<%BANNER%>

Haiti sun ( March 13, 1960 )

Digital Library of the Caribbean Duke University Libraries
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: March 13, 1960

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00254

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: March 13, 1960

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00254

Full Text
-'I-'-'


Weekly
Every
Sunday


Haiti


1un1


-VOL X 1 SUNDAY, MARCH 13TH, 1960 Port-au-Prince, HAITI No. 37 Avenue Marie-Jeanne -!" CITE DUMARSAIS ESTIME No. 18


Second


Presidential


Warning


Paul and Nancy Baussan get some early morning exercise on their
"Water Skeeter" at Ibo Beach, Cacique Island before starting
their 'chores as managers of the new pleasure resort.


U.S. Embassy
$600.000
Architectural
Beauty

This week, after a year of cons't-
ruction, the wraps were taken off
the imposing new architectural
beauty sited in spEcious grounds
at the southern end of Harry S.
Truman Boulevard the 20,000
square foot building to house the
offices and staff of the U.S. Emb-
assy.

Built at a cost of half-a-million
dollars (nearly $600,000 with furn-
iture) this e pansive\ idifice is 'a
welcome addition to the City's sky-
line and commanding an impress-
ive location,. displays two storeys-
of architectural perfection, which
Robert Bradlee, Supervising Offic-
er for' the U.S. Government says
is "As good as anywhere in the
world."
In constructing the new Embassy
(Continued on page 16)


of meat to- butcher shops through- After that delay, no meat slaught-
out the city. ered outside the slaught-
As part answer to current meat erhouse, or outside city limits can
problems, the City Fathers announ- be sold in public m a r k e ts and
ced in .a communique on Monday those who disobey this communi-
that, "The, Port-au-Prince munici- que will be punished according to
pality advises independent butchers the law."
that a delay, expiring Monday The newspaper "Le WIatin" had
March 14tih., is afforded to them to "this to say about the meat situa-
sell without paying any tax, the tion on Thursday of this week, "The
meat that they may have in their Department of Commerce has for-
possession and which does not come med a commission that must find
from t h e modern slaughterhouse. a solution' to the dispute between


Letter Uses Strong Terms



Arrogant public servants, pseudo-citizens, plunderers and
collaborators all are denounced by the President of the
Republic of Haiti, Dr. Francois Duvalier in a scathing letter
dated March 10.
Addressed to the Minister of I directions to be transmitted.


Justice, this letter is an iteration of
the President's strongly t e r n e d
warning to "'All Judges and Offici-
als concerned" written on January
20th to the Attorney General with

DOMINICAN
OUSTED REPORTER,
NOW IN HAITI
New York Times Correspondent,
Edward C. Burks' record-breaking
reporting run of a month in the
Dominican Republic ceased abrupt-
ly this week when he was shown
the door marked exit n typical
Dominican fashion.
Now in Port-au-Prince covering
Haiti, Burks has a wealth of over-
(Continued oif page 16)


Slaughterhouse Switch Kills


For over half-a-century it. has
S-been the practice of the La Saline
-slaughterhouse to kill and prepare
cattle for the consumption of the
local market. Now the La Saline op-
;i-:_eration has been switched over to
A;% the multi-modem half-a-million dol-
lar American financed slaughter-
house and meat packing plant at
Damien.
With the new switchover has
come a disrupting of the sale of
n, meat and in some cases a price
--' ise which has forced a vegetarian
diet on some stratas of the City's
S-society.
It is said that many of the small-
er butchers, who under the oper-
S action of the old La Saline establish-
-ment paid as little as 12 gourdes
to have an animal slaughtered, are
now paying slaughter prices at the
new Ifaytian American Meat and
.- Provision Company which are com-
pletely- beyond their financial' cap-
:71: abilities.
This weekend a commission for-
m ed by the Department of Comm-
e r c e is attempting to straighten
things out and it is to be hoped
that they find a solution suitable
economically to the small indepen-
I dent butchers.
A visit to the slaughterhouse this
week revealed that without a doubt
it is one of the most modern in
"the world with fine carcasses hang-
-. ing in the freezing room and with
the Bologna and 'Sausage Depart-
": ment working smoothly and at full
.pace. The management stated that
Sit Is hoped that all the present pro-
blems will be "ironed out" and
'there is a possibility that 15 whole-
S sales will be established in the
capital city and equipped with cold
", storage boxes provided by the com-
f any to facilitate the distribution


-'


Old Prices


"It has been reported to me that
many responsible in the present
administration, do not have, in the
face of the problems, the proper
attitude expected from them by my
Government. It has been reported
to me that speculators use uneth-
ical methods to impose their point
of views or ways of seeing -things.
"Some go further in their total
lack of scruples and they use in-
direct pressures that would permit
them to by-pass administrative rul-
es, or they deform them to their
pleasures by putting forward the
authority of their position or' their
relations."
The later is a brief resume of the
President's first letter in which he
issued the firm prochimation,' "I
insist, AND FOR THE LAST
TIME, that I will react with ex-
treme force against those "charl-
"atans" of a new style who use ev-
erything 'to serve their private int-
erests," and further, "qT WILL
COST MIE NOTHING TO PUNISH
THAT FORM OF SABOTAGE of
the Government and of social and
economic balance."
The following text is a direct
translation of President Duvalier's
second %warning letter of March 10,
without adulteration of embellish-


ment:
"Mr. Secretary of State,
"Everytime I have the occasion
to examine the details of the ad-
ministration of which my Govern-
ment is raising the professional lev-
el, I see not only the structural and
functioning weaknesses that I de-
nounced in my last letter, but also
undesirable traditions and practic-
es that are sprouting as if the pur-
pose was to sabotage pll efforts
of reorganization and all will of
coordination.
"I hardly understand that in a
time where real tangible sacrifice
is the common- rule, that a guilty
'laissez-faire' and a deliberate in-
ertia infiltrate themselves in the ad-
ministration and triumph in the at-
titude of public civil service and
public employees and I under.
stand even less that the authority
of the State or the Executives of
the Administration is blocked by
the arrogance of public servants
who take pride in their faults, or
in their exploits.
"I have not been elected by the
people to distribute favors to pseu-
do-citizens. the o nI y ambition of
which, and their only dream is to
look for, tqoeap, and to multiply
advantages 'M all sorts. My Gov-
ernment which is born out of a
deep revolution and an enlarged
awakening of the conscience will
hardly tolerate tlose practices and
it is putting in motion appropriate
measures or circumstantiated deci-
sions to give to the life and the ad-
(Continued on page 2)


the slaughterhouse and the butch-
ers.

"The government has announced
that there is a possibility that the
butchers will be provided with re-
fridgeratioh facilities. We, of this
paper, are for the protection of the
independent butchers, especially
concerning the outrageous prices
ask ed by the Haytian American
Meat and Provision Company and
(Continued on page 16)


ROUSSEAU SLAYING

Killing Warning To All Staunch Duvalierists?


Publisher-Owner of the newspap- SAYS MAGICOIRE
er, "Oedipe," Jeanl Magloire, rec-
ent Minister of Interior and Natio- first hour susceptible as it does all
nal Defence and now Director of convinced Duvalierists and looking
Haiti's National Lottery, made the at his case one can talk of holoc-
following declaration in. an article aust because Rousseau's tragic
published this week in "Oedipe" death in such conditions is for us
concerning the death of Dr. Roger a serious warning. Yes, we must
Rousseau. understand that our revolution is
R"Until light falls on the killing still to be defended and the moment
of Dr. Roger Rousseau, as it must has not .\et come for us to lay on
surely do some day, we can say our laurels.
that this affair, which is a true "The opponent is trying to cre-
catastrophe whatever its cause, ate confusion among us and in our
may be considered as a drama humble opinion the assassination of
that interests all who serve the Roger Rousseau is a new technic
Government with sincerity and de- to give a tragic form to the confu-
votion. sion and offer proprietous ground
"What happened to Roger Rous- to an anarchy proper to comm-
seau makes each Duvalierist of the unist tactics.


BE READY
"In any event we must be on
the ready more than ever so that
other losses as grave do not occur
in our ranks. One must not forget
that money these days is flowing
in the Caribbean to undertake a
most audacious coup beginning
perhaps with individual killings.
"So it is our feelings that thd
Government must put into applica-
tion all existing laws against com-
munism and subversive dtivities
of both private and public order.-
The entrance of foreigners into our
territory must be strictly controlled
because terrorism is entirely new
to us and has been introduced by
foreigners."


lOc


*1


Administration 'Grafters' Denounced


Disrupted Sales, Disrupted Diets








"HAITI


SUN"


Sunday, MARCH 13th, 196


wain ing.,,.


(Continued from page 1)
ministrative career, the momentum
and psychological springs that cre-
ate responsibility.
"Many indeed hardly care about
their mission and their obligations;
they consider their job as ONLY
AN INSTRUMENT, A MACHINE,
AT THE SERVICE OF THEIR
DISHONEST GOAL. When they do
ilit plunder, the citizens, convert-
ing justice into an ignoble traffic,
when they do not use the law to
satisfy their personal hatred, or to
sabotage the efforts of reconciliat-
ion that the government generous-
ly pursued then THEY USE
MENACES, TRY TO PROVOKE
FRIGHT, AND USE MEANS TiAT
DISHONOR OUR REVOLUTION
AND THE MORAL PHILOSOPHY
OF THE GOVERNMENT.
"'One or the others negate their
debts, renege their signatures, In-
voke with haughtiness their power
to destroy, and even put the admi-
nistration upside down to obtain
undignified favors or collusions.
Sometimes improvisible situations
explain the delay in the acquittal of
obligations or debts freely contract-
ed for, but, these situations are
only exceptional and should not be
generalized to protect bad faith and
encourage dishonest p u b I i c serv-
ants.
"I want them to fully understand
the scope of this warning and that
before I s t a r t the necessary re-
forms, that they will without delay
stop their little manoeuvres to con-
form themselves to the ethics of
my government and to obey the di-
scipline that was inaugurated on
October 22nd., 1957.



DISCOVER THE

OF H

Through Its P

For complete info

Stamps and other d

furnished you free

P.O. Box 723 P(




MAJESTIC AN


HOT
,SrrUTAED ON PET

PLEASANT AN

ATMOS


S tEUROPEAN OR A

IF REQ

MAJESTIC AN

4 ALSO OFFER S


LONG RE
t fi-f b^& w -r S o N ^ N


"If I pay homage to the collab-
orators that "have the passion of
collective well-being and act with
rectitude, I must also tell all the
reprobation that I profess for these
public servants without scruples.
After seven years of plundering
and waste and a full year of polit-
ical and administrative instability,
some laxity has appeared, but the
tenantss des frivolites et des faci-
lites" must not think that such a
state of affairs will be tolerated; if
they do think so then they naively
abuse themselves, because, w h e n
certain moral values must be res-
pected I have never been in .the


ODVAfl Intensifies Program...
LARGE SCALE EXPORTING UNDERWAY -


As it is already known, ODVA
has decided this year to intensify
its program of agricultural produc-
tion, not only in order to supply
the local market, but also and es-
pecially for the purpose of 'under-
taking exports of Haitian produce
on a large scale.
This first year is a year of ex-
perimentation, but the success al-
ready met is very encouraging, for
actually, on the local market ODVA
is the most important supplier of
rice, tomatoes, pepper, rice, flour.
For the first time in its business


intercourse with the United States
of America Haiti has exported ve-
getables in a quantity which was
never reached yet for this kind of
products.
Since some months, the local
market is supplied by ODVA with
approximately 6,000 pounds of rice
daily.
Furthermore since harvest has
begun -a little less than three
weeks- around 130,000 pounds of
tomatoes have been sold by ODVA,
of which quantity 90 per cent were


exported directly to the United
States of America. Only 13,0001b.
have been delivered to the local
market. The forecast for the act.
ual tomato crop is of more than
three millions pounds: that w Ill
be the most important harvest in
the Haitian agricultural history.

Pepper and Rice flour produced
by ODVA meet an equal success
in the local market. To these pro-
duces will be soon added onions,
cucumbers, and corns. This latter
produce will be-grown on a very
(Continued on page 10)


habit to fail.
"I am. persuaded that it suffices "
that I let it be known to the staff 4
of your administration that I have 4
decided to continue the "purificat- <
ion under this form so that the ad-
venturers know that there is some- i
thing that has been changed and 1
that my government will not toler- _
ate such undoings. THEIR VILE E
PRESS WILL NOT DARE SLAND-
ER THE REPUTATION OF SCRU-
PULOUS PUBLIC SERVANTS.

"I am then asking you to take
the matter personally in hand and
to decide within your department
the dispositions to take in accord- S
ance to the spirit and the letter d J
of this circular. I already have in -0.p'i
my possession a bulging file on the 4 ''
matter and that is why I invite -.
you at the reception of this to ex-
ecute its instructions. I rely on
your collaboration in this battle
which is a step in the realization '
of my program of restoration of 4
moral value and administrative ord- 4
er."



FASCINATION

AITI

stage Stamps SL,

irmation in Haiti

details which will be j

of charge, write to j The Fuel Of The Modem

)RT-AU.PRINCE Haitian Household



... ... HeatS Bettez
D MARABOUT '


'ELS Lights Better
IOOLE SQUARE OButns Without Smoke

qD COLORFUL

HERE 4 KEROSENE SOLE L" IS THE FUEL WITH THE
HIGHEST CALORIC CAPACITY AND IT IS MORE
ECONOMICAL THAN CHARCOAL. NO WASTE WITH
MERICA PLAN S 0 L E I L AND THE RISK OF FIRE IS REDUCED 4
CONSIDERABLY.
UIRED '-
USE THE KEROSENE S 0 L E I L FOR THE KITCHEN
D MARABOUT AND FOR LIGHTING, T
ER IT ALSO CONTRIBUTES TO SAFEGUARD THE FORESTS
IPBEOAL RATES ^ AND FIGHT EROSION OF THE HAITIAN SOIL!


