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Haiti sun ( March 6, 1960 )

Digital Library of the Caribbean Duke University Libraries
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: March 6, 1960

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00253

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: March 6, 1960

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00253

Full Text
- ~ ~
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Weekly
Every
Sunday


Haiui


Un


lOc


VOL XII SUNDAY, MARCH 6TH, 1960 Port-au-Prince, HAITI No. 37 Avenue Marie-Jeanne CITE D UMARSAIS ESTIME No. 17


MYSTERIOUS


The above pies. show Emmanuel Isma trying out his generous gift from members of the International
Club de Commerce. The 200 dollar tricycle presented to Isma on Friday has changed his life and lifted
him from the pitiful method he used previously for movement (far right) to the comfortable mode of tran-
sport he is now the proud owner of. '


No it's not an invasionary force. It's the TI TA TO "Army" as they
appeared during last weekend's Mardi Gras defending their strong-.
hold, Fort Jacques with serious intent. They were believed however to
be the source behind the revelers who got a little over exuberant and
starting throwing rocks. Police had to be called to break it up.

Boisterous Mardi Gras
Trois Days Revelry



After three days of continuous riotous merrymaking and
revehry, 'Carnival for 1960 drew to a close on Tuesday, leav-
ing in its wake a fund of cdlotrful images 'for paraders and
spectators to draw on tiUl Mardi Gras time comes round


again.
Like the egg and chicken story
t is hard to tell whether
Haitian people were made
for carnival or carnival was
made for the Haitian people, but,
no matter which cames first it
culminated in Haiti's 1960 carnival
with the population of Port-au-Prin-
ce thronging the streets with color,
gaiety and exuberance.
This year's Mardi Gras will long
be remembered by the half a mil-
lion people who for the four days
of celebration took to the streets of
the Capital City. Many experienced
apprehension on the first two days
of parading when little incidents
threatened to disrupt carnival and
Prevent its continuation.
Exuberance running rife was
Perhaps cause for these incidents
for 1960's carnival was one of
strong competition bet ween the
bands and parading groups taking
Part and consequent high spirits
soared beyond control necessitating
Police intervention. However swift
-i;


police action curbed this exuber-
ance and the remaining two days
of parades were conducted in fest-
ival spirit with no further troubles.
Color, music, gaiety and dancing
- all essential ingredients for suc-
cessful carnivalling, abounded last
weekend and the days proceeding
it. Taking standpoints throughout
the entire city, spectators by the
thousand lined the streets each aft-
(Continued on page 8)


DEATH OCCURS OF
MRS. JACQUES
ROUMAIN
Mrs Jacques Roumain, wife of
the late great Haitian t-riter, pas-
sed away at Canape Vert Hospital
Friday morning.
Funeral services were held at
the Port-au-Prince Cemetery Sat-
urday afternoon. Mrs Roumain lea-
ves a daughter Karine and a grand-
child.


Ambassador Drew On
k Country Tour

American Ambassador G e r a I d
Drew returns this weekend from
a three day of Cap-Haitien and the
Artibonite Valley where he inspect-
ed progress on the Pole Cole and
ODVA projects.

New British
Ambassador Here

The new British Ambassador, Ge-
rard Thomas Corley- Smith& C.M.G.,.
arrived in Port-au-Prince on Mon-
day this week to take up his new
duties.' He is accompanied by his
wife and daughter Nichole. Ambas-
sador Smith presents h is letters
of credence to the President of the
Republic, Dr. Francois Duvalier, on
Monday morning.

BARBARA AUBIN


Barbara Aubin, celebrated Amer-
ican artist viho has recently been
giving free assistance to Haitian
painters and is to hold her own
art show on March II at the Cen-
tre d'Art.

CIC Group
Off To Panama
On Saturday morning this week
representatives of the Club Inter-
national de Commerce lzft for Pa-
nama to study the Free Port Syst-
em in that Republic. The delegat-
ion was composed of Messrs: Mc-
Gurk, Club President; Louis Deca-
trel, President of the Chamber of
Commerce: Willy Guercy, Christi-
(Continued on page 16)


SLAYING

Dr. Rousseau Gunned


Down Outside Home


Dr. Roger Rousseau, gunned to
death Wednesday night in what
appears as premeditated and cold
blooded murder, was given a Na-
tional Funeral at St. Anne's Church
and buried at the Port-au-Prince
Cometary Saturday morning.
"What have I done to you?" were
the words the murdered man is
said to have uttered seconds before
his assassin or assassins opened up
a withering blast at point blank
range-it is possible they shot from
as close as arms length.
45-year-old Rousseau was in the
act of crossing the unpaved road
to his home, on Avenue Muller, aft-
er locking and leaving his car park-
ed across the street. (he had no
garage.)
His wife and eight children wait-
ing for him inside heard him arr-
ive, talk to someone or more than
one person and then came the
shattering rapid chatter of aulom-
atic fire.
Nobody heard a car on the nar-
row rutted street sited on the hill
behind Port-au-Prince's Ceometary
and. when Rousseau's family reach-
ed the road he was already lying
dead in his own blood with his
head and body literally riddled
with bullets.
Dr. Rousseau, a large man, was
for two years General Director of
the Public Health Service and only
recently was appointed as Consult
ant to the Grand Technical Coun-


oil. He was at one time Chief of
Urologie at the General Hospital.
Also a keen sportsman he was
President of the popular Bacardi
Football Club. Dr. Rousseau's bro-
ther Andre was at one time Attor-
ney General and as a staunch Gov-
ernment supporter took up arms
when the Governmedt was said to
be in peril. The deceased's wife
was a prominent nurse.
A Catholic, Rousseau had
his Rosary beads in his pocket when
he died. President Dr. Francois Dl-
valier went to the home of the de-
ceased the following morning and
offered his condolences to the ber-
eaved family.
Dr. Rousseau's body lay in state
from 7am ofn the morning of the
funeral at his brother's home, Iaw-
yer Andre Rousseau. At 7:45 am
it was moved to St. Anne's Church
for the funeral service and after
the ceremony to the Port-au-Prince
Cemrnetary.
The fniueral was attended by a
representative of the Chief of State,
high ranking Government and Ar-
med Forces Officials. Trir Palace
band was in attendance a swore
workers from every branch of the
Public Health Service, Hygeine and
Sanitation from Port-an-Prince and
surrounding districts and neighbors
from the deceased's home area,
Mlorike-a-Tnrf.
(Continued on page 16)


Grand Rue Reconstruction

Underway


After two years of rapid depreciation the Grand Rue is to be com-
pletely facelifted. The first of extensive work under the guidance of
Contractor Adrien Roy started on Port-au-Prince's main street Thursday
this week and barring unforseen holdups is scheduled for completion
within six months.








PAGE 2 SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 1960


"HAITI SUN"


IN HAITI


THIS WEEK

As Recounted by AUBELIN JOLICOEUR
Beautiful artist Carol-Diana and her husband Robert Boyer who insures
theatres in New York have migrated from cold Greenwich Village N.Y.
and are enjoying "Joie de vivre" in the City's night clubs.
Manufacturer Arthur Cohen and his wife Fran visited Haiti three years
ago and did not enjoy, it but they are back again and this time they are
loving it. They are making up a nice party here with Mr and Mrs Gene
Propper of Woodmere, New York who are searching for beauties and
arts in Port-au-Prince and its outskirts.
Doris and Jules Michaels who are making Haiti their second home
are hosts at the moment to first time visitors Melvin and Sonny Eligman.
French speaking visitor Florence Ettenberg visiting here from New
York with friend Betty Pepper got the surprise of her life when she
was presented with a beautiful copper necklace by someone in disguise
during Mardi Gras. Turns out she was ordered this gift by her boyfriend
in New York and Terry Noustas of La Belle Creole bought it. Joan Etch-
Ingham, William David and Even Janovic shared her surprise.
Tall stunning blonde, Joan Etehingham arrived here from Philadel-
phia this week. Joan is a secretary to Harry Sions. Editor of Holiday
Magazine and said that she dances for the Editors she is a great
meringue dancer and holds the attention of everybody when she starts
dancing.
Prominent Psychiatrist, Dr. Joseph Cramer and his charming wife
Hope arrived here last week; they have been visiting Haiti every year
now for four years. Dr. Cramer is Director of the Child Department of
the Albert Einstein Institute of Psychiatry in New York. They were
joined here this week by brother A. Robert Cramer and his wife. Bob
.Cramer is in the drug business in Rochester, New York. The quartet
are guests at the Oloffson.
Jean Baer of Seventeen Magazine arrived here this week on her second
trip accompanied by Mr and Mrs Albert Thomas Brod. Mr Brod is in
the Stock Exchange in Washington, D.C. and New York.
Jean and Michele Gosselin are gack here with a renewed cast of their
interesting troupe, La Comedie de Paris. Assisting the Gosselins is tal-
ented comedian and stage director, Robert Vidalin. Many of the cast
have played lead roles in some great stage plays.
Dr. Harry Bifebin went back to cold Boston this week but his wife
Elizabeth has decided to stay until some of that Boston snow melts away.
She is introducing to Haiti Mr and Mrs L. J. Lent of Ithaca, N.Y., Civil
Engineer William Wald and wife of Boston and Urban Renewal Director.
Bernard Pollen and his wife of Glen Cove, New York. These visitors are
all staying at the Villa Creole.
Fruit businessman in Cincinnati, Ohio, Harvey Reis is visiting here
wth his wife Francine. They are making a gay party with Charlie Perez
(Continued on page 16)


SThere Is the CHAPTER H of the Constitution of the Republic)
of Haiti as translated from "Le Moniteur", Port-au-Prince, Haiti,
December 22, 1597. The "Sun" will publish a Title per week of the
Constitution as it appears in the original.


CONSTITUTION OF THE REPUBLIC OF HAITI 1957


CHAPTER H
The Legislative Power
SECTION 1
The Legislative Body
Article 48.-The legislative power
shall be exercised by a single ass-
embly known as the "Legislative
Chamber".
Article 49.-The number of mem-
bers of the Legislative Chamber
shall be fixed at sixty-seven dep-
uties until the law establishes the
number of citizens that are to be
represented by each deputy.
Meanwhile, the number and size
of the electorali subdivisions for
each district will be determined,
account being taken of their econ-
omic and political importance and
the density of the population.
Deputies shall be elected by a
plurality of the votes cast in the
primary assemblies, under the con-
ditions and in the manner prescrib-
ed by law.
Article 50.-To oe a member of
the legislative body, it shall be ne-
cessary:
1-To be a Haitian and never to
have renounced Haitian nationality;
2-To be twenty-five years old;
3-To enjoy civil and political
rights;
4-To have resided at least five
years in the district represented.
Article 51.-The members of the
legislative body shall be elected
for six years and may be re-elect-
ed any number of times.
Their term shall begin on the sec-
ond Monday of April of the year in
which they are elected, unless they
have been elected to fill a vacancy.
In the latter case they shall as-
sume office upon election and shall
serve only for the remainder of
the unexpired term.
, Article 52.-In case of death, re-
signation, disqualification, judicial
interdiction, or acceptance of a new
office incompatible with that of a


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THURSDAY 7:30 P.M. TO 1:30 A.M.
DANCING DINNER UNDER THE STARS ON
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4 7 PIECE BAND STARRING
OUR YELOPHONIST. MICHEL DEGROTTES
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DANCING IN A REAL EXCITING ATMOSPHERE
THE GREATEST SHOW ON THE ISLAND!
p o o o s o o'd ,oo d o o """


member of the legislative b o d y,
provision shall be made for the re-
placement of the member in his
electoral district only for the re-
mainder of the unexpired term, by
a special election after convocation
of the primary electoral assembly
by the President of the Republic
during the month in which the va-
cancy occurs.

However, before accepting a re-
signation, the ,Legislative Chamber
may make all sorts of inquiries in-
to the circumstances surrounding
the resignation.

The election shall be held within
thirty days after the convocation
of the primary assembly. ,
The same procedure shall be fol-
lowed in default of elections or in
case of nullity of elections in tne
or more districts. However, if the
vacancy occurs during or after the
last regular session of the legis-
lature, no by-election shall be held.

Article 53.-The following pers-


ons may not be members of the
legislative body:

Those who have contracts with or
concessions from the State for ex-
ploitation of the national resources
or the operation of public services,
or their representatives or author-
ized agents, or those of foreign com-
panies in like case; unless they
publicly terminate their contracts
or transfer them to third persons
who are neither relatives nor re-
lated by marriage.
SECTION 2
The National Assembly

Article 54.-The members of the
legislative body shall meet in na-
tional assembly for the opening and
closing of each session, as well as
in the cases specified in Article 55
of the present Cohstitution.
The powers of the National Ass-
embly are limited and may not ex-
tend to matters other than those
specially assigned to it by the Con-
stitution.

