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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00252


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text







Weekly
Every
Sunday


ibaili


lOe


VOL XII SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28th, 1960 Port-au -Prince, HAITI No. 37, Avenue Marie-Jeanne CITE D UMARSAIS ESTIME No. 16


Exuberan t


Dueling Yet!

MACHETE VICTOR
OVER KNIFE
Back to 'the days of valor. On
sunday last at the first section of
Thomazeau, Eustache Alekis a n d
.Maurice Joseph fought'a lusty duel
one armed with a knife and the
other with the traditional machete.
Result showed that a knife carr-
ier is not strong enough opposition
for one welding a machete. Eusta-
che, the duelist with the knife, is
hospitalized in the Capital wit h
wounds that are considered to be
grave. Reason for the duel was not
disclosed.


1960


Mardi Gras
Dear Readers; At some time day or night recently you
have no doubt added to the classic statements list which,
according to ,psychologists, ,come under the title, "Inane," e.
g., member of the family walks in fro::.t dc:: from the off-
ice and you wisely expound, "Oh, you're home." It happens
all the time.
Well, we can't resist so ,here is our contribution.-


It's Carnival Time Again!!!


There. We've said it, and for 99
percent of Haiti's population it is
a time of festivities, fun, song, dan-
ce and parades all bubbling over
with the exuberance which seems
to run rife the length and breadth
of the Island.
Yes, it's carnival time again in
Haiti and for weeks now every
town, village and City in the Re-
public has been building up for the
three days of sheer enjoyment that
enveloped Saturday, today and will
culminate with yet further days of
Mardi Gras tomorrow and Tuesday.

It's carnival time again, not only
in the Capital City but in all the
little country districts, along the
little side roads used by the peas-
ants and even in the mountains,
Carnival, Mardi Gras and gaiety



Mardi Gras Cortege

The Mardi Gras cortege will be
composed as follows:

I. The Police;
2. Groups on foot and "masques
divers";
3. "Cavaliers a bic'.clettes";
4. The Music;
5. The King of Mardi Gras;
6. Floats bearing the queens;
7. Orches'ras on decorated le-
hicles;


8. Decorated Cars;
9. Orchestras on
hidcles;
10. Various floats;
11. Orchestras on
als;


12.
13.
14.


Decorated Trucks;
Bands on floats;
The Police.


all mean the same thing for the
oldest of grand parent t s right
through to children old enough to
walk. Children of school age, who
play a big part in the fun, have
been granted a special dispensation
by Presidential decree and signed
by the Minister for Interior, Aur-
ele Joseph NO school on Mon-
day and a half-day holiday on
Tuesday. The decree grants the
same public holiday to Public Ser-
vices and Commerce.

You may well have truly discover-
ed that it's carnival time again last
night and perhaps you're suffering
a little from over-participation and
wish to take full advantage of
(Continued on page 16)


decorated ie-


decorated flo-


"S'iltmen" are ''- ""z n big
part in this' year', C2rnia!l and
hate pirome, to be very versatile.


Grand Rue 'Face-Lift' Staits Maich 2


Repair work, including a
concrete surface, is scheduler
st art on Port-au-Prince's m
street, the Grand Rue, on M
2 stated Minister Gerard PI
peaux to members of the press
a special press conference hel
Friday this week to explain
new bonds issue and 10 cent
tax on a gallon of gasoline.
Secretary of State of Finance
Agriculture, Mr. Gerard P
Peaux, launched into a lengthy
rative giving details of the r
work and stated that the
Grand Rue repair work will b<
anced by Mr. 0. J. Brandt, In
rialist and Merchant, who had
unified an offer to buy the who
the new bond -issue.
As an opening to his address


Bonds Issued For Finance Purchased By 0. J. Brandt
new Phihppeaux stated, "We belong to ing to Mr. Philippeaux' expression, in hand all the necessary means was c
d to a Government that has nothing to "the constructive decla r a t io n," to start again and complete the Ro,\ on
a i n hide: thatl wants honesty and un- made during his s p e e c h to his construction work on the Grand sed be
larch selfishness (o be part of the Public "dear friends and confreres of the Rue. He desired to tell this to the himself
hilip- Administration and be the motive press." During the "get-to-gether" press which, he said, had always works
ss 4t of all actions and acts. A Govern- of the representatives of the press, shown the greatest and legitinfate they sl
d on ment that wants to carry out for held between 10am and 11am at interests in the subject. He declar- After
the the entire people's benefit a pro'r- Mr. Philippeaux' office on Friday, ed that making in this known the essive
times am of social and economic well- he %%as assisted by his colleagues, Government had wanted to render ductmcn
being, the Minister of Public Works. Mr. a "vibrant homage to the Press for ed b3
and "I ask of the press that they fol- Lamartiniere Honorat, by Ministers, the help it had never refused to the sp,
'hilip- low, like us, not only the project Alessrs Herve Boyer, Paul Blan- give in this project and all,others cos in
nar- of the Grand Rue, but, all the Gov- chet. Maicel Daumec and Georges in process. and C.