(NCE I (Kerosene Soleil Is A SHELL Product)


PAGE 2


2nd


Ift 44 01 lp 19 9 Ilv


&A &1JL A


9f&>fB ~ AM- Al gW-N


60
60O


"QvIQ 1.,'.ZlIV,


i ;v y t;v -zvv -Z. -z io v -z- -- -7; -Z-NZ, Ni v z- Q - -*


I p









t"HAITI SUN"',


Escape From The Snow


FRIENDLY PAL
S.ine "frozen" friends of long (Andy) de 'la Chapelle, ex Time
tendingg from the currently snow- and Life and currently McGawhill
_bound wastes of New York City and researcher .and writer, N.Y.C.;
4Greensboro that's in the South in- Patsy Carson (Catherine Kirkpat-
Scidentdy), migrated "en masse" for rick,) who works for an architect
4".=vacation and arrived in Port-au- Carolina's version of Lloyd
Prince in time to celebrate Mardi Wright, and resides in Greensboro;
..Gras weekend. Nancy Bryan, researcher for "For-
:- tune" magazine, N.Y.C.; .and sist-
g."Clminating their hurried depart- er to Mrs. Kay Taylor, University
S'ref'-om Stateside and their arriv- Student studying for her MA.,
-at 'here, the 9 fun and sun seekers Greensboro; Conrad (Jim) .Hock,
..uset-up house in Musseau, hired a Jr., a sales boss for "Little Giant
car, and set "forth to brew up the Green,Peas," stationed in New Or-
'Capital's second consecutive carni- leans and a former Greensboro re-
Val. : sident; Johin Nolan, T.V. script
,. The party of revelers were: Ann writer renowned, N.Y.C.; Bruce D.


"dy De


La Chapelle and John Nolan return to .the frozen


North.
I


RTY ENJOY HAITI'S
Voorhees, Executive of Lord and
Taylors, N.Y.C.; and two further
stalwarts from the Greensboro
ranks, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Foy.
Several of these folk had visited
Haiti previously in fact this was
John Nolan's 7th vacation on this
island, and all were eager and,
pleased to escape the U.S.'s torrent
of sto-rms and blizzards and take
full advantage of our sun, beaches
and night life.
Restaurant and Night Club pro-
prietors expressed their adiniration
to all members of the party for
their remarkable staying powers.
Each night they were sighted so-
journing to one of the City's night-
spots and early next morning found
the revelers heading for the beach
or pool.
Just goes to show, there must be
plenty of night life available in the
Capital a number of the party
arrived here "armed" with tennis
rackets but never did get round to
using them.
While on the night -life subject
there is doubtless several places
round the town who will long re-
member the bright party, who be-
came such fans of the Haitian me-
ringue. Rumour has it that mer-
ingue practice was even held at
the pool-side.


On 'the housekeeping side the par-
ty evidently found out that at least
"breakfast table" French would
have come in handy requests
for scrambled aggs produced some
startling results. Getting in and
out of the house posed a, few pro-
blems too. On the basis of the
house being fully locked and no
houseboy in evidence, it would be
advisable for any visitors intending
to rent a house here to ensure that
their prospective houseboy sleeps
within shouting range that's if
one does not like spending the night
on the front stoop.
Memories of..the war were bought
back to John Nolan on a brief sail-
ing excursion at Kyona Beach.
"Serving as a signalman in the Navy
for his war-time service John, sta-
tioned on a destroyer in Tokyo


NIGHT LIFE
Harbor at the signing of the peace
treaty, was flashed a message from
the Missouri which he could not
receive John could send messa-
ges alright but he holds the distinct-
ion of being the only Navy sign-
als man to go through the entire
war -unable to receive messages.
Fortunately the. crucial message
was received in time by John's
"savior" in the form of his com-
panion Signaller who had gone be-
low for a cup of coffee just before
the message was flashed.


Before leaving for home, com-
plete with deep tans to display at
the office, the party all stated that
they had enjoyed their stay very
much and found the ,people both
kind. and pleasant.

The party was interested to know
why voodoo had not spread to the
U.S. but Jim Hock said that he had
Jound traces of it in New\ Orleans.
and recommended the reading of
Robert Rauke's book, "Grenadine
Etchings."


.-. -- .-- ... \1 ... .

HOTEL


,MOIHTAHA
PETION-VILLE


WEEKLY ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM:
TUESDAY: 7:30pm. to Midnight Creole Buffet under
the Stars on the Terrace with excellent Dance Band.
At 9:30 pm.--Meringue Lessons 'by Lavinia Williams.
WEDNESDAY: 7 pm. to 8:00 pm. Complimentary get-
together Punch-Bowl Party.
FRIDAY: 7:30pm.to lam.-Gala Dinner-Dance in Cocktail
Lounge. Show at 10:30 pm. No cover-charge.
EVERY NIGHT: 7:00 to 9:00 Cocktail Hour with native


Conmbo.




Rent And Drive A Volkswagen Or Sportscar


FROM SOUTHERLAND TOURS

FREE HOTEL, PIER AND AIRPORT DELIVERY AND PICKUP

TEL: 3591--OFFICE: EXPOSITION NEAR .ROND POINT

',?:.


.Sunday, MARCH 13th, 1960


PAGE.3
,PAGE 3


N


The gang from Manhattan Island and Greensboro.


Lunch Dine Have Cocktails

By The SEA-SIDE

S-00-'


KYONA BEACH

--00-
DEEP-SEA FISHING EXCURSIONS
Swim, Spearfish, Snorkle, Water-Ski
And. Sail In Safe Coastal
Waters From Kyona
-00-
HAVE YOUR PARTY AT KYONA


.









*G 4 "H IT 5* II -I Sndy-MAC


R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Compa-
ny established ne"\ records for the
tobacco industry in 1959, with sales
topping the billion-dollar mark for
the third straight year and net ear-
nings setting a new high for the
sixth consecutive year.
The Company's sales last- year in-
creased 12.2 per cent to $1,286,855,-
943 compared with the previous re-
cord of $1,146,558,976 reached in
1958, according to the annual report
issued by Bowman Gray, Chairman
of the Board, and F. G. Carter,
President.
Net earnings increased 15.4 per"
cent to an all-time high of $90,357,-
655 compared with $78,326.190 rep-
orted for the previous year. The
1959 earnings are equal to $4.45
per sharp on 20,000,000 common
shares compared with $3.80 in 1958,
adjusted for the two-for-one split
which took place last year.
Dividend disbursements of $43,-
280,436 were the highest in the
company's unbroken record of div-
idend payments since 1900. The di-
vidend rate on the common stock
was increased in 1959 for the sixth
consecutive year.
"Cigarette sales were far ahead
of any previous year in 'the comp-
any's history," the report pointed
out. "The percentage of 'increase
was considerably greater than the
1953 gai nover 1957, and exceeded
the gain for the industry as a
whole."
CAMEL continued its position as
the largest-selling cigarette in the
country. Sales of this brand increas-
ed in 1959 contrary to the trend in
recent years for. cigarettes of this
type. WINSTON, the largest-selling
filler-tip cigarette, widened its mar-
gin .of leadership .in this field and
is now believed to be the thtrd-
ranking brand in the country. SA-
LEM, the country's leading menth-


HONEYMOONING
Dr. -and Mrs. John Goin from
Pasadena, Califormnia are spending
a honeymoon in Haiti and are stay-
ing. at the Sans Souci Hotel. A
Heavy snowstorm in Hartford,
Conn., the b r i d e's hometown al.!
most ruined the wedding and much
snow had to be shifted before the
oyung coupit could make their way
._. from the house to the church. What
a contrast just a few hours lat-
er they were in the Caribbean sun-
shine, first at Montego Bay and
- now in Haiti.


ol-flavored cigarette, had a larger
increase in volume than in any
year since its introduction in 1956.
The company estimated that filt-
er-tip brands now represent about
50 per cent of the total market.
Capital expenditures to provide
expanded facilities for the manu-
facturer of cigarettes and the pro-
cessing and storing of leaf tobacco,
have totaled $73,349,640 over the
last three years, the company rep-
orted. Outlays for new plants and
improvements in 1960 are estimat-
ed at about the same as in 1959
when $25,502,299 was spent for this
purpose. A new cigarette factory,
originally estimated to cost about
$20,000,000, has been redesigned to
double its capacity .at an addition-
al estimated cost of less than $10,-
000,000.


LAWYER-PUBLISHER'S


REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY
SET 1959 RECORDS


2nd HAITI VISIT


E. Washington Rhodes, Negro Rhodes to follow his profession as
Lawyer-Publisher. paid his second a lawyer which he says is his
visit in 9 years to Port-au-Prince chief interest.
when he called at port aboard the
new luxurious cruiseship, M.S. Vic- While here he called at the Courts
toria, accompanied by his wife. and several Law offices and told
Although his profession is that the "Sun" that none of these est-
I of a lawyer, Rhodes has for the ablishments were inclined to ans-


past 35 years been publisher of the
.75 year old newspaper, 'The Phi-
ladelphia Tribune (circulation 35,-
000.) *
The Philadelphia Tribune is pub-
lished twice weekly on Tuesdays
and Fridays which leaves time for


MAKE AN


CACIQUE


BEACH


BEACH


II


I


ENJOY THE SUN AND SURF
AND-THE. EXCELLENT FACILITIES
OFFERED BY -OUR RESTAURANT

AND SNACK BAR


CACIQUBE


MAiNAQERS:
Paul & Nancy BAUSSAN


ENTRANCE
$2.00 PIER PVRBSON


wer any questions posed by him
concerning the practice of la,w
here and the living conditions of
the people. Rhodes was recently
the personal guest of Fidel Castro
for 10 days during a two months
visit to Cuba.


back to New York. During their
Haitian stay the Brod's stayed at
the Hotel Oloffson.

FOR RENT:
(Chemin des Dalles)
Six large rooms newly built with
waiting room and bathrooms.
Ideal for business offices, or com-
panies, also for two- separated ap-
artments.
Address No. 29 Chemin des
Dalles or Phone 5922..


SWELL PARTY


Friends of Mrs. Vera Gallop anda.
her mother Mrs. Nierling attended-
a dirunner party given by the two
visitors Thursday night at the Snnsa.
Souci. It is said to have been ji
party to end all parties with ecel-
lent buffer, complete with table de- 4
_corations, two bars keeping pace
with liquor demands and the Hot-
el's orchestra providiring'the music.'-
for- dancing, which went well into
the night..' ., .


RUTH HAGY

VISITS HAITI

Ruth Hagy, Producer and Moder-
ator of ABC's coast to coast T.V.
program, "College News Conferen-
ce," returned .to her home in New
York City this week with her hus-
band, Albert Thomas Brod (a pro-
minent member of the New York
Stock Exchange with offices in Ne'r
York City and Washington) after
spending a week's first visit to
Haiti.
Headlines in the New York Times
were .made twice last week by
Ruth Hagy with excerpts from her
nation-wide viewed interviews with
V.I.P.S.'s and students. Ruth, who
intends interviewing Harry Tru-
man (33rd president of the United
States) on her program early next
month, flew with husband Albert
to Miami this week on their way


B. F. Goo


I


SdrI t :"
idrichi: !


SILVERTOWN TIRES

Designed to give you the

rble service at no



TIRES,' TUBES, BATTERIES AND"
ACCESSORIES FAN BELTS, ""
CONVEYOR BELTS
3t Rue des Fronts Forts -
DISTRIBUTOR
WI' L L AM NA R R

S4





HOTEL


Petionville
featuring
The Smart Saturday Night Clib

A- LA O l
9p.m. Until late Closing .
The El Rancho Duroseau
Orchestra
Dancing Nightly Except Sunday From 7pnti.
THOSE WHO APPRECIATE
THE BEST DINE ,
AT. EL BANCHO HOTEL -
And always superb cuisine


I L-.i'


ml.


; IwveL 'QTviUE4C te J e


OUTING TO


CLUB AND .IBO


New! Sensational!



3 JEWELS



AND JEWEL ROLLER BEARINGS

SOn Sale At: Canape Vert


Al.. Aux Cent Mille Articles

SDadlani's Maison Orientale


.iRA,,-EREAI


JBMM"f


Sunday, MARCH


PAGE 4


"HAITI


SUN"


LV %-0A. '




. -. t-


,- Sunday, 'MARCH 13th, 1960


"
HAITI SUN "


rl HA TI SUN
I THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
O:K Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
' EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
Gerant-Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
S MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
ILI ESTABLISHED IN 1950


NEW BUILDINGS THIS MONTH
CONTINUATION DESIRABLE
.. Several new 'buildings commanding attractive sites and

presenting "new look" facades are scheduled for complet-
ion in Port-au-Prince this week, providing a pleasurable
shot in the arm to the planification of the Capital City.
Ranging from pretentious two-storey buildings such as
the new U.S. Embassy structure-to the "oasis" appearance
:provided by the extensive "Texaco" parking lot, gas station
and rest rooms, the new group qf buildings provide welcome
t~- iJdditions to the City's gradually "turning pleasant" sky-

In addition to the U.;S. 'Embassy and Texaco projects the
:Maison du Canada," Isa 'Saieh's Art Gallery on Rue 'du
Quai and -we must get this one in- the current face lift
t tihe Grand Rue 'are onA Ihe way to completion, although
,inithe Grand Rue's case we-must admit six months of the
ktiealfender are expected to be ticked off before it presents
-- its new surface to the public.