Article 55.-The National Assemb-
ly shall-have the following powers:
1-To receive the constitutional
oath of the President of the
Republic;
2-To declare war, on the recom-
mendation of the Executive
Power;
3-To approve or reject peace
treaties and other international
treaties and conventions;
4-To revise the Constitution;
5-To elect the Chief of State in
accordance with article 100 of
the present Constitution;
6-To set itself up as a high court
of justice.
Article 56.-The meetings of the
National Assembly shall be public.
However, they may take place
behind closed doors at the request
of five members and afterwards it
will be decided by an absolute ma-
jority whether the meeting is to be
resumed in public.
(This Title will be concluded next
Week.)





-I. WTC
s/~a~


Frederick Poole from United ed by their friends the Jacques
Press International's New York Ivartmins.
News desk is spending his week va- Dr. Jack Aranoff the Ear Nose
cation in Haiti. Lodged at the Mon and throat and plastic surgery spe-
Reve in Port he has Camioned as cialist from Mont Sinai in New
far as Cap Haitien. York. well remembered for his
Dave Haralson of PAA is due to taste in Haitian art and tennis ser-
return to town today and his fam-1 vice departs today after more than
ily after supervising the various a week at Ibo Lele. He was ac-
airports used by President Eisen- companies on this trip by friends
hower on his recent latin trip. Dave Dr. and Mrs. Freed. Dr. Freed is
may be assigned next to Brazil. chief of the service of Urology at
Heart Specialist Dr. Gerard Mountefore hospital in New York.
Gros and Lulu Deschamps were They visited the Schweitzer hospit-
married last night at a ceremony al in the Artibonite and bamboched
held at the home of the bride's fa- with their many Haitian friends.
mily in Lalue. Edmound Kouri flew to Mimai
John Nolan of Television script Friday on business.
writing fame and Anne de La Cha- Kurt Fisher has recovered his
pelle of McGaw Hill returned to nose accident. He fell last weekend
New York Saturday after a reek on the Wharf and escaped serious
in lMusseau. They were entertain- Iinjury.


PAGE 2


SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 1960









"HAITI


SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 1960


SUN" PAGE 3


Yachtsmen Don't Like Haiti?


In a recent Island roundup
-ember 1959) "Yachting", I
chtsmens who's who in sailing
ering 15 pages of descripti
pics., the Caribbean potent
discussed by a number of
uting writers, one of whom
several "derogatory" sta
about sailing in Haiti's wati

Amongst vivid p i c tur
"brightly colored waters,
shed palms, picture-book
and ceaseless trade winds
rayed as, "the stuff of which
ing dreams are made," is
terposing series of comme
unnamed authors which cac
forecasts for Haiti's Tourist y
future.

As "Yachting's" display
says, "In the following pa
have assembled information
Caribbean by areas or Island
emphasis on the more popu
es. From Puerto Rico sou
east, there is little trouble
visitor from a political p
view.

"The situation is less clej
ever on both sides of the
ward Passage. This wind fill
nel between Haiti and Cuba
for its rugged weather, ci
divides an area as political
reliable as its sea conditions

"The Island of, Hispaniola
ed by Haiti and the Dominia
public, was the favorite of C
us but it is a bugaboo now
chtsmen. It is generally i
able to visiting yachts des|
exotic delights of Port-au
"Both these countries ani
are beset by internal dif
and also engaged in a tri
more-than-cold war that co
come hotter at any time.
yachts and other small cra
been used to land raiding
under cover of darkness, a
. unidentified craft is treated
; suspicion or worse. T h e r
been incidents of American


Potential Strong Enough to Warrant Correcting Action
i, (Dec- being fired on in Haiti in recent Haiti. The light was supposed to her crew managed to make it safe- berth usually
the ya- months." and all this on the have a nine-mile visibility and our ly and the voyagers, without help docks are cle
ig, cov- first page! ETA off the point was 10pm." from a pilot, tied up. ated by the
on and DAYLIGHT APPROACH Sayward continues his narrative Sayward continues, "Best proced- souvenir pedd
ial was Alas, for Haiti's yachting potent- with, "By 8pm the cloud-hung, som- ure is to anchor just outside this which can m
contrib- ial, more was yet to come in the bre mountains were clearly visible channel, hoist your Q flag and pre- inating street
n made same vein such as, "With all this and by nine we could make out the pare to repel boarders. The only ant. The Casi
tements tension, any approach to Haitian point easily, but no flick of light place where a yacht can berth safe- ly barred off
ers. or Dominican shores, sho u I d be came to cheer the navigator. ly and pleasantly in Por tis the and guarded
made, if necessary at all, in broad "None ever appeared, and be- Casino Do&k, and there is only one
e s of daylight on a boat thoroughly iden- fore quoting Haitian waters we
wind-la- tifiable as a pleasure yacht." learned not to depend on aids of
beaches The "Island Roundup" then con- navigation there in any form, from
" port- tinues, content to leave Haiti right principle lights to lowly bouys. The
h yacht- out of the picture although the Do- point was given good clearance and .;.- --
an'in- minican Republic and Cuba, the we shifted course to cross the Gon-
'nts by other two nations in the triangular ave Gulf and enter St. Mare Chan-
st dark "cold war." are graphically cover- nel, northern approach to the port
actingg ed with a resumee on what to do, of Port-au-Prince.


story
ges we
on the
ds, with
alar on-
ith and
to the
point of


ar how-
Wind-
led tun-
, noted
currently
lly un-
s.

a, shar-
can Re-
Columb-
to ya-
nhospit-
pite the
-Prince.
d Cuba
ficulties
angular
uld be-
In it,
ft have
parties
nd any
ed with
e have
yachts


how to get there, etc. But, in some
unexplainable wa y, "Yachting"
carries on its Caribbean rundown
in its "Caribbean Log" in which
the tale changes to perhaps place
Haiti in more favorable light?
Details of a "Push Button" cruise.
to Haiti, Jamaica and Grand Cay-
man, are given by Gil Sayward
who visited here on the yacht "Bit-
tersweet" in June of last year.
"After a lively passage through
the Bahamas we anchored off Mat-
tewtown, Great Inagua, to clear for
Haiti. Outside the salt flats run by
the Erikson family there is virtual-
ly nothing of interest on Great In-
agua and after securing our clear-
ance papers for Haiti we sailed at
noon for Port-au-Prince.
"Port-au-Prince lies 170 miles to
the southward and no one, to my
knowledge, has ever had a kind
word to say for the Windward Pas-
sage. For probably excellent reas-
sons it has won the reputation of
being a treacherous combination of
Cape Hatteras, Hell Gate, the Race
and the English Channel. Bitter-
sweet sailed majestically through
this sailors graveyard with hardly
a sway over an oily blue sea so
calm that, during the dinner hour.
we played LP records.
"Our first check point, accord-
ing to the chart, was the big light-
house at Cape St. Nicholas Mole,
the north westernmost point t of


UNFORGETTABLE EXPERIENCE
"Cruising the coast of Haiti at
night is an unforgettable experien-
ce. Fireflies of light from the that-
ched huts of natives twinkle on the
grey-black mountain sides which
stretch up into the clouds to heights
of better than 3,000 feet. It took
li t I e imagination to picture the
boys up on the hills disembowelling
chickens thumping voodoo drums,
dances and re-energizing themselv-
es periodically with golden Haitian
Rhum, a potent brew that we found
worked real fine in a Zippo lighter.

"St. Marc light was picked up
with murmurs of surprise at day-
break, but no one aboard was able
to discover the light structure of
bouys allegedly marking the Ar-
cadins, a wide patch of razor-sharp
coral and plumb in the middle of
the channel. The course was laid
well to the leeward of this hazard
and we chugged toward the hand-
some cathedral which, with a tall
smokestack to its left, is the prin-
cipal landmark of the Haitian cap-
ital.

"There is a large unmarked shoal
covered by a film of light green
water square in the fairway to the
steamship dock, plain to spot in
daylight but hard to miss after
dark." Evidently "Bittersweet" and


open for visitors. The
'an and not overpopul-
rabble of mahogany
dlers and beggars
ake walking the fase-
s of the city unpleas-
no docks are efficient-
to the public by day
by night.
(Continued on page 4)


Petionville's Carnival Queen surveys her "subjects" from a gaily de-
corated float promoted by the Distributors of Amstel Beer during last
,week's gay Mardi Gras.






Le Perch oir

THE RESTAURANT OF

THE HAITIAN FAMILY

IS OPEN DAILY INCLUDING MONDAYS

A SPECIAL LUNCH IS

OFFERED AT MIDDAY

FOR $1.75

AND $2.00 A LA CARTE

The menu is prepared by Albert Barcilon

Of Switzerland.


Rent And Drive A Volkswagen Or Sportscar


FROM SOUTHERLAND TOURS

FREE HOTEL, PIER AND AIRPORT DELIVERY AND PICKUP

TEL: 3591-OFFICE: EXPOSITION NEAR ROND POINT
4-. v v ,, 4- 4-, 4- .i 4- 4- 4- 4- 4' 4- 4. 4- 4- 4,. .,-$' f , ". 7 ,2 ,, ,, "4-"4- 4- 4 4- 'N. !' ~'" r w v. 4 ', .


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Swim, Spearfish, Snorkle, Water-Ski

And Sail In Safe Coastal

Waters From Kyona
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PAGE 4 ~~HATa TT1 AA i aLM LNA' AC t,16


(Continued from page 3)
LOT OF FUN
"Port-au-Prince. after one finds
that in Haiti that one should do as
the Haitians do, is a lot of fun. It
has the finest souvenir shops in
the Caribbean, bar none, and the
native craft is excellent. Liquor is
very inexpensive and the 'Rhum
du pays', Barbancourt, at four dol-
lars a gallon, is as tasty a drink
as a man could want.'"
The above, t a k e n directly and
without alteration, from "Yachting"
is a combination of complaints and
expression of admiration to Haiti.
From this it can be deduced that
if Haiti could improve on its na-
vigational facilities business from
yachtsmen and their vessels would


sited there not long ago, makes
pick up. Second problem posed by
Gil Sayward is the suggested poli-
tical strife well, it is agreed on
all sides that since the invasion of
1958 things have settled down in
Haiti to a fairly amiable and reli-
able existence.
Following the same line of gripe
as many unknowns is the unnamed
person who also contributes to the
December 1959 issue of Yachting
with further, and more pointed re-
marks, on his opinion of sailing in
Haiti's waters.
First comes the following introd-
uction from the magazine which
reads, "A recent report on condi-
tions prevailing in Haitian ports,
received from a yachtman who vi-


MONTANA
PETION.-VILLE



WEEKLY ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM:
TUESDAY: 7:30pm. to Midnight Creole Buffet unLder
the Stars on the Terrace wibh excellent Dance Band.
At 9:30 pnm.-Meringue Lessons ty Lavinia Williams.
WEDNESDAY: 7 pm. to 8:00 pm. Comrplimentary get-
together Punch-Bowl Party.
FRIDAY: 7:30pm.to lam.-Gala 'Dinner-Dance in Cocktail
Jounge. Show at 10:30 pm. No cover-charge.
EVEY NIGHT: 7:00 to 9:00 Cocktail Hour with native
Combo.


that country sound like an unat-
tractive area for cruising. Our cor-
respondent writes:

"The voyage through Haiti was
eventful, though much less pleas-
ant. The Haitian Government is a
tight, tough dictatorship. Because
of the attempted coup d'etat of
July 29, 1958, they were panicy at
the time of our visit. It is impossib-
le for people who have not seen
these things to realize what this
can imply in careless violence and
thoughtless cruelty which may
be directed as easily against the
visitor as against their own people
and often was.


magazine that people are talking
and will continue to talk about the
difhCiilties imposed on yachtmen
and their boats. What is happening
to them? They are of course seek-
ing greener pastures (waters) and
leaving Haiti to the rare boat
which strikes here by chance.

Yet amidst complaints are flow-
ing words of how beautiful and ex-
citing Haiti is which leaves one
with the deduction that if things
were a little better yachts and
their crews would be only to pleas-
ed to- visit here. The potential am-
ongst the yachting tourist world is
invaluable and it seems senseless
to throw it away, especially now


SHOT AND JAILED? that the annual St. Petersburg-Ha-
"In our experience we were shot bana 280 mile yacht race has had
at, almost jailed on more than oc- its venue changed to Miami because
casion and forced to lie at so un- of unfriendly blasts from Cuba's
sanitary a mooring in Port-au-Prin- leader, Fidel Castro.
ce that Cynthia became very seri-
ously ill of a variety of typhoid Skippers participating in this clas-
fever. sic race have expressed the desire
"There is no reason to believe, to steer well clear of Cuba and now
in view of reports that come from intend to stage a 370 mile yacht
there, that these conditions have race through the Gulf of Mexico
bettered. For these reasons and to Miami.
particularly because of the recent
invasion of the country which, like If ever there was, here is food
that of July '58, was small-boat for Haitian thought. With perhaps
mounted, I believe that American the construction of a modern yacht
yachtsmen should be warned of club and a good look at Haiti's na-
what they may encounter if they vigational aids, this Island could
should go there while the present well invite the Southern Ocean Rac-
regime remains in power." ing Conference to stage its annual
These statements are concrete event from St. Petersburg to Port-
evidence taken from a Nation read au-Prince. Haiti.