repai r
entire
e fin-
idust-
d sig-
)le of

s, Mr.


ernment's projects. I further hope
that the press will accomplish its
mission without fear of saying the
truth to whoever it may be.
"We ask also of the Haitian peop-
le that they be the first controllers
of the State's money."
Such is in substance and accord-


Figaro, the Advisor of the Superior
Couil of Accounts. Mrh. Ma r c.e
V\'aval, Chief Engineer of Public
Works, Hebert Dambreville. and by
Engineer Adrien Roy.
HOMAGE TO THE PRESS
Minister Philippeaux conti n u e d
stating that the Government had


THE WORKS
OF THE GRAND RUE
At the end of this preliminary
declaration the Finance and Agri-
culture Minister entered into the
subject of the Grand Rue. "The
works," he said "started 2 years
ago and the execution of this work


the ac
b\ own
Grand
activity
a situa
could
major
of the


,nihded to en_':. cer. Adrien
I the basis ot co.itract pas-
tween me? Haitian, State and
f. For various reasons these
have not been conducted as
should have been."
* pointing out tiat the succ-
stops registered in the con-
of the work had been caus-
reasons of financial nature.
weakerr 'roked the consequen-
Pul).ic Health. Co y Planning
.jmmercial woiks putting
cent o0. difLcjItie- incurred
ers of houses situated on the
Rue and merchants whose
es had been paralyzed. Such
nation, said Mr. Philippeaux,
only constitute one of the
worries of the Government
Republic. (On page 14)


THE PARADE WILL TAKE THE FOLLOWING ROUTE:
SUNDAY-Rue du Quai Rue des Cesars -- Rue du Peuple -
Rue Pavee Rue Geffrard Pi&a'e Louverture Devant le Pa-
lais Rue Capois Champ de Mars Deiant les Tribunes -
Rue St. Honore Ecole de Medecine Rue Oswald Durand -
Portail Leogane Exposition Hotel de Ville.
MONDAY-Rue du Qual Rue Bonne Foi Grand Rue Rue
des Casernes Rue Enterrement Rue Oswald Durand Rue
Monseigneur GuWoux Ruelle Cameau Rue Capois Devant
les Tribunes Devant le Palais Rue des Casernes Exposition
- Hoel de Ville.
TUESDAY-Rue du Quai Rue Eugene Bourjolly Rue Dan-
tes Destouches Lalue Chemin des Dalles Ruelle St. Cyr -
Rue Capois Devant les Tribunes Palais Rue Monseigneur
Guilloux Rue Oswald Durand Portail Leogane Exposition
- Hotel de Ville.








2


PAC2-


FOUNDED


IN 1805 AND INCORPORATED BY


THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT

ROI YCHENE7 AAD SONS


-AGENTS


15 AVE MARIE-JEANNE

CITE DUMARSAIS, ESTIME
Phone 2603


"HAITI


S UN "


TIME IS RIPE to CATER for WATCHING TRADE


Not so long ago, Haiti, an Is- 'ized very -trongly by yachts. Un-
land under the wind, held its own fortunately yachtsmen steered clear
with the rest of its Ca bbean neigh- of Haitian waters during its inva-
bors in the field of to rism patron- sion scare and made passage for


L
i-f's'


I PORTPRILESHgPP


- -,~ -r,


Yes the new Dadlani Store on the corner of Rue Bonne
Foi is surely a "Little Europe" stocked with fine merchand-
ise from all over t'ie world with emphasis on Indian Prod-
ucts. "Little Europe" also means Free Port Prices.