With this month's 'building activities 'Civic Pride should
receive a 'boost of considerable proportion 'but, these new
S-edifices alone do not make for a modern, concentric City
I iand many of Porttau-Prince's business houses could well
i ..take a not too gentle hint and'lead from these new buildings
S". many of whom have laid neat, substantial sidewalks in
front of their establishments. The expense and time involv-
H-. ed in the laying 'of a sidewalk is negligable when compared
to the immense effect it 'has on the eye 'and especially on
Sthe feet.

1.1' -The flood of civic-mindedness has spread with vengeance
; Ito La Saline too where it is gratifying to see that the large
:' -on, which for so long carefully nurturedd .the growth of
I ariw -t~ai'fifig ,mosquitos, has been effectively 'covered
with earth. Now that the Aew abatoir is open for business
it is hoped that the 'Municipal Fathers will give serious
', thought to the clean-up and removal of the -unsightly and
nauseating cattle 'pens and general conglomeration surro-
; oimding 'the old La 'Saline establishment.
It is to be 'hoped that the- progressive air activating
throughout the Capital City this month is not of a fleeting
nature. but one which will continue to flourish fruitfully in
the future Of 'Port-au-Prince. '



4F PRISON CLEAN-UP
ort-aiu-Prince's yelowing prison smack in the middle of
the City has 'been subject to. debate o~n innumerable dcca-
si. ons previously with perhaps emphasis placed more on its
'minimum occupancy total of some 700 prisoners than on
this pretentious edifice itself.
In the past the question of the roles played by the divers-
Sified prisoners entrenched b e h i n d the National Prison's
A, Walls has come. to the fore and 'many 'are those who have
suggested that the -inmates 'be shifted "en masse" to a new
and 'ogically -more profitable looaltion La Gonave Island.
This suggestion is both feasible for the prisoners them-
selves and the National economy. 'With the advent of this
"clean-up" prisoners moved to La Gonave could well be occ-
upied in varieing occupations on a prison farm.

R -umours circulate continuously on moral behaviour with-
in the prison walls. It is weH known that common criminals
mix freely with the young which is neither conductive
'to prisoner rehabilitation or 'morality. It 'has 'been suggested
K ?, that the -rate of homo-sexuaility is 'abnormally high and
: running rife, a state which could 'be rectified by a prison
4 farm system.

Economically a prison farm is also desirable. Farming
ativities 'by some 700 hundred odd prisoners would certain-
1?y alleviate to a big extent the strain on Government funds
m:. in providing food etc. and undoubtedly would provide healthy
:outdoor exercise for the prisoners. A prison farm is a prom-
; inent subject which deserves deliberated consideration by
-those in official circles concerned.


..i : ...


STAMP EXCHANGE WANTED
Post Office Box 925,
Palmerston North,
New Zealand 31-12-59
MC. Bernard Diederich,
C/O Haiti Sun,
Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
Dear Sir:
I noticed a reference to your
paper in our local Manawatu Even-
ing Standard and being a fellow
Palmerstonian and an X pupil of
the Convent School I thought may-
be you could help me. As an ard-
ent Letter Writer and L. must say
Stamp collector I have as yet to
contact someone in your part of
the world who has the same int-
erests. I wondered with the means
at your disposal if you could in-
sert an Advertisement in your pap-
er along any line yo6 like to print.
I promise to answer all replies if
any.
As I do not know the currency
values between our two countries
I am not enclosing the cost of Ad-
vertisement, but if you will inform
me as to such I will post it by
return of Mail.
Thanking you in anticipation,
Yours faithfully,
Mrs. Elma Read.
17 Ngata Street,
Palmerston North,
New Zealand.


HAITI SUN OF FEB. 24th 1960
"HAITI REFUTES U.S. SUGGES-
TION."
Proceeding with the investigation
of a criminal case, the first step
is: "Cherchez .a qui le ciime. pre-
rite."



FOR RENT:
FURNISHED HOUSE.
(June thru September 1960)
located Morne Hercule Peotion-
ville.

2 bedrooms, livingroom, dining-
room, swimmingpool, garage,
Dutch furniture. Servants available.
-Phone 2353 officehours.-


Has Haiti ever allowed an invad-.
ing force to organize on her territ-
ory in view of swooping down upon
the territory of a sister Republic?

So what interest should Haiti
choose to destroy the canefields of
another.nation when her own sug-
ar crop will %U ot permit her to be-
nefit of any shortage of sugar up-
on the world market?


To act thus would be retaliating
where no wrong had been done.
"On hume le parfum deletere du
coupable a cent lieux a la rondo.
Le bout de I'oreille perce, mais H
rest toujours de mise de rendre
responsible d'un mefait, "le pe-
leux, le galeux de qui seol provient
tout le mal." Aint that clear en-
ough? Gare a 1'enfant terrible!!!"
READER


. I


C MODERN COMFORTS WITH OLD WORLD CHARM




S MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR THE BEST TABLES!

A Distinguished Hotel In The Heart Of The City


'Conveniently Located To The Shopping District
All Air Conditioned Rooms with Private Baths, and Hot Water


New Pool Terrace with outside Bar and Swimming Pool

Air Conditionned Bar Unsurpassed Cuisine Finest Service
'"HAPPY HOUR" EVERY THURSDAY

FROM 5:30 TO 6:30 p.m., INFORMAL GATHERING

DINNER DANCE EVERY FRIDAY

From 7:30 P.M. To Midnight With Floor Show

S 3UNDAY NOON CREOLE BUFFETS

< AT POOL TERRACE


A A m PAGEA;r


PAGE 5









PAGE 6


Easy to drive, length reduced
Reduced Prcles, in spite of its
Ideal for Halti


"HAITI


great luxury


THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE AGENCY,
Place Oeffrard, Phone: 3216 or 3929


S. A.


GARAGE RUp DES CM.8AB, POBT-AVJ-PRINCE, HAITI
Ask also for a demonstration of the Pick-Up and Trucks
- Their saving of fuel, solidity, power and capacity are
already universally known.


SUN"


Manuscript's Discovery Leads To Revelations
On Haitian Revolution


"...Fragmentar.' accounts exist-
of the great slave -evolt of 1791
in Haiti. But until the discovery
of the present manuscript in New
Orleans, we have had no report of
the early days of the revolution in
Saint Dommnungue by an actual par-
ticipant and nothing at all tto
the best of my knowledge) from
the side of the French planters,
masters of what was until then
the world' richest colonial posses-
sion."

Taken from the opening phrases
of an introduction by the celebrat-
-ed author, Selden Rodman, the fore-
going words give apt description
to the import made by the recent
discovery, translation and publish-
ing of "My Odyssey, Experiences
of A Young Refugee From Two
Revolutions" written by an an-
onymous Creole of Saint Domingue.
Translated and edited by Althea
de Puech Parham and published
by the Louisiana State University
Press, "My Odyssey," the French
autograph on which this translat-
ion is based, only recently came
to light in New Orleans where it
has been hidden away since 1798.
The original manuscript is in the
form of a journal kept by a young
refugee from the French Revolut
ion and from the terrible and long-
continued revolt in Haiti that last-
.ed from 1791 to 1804.

"My Odyssey" consists of 8 infor-
mal but elaborately stylized letters
by the anonymous author to friends
and members of his family and it
is 'fairly clear from his narrative
that 'he was born in Saint pomin-
gue'in 1775, and had lived there
some years as a child before go-


ing to France, from which he re- to the books contents and a brief
turned to Haiti in 1791. history for the benefit of readers
A resume of the author's letters taking their first glimpse and read-
is made by Selden Rodman who ing at Haiti's stormy history.
says, "His formatiUe years, in any Graphic descriptions of the hor-
event, were spent in France to rors encountered by this young re
which the rich landowners sent fugee are detailed in the book of
their children to be educated. He letters and lose none of their im-
tells us of his last days of flight pact by coming in contact 'ith
from the French Revolution and frequent although not, all together
of taking ship at Bordeaux. unsuccessful attempts at verse.
"We see him disembark at the The youthful verve and humour
Colonial capital of Cap Francais, of this unknown author threads his
where he is swept up almost at once diary of 170 years ago with pro-
in the storm of the insurrection. gressive tales of romantic advent-
Bewildered, but only momentarily u'es and tragic ones and although
dispirited, he escapes with the oth- he writes in that medley of prose
er refugees after a hopeless resist- and neo-classical verse that had
ance to the revolutionary "tide. be come the fashion in polite eight-
Landing in Baltimore, he records eenth century society, a fine vein
his first impressions .of the new of irony and a sense of proportion
American Republic. prevent him from becoming pomp-
"He returns to the colony to fight ous.
an unsuccessful delaying action at "IMTy Odyssey" is a book well
the entreaty of the Spanish Gener- %worth reading both by Haitians and
al, Don Garcias de Moreno. Back other members of this community,
in the United States we travel here for it gives a hitherto unseen in-
and there with him for the last sight into the happenings that took
time." place during that violent period of
Thas, Rodman gives an insight Haiti's history 1791 to 1804.



T4Ui TL-WITVES


BUSINESSMEN,
HOTELS A


TAKE NOTE:


SND'
RESTAURANTS,


Here is important news: Tomatoes at 25 centimes a pound!
At the Sales Office of the ODVA on the corner of Rue
du Centre and Rue des Cesars. You will find the Tomatoes
of the fine superior quality U.S. No. 1 Grade A at the econ-
omical price of Gdes 0.25 the pound.


Sunday


FORTHCOMING PLAY
LIFE OF TOUSSAIN.T

Famous author of "Raisin in the Wordswl
Sun," a Broadway (tit which a dram"
celebrated its first birthdayy on Fri- "-%%hiti
day, March 11, Lorraine Hansberry, writing
is undertaking as her next play, '...Thy
the dramatic st o ry of Toussaint from c(
L'Ouverture (1744-1803), Haitian Ne- called h
gro, patriot and martyr. L'Ouver
News of Miss Hansberry's work 'Toussai
was discussed in "News and Goss- five ac
ip," an article written by Lewis
Funke and published in the New As Mi
York Times' on Sunday, March 6. have.sa
According to Funke Miss Han- "It's a I
sberry is "scared to death of the worthy
undertaking," the story of L'Ou-
verture. In an interesting "run-
down" on the life of this famous
Haitian leader, Funke continues, -
"Between Miss Handsberry and
the encyclopedias you can discover
that L'Ouveiture was a self educ-
ated slave who was freed shortly
before the Island uprising in 1791.
"He joined the negro rebels and
became its *organizational genius.
Eventually he gained control of the
whole Island. reorganized the Gov-'
ernment and instituted many pub-
Lie improvements. ,

"'In 1802 Napoleon seWt one of
his best Generals, Leclerc. with a
powerful force to overcome the Hai-
tian. L'Ouverture was treachehous- .
ly seized, sent to France, and died LES PI
there in the dungeon of Fort-de-
Joux, in the French Jura. His va-
liant life and pitiful death made
him a symbol of the fight for lib- W
erty and he is celebrated in one of .L


y, MARCH 13th, 1960

PORTRAYS
L'OUVERTURE

north's finest sonnets and in
atic poem by Lamartine.
tier a I s o celebrated him,
-in 'Toussaint L'Ouverture,'.
name shall be redeemed
color's infamS'.) Wordsworth
his sonnet, 'To Toussaint
ture' and Lama rtine's
nt Louverture' really-is a
t" drama in verse."

ss Hansberry is reported to
id on her prospective play,
big subject," and a very
one.


LUS BltLEUS MAIMS
,HAI TIENNES

PLACE EFRARD
pLAE GEFiFRARD r-",


/ / I/ /i

Al SHUCKS ... THAT CAT TOOL BAR
U SUBSOILER spoiled our trip down the river I


Water and dirt stay home on
land you've subsoiled the Cat*
/ / ool Bar Way Walk out on your
fields during a heavy rain. Look.-
S/ Listen: is the water running off
6/ /the slopes . the same hills that
Sdry out in summer? Or do those
puddles stay on the top? Either
case, you'll trap the water and
make it soak in faster the Cat Tool
Bar Way I Store water in the sub-
soil for future use. Get the water off

/ the top so you can work the
/// the land. You will with a
Cat Diesel Tractor and Tool Bar I
s C We'll prove it ... NAME THE *
^ DATE .. WE'LL DEMONSTRATE!





S------ .

%4u-


MAURICE BONNEFIL MANAGER OF
The Haytian Tractor Co. Cbancerelles

rtdor
Is.u"bs" ll Send me Tool Bar Farming Informationl

SF. __rmacres I


Addreu_


j tac to.l an.o..arp~iml oa Iqglfa.. V ~0ge


Sensational


THE AMERICAN VI-HICLE, IDEAL FOR HAITI
It is the "LARK" manufactured by STUDEBiAKER-PACKARD Corporation.
Neither large nor snall or rather, large and small at once
Offering all the advantages of large cars, 6 fo 7 passengers,
Stability, Comfort, Power and all the advantages of the small car
Low fuel consumption (30 to 32 miles on a gallon.








rNT "


Sunday, MARCH, 13th, 1960 "Ii


Do Your



Shopping

in Haiti

S It is getting so that people are
taking vacations as much to
shop as to play golf, lounge iru.
the.si4 or just relax. And, no
wonder when you consider the
savings to be had through Free
Port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might- spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they cap
S bpy the same gifts, in free-port
h. ops, at savings up to. 60% pf
p. I, prices. SO, for the $250
or so ftey qave, they enjo a
S nderful vacation in Ha4
perhaps the most famous free--
port shop in the world is LaM
Sell Creale located in the
heart of fascinating Port-aut.
P ince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable wonderland.
l tull of the.'world's most de-
; sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
.. ; ches," avshmekes, Handmade
bags. Gloves, Crystal, China,
S Silver, French Perfumes, Caj-
i';...meras, Liquours and a seem-
.,'. ingly endless array of native
handicraft make La Belle,
SCFeole more a shopping cen-.
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
i.. sider that one can buy the
,, world's mbst famous Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
-Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissbt,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borbl, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-.
guet-at discounts of 50% of
the U. S. .advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
S Belle Creoleg -is famous. The
!.- , ,Vpame ap jwI'.an.China,.Cr-ystal
'and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be well worth. your time to
Sc.- consider a trip to Haiti.