DISCOVER THE FASCINATION

OF HAITI


Through Its Postage Stamps

For complete information in Haiti

Stamps and other details which will be

furnished you free of charge, write to


Yachtsmen Don't Like Haiti?


TRIP


VOLKSWAGEN
BABY BUS
ALL INCLUDED:



$35

11S RATE COVERS:
a) Round trip transportation bet-
ween hotel in Port-au-Prince
or. Petionville and Cap-Haltlen;
b) One night 1st class hotel ac-
comodation in Cap-Haitien and
8 meals;

c) Trip to Milot and exoauron
to the

CITADEL

Departures from Port-au-Prince
every Wednesday and Sunday
morning, returning following day.
MAKE YOUR RESERVATION AT
HOTEL DESK OB

RAYMOND ROM41IN
MAGIC
ISLAND
TOURS

RUE DU CENTRE
Port-aumPrince.
HAITI
TeL: 2078


I


SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 1960


PAGE 4


"
HAITI SUN as


ST-VIC'IOR INVITED TO U. 8.

Editor-in-chief of the Catholic
daily "La Phalange", Franck St.
Victor leaves for the United States
on an invitation of the Department
of State. Newsman St-Victor will
spend two month in the U.S.


MADAME LEMAIRE RETURNS
TO V'ENEZUELA

Madame Emmeline Carries Le-
maire former publisher of the Span-
ish weekly Alba returned to Ca-
racas this week after a two month
visit home.

Mrs Lemaire is going to make
a cultural tour of Europe this year.


HAITIAN AND CUBAN WED
IN MIAMI

Mile Ignacia Sicar of Cuba and
Eban Fleury of Port-de-Paix were
married at the Church of St. Peter
dnd Paul in Miami February 14th.

Numerous members of the Cuban
and Haitian Colony attended the
ceremony performed by Father An-
gel Viscarra. Melle Lourdes Cardo
and Michelet Jn-Baptisfe were ma-
tron of honor and bestman. Attend-
ing the benediction nuptiale were:
Haiti consul Rudy Baboun, Vice-
Consul Claude Art', Jaco Sassine,
Mr John A. A. Appleton and his
daughter Dayan Appleton, Dr and
Mrs Carlos Orbegozo of Caracas,
Mr Najac Francis, Rene Jn-Bapti's
te, Mile Belle Fluellen of Atlanta,
Georgia.
Following the religious ceremony
a reception was held at 275 8th Ave-
nue.



SPECIAL

CITADEL




a ...-" -. ..


SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 1960


"HAITI SUN"


HAITI SUN
THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERECHU
Gerant-Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1950

GENEROUS GIFT GIVES NEW LIFE
TO EMMANUEL ISMA
It was a common sight in the Capital City, up until Friday
last, to see 33 year old cripple Emnanuel Isma "walking"
round Port-ou-Prince at.a pitifully slow gait on his withered'
and next to useless knees which were protected from the
road surface by inadequate homemade leather pads, and
essieaece 'from his hands.
Friday this 'week saw -an end to Isma's painful excursions
from ,his home at Arcadhon, some five miles from the Cap-
ital, by his only -available means of transport his typhoid.
paralyzed, spindle legs. On Friday the International Club'
de Commerce presented crippled lmrmaniuel Isma with a
gift which 'h'as already changed 'his life to a brighter course.
At a "trial run" behind the 'Hotel de Ville, representatives
of the 'Commerce Club's 52 members handed over to Isma
a 'hand propelled tricyclee that has lifted this pathetic case
off al' fours and placed him amongst his fellow men.
The tricycle set the Club members 'back some 200 dollars.
Perhaps that does not mean very mulch to some folk but
to Isma it surely means a new way of 'life and 'hope for a
ibri'ghter existence. But, it is not the $200 involved that
counts it is the action, which cleanly points out the civil
nature of this businessmen's Club.
Friday's gift was not the first gesture of the c2luib. Just
recently they footed the coat to have a color !film made of
the Island 'lle de la Tortue'; this film has 'helped Father
Rioux raise Tfunds and material 'aid for his missionary work
and medical assistance to the Islanders.
Mr. McGurk, American 'businessman and current Presid-
ent of the CGC said that the club had paid out $280 from
their funds to purchase the tricycle for Isma. $80 went to
pay duties on the m'adhine 'but it is believed that orthopedic
aids such as this, are exempt from duty charges, although
1the club 'has not yet made inquiries in this direction.
The cdib intends discussing this week the possibilities,
if funds remain, of purdHasing an additional machine for
an amputee of similar plight who has a mat attached to
his stumps and slings along the sidewalk heaving 'himself
by the arms.
With face wreathed in smiles, Isma was put through his
pates with the new mode of transport on Friday .morning
by Serge Gaillard, of the Commerce Ou'b, 'and several hund-
red people flocked to the scene \behind the Hotel de Ville
to watch 'and comment most comments were of the kind
gesture in giving the machine to Isma ,while others wond-
ered 'how, if it should eventuate, 'he will fix "flats."
The 'English made tricycle, Tubular MTJ Ltd., has com-
forthble seat, a hand action system of 'peddling and is furth-
er equipped with 'lights and a form of gear 'change for hills.
It met with the approval of the policeman controlling traf-
,fic during the practice 'run.
lErmmanuel Isma has the International Club de Commerce
to thank for his good fortune and their invaluable gift and
it is certain that as he moves around thq Capital City in
his new mode of transport his thoughts wil often turn to
those whose generosity enabled him to take this tremendous
step forward.


=I


i


SII HLrcr-fl-.ua k


You know
it's a really fine
Scotch when it's
JOHNNIE
WALKER



JOHNNIE WALKER
Born 1 20o-still going strong


I


PREETZMAN-AGGERHOLM, DISTRIBUTOR


\
OPEN LETTER TO THE EDITOR
OF "LE MATIN"
At this critical period. in Haiti's
economic history, when your Pres-
ident has requested the investment
of foreign capital and offered gov-
ernment cooperation and protection,
it is with a great deal of surprise
and not a little disappointment that
I read in an editorial in "The Ma-
tin" of Teb. 27th under ithe head-
ing:. "Societes. Autorisees" the fol-
lowing remarks:
"If we had to give our opinion
of the affair of fishing we would
h a v e referred to the suggestion
which was published in this journal
not long ago. We thought then that
fishing in national" waters should
have been prohibited to foreigners
at this time when our compatriots
are engaged in exploiting rationally
our fishing waters."
"We believe that instead of their
giving cooperation to these foreign-
ers they should sooner encourage
by loans these Haitians who are
devoting themselves scientifically to
this industry."


above that of virtual starvation to
which they have been accustomed.
The activities of the above men-
tioned Society are aiding greatly
ind developing the fishing industry
among the Haitian fishermen who
have not had the funds with which
to purchase their equipment and
expand their activities. The bomp-
any does no fishing; they help the
Haitian fishermen to develop the
fisheries themselves, in a manner
more rapid than was possible be-
f6re.-They distribute money among
ith population of the remote vill-
ages of the coast and contribute
materially to the development of
the country and the national econ-
omy.
The above mentioned Company
has spent large sums to give hun-
dreds of traps free of charge to
these poor people, and to buy from
them their catch, at prices agreed
upon by them, thus .pouring into
these villages several hundred dol-


lars in cash weekly, a phenomenon:
which they have not seen before. *
When the United Nations, several
years ago were requested to nake,..
a survey of the possibility of corn-.
mercial fisheries in Haiti, it was.
the declared purpose to prove to '
capital that investment in such fish-. !
series would be profitable.
It seems not only unfair, but un-
comprehensible for a journal ,of
your standing to allow the publica-
tion of such an editorial which
bears all the earmarks of an 'at-
tempt' to sabotage a legally estab-
lished Haitian corporation which is
composed of several Haitians and
one foreign member, and employs
and supports many Haitians.
In all fairness you are respect-
fully requested to give space to
this explanatory reply to your edit-
orial.
Copies of this open letter are re-
leased to the press.
HORACE ASHTON


It is grossly misleading to infer ,',
that the operations of the Company r
referred to would in any way.
threaten to deprive any Haitian ,
Company of their share in the fish-
eries. Such operations on the other
hand would go a long Way toward
the development of the industry.
Such ignorant statements in your
press have done more to discourage a
the investment of foreign capital HAITIAN GROWN TOMATOES SHIPPED TO U.S. 'MARKET BY AIR
tin ha iora t o an -ny e o icanuse, d A million pounds of tomatoes from the ODVA farms in the Artibonite
thoughtless the authors of s u c h Valley are destined to foreign markets as well as the local constfLers
editorials can be. this year.
I have always had a great deal For the past two weeks, ships and planes have left Haiti with important
of respect for "Le Matin" and its consignments of tomatoes for the U.S.
to este eda founder pitrad Above a shipment of tomatoes for "Indian River Vegetable Cooperat-
Matin" should have so far degen- ie" in Fort Pierce, Florida is loaded aboard a Pan American Air-,
erated that prior to the publication ways clipper cargo plane at Bowen Field. The 22,000 pounds of tomatoes
o f a statement editorially t h ey were loaded aboard in the presence of Agronomist Garvey Laurent ad-
ould not acquaint themselves with nistrator of ODVA. Photo by Gerard Lescot.
the facts.
The undersigned has no connect-
ion or interest in the Haitian-Amer- ( .
ican Fisheries Co. S.A. to which Caribbean Construction Co. S-A.
the above remarks referred save Builders The Mil City
the desire to aid the inhabitants of Bu ders Of The MilitaryCity
those small, remote fishing villages Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD
to raise their standard of living Phone: 3955. P. 0. BO.. 284
x h er' standr ofh Cg
MODERN COMFORTS WITH OLD WORLD CHARM


|IOtIL SANS SBCIJCII

MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR THE BEST TABLES!

A Distinguished Hotel In The Heart Of The City

Conveniently Located To The Shopping District
SAll Air Conditioned Rooms with Private Baths and Hot Water

New Pool Terrace with outside Bar and Swimming Pool

S Air Conditionned Bar Unsurpassed Cuisine Finest Service
"HAPPY HOUR" EVERY THURSDAY

FROM 5:30 TO 6:30 p.m., INFORMAL GATHERING

A DINNER DANCE EVERY FRIDAY

C,. From 7:30 P.M. To Midnight With Floor Show

S 3 UNDAY NOON CREOLE BUFFETS

$c AT POOL TERRACE


-.* J


. *' ,
S "* *.-


PAGE 5


I








TA IA ISU UNAYMACH6t,496


FATHER CORNET LEAVING JEAN-RABEL
-HOME TO FRANCE FOR A YEAR


Cure in Jean-Rabel for the past
eight years, Father Cornet, is in the
Capital City making preparations
to embark on the SS Antilles for
his native France where he is to
spend one year.
The young French priest is retur-
ning to his homeland happy in the
knowledge that his flock in the litt-
le northern town (Jean-Rabel) is
now recovering from the severe
drought which threatened the regi-
on last year and he will not have
to worry that they will starve
to death. Crops at the time of last
year's drought were practically ne-
gligable but since that date with
assistance from CARE and other
organizations they have reached a
steady growth again.
Last year when visited in Jean-
Rabel Father Cornet was dejected-
ly writing an appeal for medical
supplies and food for his famine
hit community. Now that the fam-
ine is over. and with a cooperative
formed they have nan-owed down
their wants to a few essentials
which Father Comet hopes to get
on his trip to France
Main essentials needed by the
people of Father Comet's parish
are medicines to combat the high
Tuberculosis's rate. During his first
days in Port this week he amassed
200 gourdes to buy medicines which
will be sent to Italian sister Tar-
cesser at the dispensary in the
small town. %
With Father Cornet on his trip to
the Capital this week was the young
President of the Cooperative and
4-C Club, Princeton Daniel. The
4-C Club is meeting success with
vegetables grown on four carreaux
of'land at Jean-Rabel, on most of


which the club is using fertil-
izers to\ demonstrate better farm-
ing methods, but the problem is
getting vegetables produced to
market.
There is little or no transport
over the barely existing road to
Port-de-Paix, the nearest market,
but when the transport problem is
solved, Daniel feels the little town
will wake up and be in a better
position to combat any further dis-
aster.
Father Cornet is to' be replaced
by Pere Maurice Morind in Jean-
Rabel which according to Father
Cornet still needs plasma to pick
up the towns children from the
state of malnutrition and of course
fortified vitamins.

