
problems, together with discussion
of State and local actions that have
been stimulated by past conferenc-
es. These discussions are intended
to stimulate citizen action in states
and communities that will result


youth and adults, professional and
non-professional persons, men and
women, persons from rural and ur-
ban areas, representatives of va-
rious racial or other groups as
well as representatives of industry,
organized labor and parents, teach-
ers, doctors and lawyers etc.,

YOUTH PARTICIPANTS
Ten out of the 92 members" of
the President's National Committee
for the 1960 White House Confer-
ence are under 21 and at least 14
per cent of the nominees of the
State Committees are between 16
and 21; and even larger portion of
the nominees of national organiza-
tions are youth.
International guests at the con-
ference give informal speeches co-
vering similar problems in other
countries, about techniques and
programs, and about current
thought afid opinion in their res-
pective countries. These guests are
assigned to Workgroups so that
ample opportunity is made for dis-
cussion of mutual concerns and
problems.
Theme of the conference on child-
ren and youth is to promote opp-
ortunities for children and youth to
realize their full potential for a


in substantial gains for children creative life in freedom and dig-
and youth. nity.


Persons attending the Washington
White House conference include



Jacmel Reports

...Jack Robinson visited Jacmel 2
weeks ago with tentative plans for
building a "Sun-Gods" type Hotel
on the point of Jacmel. Aim of the
Hotel would be to serve to the
tourist good Haitian foods prepar'-
ed from the wide variety of prod-
uce growing in this country. Plans
also include deep-sea fishing and
horseback riding as tourist attract-
ions.
-..That the road from Jacmel to
Port could well be built on a
straight route instead of following
the river's path. The mountain for-
mation would facilitate the building
of small dams capable of holding
the water during the rainy season,
this in turn could be pumped to
a reservoir on top of the plateau
in order to dispense water during
the dry season.
Further advantage gained by this
system would be control of erosion
and the saving of further silt from
being washed into the port of Jac-
mel.


The White House Conference on
Children and Youth which comm-
enced in Washington, D.C., on
March 27 is scheduled to conclude
today.





MAKE AN OUTING


CACI


COMMANDEERS
Scudding around in the imposed^
blackout on Monday night on
Freres Road was a truck load
representatives from the Electric,"
Lght Company and members of the-.,|
Police Department armed with spot--
lights and high powered flash lights.
From 7pm to 8:45pm on Monday .
power failure plunged the Petion-.
ville area into darkness and what
at first appeared to be a truck
load of "line gangers" turned out
to be a busy group looking for'4
signs of current theft a widely
practiced occupation by those who
find that "commandeering" curr-."1
ent is a lot cheaper than paying a,.
monthly bill to the Electric Light.:
Company.
So while residents sat in the dark:-
pondering on the whys and where-i-'
fores of the power cut, the busy-'s
Electric Company posse drove up-.
and down the Freres Road at high '
speeds to the accompaniment of. ;
an occasional slamming of brakes- .
and all lights turned upwards' on-
some unimposing 'power pole. Won-
der how many houses found their '.
scource of illumination cut off Tues-
day night?

FOBR SALE '50
1960 Volkswagen only done 4,090-
miles.
As new, with Radio, insurance -
paid up till November. Owner leavr- -..
ing Haiti. Buyers please contact.Ni
Rex Simon c- o a Belle Creol-i. :
A Bargain! -




TO


EQUE,


BEACH CLUB AND IBO BEACH

ENJOY THE SUN AND SURF
AND THE EXCELLENT FACILITIES
OFFERED BY OUR RESTAURANT


AND SNACK BAR

CACIQUE


EN$.00 PER PER
$2.00 PER PERSON


MANAGERS:
Paul & Nancy BAUSSAN


IN HAITI SHOP


IN HAITI SHOP
AT -

FISH HER'S

HAITI'S LARGEST FREE PORT PRICE


SHOPS AND


1) GALLERIES FISHER ACROSS FROM NEW U.S. EMBASSY


ART & CURIO SHOP FISHERS ACROSS FR


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AP


VE UP TO 60 Per Cent 0
ND BUY HAITIAN HA.
STRAIGHT FROM THE I
ON THE RUE DU QU.
(AM. EXPR. AND DINERS CLUB


*1






I






oil


OM CUSTQifS HOUSE

)N IMPORTS .
NDICRAFTS -
FACTORY.
'I
ACPTD)