AlT Nustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhaps another,. reason for
the surge in popularity pf
free-port shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
"liky qfcooperating with tra-
vel agents in their various
S. promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
i. nnbvations he has. created is
i the practice of sending a bot-
S tle of free champagne to any
'visitor to Haiti who happens
to bk celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
I'T honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niversary and Al Noustas has
S doubled. hip efforts t6 make
the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
S. even greater discounts on fa-
mus brand merchandise.
Everyday exclusive items will
;. be selected to be sold to visi-
- : tors at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
sqnds of tourists this year will
c -ome home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
When they went away.

r". *. -
= -

1 ,'114-, i:"

...':-; .a


-. .1 -


A e


, 9 m/;..,A l t. a..a


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER
P. 0. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
"" ,. " . -
imU f .to 5


AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS
MNTON, WEDGWOOD. OMEGA, PA.TK P'ILIPPE.
ROYAL COWN DARBY, JfNIA TISSO, BOOREL,
ROYAL COPENHAG, AUDEMA PI4JET,
BOYAL WORBEalER, JAEGEB LE POULTAE,
S ROYAL DOULTON, U YSE NARDIN,. RIVO, ,
ROSENTHALE, SPORE, ATLANTA, STUDIO,
S G .- ANSLm E COALPpRT yULCAIN.
__ GUSTAUBEROG. '


* -I


GEOGE I JENSEN,
, HANS HANSEN. GEBO.
DRAGSTE,I OENSE.



The Finest ot FRANCE.
ITALY. AUSTRIA,

LALIQUE BACCARRAT;
ORREFORS,
WEBB & C6bRBETT,
VAL SOLAMBERT,
STUART, LEEMAN.

HA:


Voopqo Ikred
JEWELRY




Native-InsuredS
SPFBT SHIRTS *


KISLAV,
ENGLISH DOESJIN,
ITALIAN ANTELOPE.


PBINGLE, BALLANTYNE,
BERN HARD ALTMAN
LUISA SPAGNOLI.


DANISH SILVERi
GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY
and BDAzrrAN GEMS.


-a'-


ITIAN HANDICRAFTS





Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS


SCULPTURES





SFasctows Outlet
MAHOGANY
TheBest


*


.4
Vt-,,

I
hi.


;
I ", ,''






O i

S". -'.r."r.
.', . ._ i*
:. ^ ' . : - "''t

,. ,. ,,' ,.


.GUEELAI . .

RAPHAEL, PAf'
BAlMAINiWOET^r
IEVIL.ON, VI .
CAR EN, L, GAL.t -.
FARERGE OP PARE.
JEAN D'A MBET, :
JACQUEm GRIMF
FAT, .PIGUET, .
CORIDAY. .

5NfOx CANNON


ROYAL COPENBqRA
ROYAL DOULTON
* HUMMEl










RAFFIA BAGS
& SHOES




SHAeITA'S MuSIC
Collectors litma


* World Famous RUGS & DRAPERY
Haitian RUM BARBANCOIIrX


T


Have us send gifts to your friends in the U. S. A.
without affecting your quota.- See us for more information.


P


1,.


. '


- Sunday, MARCH, 13th, 1960


9 r


..


. 1,








"HAITI SUN"


Cole In


The Norft


EXTENSIVE PROGRAM OF ECONOMIC RENEWAL UNDERWAY


By A CAPOIS
Pote Cole an organization that
many people from all parts of the
Republic have been inquiring about
in recent weeks. Po:e Cole is a
creole expression meaning let us
work together,, hand in hand or
shoulder close to shoulder and apt-
ly covers Pote Cole's purpose of
bringing the norther sector of Haiti
to economic renewal.
Officially stared in February of
1959, on a cooperative l"asis bet-
ween both American and Haitian
Governments, Pote Cole -Haytian
American Development Organizati-
on- has worked out many pro-
jects in the north in connection
with agriculture, sanitation, public
health, raising and improvement of
livestock and education.
Plans and estimates are outlined
by different Haitian Governm e n t
Services and are realized by Pote
* 'Cole's technicians and employees,
thanks to money -offered as a gift
by ICA, an American Government,
Agency which acts through USOM
(United States Operation Mission).
It is one of the new formulas in
SInter-American cooperation ac-
cording to agreement, money spent
on this operation is not toje re-
funded.
NECESSARY INVESTIGATION
In a country such as Haiti*where
studies and statistics about import-
ant projects have never been made,
where the needs and facilities have
never been ievalpated, an organiz-
atioi which intends td mhke a thor-
ough job mnst make complete in-
vestigations ot problems before
-startig on any -of them. Some of


these surveys take time for ex-
ample, those concerning road build-
ing, school construction, irrigation
systems, etc. Even specialists who
are supposed to know well all about
these things can't have either stud-
ies or plans ready in five or six
months.

To be objective, one must ack-
nowledge that in just one year,
something important has been per-
formed including preparation of
plans, study and survey for long-
term projects and others. Should
some mistakes have been committ-
ed it must be admitted that nothing
is more normal in any human or-
ganization.
There is nothing more necessary
than a few mistakes as these will
serve to avoid the wrong way in
the future. The scope of the busin-
ess and its progressive and rapid
extent are certainly occasions of
error, in a country where very few
people are accustomed to such a
diversified and large "project.
Selection and training of the right
employees takes a considerable
amount of time too but this in -it-
self is ..a big undertaking. But. it
is evident that both American and
Haitian officials of Pote Cole are
aware of any past mistakes ,and
are' gradually bringing real effici-
ency into the administration to pre-
vent repetition, a
MANY ACTIVITIES
Pote Cole -covers a wide number
of activities. In agriculture, pro-
jects are underway to' increase veg-
etable crops for export and air
cargo shipments to the States have
already been made and' will conti-


nue in the near future. Peasants of
Saint Raphael who received full
help from Pote Cole's agronomists
ire now making money in cash for
their tomatoes and it has been ag-
reed that Pote Cole is not to rec-
eive one penny commission on any
sales it all goes to the peasants.


EDUCATIONAL PLANS
All these efforts would probably
amount to nothing if it was Pote
Cole's intention to leave the rural
environment in its present state of
social immobility, But this is not to
be the case. Pole Cole's main con-
tribution to Haiti's progress is be-
ing made by the Education Divi-


At Grand Pre's farm, introduct- ion of ADO Is is indeed the
ion of new kinds of disease-resist- number one goal.
ant plants and seeds has been con-
sidered and last year experiments
were made on corn and millet with The school building program and
a resultant crop more than double, literacy program of this division
of that which the Haitian farmers will certainly change the life of the
were previously harvesting.Threepeasants, it- is expected to be the
months ago, a C-47 aircraft \flew greatest progress realized in this
direct aom Miami to Cap Haitian country. According to Vianney De-
airport to deliver livestock grad- nerville, the most active man en-
ously offered by the Heifer Prod- gaged i h'the literacy campaign or-
uct Inc. to improve herds dn dered by President Duvalier 650,-
Puct Inc. to improve herds the pupils in towns and villages
throughout the Republic cannot be


f The gift plane-load was made up
of hogs, goats, calves, chickens,
rabbits and a donkey stallion. Ear-
ly in February, Dr. Van Ness, an-
imal-disease- specialist qf the U.S.
Agriculture Department and Dr.
Haymard veterinarian of USOM
flew to Cap Haitian on an inspect-
ion tour and signed a clean bill
of health for all-. Pote Cqle's import-
ed animals.

In Sanitation and Public Health,
well-trained sanitary officers and
competent nurses will 'soon leave
their *-Pdte Cole training schools
fully certificated and able to help
their communities.,. Matrons have
also undergone special courses in
order to 'decrease the newlyborn
mortality rate existant in the coun-
try.


instructed because of drastic lack
of classrooms (these figures do not
Include young children living in the,
rural sections.)
Pote Cole has commenced a vast
project of construction, improve-
ment and enlargement of class-
rooms in the North for which mon-
ey is provided by ICA through US-
OM of Haiti and building costs and
repairs do not have 'to be repaid
by the Haitian Government only
"the Community Councils Pote Cole
works with under the supervision
of the Agricultural Department
have to provide land and some ma-
terials such as sand, stones and
a few available other commodities.
This program can be of the great-
est help in the campaign to comb-
at illiteracy. Added to this it stands
to open an era of intelligent and


PAGE.8


* I'


ii


St


a''


Pofe


Sunday, MARCH 13th, 1960 ;






durable cooperation between Offici-
al Services of the Government and
rural peoples.
When peasant children are edu-
cated in the correct way programs
can be more easily established and
agriculture and sanitation improve-
ments will follow easily.. Peopip
will also. learn to modernize their
longtime inefficient practices.
In the near future, Pote Cole in-
tends starting the construction of
a large modern building to. house
its various offices and branches -
the planned location for this build-
ing is around the Franklin D. Roo-
sevelt Square. Construction of the
Pote Cole building will mean the
elimination of the unsightly "Gar-
age du Service d'Hygiene" and the
unsavory area closeby. Houses have
already built for the residence of
Pote Cole's men on the. hills over-
looking Cap Haitian and these make
a perceptible contribution to urb- *
anism in the town. i

During this month construction
will start at Bel-Air on a-housing r ..
project to provide residential fa- ".
cilities, to the Haytian technicians -
and ten houses will be built this .,
year on, State land out of PDte Cole
funds, -,
Pote Cole's plan of activities is
a preparation of the future of the '.
North. Already they have done '
-much to alleviate the unemploym- *'
ent problem many Haitians who M
would otherwise be without jobs '
are working as agronomists, doct-
ors, accountants, clerks, scretar- .'
ies, drivers, tractor operators and .
many have jobs as workers in the ,
fields.








,unday, MARCH 13th, 1960


"HAITI


he Lui
SThis Spring, more.than ever, the
suany isles and countries of the
. !aribbean offer a greater variety
t colorful attractions than flowers
' an Easter hat. "
. i-_-Whether you want to loll on a
-afringed white, pink or black
J'ach, catch the contagion of Car-
mival, climb tree-wrapped mount-
is, explore Old World ruins or
enajoy sopiisticated night life and
gambling in luxury it can 'now
'e done in the time *it takes to
watchh a Saturday night of Westerns
oa TV,' according to the Caribbean
'T-ouisT t Association.


' A fresh tonic of foreign flavor
awaits. the spring visitor in this
l..and of many worlds, where Brit-
'bsh, French, Spanish, Dutch, Dan-
ish, African and East Indian cult-
tires are within easy reach of each
othef. Fast and frequent flights now
tbinng them to your doorstep. Puer-
to'Rico,'the U.S. Virgin Islands and
Jamaica are little more than 3
and a, half hours away from New
orik and once "remote" Sur-
i~tam,, Colombia, British Guiana
and Venezuela are easily accessib-
le, jets having .slasHed the time'
.'.almost to half. Additional sailings
9of luxury ships such as those of
Grace Line and Alcoa Steamship
..Company offer the lazy leisure of
a cruise.
SBudgetwise, there is a spring va-
cation in the Caribbean to fit almost
'every purse. Hotel rates are red-
ced throughout most of the count-
tries .starting April 15th as much
'as 15 to'40 percent! Pan American
Airways, Eastern Airlines and
"Trans Caribbean Airways now take
you to Puerto Rico and back for


re Of Sp
$81.00 undoubtedly the' bargain
buy of the globe!
Family plans first class are also
in effect Mondays through Wedn-
esdays allowing a two-thirds dis-
count. A wide selection of over 45
package tours, covering up to 7
islands and countries and ranging
from" 3 to 35 days may be. had
from your travel agent for as litt-
le as $126.00 from New York and
$85.00 from Miami. A list' is also


available at the Caribbean Tourist
Association, 20 East 46th Street,
New York. ,
Holy ieek is, the ideal time. to
visit the old historic churches and
cathedrals in Cuba, Colombia,
Puerto Rico and Venezuela, count-


ries rich in Spanish tradition. Most
of them are lavishly decorated and
remain open evenings. Particularly
impressive are the' solemh stately
processions accompanied by elabf
orate floral displays throughout
the cities and towns. -In Puerto
Rico, custom calls for a visit to 7
churches on Holy .Thursday and
highlight is a magnificent Passion
Play enacted in San Juan.
In the historic old. town of Po-
payan, Colombia, Holy Week is obs-
erved- in liturgical splendor rem-
iniscent, of Seville. Easily reached
'in a half-hour from- Call and about
two hours from Bogota by frequent
flights of Avianca, it is well worth
the trip. Members of prominent fa-
milies participate in the spectacul-
ar' Passion Play and processions..
During' 'this time, stately colonial
mansions with their art treasures
and antiques are open to the visit-
or. "El Monastario", a converted
monastary, is an interesting and
reasonable ($6) place to stay.