1.E-GE 5 ERVICE
FIRST CLASS PASSENGER SERVICE
.., -oINMCE


/







I mm
=*
*
*


ORT-AUwr"'o"'--
TO

NEW YORK
WEST24th STREET
WST now York
O nl y s direct to the center -of New Yor
only 3 Days ic Flog Cruise Ships
aACON CRISTOBAL
Sailings Mondays and Frido-i
E V &BColA O U'rtSwIDE pW ATE BAT
.--, c on ) ouHNo O SALoN
orroR 'n sWIM g P OOL
250 LBS. A GGAGE ALO

Ask about round-riP seaair ockels. r
Complete accurate informtiO.." .Onlyfro"
PAMAMA S*TEAMSIP LIN
Rue braab, LIaCO a Telephone 3962


calmer Caribbean waters.
But, that period of turmoil has
passed and' once more Haiti is in
a position to welcome the large
potential of yachts which yearly
dot the Latin American waters and
discharge free-spending passengers
at the many ports of call.
Now that Cacique Island is open-
ed -with the promise of a fine
yacht basin in the near future-
Kyona Beach going full blast, there
is nothing to prevent an *influx of
yachting trade to these favorable
shores.
Yachting now days is "big busin-
ess" and during the four' seasons
of the year there can be seen
throughout the Caribbean, thread-
ing their way through low-lying
cays to safe anchorages off broad
sand beaches, many dozens of fine
yachts with enough gleaming ma-
hogany and polished brass to earn
a berth at any of the world's fine
yacht clubs.
From the Banks of the Bahamas
to the shore of Venezuela and to
Portobello on the coast of Panama
they play the trade winds of tro-
pical America for the comfort and
pleasure of a growing number of
"yachtsmen-for-a-vacation" partak-
ing of an unusual holiday of fun
in the sun.
For little more than the cost of
room and meals in a good resort
hotel, parties of from two to 12
enjoy all the luxuries and thrills
of yacht cruising in interesting wat-
ers, moving from island to island
as whim dictates. And, if borqd
with the scenery of one harbor or
cove, they move on to another.
The skipper-owners of these
yachts are seagoing innkeepers who
cater to vacationers who just want
to loll back in the cockpit and
watch the sun etch ever-changing
patterns on the billowing sails as
multicolored waters rush past the
hull. For these, both landlubbers
and experienced yachtsmen alike,
there is more fun at sea than sit-
ting on-the verandah of a tropical
resort hotel talking to folks from
back home.
They can be spotted by the un-
usual luggage carried to their sea-
holiday appointments. Few formal
traveling bags are in the lot, but
porters load the holds of Pan Ame-
rican -Clippers with big canvas duff-
le bags, fishing and skindiving-
gear, underwater c a m,e r a s and
sports clothes packed in foldaway
or throw away pasteboard cartons
Dress-up clothes are used only
when their hotel-at-sea docks at a
gay resort island.
Most popular cruising centers to get
aboard the charter sail yachts are
Nassa u, Bahamas, and English
Harbour, Antigua, but there are al-
so fine charter yachts at Panama,


ACT OF


4!-
4


MAJESTIC AND MAR.


HOTEL
SITUA['ED ON PETIONVILI/E

PLEASANT AND COLOR

ATMOSPHERE


EUROPEAN OR AMERICAN


IF REQUIRED


MAJESTIC


AND MAR2
I


AiL OFFMR ISPEOEAL R

FOR
LaNG RESEDNCE


LABOUT


ABOUT
s
S
SQUARE

tFUL





PLAN




ABOUT 4

ATEBS


WITH A






BESSAMATIC


v9 C A M E R A S AT f I ':llit PRill.::



fof uffailsi

RUE BONNE FOI
Phone. 2390
m..Ang. :5.KHNINE
AIP-CONDITIONED


Caledonian Insurance Co.


FOR HAITI


SUNDAY, FEB. 28TH, 1960

the Virgin-Islands, San Juan, Puer- 54; Tern III, 53; Aurora, 41 and
to Rico and the' many harbors of Sea Wanderer 36.
Cuba. Guests are met by prearrange-
Eight schooners, seven ketches ment As they arrive by Pan Am
and a sloop, from 36 to 134- Clippers at St. Johns, Antigua, or
feet in length and accommodating at the French islands of Guade-
up to 12 persons each, operate loupe or Martinique. From there
from the famous old Nelson's they sail down through the islands,
Dockyard at English Har bou r. visitingg such interesting harbors as
Charter fees advertised for these Des Hayes Bay, lie des Saintes,
yachts by Capt. V. E. B. Nichol- Basse Terre and Barque Cove near
.son are $196 to $2.500 per week. Guadeloupe: Portsmouth and Ro-
plus basic costs of fuel', Tood and seau in Dominica; Fort de Fran-
refreshments. The veteran skipper ce, Martinique; and on down to St.
estimates that overall expenses, in- Vincent, the Grenadines and Gre-
cluding the charter price, to be nada. With longer vacation time,
from $18 to S40 per person per day, some go farther south "to Trinidad.
depending on the eating and drink- Visiting yachtsmen regard t h e
ing habits of the guests and the warm waters of the Bahamas and
type of yacht chartered. the Caribbean as among the world's
The yachts at English Harbour best cruising grounds. Thousands
are the Te Vega, 134-foot; Harbing- of islands and cays (pronounced
er, 93; Voyageur, U110; Caribbe, 92; ke3s) dot the vast archipelagos
Freelance, 86; Maverick, 76: Bon- between the two Americas The wat-
ayentura, 72; Pas de Loup, 70; ers are rich in fish and sea life
Mollihawk, 70; Harebell, 70; Zam- for both food and sport.
beze, 58; Dayspring, 56; Carinna. (Continued on page 16)