PAGE 14


MAHOGANY FACTORY


I-
.1 -
~ ''


r










SUNDAY,. APRIL 8rd., 1960


I ,


- *1,


aHA
ITI S ti ife


1^"\, "






'L.o.Poret, his guitar and vivac- MaigW ,of the West India Fruit
is .' ngingg' wife Janine left for Company is filling in... John M.
-.ioew York and their native Paris Kouri and friend Samuel' Dahdab
this past week. They have bid arrive today from Philadelphia to
goodbye to' the intimite Cabaret vacation here for a month with
Parisien at Hotel Riviera... Iras brother Edmond Kouri and, family...
BtolIphe Gagneron flew down from The Library Indigene of Mr and
S'Dehtroit with. son Locien Friday. On !trs Jear Brierre has moved from
%.aid. to .greetf her were doctor Rue des MiradleS to 102 Lalue (Are.
o. anddi the Tato Phipps.... Over nue J6hn Brown) and 2 doors from
r sm P is Paul Benoit, hand-, the Pharmacy Chevallier... D a v e
c. some young Christian Dipr perfume Haralgon -will be on hand today in"
ieeLtive who is stopping at. Villa Brasilia for the inauguration of
.;'Qreole. He discovered Crepes Su- Pan Am's service. Dave was form-
iaettes at Le-.Perchoir... early .with PAA at ,Bowen Field dind
SQJacquie.and Mdnique Auguste re- was. transferred to the town which
',;.-aturned to.Northern Canada.Tuesday is soon to become the, new Capital
iftiaei* Christenting theor fourth child of Brazil... Shelly Abitbol(is engag-
.,Sunday... Dr. ahd Mrs' Gerard Gros ed to-Temple Univerity dental tu-
returned from heir Miarii honey- dent Ira Seidman in' New York.
noon Friday... 'Gerard Vital atnd Shelly'is the daughter of the Textile
-: .daughter Josette have recovered tycoon.,. Famous fashion .dress des-
..-fSom their auto smash last week'. igner Mrs Helen De Huehne is va-
J' .osette,,.receptionist at the Aneri- cationing in Port and- is a guest, at
.>.:can.i Emlbssy Was showered with the Sans Souci. She started .'her.
presents during her brief convale-, career with Maison Piguet of Pa-
E-scence, eien flowers from the is ahd left France during the war
Gehnt wli6,.hit her. small, renatlt... for New .York where she has work-
ci.', elle an' Billy lkay arb the hap-, ed ever since... Rurmor has it that
piest-. yoging couple 'in town- with the boys on the Escapade, the sleek.
'cthe' bi-lt of' their:young son 4arc. yacht visiting Port.this w6bk, went
iMother .i the former Micl Ile- Roy on all. night escapade themselves.
- .and' Papa worls for. the Minottrie... Must have been a'great sight the
The Halles have a baby boy... For- next morning with all those head-
,''metr Amb ssabor Coloiel oche' B. aches .and the imbibing rhembers
irnebhe is down from Washipgton of the 'crew lying on' -tie foredeck
s'itisng his homeland for twh weeks where they spent the remains of
..e.-Brunet Rosier Edner, chief bf the night sleeping it off, in the raw.
I.'"Service of the' Lottery has left for Victor Winterbbrn is expecting 'to
ionn on a German scholarship. He ehd eight single years in Haiti bien-
.:wil s t.u d y. refrigeration 'for ,two tot. Correspondence with fellow
": amr* Watch Tower Societ)' worker in
'.!yro....* Puerto Rico blossomed inty engag-
.ohn McNamara, business Mart ement to pretty Sandra Harris, a
-.j:'ger of Pote Cole; is reported do- native' of Oregon. The young couple.
t1-ig well no' -after a 'few days of asked that special 'thanks be ex-
I,.'icicness. tended by ths column' to Maison
: '-;'. en-i Wiener, .Chief pilot fto Rey- Orientale: Jane Barbancourt and
nolds 6tliing Cbmpany, is on va- LU Perchoir for their kindness on'
i.'ation in the U.S.' Colonel Albert This occasion.
'~ w'.' ;, ,