ring In The Caribbean
Easter finds the Caribbean spru- celebrate the traditional one day The popular International Mar-,
ced up in her best finery ,- and, of freedom that Cuba's slaves en- lin Fishing Contest for the "Hem-
after church-fashion parades every- joyed in colonial times. "Compar- mingway Trophy" is in Cuba again
where. Even the most sophisticated sas" are now supplemented by ele- during the 'first part of May.
of these, though, c a n't compete., gant floats and beauty queen corn- It is fun to participate in Royal
with sights of seeing natives, corn- petitions. After the colorful fiesta Birthday Parties, which are ce-
ing down from the hills, all in in Havana, they tour the provinces., lebrated in the Caribbean with all
their starched white best, to attend Spectator or, active sports fans the fervor felt in the homeland.
services. may take their pick among a myr- The Dutch islands, Aruba, Bonaire,,
Easter Monday is a holiday, in iad of events tumbling over each Curacao, St. Maarteen, Saba, St.
many countries, and visitors find other. T h o s e visiting Martinique Eustatius as well as the exotic.
quite different activities from those and Guadeloupe may watch the country of Surinam all turn out
,at hpme. There is kite flying in major soccer game of the year bet-. in their scrubbed-face tidy perfect-
Barbados and St. Kitts, water ween those romantic French isl- ion to send up fireworks, arrange
sports competitions in Trinidad and ands, played on Easter Sunday at interesting s p o r t s competitions,
Tobago, excursions to Mt. Soufriere Guadeloupe. The soccer season op- dances and colorful parades 'for
In St. Vincent and goat racing at ens April 1 on the Dutch island bf Queen Juliana's Birthdayl, April 30.
Buccoo Reef in Tobago. Aruba. The British influence is as keen-
Exploring historic ruins is fun Tennis enthusiasts have a special Il felt as, at Buckingham Palace
in Antigua, Nevis, St. Kitts and St. treat watching top professional on April 21st, when Queen Eliza-
Lucia and youngsters especidlt y en- matches. Champions from 23 coun- beth's 'Birthday is celebrated in
joyLucia theand youngstresers especvation of the Car- tries will compete in the 9th In. pomp end splendor with full dress
ib IndLanstin Dominica. international Colombian Tennis Tour-1 military parades, colonial and hon- -
Theb ndiansla Virgin Islands Carnival nament March 13-20 at the. Barran- or awards, concerts and dances in
is a festive week of explosive quilla County Club. Jamaica plays Grendda, Trinidad and; Tobago. ,
spring celebration held April 24-30 host April 4 to 10 to the Internatio- Indeed, what better way to dust *
on St. Thomas, with parades, o nal Tennis Tournament and April away winter cobwebs than to her-
as, steel band and calypso corn- 17-23 to the Caribbean Internatio- ald Spring in the Foreign atmos-
tiats, steel band and on o nal Tennis Tournament. Gay soci- here of the flowering, exuberant.
and Queen, dancing oroand yacht re al activities, including a Caribbean Caribbean!
gattas "Carnival Vilagd", along Hat Day, 'when ladies outdo each
gattas. Carnival Vag", along other in dizzy bonnets and a fest- FOR RENT: -
the waterfront, is transformed into ive Tennis "Ball" wilfl add spark- Six large rooms with two bath-
ing thatched huts, pirate dens emb- le to the International Tennis Tour- rooms and waiting-room. Suitable
calyps th ednts.L lproctdsa nament, held March 28th to April for medical offices or business off-
calypso tents. Local pheoducts are ,3rd at the Caribe Hilton Hotel in ices and companies. Address' 1No.
offered for sale. The hi-jinks of Puerto Rico. 29 Chemin des Dalles or Phone:
"Mocko Jumbi" a costumed bogey 5922.
man cavortifig bn 10-foot stilts, sur- Fishing is a never-tiring sport, ,
rounded. -by brightly costumed nat- whether for the big ones in tourn- '
ives, have a catching spontaneity aments, or spearing little one along .
that gets everybody into the act. the fascinating .coves between Gre-
The Spring Carnival in Cuba, nada and St. Vincent, exploring W A' H
held during three weeks of April Haiti's Sand Cay, or watching the
and May, is famous for the parades finiky antics of your own "prey"
of "Comparsas",, gorgeously cost- under a glass-bottom boat in the
umed groups whose antics 'help U.S Virgin Islands.


1*


/


NJIC


YCUISi[A IN IIA 1II I


5 visq RErNT- ,a-CAR


ofieSl
-m )-RUP iC

0- .7 OR P


AMERICAN EXPRESS AND DINERS CLUB CREDIT CARD HONORED


Cars Available




Hillman Minx


OPEL .


Volkswagen
Kabrioelt


DECEMBER 15th TO APRIL 14th

DAILY RATE
24 HOURS

$9.00 PER DAY PLUS lOc. PER MILE



Weekly Rate

$45 PER 7 DAY WEEK

PLOS lOc. PER MILE

AH Rates Include Gas


Oil And Insurance


FRE


Road Maps


INFORMATION


PICK-UP AND


DELIVERY FROM


hotels

Air Ports Piers


FOR RESERVATIONS, ROAD MAPS ANi SUGGESTED ITINERARIES, WRITE OR ABLE

AVIS CAR RENTALS
P.O. Box 602
PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI.


SUN"


PAGE 9


w 1


1,


I


.,


?f :-


I








PAGE 1l


"HAITI SUN"


This is C H A P T E R1 of the CONSTITUTION of the Republic
of Haiti as translated from "Le Moniteur", Port-au-Prince, Haiti,
December 22, 1597. The "Sun" will publish a Title per week of the1
Constitution as it appears in the original.


CONSTITUTION OF THE REPUBLIC OF HAITI 1957
The following is the conclusion of last week's publication of Section
2 of the Constitution, The Legislative Power.
SECTION 3
THE EXERCISE OF THE LEGISLATIVE POWER
Article 59.-The seat of the legislative body is in the capital of tilhe
Republic. Nevertheless, according to the circumstances its seat may be
transferred elsewhere, to the same place and at the same time as that
-of the Executive Power. ,
Article 60.-The legislative body shall meet regularly every year on
the second Monday of April. The session shall date from the first meet-
ing..of the legislative body in national assembly.
The duration of the session shall be three months. In case of necessity,
it may be extended for from one or two months bythe Executive
Power or the Legislative Power.
The President of the Republic may .-adjourn the legislative body in
case of a dispute between the two Powers, but. the adjournment may
not be for more than one month or less than fifteen days, and there
may not be more than twq adjournments during the same session. The
period of the adjournment will not be counted in the constitutional dur-
ation of the session.
If, after two ministerial crises caused by a vote of censure of the
Parliament, and after the aforesaid two periods of adjournment during
the same session, the dispute between the two Powers continues and
paralyzes all executive activities, a decree of dissolution, shall be issued
by the Executive Power on the recommendation of the Council of 'Sec-
retiries of State.
The. same decree shall order new elections, which shall be held within
three months. The publication of this decree will entail the immediate
-!recpll of all. members of the; Ministerial Cabinet, who may in no case
be members of the next government.
A 'decree dissplving the Parliament not issued in the manner pres-
cribed i the present article shall. be null and void.
Article 61. -In the interval between sessions and' in case of emergency,
the President of the Republic may. call the legislative body in extraord-
ay '.session.
S Heshall then'give it an account of this measure in a message.
S' -I.te event of the convocation of an extraordinary session, the legisl-
ative-;body may not take up any matter irrelevant to the, reasons for
S the oinvocation .
-.'However, .ny member of the legislative body may Address- the Ass-
: emly' on ,questions' of general interest.
Ail 2.,-The legislative body shall verify and validate the powers
"..of is members and. render a final decision on any dispute that -may
Sarise in.the matter.
M 1id fit-The members of the legislative body shall, take the follow-
i cih: "I swear to tiphold the rights of the people and. faithfully to.
S erve e Constittion."'
'., .64.---The meetings of the legislative body shall be public.
S .-Assembly may go into closed-door session at the request of five
meberA and then decide by, a majority vote. whether the session is
to be resumed in public.
-' Article 65.-No monopoly .may be established except in favor of, the
State, of the communes and only in the cases and under the conditions
specified by law.
However, in the exercise of this privilege, the State or the communes
may. substitute firms or companies for themselves. '
': n such cass the concession contract must be submitted to the legis-
lative body for ratification.
Article 66.-The legislative power shall make the laws on all matters
:of general interest.
The .initiative may be taken by either the legislative body or the Ex-
ecutive Power.
,, Nevertheless, the Executive Power shall have the sole right to initi-
ate ,laws ememning public expenditures, and the legislative body may
i ot increase all or part okthe expenditures proposed by the Executive
;P'w-..- Wer. .

Article 67,-The legislative body shall, through its .regulations, appoint
its personnel, precribe its rules of conduct, and-determine the manner
.' ,inh. which it shall exercise its powers.
: ..It 'may, by a two-thirds majority, impose disciplinary penalties on
.its members for reprehensible conduct.
'" 'Article 68.-The members of the. legislative body have immunity frbm
legal process and may not be removed- from office from the.day of their
taking the oatF to the expiration of their term.
Th- ey may. not be excluded fiom the assembly or prosecuted or attack-
aed at any time for, their opinions or votes in or because of the perform-
; e. of their duties.
Article 69.-No member of the legislative body may be imprisoned
i, for debt during his term .of office.
Article 70.-No member of the legislative body may, during his term
.. office, be prosecuted or arrested for a crime, misdemeanor, or petty
oense, or even for a liolitical offense, without the authorization of the


.


" I
I


Don't miss the great
events pf the year... the
Eucharistic Congress in
Munich, the Passion Play
in Oberapmmergau, the
Olympic Gaimes in Rome,
industrial fairs, art exposi-
tions ahd music festivals.

Fly to Europe the modern
way... by'Pan American
Jet Clipper*-.. and cross
the Atlantic in just sicx.
hours and 25 minutes!
And with the Fabulous
Pan Am Holidays you can
enjoy, from beginning to'
end, the grandeur of the
Old World.

Save traveling time . .
Make reservations on Jet
Clippqr. Visit your Travel
Agent or Pan Am.


I'


.
*


t
.
-


EA'ar AM

WORLD'S MOQT .EX ASM AIRBmmI.


IMANIE OUOU OWAtU IITa 3451


SituStt.


Caribbean Construction Co. SA.

Buiilders, Of The Military City
Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD
Phone: 3955. P. O. BO.. 284


Sunday, MARCH 13th, 1960 1r/

SPECIAL .
C.I A L

CIT A/DEL "'

T RIP P'
By .4


Assembly, except where apprehended flagrant delicto iri the. commission
of a crime punishable by penalties such as .heath, personal restraint,
penal servitude, or loss of civil rights (peine inflictive ou infamante).
The matter shall then be referred immediately to the Legislative Ass-
embly if it is in session; if it is not, the President of the Republic shall,
within the forty-eight hours after the arrest of the member concerned,
call the legislative body in extraordinary session, to rule on his case.
Article 71.-No action of the Legislative Assembly may be taken with
out an absolute majority of the members present, except as otherwise
provided by the Constitution.
Article 72.-The legislative body shall have the right of investigation
concerning the questions submitted to it.
Ths right shall be limited by the principle of the separation of powers
in accordance with Article 47 of the present Constitution.
-Article 73 -'To be passed by the Assembly a bill must be voted on
article by article.
Article 74.-The Legislative Assembly shall have the right to amend
and divide the articles proposed. No bill shall become law until it has
been passed in its entirety.
No bill may be withdrawn from discussion so long as it has not been
definitively passed.
Article 75.-Every law enacted by the legislative body shall be sent
immediately to the President of the Republic, who, before promulgating
it, .shall have the ,right to object to -it in whole or in part.
In such case, 'he shall return the law, with his objections, to the leg-
islative body.
If the law is amended and approved by the legislative body, it shall'
again be sent to the President of the Republic for promulgation.
If the objections are rejected,'the law shall lie returned in its original
wording to the President of the Republic, who is under the obligation
to promulgate it. ,
(Continued. on page 12)






EUROPE 19860


RAYMOND REMAIN
MAGIC
ISLAND
,TOUR S


* -I


" RUE DU CENTRE -
Port-au-Prince,
HAITI
Tel.: 2078


'LE (ENTE D'ART
Foun i.d 1944.
Excli7 ve a entis:




rom Pan Ah .,


many othend
17 Rue de la Revolution
From Pan American 1
in town one block toward
6ay, half -block to left.
Open Monday through ."
Saturday
,9-1. 3-6 Phone 2055 "



M '
"-- ^ -" . ""


JOSEPH NADAL & CO.
Distributor
,. i:


11


-i


VOLKS AGEN
BABY" BUS
ALL INCLUDED.



$35'

HIMS RATE COVERS:
a) Round trip transportation bet-
ween hotel in Poirt-au-Prince
or Petionville and Cap-Haitieo;
b). One night 1st class hotel ac-
comodation in Cap-Haltien and
3 meals; /

c) Trip to Milot .and eycrula'
to the

C [T A D E.L

Departures ,from Port-au-Prince"
every Wednesday and Sunday
morning, returning, following day.
MAKE YOUR RESERVATION AT
HOTEL DESK OR


9 qmufIwlM




**11


*2 _' .. .
U . ..
..-


, MARCH 13tb, 1960


MAGICIAN


-.Dancing is an
'. f you're sitting in the Rex Theat-
r next Tuesday night and you mo-
m rentarily disappear don't be sur-
prised it's all part of the act of
Prince Notaes de Majahara, billed
as the "World's Greatest Magici-
.-an. "









The Majahara is quite used to
-making people disappear and reap-
p.pear in Haiti as this is his 12lh
..o'ur. here since 1911 when he per-
formed his 60 minute show in
PTractically every City and town in
the Republic.
S This trip however he has time fori
one performance only, to held at
the Rex at 8pm Tuesday night, and
W ill then fly to Jamaica to give a
series of displays of his art. The
-Majahara has been practicing as
-a magician for the past 53 years
m -and during that time has visited
y parts of the globe.
.eBorn in Trinidad. the British ma-
'tn hbe uses an Indian costu-
a'fne o and title for his one-man show
'ex 4ned to the "Sun" how he
h4 e to take up magit as a profes-
rai by stating, "Whenever magici-
-s toured Trinidad they request-
:d at their shows for small boys
|'to come onto the stage as subject
fora particular trick.
"I went to all these shows," ex-
.-Plained the Majahara, "and I was
the only boy whoever went on the
stageg. Affer I had played victim
.several times for one touring magi-


-" HA ITI


SUN"


Want To disappear?