I


^^^^^^ ^^^^^^INV^


to-mwe


pi




9 ~
-~ --


SUNDAY, FEB. 28TH, 1960 "'HAITI


SUN"


-V _______


Skill And Ingenuity By This Week's

Personality


MAURICE PI

Ever tried smoking a cow? Well
we can guess your answer and ag-
ree that the statement is a little
exaggerated, but, our personality of
the week, 42 year old Maurice
Pierre can, with simple tools, a few
hours work, and a load of skill
and ingenuity turn out a beautiful-
ly grained and finished pipe from
one piece of that bovine animal
- its horns.
But before giving details of Pier-
re's ingenious method of pipe mak-
ing let's take an insight into his
colorful life. Like many of Haiti's
artists, Pierre was born and bred
in the district of Croix des Bou-
quets, the son of a farmer with
a small plot of land.
Maurice Pierre received 4 years


ERRE'S


THRIVING 'PIPE'


schooling but his family being poor
people were unable to continue his
education and he left school to en-
ter the small business world of
buying and reselling. Industriously,
Pierre would purchase cloth, flour,
trousers and other lines of a sim-
ilar nature in the Capital City and
then hawk them to markets in the
Plateau Central and other country
market areas.

Unfortunately the young "trader"
lost both his funds and his hawking
courage and so decided to move
into the -busy world of the tourist
trade. He sold straw hats, maho-
gany statues and salad bowls to
the "Blancs". on the bicentenaire
and then made the acquaintance of
a very elderly man, who died last
year, which led him to his new and
novel trade.


In Pierre's home town of Croix
des Bouquets, the old man instruct-
ed him in the art of making smok-
ers pipes from the horns of cows,
a task which Pierre has been per-
forming ever since. He started to
sell his pipes both to Haitians and
tourists and for the past four
months has been selling in half-doz-
en lots to La Belle Creole.

COLLECTOR'S ITEM
Maurice Pierre's pipes are con-
sidered by many pipe smokers to
Maurice Pierre holds a selection ,be rare collectors items. Necessary
of cow horn, aluminum and plastic ingredients for one ot these pipes
in his hand all of which make are a piece of cow horn, some alu-
up into butifuy finished pipesminum, pieces of plastic and loads
fit for collector's items pipes of skill and patience. Only tools


TRADE


necessary are a hand saw and a
file. All of the finished products
have a high polish and are finely
grained.
The inside of the bowl is lined
with aluminum and colorful bands
of plastic separated by additional
aluminum adorn the stem. The
plastic comes of course from the
hobbyists old standby a plastic
toothbrush. Pierre 'also makes a
smaller version of his pipe for ci-
garette smokers.

Business has increased to the ex-
tent that Pierre now employs four
workmen in the assembly of the
pipes which are a completely hand
made product. Founder of the busi-
ness, Pierre can make two pipes
a day and the total production of
his little factory in the yard of his
small caille on' Rue du Centre in
the Portail St. Joseph area (where
he lives with his family) is 8 pipes
per day. When business is good
Pierre pays his workers 4- gourdes
a day.

Pierre has a wife and three child-
ren, two sons and one girl, and he
hopes all his children who are all
attending school will be able to
get the education which he missed.
He still considers himself a "mal-
heureux" although he has a thriv-
ing little business with all the ear-
marks of an art.