B. F. Goodrich

ILVERTO WN TI RES
P signed to give you the bet

poslIble service at no exti@t.



< TIRES, TUBES, BATTERIES AND'
ACCESSORIES FAN BELTS,
CONVEYOR 'BELTS
E 3, Rue des Fronts Forts
-. DISTRIBUTOR
SWI L L'I A M N A R R


I'


IN THE, NORTH
THIS WEEK
By Our Northbrn Reporter
The .big problem of the North
Since' a 'month is the non-stbp rain
flood. .The damages occurred to the
roads are more than serious; in
some localities, it's a true catast-
roph: fields are' washed out, the
first blooming of the coffee-trees
has been considerably reduced.'
Sugar factory of Larue stopped
all 'operations. There is rio possibil-
ity of transportation of sugar cane;
vicinal lanes are all converted into
swamps. /
Likewise, bananas plantations of
West India Fruit are reported hav-


Student
(Continued from page 3)
day by Le Nouvelliste, addressed
to President Dwight Eisenhower
arid written 'by, "Cercle des Etudi-
antsi" the students ask that the
U.S. President intervene personally
into matters of segregation.
The students asked ,Eisenhower to
intervene, "before Governors' of the
States who believe .that in spite of
the. progress of-our civilization they
should pursue racial discriminat-
ion.".


ing suffering from:' the general in- "We (the students of Cercle) have
undation. been following closely the incidents
SMiss fiarjorie Breunig, of Amer- opposing black students and their
ican' Institute, visited Cap-Haiitien white co'nrade4 and have seen that .
on her monthly routine tour, of in- a number. of towns in the United i
section of Antenor Firmin Instit- States have become in famous
ute. Miss. Bteunjg was '1ccompani- through their deplorable practices,
ed by her charming mother. such as Litile Rock.
With a particular ipsistance, te- "The National Union of Ameriban
lediol :spread out words the long- Students has informed us by way
time dormant sugar factory of of c'itcular letter that 100 colored I
Welsh; .at Uimonade, will be awak- students in Nashville, Tennessee d
ened very soon. Eng. Marcel The- have been arrested, molested and I
baud is supposed to 'be the general beaten by public enforce-men? ag- l
manager of that business. ents; they, have been accused of
protecting against the prohibitation I
Some almost 'secret contacts of to negroes of a bar strictlyy reserv-
two-well reserved',ien with farm' ed, for the'patronage of.whites.
ers interested in cacao plantations
have inclined people in Cap-Haiti-, "Through the internAtional news
'bn to suppose the visitors were agencies we further learn of 'the
surveying the place to establishing incarcePation of 400 students..in
a chocolate factory in this part of South Carolina -always the blacks.,
the country, too. Immediately just and always those who have
one wordi'was in every mouth: plausibly manifested against racial.
monopole.2. discrimination. The Cercle des.'Etu-
diants deplore these incidents which
The last call of Stella Polaris occur 'at short intervals in your
poured down into Cap-Haitien and country. .
Milot very'. few tourist s. Pro- '
fessionals of, tourism are -expecting "The' Cercle further condemnsU
a cruiseship for April 13th. It may the brutal repression directed ag-
be the last for .this present season. ainst those students who, in peace-
Joe and Jane Thompson gave a fillu manifestations in virtue of the
tiUP mLO.L- JJ&1 L) Jd 1 i I


uce coR UtaLL-party. JasL i nThursday
at their 'lovely house in Carenage.
Joe is Senior advisorr of Pote Cole's
Education Divisioh. '

Cap-Haitien has been selected,as
the seat of a meeting df thirty ne-,
groe travel Agents from the Stat-
es, The conference will be held next.
May, a little before., the big Con-
ventiort. of Southeasteri ,Chapter' of
ASTA in Por't-au-Prince.'
Fort-Liberte has a new Prefect:
Mr. MThtrtin Jean-Louis replaces Mr.
Nyl Calix'te.