N PRINCE NOTAES DE MAJAHAAkA CAN


* '. *


sometimes in a different manner.
Going back to the use 'of props,
he confesses to the use of one type
of prop occasionally a borrowed
coin from the audience.
During his current visit here in
Port he paid a visit to the Royal
Bank of Canada to cash a check
and while there performed a little
trick. for the teller. This started
4 converging of keen bank employ-
ees and customers and the Majaha-
ra ended up practically doing his
whole show. He says he received
good applause although not an ex-
tra 'check from the bank.
People are currently "disappear-
ing" in other parts of the world to
and. their absense is also due to
the conjurings of a turbaned Ma-
jahara. This second "Prince" -
named Ralph Majahara- is none
other than the Prince Notaes de
Majahara's son. it is getting con-
'fusing.
Like his father, Ralph Majahara


depends on the "speed of the hand.
etc." and uses no props and his
show is of a similar pattern to
that of his father's ftom whom he
learnt his tricks. But, not by' tuit-
ion. He just quitely watched his'
father performing fintil he too
could do the selfsame routine.

Ralph Majahara is currently
touring. California having recently
returned from Europe so it can be
seen that this father and son com-
bination believe in mystifieing peo-
ple on a wide scale. After his show
here Prince Notaes de Majahara
plans to return to Jamaica for a
series -of shows but doubtless he
will be back here again before lopg.,'
- if not to perform magic, then
to dance. Yes, he also holds med-
als for ballroom dancing and has
displayed his dancing capabilities'
in many ball rooms around -the
world and has competed with succ-
ess in top Championship events.


W'


either of the Maiahara's arts. (See Story below)


cian, he ,told me that I had the
makings of a magician -because
I never revealed his tricks on re-
turhing to the audience- and that
I should take magic up."
So magic became the Majahara's
life and his continued mastery of
the art has kept him in demand
for 53 years. Much of his success,
he claims, is owed to the fact that
he never uses "'props" the cumb-
ersome, flashy cabinets and dev-
ices used by many magicians to
awe their audience.

. "All my magic is sleight of hand
and I move from place to place
without any props whatsoever. For
me mechanical props are not ne-
cessary as I have three hands
which come in very handy for most


more mysterious
sbeak at all.


if he doesn't


Hie has spent a considerable S
amount of time in Haiti apart from
his tours here. At one stage he
lived in Port-au-Prince for.,a period
of two years and one of his three
sons was born here. He has two ',,
grandchildren living in the Capital iQ,"
and his son Ralph's wife lives in
Haiti.


Since commencement of his ma-
gic career in 1907 the Majahara
has performed in practically all the
major cities of the world although.
he does not make a habit of playing
in theaters and refuses to play in
night clubs. Most of his work is
performed for Clubs and Associati-


of my tricks." ons together with many universities
and Schools. During the war years
Prince N o t a e s pe, Majahara he toured with USO providing en-
claims he can produce his "third tertainment to troops and has
hand" at will and as another spect- since the war given his show many
acular. trick says he can make times for various Armed Forces -
a ,man disappear just like that. No his most recent being for members
mechanical aids, cloths or other of the armed forces in Canada. *
embellishments, just make him dis- Majahara- has also toured extens-
appear? iv-ely in the States and particularly
During his performance in Port- to Catholic Universities, Military
au-Prince the Majahara does not Academies and Schools. During his
intend to keep up conversation with entire career he has never changed
the audience in French. (Although his show or its pattern with the
he speaks Creole, French, Spanish, exception of presenting his tricks
Portugese and of course fluent En-
glish.) He explains that it is much ,


EW BEAUTY
FOR YOUR WALLS, WOODWORK, FURNITURE 1












S: SHERWIN-WILLUAMS


NAMI*MID A
|UXTEgRIR*INTERIOR GLOSS ENAML

JOSEPH NADAL Agents


I -


WEST z :r. - -r wY Io
Only Dys 3DO irect to the center O i New Yorkps.
Only modern American Flag Cue Shps.
City NCON CRISTOBAL
Sailings Mondays and Frida g

EVERY CA3t OU'sIE PD&P AN
SCONDIO W1MMO POOL
250 L s. A B A .


Ask bout round_4rip sea-air. tickcis.
CoAsm accurate information only tfro


Rue Abrham Lincoln Telephoe 30


,'14,.


.I


IN HAITI SHOP
AT


FI S-HER


HAITI'S LARGEST FREE PORT PRICE

SHOPS AND MAHOGANY FACTORY

1) GALLERIES FISHER ACROSS FROM NEW U.S. EMBASSY

2) ART & CURIO SHOP FISHERS ACROSS FROM CUSTOMS HOUSE


SAVE UP TO 60 Per Cent ON IMPORTS
AND BUY HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS
STRAIGHT FROM THE FACTORY
ON THE RUE.DU QUAI
(AM. W.B. AND DINERS CLUB ACCOrTED)


. .1


2 PAGE 1'


SHOW YOU HOW

SHOW YOU HOW .",


I(


ADA :









PAGE 12 "HAITi SUN" Sunday, MARCH 13th, 196


CONTINUATION DESIRABLE U.S. MAY HELP TO
(Continued from page 10) BUILD ROADS HERE
Rejection of the objections shall be by a two-thirds majority in a Although it is still a long way, off,
yea-and-nay vote of each member of the Assembly shall be entered there is a possibility that the Unit-
in the margin of the record beside his name. ed States' Navy Seebe, will be
Failing a two-thirds majority for rejection, the objections shall be sent to Haiti to help in the Island's
country road-building program, ac-
accepted. cording to a Washington despatch
Article 76.-The nght of objection must be exercised within eight days and published in two local papers


from the date of receipt of the law by the President of the Republic,
not counting Sundays. legal and national holidays, nonworking days, and
days of adjournment of the legislative body, in accordance with Article
60 of the present Constitution.
Article 77.-If the President of the Republic makes no objection within
the time-limit specified, the law must be promulgated, unless the ses-
sion of the legislative body has ended before the expiration of the time-
limit; in such case, promulgation of the law shall be postponed. In
such case the law shall be sent to the President of the Republic at
the opening of the session, for the exercise of his right of objection.
Article 78.-A bill rejected by the legislative- body may not be re-
introduced in the same session.,
Article 79.-The laws and other acts of the legislative body are made
official by (publication in) the Moniteur and shall be placed, in bet
.printed and numbered bulletin entitled Bulletin des Lois et Actes.
* Article 80.-The law shall date from the day of its definitive enact-
ment by the legislative body, but it shall not become enforceable until
after'its promulgation by the President of the Republic and its publi-
cation in the manner prescribed by law. O0
Article" 81.-No one may submit petitions in person to one legislative
body..
Article 82.-The authoritative interpretation of the Jaws belongs only
to the Legislative Power; this interpretation shall be given in the form
of a law.
Article 83.-Each member of the legislative body shall receive a
monthly compensation of two thousand gourdes from the time of taking
his oath.


here recently.
No definate decision has been
reached but officials in Washington
have confirmed that such a propo-
sal has been under study since last
summer. The proposal so far has
not progressed beyond the "infor-
mal request for a.feasibility stud-
y," forwarded to Washington by
Marine Colonel Robert D. Heini
Jr., Commander of the U.S. Milit-
ary Advisory Mission in Haiti.
In his request, Heinl had pointed
out that one of Haiti's greatest
needs is a road system that would
open the country And enable peop-
le in the hinterlands to market
th e i r products in Port-au-Prince.
But, over-populated Haiti has long
been in a financial straiti-jacket.
Colonel Heinl suggested that the
Navy could help Haiti and itself
by using' the country as a training
ground for the Seebees (the Navy's
equivalent of the Army's Corps of
Engineers.)
One project Heinl probably had
in mind is the 120-mile road Haiti
is planning 'from Port-au-Prince to
Aux Cayes for which $300,000 was
recently authorized for an engin-
eering survey.
H ni ul' rp t W vu+4 r-


enr st request was by letter to
SArticle 84.-lVembership in the legislative body is incompatible Rear Admiral Eugene J. Peltier,
Head of the Navy's Bureau of
with any other office remunerated by the State, except that of Secret- Yard's and Docks. An official is
ary of State. Assistant Secretary of State, or Diplomatic Agent. quoted as saying, "They are still
Any member of the legislative body who becomes Secretary of State, studying the feasibility of it ana
Assistant Secretary of State, or Diplomatic Agent shall cease to be there can be no decision until the
entitled. to the compensation granted him in the preceding article, Htogetan and U.S.her on a f Governmequest."s get
unless he is on a temporary mission. -
No member of Parliament who becomes Secretary of State, Assistant DEATH OF
Secretary of State, or Diplomatic Agent may participate in the deliber-
ations of the legislative body. Mrs. UDO NIRK
Article 85.-The right to question and to interpellate a member of Dirs Ued o Nirkn. Mexicorned Gbruary 29th,
Mrs Udo Nirk borned Gabrielle
the Cabinet or the entire Cabinet concerning the acts and records of" Jean-Charles.
the Executive Branch is accorded to every member of the Legislative Condolences to Mr. Udo Nirk her
Assembly. husband, Donald Russel her son,
A request for interpellation must be supported by two-thirds of the Mr. Thomas Russel and her sisters
membr of he AsMrs Georgette and Celeste Jean-
members of the Assembly. Charles.

000 00#OO 0 000 0 00 00 .
-oo s o + + ---rw'rwe -rw'c'ri


S7Hotel Choucoune

ENTEkrTAINMENT PROGRAM...


Dine Wine Dance:

EVERY NIGHT WITH A LOCAL, EXOTIC 4

4 PIECE BAND FROM 7:00 TO 9:30 P. M.


Special !Special!
,TUESDAY 7:00 TO 8:30 P.M. -

GET TOGETHER PUNCH BOWL PARTY 4

THURSDAY 7:30 P.M. TO 1:30 A.M.
DANCING DINNER UNDER THE STARS ON 4
* 4THE ROMANTIC ROOF-GARDEN 4
4 7 PIECE BAND STARRING >
OUR YELOPHONIST MICHEL DEGROTTES
,ATTRACTIVE AND DELICIOUS BUFFET AND A SHOW
*ATURDAY 9:30 P.M. TO 3:30 A.M.
'A MU S T ! !

DC Gala Night

DANCING IN A REAL EXCITING ATMOSPHERE 4
THE GREATEST SHOW ON THE ISLAND! 4
4 4iSQ@ t$N00#0000000 o oo 0000d0 0 0o o o o 000 o oo


- .' ELJRcLj
TREE
PORT PRICE SHOP

I ''


-~Wr


S. .. ,' -'-- - :- .


Yes the new Dadlani Store on the corner of Rue du Bonne
Foi is surely a "Little Europe'" stocked with fine merchand-
ise from all over the world with emphasis on Indian Prod-
ucts. "Little Europe" also means Free Port Prices.


THE PRODUCE OF FIRST QUALITY
AND THE LOWEST PRICES
This is what you can find at the Sales Office of the ODVA
at the corner of the Rue du Centre and the Rue des Cesars.
Fresh Tomatoes U.S. No. 1 Grade A 0.25 a pound
Piments Doux variety 0.50 "
Rice Flour in one pound bags 0.35 "'
Rice Flour in five pound bags 1.50 ,
Rice Flour in ten pound bags 3.00 "
Blue Bonnet Rice Grade A in 100tb sacks 52.50 a sack
Blue Bonnet Rice Grade B in 1001b sacks 42.50 "
Blue Bonnet Rice Grade C in 100Ib sacks 29.00 "
Blue Bonnet Rice Grade D in 1001b sacks 19.00 "
Blue Bonnet Rice Grade E in 1001b sacks 10.00 "
BUY PRODUCE OF FIRST CHOICE
BUY "BON MARCH"
A BUY HAITIEN
AT THE 0 D V A SALES OFFICE


SOUVflAU rr
DIFFU KuMT'



SANS CHAMBRB


rqyrofll am~lor6 de la bane A
roulement done une traction eof
e6curi- suppm16rentaires. U hin e
'~hpositif de silence srdurt less d
rhais hrwits d6sagr6ables du pm
'tndtc quo la construction lgafie
sper-Cushion Sans Chambre
.perrit 'fabiorber les cahot do I
noute. Vous aureo moins do pqw A.
tla+. 6t moins do delai parce que
Construction Grip-Seal exclusive d
GSoodyear 6limine pratiquement_ L
nevaesom habiuelles.'