TAKING SPELL
FROM STUDIES
Jacques Armand has taken a bri-
ef spell from his economic studies
at New York University to visit
with his father lawyer Benoit Ar-
mand in Port-au-Prince.
Jacques who is specializing in
Latin American affairs is Presid-
ent of the NeW York University's
student council and was recently
awarded a medal for outstanding
scholarship and service to the
school. He expects to remain in
Port till the end of March.


JOURNALIST DANIEL GAY
MOVES TO MEXICO
Daniel Gay of the editorial staff
of "Le Nouvelliste" left for Mexico
Friday. He will study for two years
on OAS social science scholarship
in Mexico City.


A Haitian Army Corporal m
untimely death on Monday nit
what has been described b:
authorities as an accident.
Corporal Paul Nicolas, a r
clean-cut soldier, was blown
a grenade on the pavement
ite the statue of President A
dre Petion on the wide street.
ing to the Jean-Jacques Dess
Barracks.
Details of the violent ac
are a little vague but it is I
that Corporal Nicolas was d


TEXAS OILMAN
HERE ON
LUXURIOUS YACHT
The motor-schooner Onza visited
Port this week with owner Texas
oilman H. W. Hennies, his wife,
daughter and guest Herbert Her-
zog.
The luxury sailer sixty feet in
length has a seventeen foot beam
bnd seven foot draft. Hailing from
Houstan the vessel is captained by
H. S. Coid who has visitedd Haiti on
several previous occasions.

ROBBER SHOT
TO DEATH ON
RUE DU CENTRE
A thief with a long criminal re-
cord was shot to death on the Rue
du Centre opposite the Magic Cine
Tuesday morning by a detective.
The robber was shot as he tried
to escape after a short tussel with
the detective.


Accidently Explodes
iet an a small grey Vauxall. Victor, lic- the pav'
ght in ense number 2502, which was des- grenade
y the cribed by/officers at the `scene as ain that
a police car. plosion.
neat At approximately 8:30pm on the and the
up by Monday night, .a little more than ed and
oppos- an hour after the Police were alert- ed by fr
lexan- ed and dispersed the Mardi 'Gras ing green
lead- parade because of incidents of rock hand wit
alines' throwing, the Vauxhall carrying 3
soldiers brushed with another pol- Shortly
cident ice car and skidded across the road brigade
known mounting the footpath, the side'
Driving The shock Is said to have thrown for Corp
Corporal Nicolas from the car to on Wedi


ement along with a hand
which exploded. It is cert-
there was a grenade ex-
Death was instantaneous
front of the car was smash-
liberally pitted holes caus-
agmentations of the explod-
nade as was the rear right
window.

' after the incident the fire
was called in to wash down
walk the funeral service
oral Paul Nicolas was held
nesday.


Sensational


THE AMERICAN VEHICLE, IDEAL FOR
It is the "LARK" manufactured by STUDEBAKER-PACKARD


HAITI
Corporation.


Neither large nor small or rather, large and small at once
Offering all the advantages of large cars, 6 to 7 passengers,.
Stability, Comfort, Power and aU the advantages of the small car
Low fuel consumption (30 to 32 miles on a gallon.
Easy to drive, length reduced
Reduced Prices, in spite of Its great luxury
Ideal for Haiti


THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE AGENCY,
Place Geffrard, Phone: 3216 or 3920


S. A.


GARAGE RUE DES CESARS PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
Ask also for a demonstration of the Pick-Up and Trucks
Their saving of fuel, solidity, power and capacity are
already universally known.


Iii


-~ a a a a a a ~


WHAT 'MAKES A WEDNESDAY NIGHT SPENT
AT THE



Bacoulou Club
SO EXCITINGLY DIFFERENT? FOUR WORDS,



FAMOUS BACOULOU D
VOODOO DANCERS
BUT THAT TS NOT ALL THAT IS OFFERED BY

STHE BACOULOU
'FEATURED ITEM ON THE MENU IS THE STEAK

DINNERS DELICIOUS
AND ON SUNDAY NIGHTS

FURTHER ENTERTAINMENT
THE
4, ^- SINGING COUSINS
POPULAR MIXED CHOIR AT 11 P.M

BACOULOU is located at Petionville on the Square.



Lt fqu&.c &fy~4 Thin I~we


PA.GE 6


Cpl. Paul Nicolas Dead, Grenade


SLHOTEL


Petionville
featuring
The Smart Saturday Night Club

LA RONDE
9p.m. Until Late Closing
The El Rancho. Duroseau
Orchestra
Dancing Nightly Except Sunday From 7pm
THOSE WHO APPRECIATE
THE BEST DINE
AT EL RANCHO HOTEL'
And always superb cuisine


V--


SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 1960


SUN"


15, -C, .


.I


"HAITI








SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 1960


"HAITI SUN"


Do Your



Shopping

in Haiti

It is getting so that people are
taking vacations as much to
shop as to play golf, lounge in
the sun or just relax. And, no
.wonder when you consider the
savings to be had through Free
Port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they can
buy the same gifts, in free-port
shops, at savings up to 60% of
U. S. prices. So, for the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
wonderful vacation in Haiti.
Perhaps the most famous free-
port shop in the world is La
Belle Creole. located in the
heart of fascinating Port-au-
Prince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable wonderland
full of the world's most de-
sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
'ches, Cashmeres, Handmade
bags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
meras, Liquours and a seem-
ingly endless array of native
handicraft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
sider that one can buy the
world's most famous Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
guet---t discounts of 50% of
the U. S. advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
Belle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented..Before buying
an expensive watch it might
-be well worth your time to
consider a trip to Haiti.

Al Noustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhaps another reason for
the surge in popularity of
free-port shopping. His ad-
veFtising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
licy of cooperating with tra-
vel agents in their various
promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tle of free champagne to any
visitor to Haiti who happens
to be celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niversary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts to make
the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
mous brand merchandise.
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
sands of tourists this year will
come home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
when they went away.


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER












FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER


P. 0. Box 676,


PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI


Sa vj^e 40 to 65
^Ifl r'I~i*f
a^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^I^^^^^^H^H^^B


AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS


MINTON, WEDGWOOD.
ROYAL CROWN DARBY,
ROYAL COPENHAGEN,
ROYAL WORCESTER,
ROYAL DOULTON,
ROSENTHALE, SPODE,
AYNSLEE, COALPORT,
GUSTAUBERG.



GEORGE JENSEN.
HANS HANSEN, GERO,
DRAGSTEVI, GENSE.



The Finest of FRANCE.
ITALY, AUSTRIA,


LALIQUE, BACCARRAT,
ORREFORS,
WEBB & CORBETT,
VAL SOLAMBERT,
STUART, LEERMAN.


OMEGA, PATEK PHILIPPE,
JUVENIA TISSOT, BOREL,
AUDEMAR PIGUET, /
JAEGER LE COULTRE,
ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO,
ATLANTA, STUDIO,
VULCAIN.




KISLAV,
ENGLISH DOESKIN,
ITALIAN ANTELOPE.



PRINGLE, BALLANTYNE,
BERN HARD ALTMAN,
LUISA SPAGNOLI.




DANISH SILVER,
GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY
and BRAZILAN GEMS.


GUERLAIN, LANVIN, -
CARON, CHANEL,
RAPHAEL, PATOU,
BALMAIN, WORTH,
REVILLON, VIGNY.
CARVEN, LE GALLONN.
FABERGE OF PARISH
JEAN D'ALBERT,
JACQUES GRIFFE
FATH, PIGUET,
CORDAY.

MINOX, CANNON



ROYAL COPENHAGEN.
ROYAL DOULTON,
HUMMEL.



HARVEY'S BRISTOL
CREAM, All FRENCH.
DANISH and
SPANISH LIQUIEURLS


HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS


VooDoo Inspired
JEWELRY




Native-Insnired
SPORT SHIRTS


&


SCULPTURES


Factory Outlet
MAHOGANY
- The Best.


RAFFIA BAGS
& SHOES-




HAITIAN MUSIC
- Collector's Items


Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS

World Famous RUGS & DRAPERY
Haitian RUM BARBANCOURT


Have us send gifts to your friends in the U. S. A. f
without affecting your quota.--- See us for more information.


PAGE 7


0


.d' a








0


PAGE.


fContnued from page 1)
ernoon and evening to view the
mass;'e procession of paraders and
followed the gaudy scene as it
wended its way through the main
thoroughfares of the Capital City.
Weeks and weeks of preparation
went into this mass venting of en-
ergetic festivities and the thous-
an.ds of paraders received just ap-
plause for their efforts from the


teTMATTT SUN"


Boisterous


spectators. For approximately four
hours each day on Sunday, Monday
and Tuesday, huge groups of danc-
ing paraders, bands and floats un-
reeled a display of gay abandon
and tireless energy.
The stamina of those taking part
in the street parades was fantastic.
A large percentage of these people
e-nt without sleep or pause for
three sold days and each day came


Carnival featured many tine floats as \iell as some lovely young girls.
the beauty of %which is shown above in the person of the Queen of the
City. Carmel Trenard who rode though the Mardi Gra. parade on a
float displayed by the distributor for Splendid. the local cigarettes, Jo-
seph Nadal and Co. Miss Trenard %as presented after carnival with
a wvrit match by Jean Claude Nadal on behalf of Nadal & Co.


back for more continuous dancing
and music. The fervour displayed
by these paraders was contagious
and the dancing feet and rhythmic
music caught up many of those
standing on the sidelines, setting
their feet dancing and swaying to
a new beat each time a group of
dancers or a new band passed by.

LIQUID ENERGY
No doubt a contributing factor to
the virile performances of parad-
ers was the quantities of spirituous
liquors circulating among the vari-
ous groups and even casual observ-
ation revealed an amazing variety
of bottles and ustensils used to con-
tain the liquids and as mediums for
drinking. There was of course the
traditional .Haitian Rhum
together with beer in
diversified quantities and bran d
names and unidentified liquids of
practically every shade and hue.
Method for dispensing these "char-
ges" of energy was amusingly va-
ried. It would be safe to say that
without exception every person tak-
ing part in the parade carried a
drinking ustensil of some descrip-
tion
Supporters of the various floats
and cars %when the need arose danc-
ed their way to their group's ve-
hicle and held out the already men-
tioned variety of mugs, cups. glass-
es, lars, cooking pots. hats, bottles,
the occasional baby's pot, and in
a number of instances baby's
feeding bottles complete with nipp-
le Willing dispensers on the floats
and trucks poured forth into the
waiting recepticles and thirst sat-


SUNDAY, MAROH 6th, 1960
1


PAGE 9


MARDI


controlled automatons. Advertizing
was not left out the festivities
either and several dist-
ributors in Haiti of American cars
mounted the latest models on de-
corated trucks and drove in the
procession yet again with the ad-
ornment of young ladies handing
out sweets to eager patrons.


ed, paraders moved back to their
dancing and singing.
Ice was another substance much
in demand and Port-au-Prince's Ice
Factory surely had a full time pro-
duction line in action keeping up
supply i,es of barrels of
ice to both street vendors -
patronized by a "booming"
trade of spectators and paraders
without a truck or float scource of
supply and parade groups. Des-
pite this wide-scale drinking there
was no outstanding signs of drunk-
enness.
The cortege for Mardi Gras pro-
vided plenty of variety and consist-
ed of first the Police -who infil-
trated to a large extent among the
procession during the three days-
followed by groups on foot and
"Masques divers." "Caval i er s a
bic.clettes," the music, the King
of the Mardi Gras, floats bearing
the Queens, Orchestras on decorat-
ed vehicles,, Decorated cars, a sec-
ond procession of orchestras on ve-
hicles, various floats, orchestras on
decorated floats, Decorated trucks,'
Bands on floats and a final van-
guard of Police.
Following close behind the first
batch of Police and setting the pace
for the long line of paraders were
the groups on foot. In gaily colored
costume and interspersed with litt-
le drum bands they made a fitting
opening to the procession. Behind
these came a g r ou p of cyclists
mounted on machines as gaily de-
corated as themselves. This group
performed evolutions which, alth-
ough startling, were conducted with
skill.