A food carload from Care Found-
ation vanished in a few .seconds
when hungry people assaulted, the
truck in front.of the storage place
of provisions.


The Haitian students' leter .con-
cluded by stating; "While awaiting
he situation of these studefits' to
be improved we express our solid-
irity 'as we express 'our compass-
on.


SOCIAL HIT.

The winter season was closed
Monday -night with a fashionable
tinner-party at Villa Rosd the
beautiful Ashton mansion, over
cooking the Capital.
Lovely Daska fvarnpvic hosted the
pirty which. ended with danc.ing.
into' the wee hours of -Tuesday
morning to the music bof he popu'l-
ar El Rahcho orchestra. Som 50
guests were present. :
Miss'Ivanovic is Vacationing hei'.
with her parents the Vladimir Iva-,
novics of Combined. ,Argoies Ltd.,
International. Shipping Co. of Ne*w.
York and London. Master VIadan
and. his artist brother Deyan are -
downs fromn M.anhattan with their
farmly and Daska's. two schpot fri-
ends Melissahn and. Alexandra Wil-
lin.

The Ivanovics seasoned travellers
are cousins of Mrs. Horace Ashton.


..WHAT 4MA A NDAYSAY NIG PN
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PAGE 16


. I IUP IW0IA.


,Outcry
rights of the human person, recl-
aim their legitimate rights to fre-
quent all the schools participate in
all activities of public life without
ariy discrimination.
I "Repettion of these acts ep ,
weU the restrictions that .,ftai6
authorities make of tle prl Sdes
of democracy and the .onmt th..
which, they hold the idea ls expiess-
ed in the deblhration of t!ie rights
of man." -
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"HAITI


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SUNDAY, APRIL 3rd., 1960,


Protection Of Rural Health
NURSES GRADUATE FROM
POTE COLE'S SCHOOL


By Our Northern Reporter
Eighteen young girls received
their diploma and their assign-
ment, last Saturday March 26th in
Cap-Haitien after a seven-month
theoretical course and practical
training at "Ecole des Auxliaires
Infirmieres Hygienistes", operated
by Pole Cole in this town. Minister
of Public Health and Population,
Dr. Carlo Boulos and Officials of
the Point IV Program, came espe-
cially to the North for the occasion.
All local authorities, Pote Cole's
bosses and Employees and a large
audience of well-known Capois at-
tended the ceremony at the over-
crowded reception-room of the City
Hall.
TRAINING COURSES FOR
AUXILIARY NURSES
When HADO started its operation
in the Nqrth, with the objective to
rehabilitate economic and social
I


conditions in this area, the survey-
ors thought radical changes couldn't
be expected if, education, sanitation
and health improvement did not
rub out lamentable practices long
in use in the peasant's habits. As
pointed out by Major Robert Ba-
zile in his introductory speech; "to
achieve its objectives Pote Cole
has to work first on the Haitian
human being in order to raise his
standards and integrate him into
civilization's stream." To this view,
the Auxiliary Nurses Training
School was opened last August un-
der the direction of Miss Paulette
Debrosse, a competent and active
Nurse and graduate from a Cana-
dian University and Miss Claire
Martineau, Public Health Nursing
Consultant from SCISP.
Twenty-four students were need-
ed: more than one hundred condi-
dates applied to be enrolled Pnd


The group of graduate nurses pose for their pictures after last week's
graduation deremaony from Pote Cole's Nursing School. The young women
will each be assigned -to a rural area where they will assist in teaching
methods of hygiene nursing and good housekeeping.