.eoDti'E At
Mor s a m mo k waesm t oamn m


." i:
- .'*';


Sunday, MARCH 13th, 1960)


PAGE 12


"HAITI SUN"


, I


I


I




d ... ..R 1. .
e :, .. -* .. *.'= .
S- '

7,-' -. -
Sund-ay, MARCH 13th, 19(


o ('Ctinped. from page 1)
buildingng, designed by Officina Don
,kh.t.h, Architects 'of Caracas, Con-
etictora Anderson, S.A., (owned
rd operated as a corporation by
-..Fic and. David Anderson nat-
of TrinidadM combined several
Wldig materials which have cul-
ated- in making the U.S. Emb-
Sarresting from all angles.
ern and southern walls are
native field stone which give the
.stfbrey. edifice a rugged yet app-
ece while the, remaining walls
*-rpbuilt of specially insulated steel
pels. Rectangular shaped and of
he flat-roofed style, the building
ira... n effective Port Cochere jut-
-tipg out and covering the main
-entrance and. driveway.
-'-7Entrance to 'the new" E m b a s s y
%building is made through' aq im-
-.prdesive- door finished in gold. To
cI.eaoh side of the door is grill work
finished in .white and with the U.S.
Sel jn Gold on the right hand grill.
| he entire interior is supplied with
|ibtermostat conr0lled air condition-
| tng and is perhaps the first build-
-'wg in Haiti as completely equipped
with these cool-air plants. 1-25, 1-
I0 and 1-5 ton 'air conditioning unit
-'inae up. a total of 50 tons of con-
i*"ditioning for the f i r s t, mezanine
S-'and second floors.
r INTERIOR LIGHTING
1^' Following the same pattern as
the air conditioning the lighting in-
...side is complete consisting of
-'186 fluorescent lights and 400 -ex-
Spanse windows. In. the case of
E'-town power failure the Embassy is
.-well equipped with emergency
ihghtng per medium of a plant cap-
'able" of generating 37 and a half
|. kilowatts.
.-Furtfier light enters the building
.'-by way of the ornamental block
-.walls sited to each side of the
,.sweeping staircase. These walls op-
-eri out onto courtyards. at the north
-..nd s6uth ends.
Apart from their light giving cap-
--abilities, thb 4W windows display
'ia .iew of the City and surrounds
.:or which it would be .hard to find
'a .criterion. From the windows in
L his-suite, the American Ambassad-
-Gerald, Drew, has an unobstruct-
'el panorama of. practically the en-
tr.city ind waterfront. Naturally,
. -apart from their light and view po-
.I.-tential; the embassy's windows let
"-in a lot of sunlight and glare. This
I'-hia. been effectively and decorous-
;, ..counteracted by the fitting of
-asley *manipulated louvers manu-
sfatured -of anodized aluminum and
2-ixrd- vertically to the outside of
-'each set of w'tdows.
!"- So enecove and colorful are the
'" louvers, finished in blue, grey, silv-
-|.er and gold, that carpeting in each
SI' the' offices has been matched
.-:to the finish of the louvers. In ad-
-'."dition to the louvers sun shades
.'-.have also been 'fitted and the com-
binration of both adds to the beauty
&.niinish of the building.
P -'Interior-floors are terrazzo with
-:'Georgia marble laid on Portland
-w ite cement and heavy copper di-
|^:--viding strips. The ceilings are
pditnted white and all walls are a
: light shade of grey which combines
-"'astfuly with the flush cedar doors
,.n--- .mhogany finished with trench
'^:yplisfhr
.'Tbe tzuite color finish of walls and
Ecifbii 6leditl'i th e air conditio-
g gd give the building's inter-
To a completely cool appearance.
-W' trials with the exception of
toilets whichh although spacious
Rldi appointed are a little on
ithe w 'de. This was explained
by n me r&.er of ,the construction
,iho said, "If it's too hot,
th^?jid&a and designed by Je-is


I . .


" H
H _-


- -.- " -'.. :"t .,', : .,t r-:,.: -. . "'" ""
.- '" . " *" .. '. . . ) .** '* "* ..i .*:* ** ,'' "." .. '. *. ?' ***''.*
-- .. .7 P .
S.
.. . . ., . ' :-, .. :'..' ..4 .."
IT I ."SU N""__"_ '- " .-'
7 7


[AITI S U N .P- FAGElis.


Eun t /T^^ W C*01''\ concrete reinforced piles left from -
an old 'soap ahd oil facto.y. -' -_ "
EM BASSY'.. These foundations were cleared
and by- the' end of March all the
piling, fabricated on the job, had
been -- laid. The entire Embassy
well it just means, people won't building. is sitting on solid rein-
stay here long." forced' .piling and has a unique
All furniture for the mAny offices bottom beneath its basement. The I
Risim Design Co., of North Gros- bottom is water proofed entirely,
venordale, Conn., -and OrsenigoCo., like that of a ship, with asphalt
of Westerly, R.I. The furniture and water proofing. The building of the
equipment for the offices is.-of. con- Embassy. took up the employment
tempory and eye-pleasing -design,- of some 160 men.
and was arranged by Mrs.-Jessie All of the construction Work on
Artomanoff, interior decorator the Erhbassy building was perfor-
from the Washington office of For- med by Constructdira Anderson. S.
eign-Buildings. _. A.. a company originally form-
ed in Venezuela. The Anderson
OUTSIDE LANDSCAPING brothers, Eric and David, have pei'-
With only a few touches left to formed most of their \(ork in the
made to the interior this week, past in Venezuela add mainly for
most of the activity around the Em- the American Oil and Mining Co.
bassy was centered on the outside and private concerns. p. 4 j r
landscaping. The spacious grounds The two brothers also operate a M ed. .rom
-are being dotted with laws, plots new company under the name of An-
of garden and many trees' With the tilles Development and Construct- -O '. l
aid of a mobile crane many trees ion Company Ltd., and were rec-
have been planted around the build- ently awarded the c o n t r a c t for i
ing including Coconut, Royal Palms building a new. 5- room Hotel in ,lTU A GLACE NATIOALE, S.A.,
and Bougenvilla trees. Wrought ir- Barbados which is to be called the PORT-AU-PRINCE "
on fencing surrounds the outVr Sandy Bay Hotel. Work on this pro- -' N ARl WA
borders of the property and the' ject, in St. James, Barbados,' has
podium wall to.'the rear hds been already started.
filled and.landscaped with lawns. All the administration work on .
Around the perimeter of 'the Emb- the U.S. Embassy building was
assy building, floodlights have been one by David Anderson with Dinrk
placed to highlight the building at wilpe as Supervising Engineerand -
night. Jack Scott acting as Office Manag-
SOLID FOUNDATIONS er on the job. Now that the work "
When the building'd construction here is finished David intends lea%-
was commenced- in December, ing Port-au-Prince at the begin.
1958, an immediate setback waj in- ing of next month accompanied by Je. __0 1 r
curred by the discovery of heavy (Continted on page 16) THE- RESTAURANT OF .



SMAIEEANNE THEHAITIAN FAMILY
AIR-oNDITIONED IS OPEN DAILY INCLUDING MONDAY
XI STRAW-GOODS FACTORY
^-" ,A' SPECIAL LUNCH IS
o 134, Rue du Centre OFFERED T MIDD
POT-U-I OFFERED AT MIDDAY
PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

SHOES HANDBAGS HATS FOR $1.75

HAITIAN RECORDS FRENCH PERFUMES AND $2.00 A LA CARTE
HAITIAN CERAMICS
HAITIAN CERAMICS The menu is prepared by Albert Baroilon
15 Years Experience in Handicrafts. --
P.O.Baox 975 Open Every Day Of Switzerland.
From 8:00 a.miTo 5:00 p.m. ___





Festival' 'Festival"'







A FINE FLOUR FOR CAKES NE WLY MADE BY



S"Cribbean Mills Inc.".



HAS BEEN DISTRIBUTED TO GROCERS THIS WEEK.


YOU TRY IT ASK YOUR GROCERY F 0 R THAT CAKE FLOUR


'' FESTIVAL '' IT'S THE BEST IN THE FTOUSE!


#0000 0 -0-00-o-o-O- -O--


m;.-


-.








Sunday, MARCH 13th, 19' 9~


mAvE ij ILA T CITI"


All The Comforts


"Half an hours drive from Port-
au-Prince and a short boat trip ac-
ross the bay, places visitors on the
little mile-square island of Ile A
Cabrit last reuge of the Arbwak
Indians and from time to time a
treasure trove for Archeologists
seeking pre-Columbian relics.
Where turtles and iguanas until
recently took their leisure in priv-
acy now stanl all the requisites to"
make Ibo Beach a popular pleas-
ure resort both to JU.S. visitors and
Haitians.
Ruler of this little island realm
of sun and surf is friendly Port-
au-Princien, Paul Baussan (a not-
ed raconteur and blagueur) who
took over managership of the
resort ingeniously converted by his
cousin, Robert Baussan, a noted
architect and a leading pioneer of
the Haitian Tourist Industry.


CACIQUE ISL
Paul, formerly public relations
man for Rhum Barbancou, t and
La Belle Creole, shares his island
domain with his petite and pretty
American wife, Nancy Hogarth and
their, five month's old daughter Ce-
lie. Before coming to Haiti Nancy
was a native of Frederick, Mary-
land the town made famous as
the burial place of Francis Scott
Keys, author of The Star Spangled
Banner.
Nancy came to Haiti on a vacat-
ion from the Publicity Department
of Life magazine and fell in love
with both the country and her
squire, Paul Baussan. Since assum-
ing managership of the growing re-
sort oo Cacique Island the couple
have both become avid short wear-
ers and Nancy and Paul swear that
there is- no healthier climate any-
where in the country.
The Baussan's live in bomfortab-


PHMILCO TROPIC 103
INTERNATIONAL 6-BAND RADIO
Listen to the High-Fidelity brilliance of this Philco master model and
you'll think you're in the studio, so keen and clear is every programme.
But that's only one of this model's many fine features; others include:
Complete' short wave and standard broadcast reception on 6 Bands.
Fascinating 'long-low' styling-fully 2ft. in width-with rich walnut
finished cabinet.
High-Fidelity sound from speaker network of- duo-cone front speaker
and dynamic side speaker.
Built-in antenna.
Separate bass and treble audio controls.







FIRESTONE INTERAMERICA Co.
Radio Pleasure

NOW ENJOY HI-FI



IF YOU WANT THE
''PAR EXCELLENCE'' 4
IN SERVICE, CUISINE AND
ATMOSPHERE THEN
ACCEPT THE WARM
W WELCOME AWAITING
YOU AT THE


Quisqueya.

D'INE AT THE


I Quisqueya

HAITIAN AND AMERICAN
4 CUrNINE
ONLY A FEW MUTES FROM
4 TOWN IN PETIONVILLE

d f<^^^^^^^^^^>^^


AND


FAST BECOMING(


le quarters attached to the offices
and main restaurant and bar and
make a habit of rising at dawn
each morning without the assist-
ance of sleep-shattering roosters
and dogs. They are rapidly becom-
ing specialsts on sea-lore and as'
an example to their knowledge,
found out that by purchasing three
barrels of raw salt for 12. gourdes
from a sailboat hailing from Gon-
aives, they could rid the beach
of pestilent sea urchins by-he simp-
le expediate of pouring the salt
into the sea fronting, the beach.
For $120.00 a year it is possible
to obtain membership to this de-
mocratic little kingdom and not
have to pay the normal 2 dollar
entrance fee, or a dollar per child
over the age of five, and member-
ship also means a private dressing
room without the normal 50 cents
rental charge.
To rent a modern "Ti Caille"
with all the comforts of a small
bungalow costs the visitor $8.00 per
day, or $12.00 for a couple. Caci-
que also boasts an excellent rest-
aurant and snack-bar where a full
meal can be obtained for as little
as $2.00 a large staff ensures

PANAMA LINE PANAMA
CANAL COMPANY
The SS "Cristobal" of Panama
Line arrived from New York at
':00am. March 11th, 1960.
The following passengers disernb- .
arked at Port-au-Prince:
Mr & Mrs H. S. Ackley, Miss El-
ine-Barrymore, Rev. Achille Bru-
et. Miss Florence Belsky, Mr &
Irs Robert Hill, Mrs Giselle Jo-
eph, Mrs Alcine Lafond,' Mr &
/Irs W. B. Lloyd,-Mr & Mrs Ed-
iund 0' Brien,. Mrs Georges Sa-
lmon, Mrs Jeanette Schilling, Mr
Mrs Walter H. Smith. *


OUTBOARD MOTORS
FOR SALE
1 new 35 H.P. Evinrude bigtwvin
I Used 1956 30 H.P. Lark with
Electric Starter and Long shaft.
Phone: 3781
DICK FORGHAM
BRASSERIE DE LA
COURONNE, S.A.
For details contact:


(


NO LUGGING .


NO OVERWEIGHT T .-


NO CUSTOMS PROBLEMSt
,






FOR YEARS NOW TOURISTS HAVE BEEN PLAGUED WITH
CARTING LIQUOR THEY HAVE PURCHASED, with over-
weight charges; withcustoms problems, fi one- fe i
swoop L. Belle Creole has made it possible to' ha -e
liquor purchased abroad, particularly in Haiti, delivered
lo your home, in most- cases at prices cheaper than you '
can bring it through, accompanied by all your otht
purchases. .:



ON A CARTON OF FIVE BOTTLES ,
N. V.. ODef. aur N.Y.: Yftt
.t w Price* wrelitpose Hle
1; 'elL' Special Reserve Whisky $32.20 $13.50 $16.50-
2. Hanky Bannister Finest e :
Sctiteh Whisk 29.90 13.50 16.50 4
3. J. &. Rare Scotch Whisky .33.00 13-.50 .50
4. Baantine's Scotch Whisky 32.35 13 50 1.50
5.-ueen Anne Scotch Whisky 31.45 1350 16.50
6. Gilbey's Spey Royal Whisky 31.25 13.50 16.50
7. Black & White Scoteh Whisky 32.00 1350 .1650
8. John Jameson *** Irish Whisky 29.90 13.50 .., 16.50.
9. Canadian Club Whisky 3"1.50, 5I "
31.50.... 18 -. .&
10. Oefeater Gin 28,45 11.0 4W 0-.M
'11 Cherry Heering 44.25 .21 "" 0
12. Drambuie 46.00 ,25,0 4 '

-3 IU-- are- -C S- -

&


uesiqn- "U I.BRush
AND SUPERB AND FAMOUSl
QalN. -Re ,4 Po E : Sisal.a
! ,. GRN u.,, ..AND RUE S. PHONE. S: 26 94


S 61


tfaito Cisine


" ,,
HAITI SUN


1I "- 1 1 4


i


Of Home
G POP ULAR RESORT
service that surpasses that obtain- motivated by the feet of aspiring. '
able on the mainland,. riders. ..
For the active there is plenty of
water skiing on the placid watered Scheduled for completir in 960 '
side of the island or in the rougher are modern bungalows suspended
water nearby. over the cliff behind the beach, a- :P
Ile A Cabrit also boasts a remark- swimming pool built into the sea..
able and certain stomach reduc- itself, a golf course,' temnils club,.
ing contraption known as a "Water yacht basin and even a"tock fightL
Skeeter." this ingenious little ma- arena and a miniature village-sty--
chine is powered by a paddle wheel le market. -





NE WAY TO BUY ..