. Then came the first of the many
floats. Although unnamed this part-
icular float (bedded on a well can]-
oflaged truck) mounted a good
band serving as orchestra for a
large group of followers on foot
dancing in attendance close behind.
In bright red costumes, the dancers
numbering well over a hundred.
wore a fascinating array of head
gear. Some wore helmets while oth-
ers were attired in caps, fatigue
caps, paper bag hats and even
workers protection aluminum helm-
ets.'
CELEBRATING KING
A float bearing the King of the
Mardi Gras- came next complete
with attendants and sla v e. This
float load of young Haitians were
really celebrating carnival and
were well supplied with liquid re-
freshment and food. Occasionatlly
the members of this float threw
oranges and sweets to eager hands
in the crowd lining the streets and
at one stage they literally bomb.
arded Haiti's Sugar Cane Queen of
the World, Miss Cl Fouchard. The
King on the float picked out Nliss
Fouchard standing with a group of
friends among the spectators and
threw an orange in her direction
this she caught with a beautiful.
ly executed catch high above hlii
head. Unfortunately the Sugar Cane
Queen's catch was a little too gojrd
and spurred the float's occupants
to start throwing "articles of food
right left and centre and mainly
in the direction' of Miss Fouchard's
group. Oranges, coconut husks.
pineapples, bread and the crown.
ing "glory" a massive piece of


RESTAURANTS,


Here is important news: Tomatoes at 25 centimes a pound!
At the Sales Office of the ODVA on the corner of Rue
du Centre and Rue des Cesars. You will find the Tomatoes
of the fine superior quality UI.S, No. 1 Grade A at the econ-
omical price of Gdes 0.25 the pound.


1S3

Which luckily .missed dropping
S p n their' tracks.
b oe hind the providerss
ane a bright mass of dance
e -from the group, "Les Devoues."
ind in colorful paisley patterned
sdirs the dancers delighted th
d as did their band from thei
.-P high up on a gally decorated
to1 Nearly all the floats carry
.Mg band groups were mounted o
Truck base and most them tower
dt righ above the street in proper
tons seenungly defining all law
f grait'. Musical aid was given
he LEs Devoues group by the drive
a of the float who accompanied
t$. stirring meringues with inde
b ~a :,el effective blasts on the
u-ud: horn at the end of eaci


TAKE NOTE :


Days Revel
g on the tunes at intervals. Several lanterns. Belund them was the flo-
of the floats were denoted to ad- at paraded by the Dental Associa-
" vertizng although each float had tion complete 'with dentists and
- its share of pretty girls, nurses and a surrounding group of
As the parade progressed and it dental equipnient and' a startling
d grew dark. the many floats turned array of oversized gleaming teeth
e on concerned lighting which gave which encircled the whole float.
r added color to their decoration and
d it is in this state perhaps that it Tele-Haiti entered a very impres-
- is best to describe them. Follow- seive float complete with massive
n ing the Les Devoues group and flo- TV set and 'snow" and one of the
r- at was the impressive float pro- "zone" queens behind the screen
r- moted by the National Lottery. This waving and gestering to her sup-
s featured a huge gold Haitian coin porters. This float had been well
n imprinted with the words, "Repu- prepared and was received well.
- blique d'Haiti 190S." Tlus impress-
d ive display was augmented with Perhaps of all the floats the best
a- three young Haitian cirls who wa.- hand was given b:, the spectators
e ed and smiled to lhe appreciate to the float paraded by "Sha Yoyo."
h audience. At the rear of the float sat a small


%T[RANGE MIXTURE
In the later stages of Tuesday's
uradEi m e band music was fre-
quittl\ ijoned at different key lev-
el b., th'e ailing sirens of police
,ag,,ns a th e y sought passage
tlroug.ih Hie revelers. It made a
4trJdce ,unitiast on one hand
tlroinEs ,f celebrating paraders and
on the other the hussling urgency
.-[ the Police vehicles.
Despite the dancing. singing and
e.,utberint displays of the people
tunip,:isin the many c a r ni v a I
groups trN floats made the centre
,piL-s l the parade and many of
then ciariied elaborate decoration
and sign-..,:rk. Those without the
undiubtedi advantage of a ban d
mdie up for it with record player
and lnuI'dsp-.paker, indeed one inge-
nious float provided hidden record
pla:,ei and musicians helping out


Other vehicles participated in the and legs clutching bottles hanging
three days of parading apart from over the sides and pulled by gaud-
the truck and jeep drawn floats, fly dressed peasants in spasms of
Several ambitious revelers gathered haste. The bubbling humor of these
up the oldest car they could find, worthies more than made up for
removed everything not pertaining their less lavishly decorated floats.
to mechanical function, loaded up As previously stated practically
wi- costumed passengers and join- without exception all the floats had
ed the parade. Of this classifica- bands on them to provide music
tion was the 'very, very old Ford for their supporters. These bands
creation which gamely limped al- consisted of from one member, as"
ong the loute in vanguard of the in the case of the drummer pro-
procession boiling over every viding rhythm for the two dancers,
tie minutes but with plenr.\ of to as many as thirty. Instruments
willing assistance 'to -keep it mov- used by these bands for their rhyth-
fij Incidently, this veteran was mic renditions were usually saxo-
later. much later, seen after the phones, trumpets, accordians, trom-
final parade had finished being pu- (Continued on page 10)



HOUSE-WIVES,
BUSINESSMEN,
HOTELS AND


Another popular float, unnamed,
was the one featuring a huge voo-
doo drum and two costumed dane-
ers accompanied by a drummer.
During the length of the parade
they danced traditional dances prac.
tically without cessation and the
crowd's applause sinirutied their ef.-
forts. The City Hall's float was th>e
next to make its appearance and
was constructed in the form of a
ship. The ship bearing a strong re-
semblance to Columbus's "Santa
Maria" and bearing on the stern the
words' "Ville de Port-au-Prince,"
was obviously the result of a lot of
work. Along its "decks" paraded
both male and female crew memb-
ers.
The Haitiin Cement Co.'s float
appeared after the City Hail dis-
play and featured of course
more pretty girls and
an effective display of chinese


compact band while on a specially
constructed stage up front three
male dancers dressed in turbans,
floI tiec silk sluits, black trousers
and in stockinged feet drew vora-
cious applause with their Cha Cha
Ciha dancing. This was a really
smooth combination and ir was easy
to see thar the trio had gone to-
somrne pains to perfe-ct their dances
Each and evet step was perfectly
timed b.h the thiee men and the
audijencr" could not get enough of
it
Then there was the floars carr'-
ing the Queens of the various City
and Suburban districts all of
whom in their regal tobes sat or
stood in their "'court" and obliged
the calls and cheers from the sp'-cl.
ators with wa\es and throw n kiss.
es Unfortunatel. these 1 o v e I y
young g misses steriot3 ped their gest-
ures tto such an extent they gave
the impression of being r I g i d I


I ... ENJ i Y '


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DECEMBER


Cars Available




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Weekly Rate


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AHll Rates Include Gas


Oil And Insurance


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Road Maps


.INFORMAtIONI


PICK-UP AND


DELIVERY FROM



hotels

Air Ports Piers


FOR RESERVATIONS, ROAD MAPS AND -SUGGESTED ITINERARIIE, WRITE OR OCA LE

AVIS CAR REhTALS
P.O. Box 602
PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI.


0 ,,A. i


UNDgAY, MARCH 6th, 1960 "HAITI SUN"


volkswagen
Kabriolet


Off ice till~f~


shed not quite so willingly through
the City streets.
Not to be outdone by the preten-
ious floats were those aspiring peas-
ants who labored long and with
g r e a t success at decorating the
hand carts or wheelbarrpwvs used
to carry produce through the
streets. Some of these were well
and truly decorated hv limn aris


r







"HAITI


SUN"


SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 1960


Boisterous Mardi Gras -


(Continued from page 9)
bones and of course the drums with
other forms of rhythm instruments
k such as cow bells. vaccines etc.
When two of these rival band
groups started playing
within a few feet of each
other and both playing differ-
ent tunes the effect was quite spect-
acular.
Second only to the floats and bands
were the many groups of supporters
making up the various "clubs" for
the procession. Some of these
groups had members totalling
close to 200 and rivalry between
groups was close and, on a
few occasions during the three days
ot parading, came to clashes and


the exchange of free-for-all blows
between both the group members
and the Police.
Of theses -roups the largest were
"Derange," "Dragon," "Ti-Ta-To"
and "Diabolo"' groups. All of these
as well as having massive floats
and bands had throngs of singing,
dancing and drinking revelers go-
ing before and after them.
STRAINED RELATIONSHIPS
Attired in yellow shirts and black
trousers the followers of Ti Ta To
danced and marched around their
float which, built as a aronghold,
was entitled,- "Fort Jacques." The
fort bristled with oversize machine-
guns made from wood and many
of the Ti Ta To "army" were out-


fitted with helmets, wooden guns
and bandolieis of wooden amuni-
tion. Unfortunately it is believed
that during Monday taught's parade
members of the group got over en-
thusiastic and commenced elevating
rocks into the heavy crowd of spec-
tators lining both sides of the
street. They also indulged in lett-
ing off loud firecrackers in the
street which at one stage caused
a mass dispersal of the crowd.
This disturbance was swiftly
broken up by Police who appeared
on the scene firing pistols into the
air and followed by an armoured
car carrying machineguns these
were not made of wood. The alter-
cation caused the abandoning of
Monday evening's festivities. How-
ever TI Ta To's float, band and


LE CENTRE D'ART
Founded 1944
Exclusive agents:
Alix, Amiama, Armand, Bazile,
Benoit, Bigaud, Blanchard, Desro-
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Joseph, Leontus, Leveque, Llautaud,
Montas, NormUi, Obin, Pierre, St.
Brice, Stephane, Turnier, Vital,
many others.
17 Rue .de la Revolution


From Pan American
in town one block toward
bay, half block to left.
Open Monday through
Saturday
9-1 3-6 Phone 2055 1











US -





LES PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUES
HAITIENNES
sm ,:Ou i


3 Days Revelry
supporters were all back in the pro- least appeared in fine fettle and
ceedings for Tuesday's parade and danced all the time.
were far more subdued than In the And so on Tuesday evening, 3rd
previous two parades. day of festivities, gaiety, exuber-
ance and parading. 1960's colorful
It seemed like all the argument- Mardi Gras came to a close. Des-
ation and incidents between the riv- pite the minor infractions that took
al groups stemmed from parade place and tainted parts of the first
positioning which did not suit the two days celebrations, this year's
large clubs who each wanted, carnival was an undoubted success
of course, to be in front of his riv- that will provide many interesting
als. Jostling of positions did not reminiscences until next year's
find favor with any concerned and revelry comes round.
imposed a severe strain all round
on otempters which on eru tinwI --re


quickly, quitely, and in some, cas-
es painfully, quelled.

Another group with popular mem-
bership was the group "Dragon,"
who arrayed their members in red
shirts, black trousers and Sisal
hats with the group name painted
on them. Dragon also managed to
get themselves into a couple of al-
tercations with the law during car-
nival but in Tuesday's parade at


The costumes have been put away
in safe keeping, makeup washed
off and most of the floats dismant-
led. The thundering, though peas-
ant music which swelled through the
streets of the Capital has subsided
and once more the City has settled
back to its everyday pattern. But,
next year -and it's not that far
away already- Port-au-Prince's po-
pulation will once more adorn it-
self, as will the City, with the air
and irresistible lure of Mardi Gras.


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->I




"1,'. *,' -K *'~'*~**

N


AY, MARCH 6th, 1960


/
/
"HAITI SUN"


The Modern 'Golden Touch'


PAGE Ib


PERSONALITY OF THE WEEK
,As personality for this week we
-'have chosen a man who came to
Haiti in 1910 while in his early
.20's and within a few years esta-
blished florishing industries on this
Island. He is a man with remark-
.- able driving force and undeviating
:.nvictions who has been honored
with the OBE from his Sovereign
i .Queen our personality is 69 year
Sold Oswald -J. Brandt.
Hall a century ago 0. J. came
'to Haiti from Jamaica where he
.';wap born of German-Irish parent-
age (his great grandmother was a
Carib Indian) and took a position
in Port-au-Prince in the accounting
47 department of the National Bank.
Today, as'he sits in his own office,
he can read from his desk a de-
,dicus to him from, and written on
.. .a portrait g.L President Dr. Fran-
.cois Duvalier which pays tribute
to his career with the follow-
ing words, "To my Dear co-citizen
for the outstanding contribution he
has made to Haiti during forty
.years."
When the "Haiti Sun" called this
wek on Mr. Brandt we found the
B ax r e I chested. Businessman at
wo* in his small 10 x 10 air con-
ditioned office, sited b e f o r e his
coffee sorting plants on the Rue du
Quai, wearing his habitual short
sleeved shirt without jacket in
which he is seldom .caught.
Shortly after joining the National
Bank Brandt made a change -
across the street to the Royal Bank
bf Canada where he held a position
-'".as joint Manager until leaving the
bank in 1928. He still continues
with the Royal Bank of Canada on
a business basis however and deals
with it in both Canada and the Un-
ited States.
.