Carrying his bundle of display
pipes in a plastic brief-case, Pierre
has acquired the necessary words
of English to make a sale. He


points out a pipe to a potential
customer and has sufficient grasp
of English to make a sale by using-
the language of the Blancc."
At present he purchases the horns
for the manufacture of his pipes
from the old abattoir. When asked
what he will do for raw material
now that the new slaughterhouse
at Damien is ending the life of the
old Hyppolite landmark, he replied
that he will go out to Darnien to
purchase any horns needed. At pre-
sent Pierre buys the horns from
anyone he meets at the slaughter-
house for a gourde a piece 20
cents American.
Maurice Pierre says that when he
starts selling his pipes in large
quantities he hopes to buy better
work tools to facilitate the produc-
tion. So far as the quality of this


skillful workers pipes goes; Your
Reporter has already become a
purchaser and dip until this writing
found the pipe to be as cool a
smoke as any French or English
Briar.

The IV session extraordinaire of
the 38th legislature marked for
favorable vote of the Franco-Hai-
tian agreement and the Grand Rue
modernization, ended yesterday.


SW


LelPerlchoir
THE RESTAURANT OF

THE HAITIAN FAMILY

IS OPEN DAILY INCLUDING MONDAYS

A SPECIAL LUNCH IS

OFFERED AT MIDDAY

FOR $1.75

AND $2.00 A LA CARTE

The menu is prepared by Albert Barcilon

Of Switzerlamd.


HOTEL IBO LELE

MONDAY-GRAS FEBRUARY 29, 1960




Carnavalesque Haitian Night


: Coumbite- 9p.m. to 6 a. m.

BARBACO BARBECUE BUFFET
FOLLOWED BY


1 Bamboche F a ysanne


COUSINS' BALL BOYS AND GIRLS

SPECIAL SHOW OF THE COUSINS CHOIR
$.2.00 ADMISSION

BUFFET CHAMPETRE $10.00 PER COUPLE
6.00 PER PERSON

(INCLUDES ADMISSION)

KINDLY MAKE RESERVATIONS IN ADVANCE AT


HOTEL IBO LELE


|I^^^^^^>^<^^^^^a


PAGE 3









"
HAITI SUN 's


SUNDAY, FEB. 28TH, 1960


YACHT RAIDER
NOW BELIEVED
LOST AT SEA
Still no sign has been found of
the missing British .Nacht Raider
or its "first mate." 22 year old
Harriet Elizabeth Benton, both off
which have been the subject of an
international search. At one stage
the yacht was thought to have sunk
somewhere near Haiti's coastline.

Now it has unconfirmedly been
.reported in waterfront circles that
the yacht went down in a recent
storm between Casablanca and the
Cangry Islands. Latest unconfirmed
'report as to which part of Latin
America holds the key to the Raid-
er's mystery disappearance comes
from the weekend visit of the yacht
Scampy to Antigua. Scampi crew
members said that they were the
last to contact the Raider.
, They reported severe storms in
the general area where they last
contacted the Raider and. also said
that they doubted the seaworthiness
of the British yacht and the exper-
ience of its crew.



SPECIAL
CITADEL
TRIP
By
WOLKS W A G E N
BABY BUS
ALL INCLUDED:


$35

1TBS K ATE COVERS:
a) Round trip transportation bet-
ween litel in Port-au-Prince
or Petionville and Cap-Haitien;
b) One. uigbt 1st class hotel ac-
comodation in Cap-Haitien and
: meals;
c) Trip to Milot and excursion
to the


C I TA DEL
Departures' from Port-au-Prince


. every Wednesday and Sunday
morning, returning following day.
MAKE YOUR RESERVATION AT
HOTEL DESK OB

RAYMOND REMAIN
MAGIC
ISLAND
TOURS
RUE DU CENTRE
Port-au-Prince,
-HAITI
Tel.: 2078



I- S LA


fe CAMIPckY 0(-SJ1/es-
t _
- Crnnk*sDW/n


Tele-Haiti Programme


6.00 pm.-Mire Tele-Haiti Mu-
sique (Disques)
7:00 pm.-Presentation d u P r o -
gramme de la Soiree
7:03 pm.-Bulletin Meteorologique
?:06 pm.-Royaumne de la Mer: -
"Atomic Island"
7:30 pm.-Heure Enfantine
7:45 pm.-Telenouvelles (lere edi-
tion du soir) Revue
de ('actualite internatio-

DIMANCHE 28
1:00 pm.-Mire Tele-Haiti Mu-
sique (Disques)
2:00 pm.-Presentation d u P r o -
gramme du jour ,
2:03 pm.-Heure Enfantine
2:30 pm.-Junior Western:
3;00 pm.-Actua4tes et Documen-
taires
3:30 pm.-Programme hebdoma-