YOUR FAVORITE LIQU S


AXuniquqand new servw'IprcIvl d1 by a I ""'c r""
saves yUo1nthe l money and ergy.


/ ON STATESIDE :
VE UP TO 0 LISTINGS
.









Sunday, MARCH 18th, 1960


"HAITI SUN"


ti Joseph -report







Auto licence plates for 1960 will be distributed from tomorrow at -the
Bowen Field Traffic office... Rev. Timothy Kennedy one of two catholic
priest psychologists in the Americas is down from New York visiting
hFather Smith at Carrefour. He will teach at the Catholic Medical Univ-
?",erqlty in Puerto Rico on its completion... Doctor Derose wrote in Oedipe
:Sunday that the U.S. aid to Haiti comes" in insuffcent amounts, so that
iAmerican policy is abetting Communism in the Caribbean... "Chantage
on Cabotinage" was the title of an article discussing ODVA in La Lutte
t lhis week. "Blackmail or a noise maker"...
r. Srs Carl Fombrun flew to New York this past week with Junior... Jean
F iClaude Armand is on a business (Haitian fabrics) trip to the States and
V.-Puerto Rico... Lucien lHibbert, Haiti's Ambassador to the OAS was ap-
*-. ,iointed a member of the Interamerican Bank at Salvador. A high dist-
:.jnction for this doctor of economics and maths.... Lawyer-Businessman
David Ades left to New York yesterday after a visit home following a-
-- tour of Latin America. He loved carnival in Rio... Senator Arthur Bon-
homme visited C.T. last weekend.... Senator Jean-Marie Moise is back
from a special mission to the States... Newsman Henry Taylor of the
c Washington Daily News and diplomatic correspondent for the Scripps
i- -Howard newspapers arrived Saturday from the Dorhinican. Stopping
with Le Matin publisher Franck Magloire, Mr. Taylor is soliciting an
interview with President Duvalier... From a cruiseship at sea last Wedn-
Resday the Le Perchoir was cabled to have luncheon reserved for four
signed Hemingway.' It raised and it was. not the great author anywqy...
:-Mr Eugene Grasberg who was Klein & Salks specialist (economics and
tax) on the job here has been appointed consultant to the Department
: -of Commerce. Klein & Saks has ended its mission here... Dr Louis Mars,
Recent Foreign Minister is replacing his father as Ambassador to France.
... GermanMinister and Madame Luedde-Neurath are off to vacation
in the Fatherland... The new Minister of Chile in Haiti, Senor Martial
Rivera Marambio arrived Tuesday accompanied by his wife... Maud
iBrierre lqft Thursday for three years Laboratory sydy at the University
1-of-Medellin on a Lope de Vega scholarship... Yung Clarisse Pierre in
her" home close to the Marche Virgile in Nippes gave birth to triplets
S-a boy and two girls- this past' week. Le Matin called the Welfare
SDept. attention to the heavy load of the father Clairvoyant Bernadel and
.asked for special assistance for this peasant family...
,.' Franck St. Victor, director of La Phalange left Tuesday for the States
on an invitation of the U.S. State Dept. He will visit Washington and sev-
:eral other Cities and University centers... Road communication with the
t Capital and Haiti's second city Aux Cayes was reported as impossible
this week... because the highway is almost non-existant in parts... The
Fishery cooperative of Luly was inaugurated last Sunday by the Minister
Sof Agriculture Greard Philippeaux... An earthquake was felt in the Cap-
ital 11:45pm Monday... Former Mayor Antoine R. Herard and propriet-
or of Radio Port-au-Prince has been nominated attache to the Haitian
Consulate in Chicago for Tourism... Mademoiselle Heini daughter of
Colonel and Mrs Robert Debs Heini, Naval Mission chief, flew to the
SStates Tuesday to continue her studies... Lovely Josette Fils-Aime is fian-
Mce with Dr. Gerard De Catalogue... Roger Pouille and Paulette Sielait
'were married March 5. Dr. Jean Price-Mars was bestman and Mrs.
"C'harles Dambreville was matron of honor... Ghislaine San Milan and An-
'thOny Camille son of the late Mayor of Port-au-Prince Dr. Nelaton
C.aille will marry at the Sacre Coeur March 26...





HOTEL RIVI

IF YOU WISH TO ENJOY SEVERAL A
'IN "AMBIANCE D'ART ET D'INTIMITE?
"LE CABARET PARISIEN" OF. THE H C
WHERE Y)U CAN DANCE TO T HE
AND LISTEN TO STAR OF "LA CH
J A NINE PORE T

EVERY SATURDAY, A SPECIAL EVEN
BONNE HUMEUR ET DE FANTAISIE"
WITH THE GRAND RIVIERA ORCHEST
?"LES JEUX ET CONCOURS ANIMES B

ENTRANCE TO THE CABARET PARISIEN




Ok j.... ..


WHO'S WHERE

IN HAITI


By JOLICOEUR
Retired Brigadier General of the
U.S. Marine Corps, George 0. Van
Orden returned to Haiti on his 3rd
visit this week and plans to bring
his family here in two months time.
Noted Surgeon, Edgar F. Berman
of Baltimore and his wife Phoebe
were greeted by officials of Haiti's
Public Health Service on their arr-
ival here on a visit in relation
with the construction of a modern
hospital in Haiti.
Insurance broker Alfred J. Bern-
stein of New Jersey and his wife
are here in Haiti for a week. Bern-
stein's wife Jean holds Women's
Division -fishing record in the In-
ternational Game Fish Association.
Future D'Adesky, former actress,
show girl and stage, screen and
radio performer flew to N.Y. this
week on business in relation with
the development and promotion of
Kyona Beach which Future r uns s
with husband Pierre.
Princess Vita Hohenlohe von Lut-
tichau of Toronto and her mother
Mrs. William B. Marbury, of Wash-
ington, -D.C., have been staying in
the capital city since last week-
end.
Pat and Dan Griffith of Vista,
California have announced the birth
of their first child, Anthony Brian
Griffith born on February first
of this year. The Griffith's are cur-
rently visiting Haiti.
David A. Dietz, Market Psychol-
ogy Inc. of Park Avenue, New York,
and his wife Terry are staying on
a short visit and have already
planned to make a return visit to
our Island.
MIodel Enid Ansley spent three
days here this week. Enid models
on T.V. and has just appeared on
the cover of LIFE magazine to il-
lustrate an article on hypnotism.
Speaking fluent French, writer
George Abell stopped here for a
week's visit recently. George used
to be Paris Correspondentr of Time
and Life and is the grandson of the
founder of the Baltimore Sun.
Mlr. a nd Mrs. Leonard Church
of Lavalette, N. J., a re enjoying
their 10 day vacation in Haiti and
are staying at the Sans Souci Hot-
el.
A weeks vacation is being enjoy-
ed by Dr. Sarah Bodwitch in Haiti
after a long and interesting tour
through Central America. Her ma-
ny friends on this Island have been
entertaining Dr. Bodwitch who is
staying at the Sans Souci Hotel.
Mr. Felix Lopez. manufacturer
from Etmhurst. N.Y., spent two
days in Haiti recently arid stayed
(Continued on page 16)





[ERA

AGREEABLE HOURS
" THE PLACE IS :
)TEL RIVIERA4
RIVIERA QUARTET
ANSON "


NG OF "FRANCHE

RA AND
9Y LUC PORET.

IS FREE.

<^ < < < ^ ^< < ^ ^ ^. ^. s.^4


IASSELBIAD

BRAUn
/o 6y








^owa
7tEz
O~cN
VOs 1'l


Tt rC


WITH A


BESSAMATIC


i9 C A M E R A S AT 11.I: gqIRT PRICl.PI




iS ^ oltS.fl


RUE BONNE FO
Manage :S.KRHN


Phone: 2390
AIR-CONDITIONEO


You know
It's a really fine
SScotch when it'

S JOHNNIE
| **WALKER. *



JOHNNIE WALKER
Born 1020--AI going strong


PREETZMAN-AGGERHOLM, DISTRIBUTOR


4 WHAT 'MiAKES A WEM1NESDAY NIGHT SPENT
. AT THE


SBacoulou Club

SO EXCITINGLY DIFFERENT? FOUR WORDS,
4 4

FAMOUS BACOULOU
VOODOO DANCERS
BUT THAT IS NOT ALL THAT IS OFFERED BY

THE BACOULOU
FEATURED MTEM ON THE MENU IS THE STEAK

DINNERS DELICIOUS
AND ON SUNDAY NIGHTS

FURTHER ENTERTAINMENT

SINGING COUSINS
POPULAR MIXED CHOIR AT 11 P.M

BAOOULOU is located at Petionville on the Square.

k4 4 4 4


PAGE 15


N-01 -11 -10, Iw I%- Iroll


I 1-7vNVN7v-*7p








r',iA.mM 10 A.Lu J.,. m


Sunday, MARCH 18thi i


"
HAITI SUN "


U.S. EMBASSY....
(Continued from page 13)
his wife, Grace and their children,
David Jr., Miles, Elizabeth and
Ann.
Many friends have been made by
the Anderson family during their
stay here and they have become
a part of the community to which
they hope to return in the fuLure.
Of David Anderson, Supervising
Officer Robert Bradlee said, "He
has been very cooperative through-
out the building and went all-out
for a top finish job." Anderson
says that Bradlee had advocated
and insisted for a "top-noted" job
all along Bradlee, a foreign build-
ings officer from Florida, will with
completion of the Embassy move
onto a new job.
There is no doubt that the desire


SOCIAL NEWS
(Continued from page 15)
at the Sans Souci Hotel. Mr. Lop-
ez's company manufactures fertil-
izer in the Dominican Republic and
he was most interested in the new
fertilizer plant we have here.

Hollywood, Cal., resident, Alvin
E. Shumate spent just one night
here recently on the course of his
Caribbean tour but he hopes soon
to be able to return and stay long-
er in Haiti.

of both men to perform a good job
on the construction of the U.S. Em-
bassy has been gratified. It would
be hard for the severist critic to
find fault with thigh modem eye-
catching structure.


IN-CAPHAIIE TH REDEZVOS I AT-


IN-CAP-HAITIEN THE BENDEZ-VOUS IS AT
- HOSTELLERIE DU ROI CHRISTOPHE

COMPLETELY AND RECENTLY RENOVATED

New Monumental entrance and new reception office
Air conditioned rooms with private baths and hot water

Air conditioned Bar

Filtered water pool with outside Bar


Large tropical garden with parking


Top quality french cuisine

Evening dance every Thursday

With the Famous Jazz SEPTENTRIONAL


SLAUGHTER...
(Continued from page 1)
a compromise must be found at
all costs.
*But, we of this paper are 100
percent in favor also of the "bur-
ial" of the old and disgusting pro-
cess of slaughtering.
This slaughtering process should
have been abolished long ago in
a country which is in the midst of
a great tourist movement.
"We hope that the butchers will
be the first to admit that the old
ways were revolting."
In addition to the above state-
ment, Le Matin earlier this week
posed the problem of the sharp
rise in prices for slaughtering by
stating, "The butchers' of Petion-
ville are complaining that .the new
slaughterhouse at Damin is charg-
Ing 15 dollars to kill a sheep and
10 dollars to kill a pig, 'while the
price for killing a goat or sheep
now stands at five dollars.
"'We think that this is a little
steep when you consider the price
to kill a goat which is double the
animal market purchase price."


ODVA INTENSIFIES...
(Continued from page 2)
large scale in view of export.-
Amount of money collected from
the sale of rice will be reinvested
in the Rice plant of Deseaux in
order to improve its proceedings,
and amount collected from the sale
of tomatoes and other vegetables
will- be devoted to the amortization
and interest account of the Exim-
bank loan to the Haitian Govern-
ment for the construction of the
Peligre Dam and the irrigation of
the Artibonite Valley.


OUSTED REPORTER...
(Continued -from page 1)
seas experience behind him. Prior
last September Burks reported as
foreign correspondent in Europe
to joining the New York Times
for a period of three years for the
Baltimore Sun, spending most of
lus time in Czechoslovakia, East-
ern Germany and Central European
,d


countries. ..i
Before entering the josunalji
world Burks saw war service 4 '
the European Theatre of war'in
Italy and prior to joining the Bp'IV.
timore Sun was a member of the.
United States Air Force, operatig
radio stations in. Europe. Edwaxd .
Burks speaks French, Spanish an_--->
several other languages.


MEN'S 6HIRTSm
CARVES


WI ~k4k4k~~A~


'4







I.







~1~


The SATURDAY EVENING POST said: 4
"One of the highlights of Port-au-Prince night life
4 is the Oloffdon's uninhibited Monday night floor .

rch perfumes show..."
Indian stone -
ite perfume th
Collection h



OR HOTEL Oloffson I
rld's famous -
rt prices 4

I Show



O"Oui Chei e


EVERY MONDAY AT 10 P.M. SHARP

. We recommend that you reserve for

DINNER and SHOW.........$5.00
Dinner will ,be served from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m.
iM Entrance for show only: ..,.$2.00 Limited space


HE_ OrLVY PRICE
44 4 __ __ __ __ __.__ __ __ _


4


SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCASION


THE WORLD


FAMOUS



-


For all kinds of Fren
visit Haiti's Smartest
Select your favouri
from our large c

JEAN PATOU
CHRISTIAN L
We.offer you the wo
brands at free po

--LE GALLON

CARVEN

LANVIN NIN.
CARON
CHANEL
RAPHAEL
etc... etc...
MILOT


dds


PAG. IR