0. J. Brandt
OIL-COTTON VENTURE
After leaving the -Royal Bank of
Canada Brandt took his first step
into the industrial work and one
which was to make him ultimately
a leading figure on the Haitian in-
dustrial scene. In conjunction with
the American Foreign Banking Cor-
poration of New York and Burtron
and Griscomb & Co of, Philadelphia,
he started an edible oil industry
coupled with the export of cotton.
With financial aid from these two
big firms he commenced his busin-
ess dealing in edible oils and short-
ly afterwards, built Haiti's first and
largest textile mill.
Using locally grown cotton, the
mill was opened in 1943 and Brandt
describes it as ar self-contained mill
with 12,500 spindles and 75 cards.
This prosperous mill has its own
diesel electric plant.

Using the d riv e and initiative
which has featured throughout his
career, Brandt opened, during the
Government of now exiled Presid-
ent Paul Magloire, a Laundry Soap
factotey which today rates as one
ot the principle producers of that
product in Haiti. In yet another di-
rection this busy businessman alt-
ernates for first place, along with
four competitors, as Haiti's biggest
coffee exporter. During our inter-
view he stated that this year he
expects to export between 85 to 90
thousand 60 kilo bags of coffee.
It would be hard to find another
with-as diversified interests in in-
dustry as 0. J. Brandt.

Included in his formidable list of
interests is that of the Haitian Mot-
or Co.# distributors in Haiti for
iChrysler and Hillman motor cars.
Another Company in which Brandt


IVA-f-iti JJLAIV.IV4,
AIR-CONDITIONED

STRAW-GOODS FACTORY

134, Rue du Centre

PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

SHOES HANDBAGS HATS

HAITIAN RECORDS FRENCH PERFUME
i HAITIAN CERAMICS

15 Years Experience in Handicrafts.
P.O. Box 975 Open Every Day
From 8:00 a.m. To 5:00 p.m.


IN CAP-HAITIEN THE RENDEZ-VOUS IS AT
HOSTELLERIE DU ROI CHRISTOPHE

COMPLETELY AND RECENTLY RENOVATED

New Monumental entrance and new reception office
Air conditioned rooms with private baths and hot water

Air conditioned Bar

Filtered water pool with outside Bar

Large tropical garden with parking

Top quality french cuisine

Evening dance every Thursday

With the Famous Jazz SEPTENTRIONAL


Has Many Haitian Industries
has interests is thel agency hand- City that 0. J. Brandt is thi
ling for DKW jeeps'and cars. who a fortnight ago purchase
He himself is an avid small car Government issue of bonds
fan and although he will be 70 in urated to supplement funds I
October he regularly drives around pair work on Port-au-Prince's
Port-au-Prince in a small, unpre- street, Grand Rue. He told u
tentious car. had paid cash for the bond
OUTSIDE INTERESTS cause he considered it a n
Brandt does not confine all his one priority for the Island th
business interests to Haiti. His in- Capital City's main street be
vestments spread to his native Ja- ored to an efficient, state of
maica where he is a shareholder in as rapidly as possible.
the luxurious Arawak Hotel. He ad- Although mention has been
mits that in this glamorous Hotel in Brandt's purchase of the
he is a sLx figure investor. Brandt that he was acting on ",acco
held a heavy mortgage in the Ara-
wak but it was recently absorbed THE PRODUCE
by banks. AND THE
Jamaican p u b lic building pro- This is what you can
jects I form 3et another investment Thss what of can f
for him as does a large cocoa plan- at. the corner of the Rue
station in British Honduras which Fresh Tomatoes U.S.
under a contract basis sells large Piments Doux variety
amounts, of cocoa to English firm Rice Flour in one pou
of Cadburys. Brandt is not a man live pou
to discuss his obvious wealth and Rice Flour in tive po
bashfully declines reference to it, Rice Flour in ten pouw
but, it is authoritively known that Blue Bonnet Rice Grade
he is worth anywhere hiom 10- to 'Blue Bonnet Rice Grade
15 million dollars and a business Blue Bonnet Rice Grade
aqualntance says that the dynam- Blue Bonnet Rice Grade
ic businessman is fairly liquid. Blue Bonnet Rice Grade
In order to satisfy the great cau- Blue Bonnet Rice Grade
tion of needs for his vast industrial
empire in' Haiti, Brandt has mod- BUY PRODI
ern fully equipped wood and steel BUY
working shops and if a spindle or BI
cog is required then the shops are AT THE 0
fully capable of turning 'them out.
Brandt has a simple, yet sound
explanation for his good physical
condition.,, "Just don't do anything /
to excess." this does not fit in
with his working schedule howeverS ai
t which is one continual round of ac- SHUCKS.
tivity, making each day a full one. SH O1 I
nor his capacity for making money. SUBSOILE
He is not content to rest up after
office hours though and is known /
to make his own furniture, do ma-
sonary work, tinker round with all Wate
lands of machinery and in short I
is an insatiable worker. land
Businessman Brandt is a I s o a Tool Bai
busy family man, he has tuo sons, fields
both of whom work for their fath-
er's businesses, two daughters, 15 Li
grandchildren and five grandchiuld- the slope
ren. Being a truly doting grandfath- 1
er means that eveih in his leisure i dry out i
hours he is kept busy and during puddle
the recent three day carnival he case, yo
was observed escorting a number
of his grandchildren around. make it soak
Four years ago Brandt received Bar Way! Sto
the OBE from Her Majesty Queen soil for futui
Elizabeth as an "outstanding Brit-
ish subject" and in his office he the top so yc
has a photograph of the Royal fam- the land
il.. Unlike many others, when pol- / Cat Diese
itical tables turned and Paul Ma- Does
glokre was ousted, lie did not re- ,S'_ "'r We'll prove
move from his office wall the S x h DATE . WE'
10 picture of Magloire in military Q
uniform as it appears everyone else
in the country, did Close to the ,
picture in Brandt's othce of Pres-
ident Duvalier is a large portrait w ..
of his Brandf's mother with frh'esi ., ,.
cut flowers in front o, it. fre- -

Under the present Goternment t "
when Brandt threatened to close up
his entire industries her lie spent
a couple of days in asylum in the MAURICE BO]
British Embassy. He is a man be- The Haytian 1
hleved to have an enormous
amount of courage and is one who ,j D4 Tractor
believes in speaking bluntly from With CaI Subsoiler
the shoulder.
His fearless and independent I
wa.s of thinking have often landed '. -
him in trouble and on occasion in
jail. Even during times of political
upheavals and name calling.- I -
Brandt has continued about his ,
daily round of tasks without show- IYOUR CA
ing any concern whatsoever. I Y *BOU CAa
It is well known in the Capital L------- --- ---


e man
ed the
inaug-
for re-
main
is that
ds be-
umber
at the
e rest-
repair

made
bonds
unt of


others" we believe that no third
man is involved and that Brandt
bought the entire issue himself.
We hope this final paragraph
does not cause 0. J. Brandt any
domestic altercation but, it is wide-
ly known hat he is a very popular.
"boss" amongst his employees and
when building his textile factory
made himself even more popular
by giving away to the workers the
specially prepared lunches g i v e n
him each day by his wife getting
the, Haitian "shanty" cook to pre-
pare him a typically Haitian meal.


E OF FIRST QUALITY
LOWEST PRICES
ind at the Sales Office of the ODVA
du Centre and the Rue des Cesars.
No. 1 Grade A 0.25 a pound
0.50 "
nd bags 0.35 "
nd bags 1.50 "
nd bags 3.00 "
A in 1001b sacks 52.50 a sack
B in 1001b sacks 42.50 "
C in 100lb sacks 29.00 "
D in 100th sacks 19.00 "
E in 100th sacks 10.00 "

UCE OF FIRST CHOICE
"BON MARCH"
UY HAITIEN
D V A SALES OFFICE


/


/ //I


... THAT CAT TOOL BARI
R spoiled our trip down the rivet 1


//
r and dirt stay home on
You've subsoiled the Cat*
r Way! Walk out on your
luring a heavy rain. Look.
listen: is the water running off
es . the same hills that
in summer? Or do those
es stay on the top? Either
u'll trap the water and
in faster the Cat Tool
re water in the sub-
re use. Get the water off


>u can work the
. You will with a
I Tractor and Tool Bar!
it ... NAME THE
LL DEMONSTRATE!










NNEFIL MANAGER OF
'raetQr Co. Chancerelles




i' r I 'rm--
I

Name- -oI
Ia Addr.e_


TERPILLAR* DEALER
Lo.erp.idl oram eg.;l..d foa U -d -


s4

>47

At








PAGE 12 ~HAITI SUN" SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 1960


village of whitewashed mud and cessions that snake out into the
thatch huts outside Port-au-Prin- countryside, laughing, joKing and


ce's fashionable suburb of Petion-
ville, he is usually a smartly dress-
ed fellow, cotton stuffed in sport
jacket with a pink boutonniere, a
big cig dr and harlequin glasses
while in remote Basse Guinaudee
on the southern peninsula, he is
a rustic with ragged face and sisal
beard.
The effigy of Judas is hidden by
an elder of the village and then
w o me n and children brandishing
sticks and kitchen knives search
the villages crying, "Qui bo' li?"
(where is he hidipg.) Then entire
village populations -including stiff
jointed ,ancients and bare-bottomed
small fry- join in the Ra Ra pro-


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An ancient Holy Week ceremon-
ial which has been colored and ab-
sorbed into the, folklore of the peop-
le of the villages will be celebrated
throughout Haiti early next month
- it is the enaction of the Judas
Hunt.
In effigy, 'Monsieur Judas" will
come to visit the peasants as one
of the twelve apostles and an hon-
ored guest, but, as soon as the
death of Christ is announced on
Good Friday the symbolic traitor
will "flee" and the hunt for him
will begin early on Holy Saturday.
Throughout the B I a c k Republic
the Judas figure varies according
to local artistry and fancy. In Co-
lonie des vacances, a prosperous


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Aux Cent Mille Articles

Dadlani's Maison Orientale

_.-.^ &n


BARBARA AUBIN'S ART SHOW
CENTRE D'ART MARCH 11
All interested persons are invited hibitions, group shows she has par-
to attend the Verriissage of the ticipatei in and awards won is im-
show of art work by Barbara Au- pressive. She has three important
bin, Chicago, Illinois, which is to fellowships received in crea ti've
be held at the Centre d'Art on painting one from the Art Ins-
Friday. March 11, from 5-7pm. titute of Chicago for work and tray-
The studies of' this young Americ- el in France and Italy in 1955-56.
an in the techniques of art and in and two grants for creative paint-
the teaching of art have been thor- ing in Haiti, 1958-59.


ough and comprehensive, someth-
ing she has brilliantly demonstrat-
ed in her course given gratis at
the Centre d'Art.
Miss Aubin's list of one-man ex-


The Centre d'Art is very grateful
to Miss Aubin for her generous and
sympathetic help to the Haitian art-
ists who have worked with her.


MRS. BERNARD GIMBLE BUYS WORK
BY GEORGES LIAUTAUD


singing creole chants to the accom-
paniment of throbbing tamb o u r s
and booming vaccines (huge bam-
B1oo pipes that give off hollow re-
sonant notes when blown). Waving
clubs, machetes and even old colon-
ial swords they thrash through the
ravines and the canebrakes, and if
by chance they come on a neighb-
oring village's Judas first then
so much the better, they whack it
up with glee and by noon Haiti is
strewn with dismembered dumm-
ies, bleeding profuse quantities of
sawdust and rags.
A few years ago a rumor went
around t hat the authorities and
some of the more sophisticated is-
landers were embarrassed by the
primitive re vel r y of the Ra Ra
bands and would attempt to ban
them from the Capital. But in Port-
au-Prince police said that they had
no orders to stop the merry pro-
cessions and even priests admitted
that they saw no harm in the Jud-
as. At the time one priest explain-
ed. "We take a nuetral view, neith-
er encouraging or discouraging it.
It is part of the peoples need for
release."
The peoples or o r h e r catholic
countries also mete out stern just-
ice to Judas at the end of Holy
Week. In Spain and Pottugal, and
in several Latin American count-
ries, the peasants burn Judas in
effigy Mexicans blow him' to
bits with firecrackers."


and metal sculptures by Georges
Liataud opens on April 18 at the
Janet Nessler Gallery, 718 Madis-
on Avenue, New York City.

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OW TOURISTS HAVE.BEEN PLAGUE WITH
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lie Creole has Made it possible to. have
sed abroad, particularly in Haiti, delivered'
, in most cases at prices cheaper than you
through, accompanied by all your other '
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ON A .CARTON OF FIVE'BOTTLES


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31.25 1350 16.50,
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29.90 13.50 16.50
31.50 1950 22.50
28.45 11.50 14.50%.
44.25 21,00 24.00
46.00 25.00 28.00
33.56 .21.50 "2450.