6:00 pm.-Mire Tele-Haiti Mu-
sique (Disques)
7:00 pm.-Presentation d u Pro-
gramme de la Soiree
7.03 pm.-Bulletin Meteorologique
7:06 pm.-Royaume de la Mer: -
"Beach Comber".
7:30 pm.-Heure Enfantine
7:45 pm.-Telenouvelles Ilere edi-
tion du soir) Revue
de I'actualite internatio-
nale et national de la
journee. ,
8:00 pm.-l Spy (11eme episode):'
"Baby Spy". (Version
anglaise) Serie consa-
cree aux palpitantes af-
faires d'espionnage. dans
le monde que Raymond
Massey tient a faire re-


6100 pm.-Mire Tele-Haiti Mu-
sique (Disques)
7:00 pm.-Presentation d u P ro -
gramme de la Soiree
7:03 pm.-Bulletin Meteorologique
7:06 pm.-Royaume de la Mer: -
"The South Seas"
7:30 pm.-Heure Enfantine
7:45 pm.-Telenouvelles (lere edi-
tion du soirl Revue
tie l'actualite internatio-
nale qt national de la
journee.


8:00


nale et national


pm.-Programme de la West-
inghouse:. "Captain G r i-
et"-"Angel of Paradise"


8:30 pm.-Foreign Intrigue: "Per-
fect Plan:'
9:00 pm.-Telenouvelles (2e. edi-
tion du soir) Resume
des principles et der-
nieres nouvelles du jour

9:05 pm.-Telecmema
10:00 pm.-Fin Iymne National


de la


journee.
8:00 pm.:-Theatre de I'Ouest: -
"Stage Coach Outlaws"
8:30 pm.-Show de la s Westing-
house: "Trail's End"
9:00 pm.-Telenouvelles (2e. edi-
tion du soir) Resume
des principles et der-
nieres nouvelles du jour
9:05 pm.-Telecinema
10:00 pm.-Fin Hymne National
FEVRIER 1960
daire de la Maison Nob-
be & Bondel "The
Storm"
4:00 prm.-Bulletin Meteorologique
(Courtoisie de la Coha-
ta)
4:05 pm.-Telecinema '
5.40 pm.-Telenouvelles
6:00 pm.-Fin Hymne National


vivre sur te petit ecran
chaque lundi soir.
8:30 pm.-Les petites histoires de
notre Histoire. Une e-
mission original, patroif-
nee par ta Maison Char-
les Dejean & Co., presen-,
tee par Max Bissainthe.
8:45 pm.-Revue de l'Industrie -
IOP-293-Un compete ren-
du hebdomadaire des plus
recent developpem e n t s
de I'Industrie et du Com-
merce aux Etats-Unis
9:00 pm.-Telenouvelles (2e. edi-
tion du soir) Resume
des principles et der-'
nieres nouvelles du jour
9:05 pm.-Telecinema
10:00 pm.-Fih HTIymne. National


6:00 pm.-Mire Tele-Haiti Mu-
sique (Disques)
7:00 pm.-Presentation du Pro -
gramme de la Soiree
7:0S pm.-Bullehn Meteorologique
7:06 pm.-Royaume de, la Mer
7:30 pm.-Heure Enfantine

7:45 pm.-Telenouvelles (lere edi-
tion du soir) Revue
de l'actuplite internatio-


6:00 pm.--Mire Tele-Haiti Mu-
sique (Disques)
7:00 pm.-Presentation d u. P r o -
gramme de la Soiree
7:03 pm.-Bulletin Meteorologique
7:06 pm.-Royaume de Neptune.
7:30 pm.-Heure Enfantine
7:45 pm.-Telenouvelles (lere edi-
tion du soir) Revue
de 1'actualite internatio-
nale et national de la
journee.
8:00 pm.-Faubourg de Paris (9e.
episode) "Actress Sto-
ry"-Serie consacree aux
dra m e s policies de la
VENDRREDI
6:00 pm.-Mire Tele-Haiti Mu-
sique. (Disques)
7:00 pm.-dPresentation d u Pro-
gramme de la Soiree
7:03 pm.-Bulletin Meteorologique
7:06 pm.-Royaume de la,,4er
7:30 pm.-Heure Enfantine
7:45 pm.-Telenouvelles (lere edi-
tion du soir) Revue
de I'actualite internafip-
nale et national de la
journee.
8:00 pm.-Flash Gordon
8:30 pm.-Le Programme hebdo-
i madaire/de 1. a Ford


nale et national de la
journee.
8:00 pm.-Show de la Westinghou-
se: "Cow Boys"-"Gang-
tern Den" .1
9:00 pm.-Telenouvelles (2qL .edi-
tion du soir) ..esume
des principles et der-
hiieres nouvelles do jour
' 9:05 pm.-Telecinema
10:0 pmn.-Fin -- Hymne National


grande, ville avec les ta-
lens de Louis Jourdan et
de Claude Dauphin
8:30 pm.-Le Programme hebdo-
madaire de la Maison
Lelio Bailly avec le Vir-
tuose incomparable du
violon: Florian Zabach:
Ep 4-22
9:00 pm.-Telenouvelles (2e. edi- "
tion du soir) Resume
des -principajes et der-
nieres nouvelles diu jour
9:05 pm.-Telecinema