after an examination test, the sel-may be of great benefit for other


ected 24 were admitted to follow
theoritical courses totaling four
hundred and twenty (420) h o u r s
and to perform in hospitals, dis-
pensaries of Cap-Haitien, and sur-
roundings a practical training
which lasted almost four months.


countries facing problems like
those of our own qountry..."
Diplomas were then delivered
and also rewards to five "laure-
ates" offered by Officials of Point
IV and Pote Cole. Miss Debrosse
presented a souvenir gift to "each
one of her former "pupils"..


of assignment w e r e individually..
remitted to the eighteen nurses by;
Eng. Gerard Jospitre. -*

At the end of the ceremony, Mis
Claire Martineau, Public Health..-
Nursing Consgtant .fro .mSCISP,
thanked Officials, guests, parents -
and all the assistance.


A GOAL TO WORK TOWARD Miss Arlette Antoine, laureate of An appetizing 'buffet completed
On the same day, the eighteen au- the promotion, delivered a "thank- the ceremony which concluded at
xiliary hygenists nurses received ing" 'speech. Shortly after, letters noon.
their assignment. They will be liv- -
ing throughout the country from.
Le Borgne to Ouanaumlnthe, from
Grande Riviere du Nord to Pilate.
The role they are called to fulfill
in the rural communities is one of
the most challenging, as was em-
phasized by the Official speakers.
Auxiliary nurses ill face a great
variety of problems and their eff- |
orts will be to get a desirable in-
terplay between individual and en-
vironment that will contribute to
normal and impressive growth of
the Haitian peasantry. Their action
will be mostly preventive: help
and -advice to pregnant women,
care to babies and to youngsters,
and ,above all, general prophylaky
of the rural area to ensure health
and hygenic living standards. GRADUATES OF POTE COLE's Nursing School gather around one 4
Health and sanitation are certain- thb delicacy laden tables after the Nurses' Graduation Ceremony, held
ly indispensable if we sincerely In C ea w .
want to raise economic standardslas week.
in the rural communities. When
malaria, syphilils and other dise-
ases are on the way to disappear-.
Ing, a brighter future can be con-
sidered to rHaitian people. Exper- iivugp,. .
ience, indeed, has revealed that all
attempts made in the past to im-c| .
prdve the agricultural conditions in F -
Haiti failed because theworker, the. SCN
human material, has never been
previously put into condition to have
his health well preserved. 'FIRE CRR RtONLIRIVEL coo /
The goal Pote Cole is working
toward is the realization of a defin'-
ite health standard in rural en-
vironment. By scattering a group .
of eighteen hygenists nurses to the
surrounding country people other
groups will be formed in the near
future -, HADO pointed out its
evolving decision to provide cons-
cious practices of medical care in
order to raise first and to maintain
after, at a desirable level, the "hu- ,
man capital" to be brought up-t- For all kinds of French ped n s
date in every way. .FL --- -


DIPLOMA DELIVERING
CEREMONY
At 10:30 am., the ceremony start-
ed with "La Dessalinienne", foll-
owed by a welcome speech from
Major, Bazile, "Coordinator ol Pote
Cole. In a brief review of the be-
ginnings of the School and other
similar. undergoing action, Bazile
underlined the true objectives of
Pote Cole's Program, which is an
experience, the most important ev-
er undertaken here, to rehabilitate
"L'Homme Hailien" and to provide
him with what he needs to be a
real free mdn, reaching better life
by enjoying better conditions.
Minister Boulos next talked to the
graduates and called their attention
to the grandiose role they assum-
ed "since today": he promised the
entire collaboration of his Depart-
ment.
Miss Debrosse recalled what' has
been realized and presented the
happy graduates. Once more -and
not for the last time, she underlin-
ed it- and lavished on them' hearty
advice, like a mother whom the
daughter is going out of the home.
She gave them .the assurance that
the School will always be opened
to help them and finally- she stated
her "ambition that this experience


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