Judas Effigy Hunt


Ancient Ceremony Held Next Month


Mrs Bernard Gimble bought re-
cently at the Centre d'Art, Georges
Liautaud's three piece iron sculpt-
ure. "Adam and Eve and the Ser-
pent." It is to be the feature of her
new Japanese garden at her count-
ry home in Greenwich, Connectic-
ut.
Pauleus Vital's painting of Jac-
mel was also bought by Mrs. Gim-
ble who was accompanied at the
Centre d'Art by Mrs. Charles Za-
dok of New York, also an important
art collector.
The two man exhibition of -re-
cent paintings by Auloud Joseph


PAGE 12


"HAITI


SUN"


SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 1960


I









PAGE 13


N M Q 6S


Willoughby Discusses West Indies


America -the repository of politi-
cal power- to enjoy a large meas-
ure of autonomy and popular re-
presentation without in any way
preventing such States from cons-
idering themselves "Americans",
owing allegeance to one Flag. The
point is important. Californians,
Texans, New Yorkers, and Rhode
Islanders, as examples of State or-
igins, are justifiably proud of their
individual States, but are nonethe-
less each fully conscious of their
initordeendenen nnn ito thlrk CS tta


In common with other West Ind- of the Union, which they Lequall
ians living abroad. I have become p y proclaim the independent
personally interested in, and con- America to which the "free world"
earned about, a fundamental ele- America to which the "free world"
ment of the fut of th Caribba now turns for counsel and succor
ment of the future of the Caribbean as the last bastion resisting the er-
islands West Indian Federation. osion of freedom and free enter-
It seems to me like yesterday priseso characteristic four
.that I was reading in TIME Maga- Twentyeth Century.
zine of Feb. 1957 that a West Indi-
an federal structure had actually All of you, my friends, as stud-
been consummated. My feeling of ents of History, know how the au-
pride was understandable in noting tonomous Swiss cantons are poli-
the acknowledgement in that Time tically knit together and how suc-
article that the most ardent and cessfully they have worked togeth-
articulate protagonist of a strong er and remained neutral under their
Federal structure for the American Federal umbrella while wave upon
Mainland Colonies Alexander Ha- pounding wave of armed conflict
milton was born in St. Kitts. rolled upon the Swiss frontiers.
When some West Indians are tempt- Most of us are prone to take the
ed to refer disparagingly to St. political and diplomatic astuteness
Kitts as 'small island," they might of the Swiss for granted without te'
usefully reflect on the fact that the fleeting fully upon the fact that the
architect of the American constitu- Swiss accomplishment in success-
tional pattern of Federal Union fully keeping their frail vessel aflo-
which has withstood the test of at upon the troubled international
time was born there. waters for so long is no accident,
As a student of your growing Fed- You know too, fellow West Indians,
-eral pains I want to emphasize
that I am no authority, and desire ----
to be considered as no authority on -
this subject I want to say that -
it has always seemed to me a "
great pity that your British Guiana 2'


Caribbean neighbors have so far
not felt impelled to align them-
selves with the Federation move-
ment. I find it a little .difficult to
accept that a proper approach to
influential public opinion in Brit-
ish Guiana cannot, and will not, in-
duce our West Indian compatriots
in that country with all its potent-
ialities to remain aloof from a mov-
ement of which they are so inte-
gral a part and to which they can
make so needed a contribution of
balanced a n d progressive leader-
ship.
In today's intensive and unremit-
ting ideological struggle for the
minds of men, and the concomitant
political concern for control over
vast land masses and their large
populations -in military terms,
manpower reserves- I do not need
, to remind you that the influence
and strength of the United States
in today's anguished world are di-
rectly attributable to Hamilton's
strong, dynamic Federal set-up.
Hamilton's political acumen and
statesmanship have successfully
enabled all the Sovereign States of


h o w Bismarck unified Germany, of living for the West Indian people. own personal ownership cultivati-
and how Italy was woven into one I am under no illusion that there on) to grow and producee progress-
political garment. Without such po- can be no overnight change of the ively more and more of the food-
litical integration and such sensib- long-established agrarian pattern stuffs upon which you are now so
le recognition of the importance to of devoting the greater portion of dependent from non-Caribbean sour-'
national survival and growth of your arable land to cultivation of ces. Your diversified agricultural
the interdependence of each nation- a staple cash crop. This is to say program within the Federal struct-
al segment upon the others, is there that I accept, as a practical, though ure should also consciously and de-
anyone here who believes that these unpalatable, fact that substantial liberately aim at inducing your
nations, as we have come to know segments of your labor force will large plantations to enter the mark-
them in our Twentieth C e n tu r y, have to continue to depend upon et of producing for Caribbean con-
could possibly have achieved their the large plantations for their bas- sumption.. Why should your" entre-
national prominence, influence, and ic income for some time to come. preneurs ignore profits on invested
stature had they remained isolated But within this acceptance. I wish capital on their very doorsteps?
political and economic compart- to urge, with the greatest insist- Here is where your Federal dir-
ments, lacking centralized direct- ance, that planned programs be section and guidance becomes vit-
ion, impetus and guidance? If there intensively developed on two broad ally important. The essence of suc-
are any such, let them step for- fronts: F i r s t, make diversified cess for such a program is cons-
ward and profess their need to be homestead subsistence farming at- ciously to make production and
enlightened. tractive, on scientific lines, and en- consumption complementary and'to
courage your West Indian agricult- avoid unprofitable duplication: Fo*r
Thias oms hiciled thouside otful West ind- i'alworkers (by means of making example, one region should produce,
ain s domicile distresed toCarib- available accessible areas for their (Continued on page 14)
bean are genuinelys' distressed toI


uoai ate gnuinu e .- j I .istrt U LO
read such factual articles as the
one which appeared in The Econo-
mist on Sept. 1959 That article
pinpointed the weakness stemming
from a Federal structure w h i c h
lacked strong central powers and
which was receiving only lukewarm
support from its component entities.
Our distress was also acute on
reading of the bickering and squab-
bling over representation by the
larger and more influential units
to assure open domination of the
Federation by the wealthier and
more heavily populated islands.
Your Caribbean problem, as I
ee it, is to improve the standard









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Dr. Winston C. Willoughby, a
Dentist friend of Colonel Timoleon
paret, from Washington, D.C., re-
"'.Oently spent 10 days here in Haiti
on a visit and during that period
wrote the following interesting art-
Jele which we have reproduced
without alteration or embellish-
S.meat.
A West Indian, Dr. Willoughby
eft Trinidad at the age of five
ears and has been In the U. S.
.since.


WITH A






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"HAITI SUN"


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V>f0S9SS


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. . . . Qy v -1


UN DAY, 1*ARCH 6th, 1960








"HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 1960


La Belle Creole's Liquor

Scheme Catching On In U.S.

La Belle Creole's new scheme en- of $3.00 for home delivery in N.Y.
abling tourists to purchase liquor City and regular Railway Express
here in Haiti and have it delivered charges to other points."
either to the door or their ware- The second article appearing in
house in the states is receiving the Chicago Sun Times on Sunday,
wide publicity in the U.S. and La Feb. 21, reads---SPENDING MADE
Belle Creole's owner, Elias Nous- EASY. "Talk about making it easy
tas's tourist idea appears to be to spend your money. In Haiti, La
snowballing. The following, are two Belle Creole shop now offers a way
quotes from stateside papers and to bring home your allotment of
read; duty-free liquor almost painlessly.
New York Sunday Times, Feb. 21 You don't even have to carry the
- LIQUOR IN HAITI. "Vacation- five fifths abroad the plane. They
ists in Haiti can avoid the trouble will see that the liquor is delivered
of carrying around dutyfree liquor to your home. La Belle Creole's
purchased at one of the island's owner, Elias A. Noustas says that
major Free Port shops, La Belle this way there is no overweight or
Creole, by arranging to pick up customs problems and he further
their purchases on return to New maintains that it is more pleasant
York. not to have to carry the heavy li-
The vacationist can pay for the quor and that leaves space for
allowable five bottles of liquor in your other purchases.
Haiti duty free and then either col- Write La Belle Creole, Port-au-
lect the purchase at the store's Prince, Haiti for an explanatory
clearing house at 115 Broad Street, folder, or drop into the shop if you
here in New York, or pay a charge are in that Caribbean country."


4 IF YOU. WANT THE
4 '*PAR EXCELLENCE'' E

IN SERVICE, CUISINE AND
ATMOSPHERE THEN
ACCEPT THE WARM
WELCOME AWAITING
YOU AT THE



Quisqueya

DINNER AT THE

Quisqueya


IS A NIGHT TO
BE REPEATED 4
ONLY A FEW MINUTES FROM


w. I Problems
(Continued from page 13)

canned and powdered milk enough
to make large-scale production ec-
onomically competitive with for-
eign imports if the foreign import
is to be displaced. This region
would then export its surplus pro-
duction to other Caribbean islands
and, in turn, import from other
West Indian partners within the Fe-
deration such needs as leather,
smoked and frozen fish, cornmeal,
smoked meat, etc.

It is only by strong Federal
guidance that you can hope to ach-
ieve the encouragement of agricult-
ural specialization on particular
consumable goods in such a way
as to stimulate large-scale product-
ion, with its attendant employment
opportunities, or each of the is-
lands. It is only by a planned and
integrated West Indian economy
that you will enter on the road to
improvement of your present sub-
standard living conditions.
The logical corollary of the first
step is the second broad front on
which you need to concentrate your
Federal energies. This second step
is the development of a long-range
plan to train and equip your West
Indians to understand and operate
mechanized equipment in progress-
ively increasing numbers. Just as
the agricultural worker with a hoe
in Haiti is an economic anachron-
ism in our mechanized age, so too
we must recognize that our Federal
structure must consciously plan in-
dustrial production by West Indi-
ans, to produce durable goods and
light and heavy equipment for use
by West Indians, and with plowed-
back West Indian profits. Only by
so doing can you insure that your
standard of living will be' jacked
up. It is futile to indulge in wishful
thinking that a fragmented appro-
ach to this problem can amount to
anything else but economic spinn-
ing of your wheels. You will pardon
me for reminding you that none of
your islands individually has stock-
piles of rubber that will permit it


ith w economic impunity to indulge
VTOW7N TN PETIONVILLE in so childish and unproductive a
pastime.
TO W N IN* 4 ] This is where the crying need is
for strong West Indian Federal
leadership. As the cited article in
The Economist pointed out, your
Caribbean misfortune is that indi-

centrated in the local legislatures
and your "cream of the crop,"
while paying lip service to Feder-
ation, has studiously avoided align-
ing themselves with the Federal
Council. Your island Caesars have
not scrupled to tie their political
S a. futures to their individual island
strongholds and have been timor-
ous to run for Federal office where
they should be engaged in hammer-
ing out Caribbean and West Indi-
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porary positions of power to the fact that what the American andc
Federation's crying needs, how can the Swiss have achieved politically
you expect the rank and file of you are mentally incapable of att-
your citizenry to cease and desist aining standing or falling togeth-
from thinking of themselves as Ja- er, as West Indians, under one West
maicans, Trinidadians, Grenadians, Indian parasol?
etc. and start taking pride in the Dr. Winston C. Willoughby


' .- '- -," "'- - -"-"

.LITTL

SP T PRIIE SHOP
*** 11.1---


* a -N.


Yes the new Dadlani Store on the corner of Rue du Bonne
Foi is surely a "Little Europe" stocked with fine merchand-
ise from all over the world with emphasis on Indian Prod-
ucts. "Little Europe" also means Free Port Prices.


NOUVEAU UrT


GANS CHAMBRE


Le qrofil am6blore de la baA &,
roulement donne une tractiom o W I
56curitf.supplementaires. U gA ini
dhsposifif de silence reduit teU dON.
rents bruits desagr6ables du puoe
tandcs que la construction I6greo d&
rSuper-Cushion Sans Chambre IdI
.permet d'absorber les cahots de la
route. Vous aurez molns de pneus I'
plat. et moins de d6lais parce que lIa
,Construction Grip-Seal exclusive de,
Goodyear limine pratiquemeat IL
creviesons habituelles.