10:00 pm.-Fin Hymne National

4 MARS 196 ,
Motor. Co. lere Par-,
lie Ayetu esp d& ltobin
des' Bois: "Habilete de
Main"' 2mne Partie
Minutes aireables en
comBgnie- du chantetur
I dc.arm tankie Lai-
ne et Ss s Jivltep.
9:39 pm.-TelIayelle 24' ( edi- -
tion du solif) Resume
des principales et der-
nieres 'ridiielles du. jour
9-.40 pm.-Moments' Musicaux
10:00 pm.--Fi- Hymne' National


SAMEDI MA5 S 1960 ..'
.' nale et natipnl.e de I
6:00 pm.-Mire, Tele-Haiti. Mu- jo ne. ".
7 siqie' (li sques) 8~ & 0 pm.-Theatre de l'Ouest ,
7:00 pm.-Presentation du P r o 8:30 pm.-Show de la Westinghbou- A
7: gramme de a Soiree se "Shadowed"-(Star
,grajPerformance)' *
9:00 pm.-Telenouvelles (2e; edi-
7:03 pm.-Bulletlin ieteorologique tion -du soir) Resume..
7:06 pm.-Royaume de la Mer des principles et der-
7:30 pm.'-Heure Enfantine nieres nouvelles du jour '
7:45 pm.-Telenouvelles (lere edi- .. ,
tiofi du soir) --, evue .9:05 pm..-LFLd1i"a 3
d, Ta1Iyalite' intern tio- 10.00 pm.- in ne Nat


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PAGE 4


WI


SAMEDI 27 FEVRIER 1960


MEROREDI 2 MARS 1960


JEUDI 3 MARS 1960


LUNDI 29 FEVRIER 1960


MARDI ler MARS 1960


A FINE FLOUR FOR



"Caribbea



HAS BEEN DISTRIBUTE



YOU TRY IT ASK .YOUR,'


S'' FES T IVA '' IT
i f


A iJA-


A


t







SUNDAY, FEB. 28TH, 1960


aT- i AATaT 0rTNTvAar 0


WHAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
Gerant-Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
I ESTABLISHED IN 1950

t "FACE LIFT" FOR GRAND RUE
The numerous small shop owners and nearby residents
Son. Port-au4Prince's main street, the Grand Rue, can give
way to perhaps even more exuberant participation in Mar-
di Gras this weekend than they might have done and for
one very good reason after 2 years of lying in a disrep-
S., utabe state of repair the Grand Rue is to be given an ext-
* ensive fate lift.
Over this long period of 2 years not only the numerous
shop owners at the Southern end of Grand Rue have suffer-
ed. Any cars attempting an 'assault on the '"hewed-up" road
;-. surface have been brutally beaten 'and 'have long since given
up trying. As for the number of snide remarks passed as
to how many corn crops have been harvested on the heaps
of mother earth scattered about the main street, well, they
i.f are to numerous to mention..
Then of course the really sarcastic can pass witty remn-
arks, which 'hit the truth very closely, about the mosquito
flou' ifl ltg cess pools 'and the by now monumental cement
y.n. l machine whilih. for a year bas graced the Grann Rue
wit ai ever increasing mantle df grass and weeds around
-its under carriage.
Cuti.nination to all this is that a solution 'has been reached
."",to provide funds for the 'completion" of repairs. The Gov-
ernmenit is to issue one million dollars w orth of bonds for
an interior loan to be used for the vital repairs which are
:, to include a concrete suftface on the long neglected street.
.The loan will. be. repayable in five years by the new two
cent tax on a gallon of gasoline and the Government will
- retain the right to grant a ten percent discount to the buy-
erS :, .:.. citie.a 'of Grand (Rue, throw thlyselves into Carnival
-witl reekhesa abandon, everything appears to 'be coming
n ..s ib- on the surface eapway.