SOD9i EAR
J m i um moun m


PAIGE, 14


A mN -- AI


<


i








.SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 1960


"HAITI SUN"


MRS. ZIRINSKY-


FRIEDMAN


t Mr and Mrs Bobby Gaillard left for North America on a business-cum-
-:pleasure trip. Mr and Mrs Yvon Regimbald of Sorel, Quebec are spend-
ing the month here in the home of the Trans-World Trading Company
manager... The old Fosy Laham Jewelry store on Tourist Avenue which
S.caught fire on Aprils fools day in 1957 is being renovated... Robert W.
Smith Associate Editorial Page Editor of the Minneapolis Star and The
Minneapolis Tribune is looking at the Caribbean basin. He is here at
the Sans Souci Hotel... Dr. lur M. A. Van Zeebroeck of Belgium is
working with the Sun Life Assurance Co. of Canada... Two women off
the! Tourist ship Empress of England were caught picking up a purse...
Th .h6 Jean Gosselin: company was a success on Tele-Haiti Thursday night.
They did the saltest act of the Andre Roussin play "Lorsque Parail L'En-
S ul" The company opened at the Rex Theatre last night... Maison du
Cahada, the Barbancourt building on the Rond Point in the Exposition
has got some fancy tenants. Reynolds Mining Co., The German Embassy,
Attorney George Baussan, The Sun Life Assurance and now Pan Amer-
clan World Airways is planning to move tHeir Rue Pavee Offices to the
ground floor of the new building.... Moses Katz is leaving his adminis-
tration job with Schweitzer Hospital... Future D'Adeskey announced the
show at the Bacoulou Wednesday night... A Regie du Tabac DKW stove
.in the tail of the- West Indies Cessna aeroplane Saturday when it flew
out of control on Avenue Somoza and into the hangar... Roland Wiener
is on a fortnight business trip to Chicago.. The hard core of the "De-
ranges" Mardi Gras band turned out Friday to bid one of their leaders
IElie Chemaly goodbye. Elie is off to study diesel engineering in New
York. The group numbered 1,500 in the carnival said they had only one
casualty and he was at the airport. He received a stray bullet... Jacques
-Honorat director of the Tourist-office flew to New York Friday... The


Jacques Malvals returned from a week in Miami
and Phito Morel were Queen and King of the fa
Gras ball Friday night. More than 350 people
till the wee hours....

Atherton Lee returned from a short stay to
from Jamaica where he is nbw a resident. He
telet des Fleurs in the States writes that their
shipped to Washington, D.C. where they are us
ment at the highest levels... The Midwvst and
ASTA are holding their -next reunion in Port-ai
S th... Doctors Cadet C. Pierre-Louis and P. La
day from attending a tropical medicine congre
Igor Allen, chief of the Audio-visual branch of U
last night under the auspices of the "Haitian
citation on Audio-visual technics. Mr. Allen who
esian as well as French and English spent 16
coming to Haiti... Ivan Veit director of promotion
New York Times was here last week at the
They were met on arrival at the airport by And
representative of the New York Times in Haiti..
York Times arrived Thuasday on one of his inf
He is spending several days with George and


ENTERTAINS HERE

Mrs Florence Zirinsky-Friedman
was host at a gala dinner party at
Montana Hotel last Friday. Among
her guests were Judge and Mrs.
Daniel Fouchard, Albert Wiener,
Fortune Bogat, Majo rand Mrs An-
thony J. Kubelius Jr., Mr and Mrs
Jules Michaels, Mr and Mrs Natan
Abramovitz and Major and Mrs Jo-
seph O'Neil.

WANT TO BUY

A MILLION HATS

Bob Irving, of the Sun Island Im-
port Co., is here on his fourth trip
to Haiti and is staying three weeks
at 'Beau Rivage. Last time in Port
Bob, a hat importer, bought 2,000
hats to retail back in the States and
if he can get them at a competitive
price this trip intends buying a
million fibre and straw hats.
Starting last April. Bob Irving
has been buying hats in Yucatan,
Mexico and Jamaica and now has
plans to set up a purchasing depot
here in Port-au-Prince where he
will buy hats from the cottage in-
dustry. His firm has its office in
Las Vegas, Nevada and handles
the West Coast of the U.S.., -encom-
pasing some 26 million people.


BREAKDOWN ON HAITI'S TOURIST PROBLEM
Tourism a seven letter word that has corie in for so
much discussion and argumentation in recent months that
many -people are getting heartly sick and tired of trying
to sort out the pros, 'the eons, 'and the real reasons behind
the drop in Haiti's tourist trade.
Many and diversified have been the reasons put forward
for the declining numbers of visitors to this Caribbean
Isle. lit hbas 'been suggested that political trouble in neigh-
'boring territories are making the tourist sufficiently wary
to leave the Caribbean off 'his vacation agenda and
consequently Haiti. Then too, others profess that the
trouble 'lies which the 'bounds of Haiti's 'boarders itself with
examples of "Tourist-turners" such as beggars, no interna-
tional airport in the North, lack of entertainment and the
"gimmie nickel 'poppa" routine.
Further 'breakdown of the suggested reasons for slack-
ened tourist trade brings in the question of 'advertising.
Several Haitians, who profess to be "In the know" say
that Haiti is not getting a fair deal 'with its publicity and
people cannot be expected to come to Haiti is they don't
know a-nyOhing about the place.
Well of course we 'could go on for edc'umns giving more
and more "reasons" that are current but the fact remains,
and will certainly remain if something is not done, that
tourists are .becoming rare items 'with 'the passing of each
week. Tourists like to igelax and generally to spend money.
The more money they spend in Haiti the better it is for
Haiti 'but right now Jamaica, Trinindad, 'Puerto Rico and
the Virgin Islands, to mention 'but a few, a getting all the
trade.
That is both a difficult and far reaching question and
far 'be it for us to add to the existing confusion by making
more suggestions, well, maybe just a little one how ab-
out advertising.


'r 40"'rO Crc wa '' ' wa


i Friday... Janine ilred 7
bulous Sans Souci Mardi
- all costumed danced
o HOTEL RIVER

Port-au-Prince Tuesday
says the agent for Cha- IF YOU WISH TO ENJOY SEVERAL AGREEABL
flowers are no rtrans- IN "AMBIANCE D'ART ET D'INTIMITE?" THE P

SSouthwest Chapters ofn "LE CABARET PARISIEN" OF THE H O T E L R
u-Prince from May t to ^WHERE YOU CAN DANCE TO T H E RIVIERA
venture returned Thurs- jAND LISTEN TO STAR OF LA C H A N S O0
ss in Guadeloupe... Mr. J ANINE POR ET .
JSOM gave a conference
English Teacher's Asso- EVERY SATURDAY, A SPECIAL EVENING OF
speaks. Russian, Polyn- BONNEHUMEUR ET DE FANTASIE"
n BONNE HUMEUR ET DE FANTASIES
years in Tahiti prior to
mn and circulation of the WITH THE GRAND RIVIERA ORCHESTRA AND
Ibo Lele with his wife. "LES JEUX ET CONCOURS ANIMES BY LUC
ly. Anderson Commercial
Bob Czulin of the New ,ENTRANCE TO THE CABARET PARISIEN IS FREE.
frequent unofficial visits.
Edwidge Kenn at the
(Continued on page 16>f$84^> & 4344 so>oo. o ooo oeo 4, 4ooooo


A 4
4


E HOURS-
?LACE IS:,
IVIERA
QUARTET,
N "


"FRANCHE



PORET.


YOUR CHOICE OF SERVICE TO MIAMI TWICE DAILY


shopping Parhe... with the World's Most Experienced Airline
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SRelax aboard DC-7B or Super-6 Clippers* with radar. Enjoy luxu-
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Fly to Miami in the wonderful world of Pan American


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. . . . . . . . . .......... '. ...... ...... .: ;. J"= ...... .z ,


PAGE 15


I


L=PLLT








"
HAIT 1 SUN 's


SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 1960


IN HAITI THIS WEEK
(Continued from page 2)

who is here to set up a new abbatoir and two other members of the
party, Norma Carr of New York and Odette Sassine.
Jean and Jerry Sopherstein of Boston are finding their holiday in
Haiti great and already laying plans for a return visit. Other keen visit-
ors here at the moment include Record Distributor Al Hirseh, accomp-
anied by his wife, from Forest Hills, New York, Dr. Raymond Cook,
Physician Surgeon in Essexville, Michigan and his wife, Mr. Robert
F. Larue, an executive of the Advertizing and Public Relations firm of
Larue and Cleveland, in Detroit, Michigan who is also sharing his
holiday with his wife and Misses Rosalie Stento, a secretary and Sally
Terris who owns a woman's dress shop in New York.
Stailey Berkowitz and his wife Ruth and Sam Kaufman and his wife
Elaine are present guests at the El Rancho. Stan and Sam are Directors
of the Irving Berkowitz Co., New York City large manufacturers of
sewing machines. Wally Talamrs of the Canape Vert shop has been
showing them around Port-au-Prince.
Retired Thomas B. Boles of Ottawa, Canada is back here with a party
of four including Investments Broker Mr. Joseph C. de Pencler and his
wife, of Toronto, and Douglas B. Hall, President of the Insurance Comp-
any General Accident of Canada and his wife.
Automobile Executive James Peltier of Coronado, California and his
wife, Attorney at Law John Matthews of Mit. Clemens, Michigan and
his wife are Island hopping in the Caribbean and declare that Haiti is
the most delightful of all the islands. They are guests at the Oloffson.
Young Psychiatrist Dr. Jean Larson and* his pretty wife Dorothy of
Springfield, Mass. are guests att he Beau Rivage Hotel. Dr. Larson has
met here with his prominent Colleague Dr. Joseph Cramer, one of the
leading Psychiatrists of the US.
Bonald Friedlander, son of Mr. Jack Friedlander Manager of the In-
ternational Casino is making his first visit here. Rony is an Executive
in Furnitures Business in Washington, D.C. He was given a warm wel-
come here 1W Daddy and the great many friends of the "sympathique"
bom


CIC GROUP OF F
S(ConMnned from page 1)
.'an Germain and Club Vice Presid-
Sent, Charles Fequiere and two re-
presentatives of the Department of
Commerce and National Economics.
M .esrs. Wiener Charles and Bon-
'hommne.
Thb delegation wnr s ud y the
Free Port at Colon in view of est-
": abliMhng a similar system in Haiti.
i: *- ----------


I,
I.


SLAYING

(Continued from page I)

Police have opened an investig-
ation into Dr. Rousseu's death but
several attempts to secure inform-
ation from the Police this week by
the "Haiti Sun" were thwarted and
produced no result.


For all kinds of French perfumes
visit Haiti's Smartest Indian stoie
Select your favourite perfume
from our large collection

JEAN PATOU
CHRISTIAN DIOR
We offer you the world's famous
brands at free port prices
LE GALLON
CARVEN
.LANVIN NINA RICCI
CARON
CHANEL
RAPHAEL
etc... etc...
MILOT


tIl


PROGRAMME
DE LA COMPAGNIE
"JEAN GOSSELIN"
Samedi 5 Mars: "Lorsque L'En-
fant parait", d'Andre Roussin.
Lundi 7 Mars: "Cyrano de Ber-
gerac", gala Edmond Rostand.
Mercredi 9 Mars: "Huis-Clos", de
Jean-Paul Sartre, precede d'une
conference sur le theatre de Jean-
Paul Sartre, par Robert Vidalin.
Vendredi 11 Mars: "Andromaque
de Racine.
Mercredi 16 Mars: "Le Misan-
thrope" de Moliere, presentation
moderne precedee d'un prologue.
Vendredi 18 Mars: "Cour d'a-
mour a la .fanedase", festival de
poemes et chansons de Villon a nos
jours.
Artistes: Henrf Barbler, Genevie-
ve Ares, Christian Bartola, Simo-
ne Faget, Jean Gosselln, Michele
Margey, Jacques Herbert, Michele
Felix el Robert Vidalin de la Co-
medie Francaise.
NEW SLAUGHTER-
HOUSE STARTS
KILL TOMORROW
The Haitian American Meat
Packing Co.'s plant goes into oper-
ation on Monday with the closing
of the old La Saline and Petion-
vylle Municipal Slaughterhouse.
EMBASSY READY
MID-MARCH
New American Embassy on the
Exposition is expected to be com-
pie for a mid-March opening.


TI JOSEPH REPORT
(Continued from page 15)


Montana. Bob spent two weeks here last month developing a tourist
promotion for Haiti to appear in the Times on May 8 and June 5...
Merle Easton editor-in-chief of the educational material for the Con-
gregational Churches throughout the U.S. is spending a month at Ibo
Lele. She finds it easier to read manuscript in sunny Haiti than wintery
Boston. Merle Easton is also on the lookout for an artist to illustrate
their children's books... Johnny Abujaber late of La Belle Creole and
Bethlehem has opened up his own store on Tourist Avenue the former
story of Jean Claude Abraham...


FOR RENT: FREE PORT i
Six large rooms with two bath-
rooms and waiting-room. Suitable X Dresses and
for medical offices or business off- X and deliver
ices and companies. Address No. N hi.
29 Chemin des Dalles or Phone:
5922.


7'w, w1wg, -iw w11 w:,


4
4
4
4
4

4
4


The SATURDAY EVENING POST said:
"One of the highlights of Port-au-Prince night life
is the Oloffson's uninhibited Monday night flow
show..."



the


HOTEL Oloffson



Show



"Oui Clherie


EVERY MONDAY AT 10 P.M. SHARP

We recommend that you reserve for

DINNER and SHOW.........$5.00
Dinner will be served from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m.
Entrance for show only: .... $2.00 Limited space


4
4

4
4


SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCASION


THE WORLD


FAMOUS


PAGE 16


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