INCREASEDD ,AID FROM U.S. FORTHCOMING
'PeopleT of South America have 'been looking forward to
.'" Wsi;dent !Eisenhower's tour with keen anticipation see-
,ig', it perhaps the gleamisig., of a sign that says "'At long
i last our neighbor to the (North is recognizing the full im-
,portance of our nations in World affairs."
Allthouh the U.S. 'President is not including Haiti or any
otherr CariTbean Nation on his 'South American tout, Haiti-
along with 'other members of the community of tlhe
Sericas, 'are 'looking to Ike's trip as resulting in a possible
tradingg in U.S. policies.
i'air many years, centuries in fact, Latin America has
dd the burdens of poverty, hunger, oppression and
W1 turmoil. Now it seems that after years of relative ne-
eot, .the United States- is recognizing the potential df the
Nations and may well upgrade its policies of aid -
only to-Soutih America but, it's 'hoped, to Haiti as well.
S The UJS can help remove this c lak of oppressions cov-
HaitiL andits fellow Latin American 'Nations by show-
;patience and uAderstamding toward legitimate aspirat-
S and in doing this would eirtainly be safeguarding it's
S tinre. hnreased U.&S aid would have the same effects
...a insurance policy handsome dividends for generat-
S.to come.
--1aitin America's importance to the 'US. is obviously being
gise'd andt was perhaps best summed -up in the report of
eiAmerican 'Assembly of Columlbia University which stat-
'.in .pait, '"Here is a world 'on which, to a considerable
,we depend for our existence as a great power.
#I0f we were deprived -of the .rqW materials of 'the area or
arkets, our economy would be 'gravely, perhaps vitally,
-It is an area wheote do hostile power can be allowed
a f&lhobfld, folr strategically this is our soft under-

e cannot wit the cold war in Latin America, but we



ibbean Construction Co. S-A.
il, Builders Of-The Military City
CGon. Manager: Gerard THEARD
Phone: 3955. P. O. BO.. 284


FREEDOM OF PRESS IN LATIN AMERICA -


Only Independent Press


Guards Right To Know
By ALDO GARCIA ted the personal character of gov- the ownership of newspapers and
ONE OF' THE basic tenets of eminent leaders, o t h e r publications by presidents
democracy is that where the people Often such personal attacks have and o the r government officials.
have the opportunity and means to included cries for assassinations, With such publications as their pri-
information and knowledge about rebellions, and degrading referenc- vate organs of propaganda, officials
their government, an informed pub- es to personal and family affairs. blow their own trumpets to drown
lic opinion will resist infringements In those cases %\of vilification out critics' voices and to build up
on their fundamental rights by ar- where ibel laws are violated, the their reputation as champions of
bitrary, unreasonable tyrants and courts have not been independent the people.
demagogues, enough or strong enough to cont- It is fundamental that "the pub-
Thomas Jefferson expressed most rol the situation. The result is that lic cannot rely on an interested
eloquently the value he placed on arbitrary and capricious executive group for the disinterested truth."
free expression when' he said, "The action often is resorted to, with Government and the press must be
force of public opinion cannot be police stepping in to punish and completely separate and independ-
resisted when permitted freely to to suppress. ent, for otherwise the press will
be expressed. The agitation it prod- DESACATO, which makes individ- not be able to discuss freely and
tIces must be submitted to. It is uals liable for the expression of openly all sides of government ac-
necessary to keep the waters pure." opinions critical of government of- tivities. The people's "right to
THE PEOPLE, all of them, must ficials and which subjects individu- know" can exist only with an in-
have the opportunity to be properly als to criminal sanctions for hav- dependent press.
informed in order that public opi- ing opinions, is certainly the worst ONE OF THE most encouraging
union may be able to distinguish kind of violation of freedom of the aspects of recent times has been
between truth and falsehood, bet- press., the progress in the solidarity of
ween honest leadership and dema- the 21 American Republics within
goguery. To punish such opinions and the Inter-American System. There
Daniel Webster said: "Discussion make them a crime is to repress has been increased cooperation bet-,
is the anvil from which the spark the wholesome ideas of citizens; ween the nations that comprise this
of truth is struck." And, if the for, although there may be a few American Family.
"spark of truth" is to be recognized who are fnnlhardv and mav pnntiH.- The lproani7ntino nf Amar'on


by the people and serve to form nue to express- their opinions, the States has exerted a good influence
an intelligent public opinion, there majority are coerced into silence in the area of press freedom. The
'must first be education of the peop- for fear of punishment. Inter-American Press Association
le. This institution of desacato, found has done a great service to the
STHE PRESS in Lati- America in many of the penal codes of Lat- cause of free men in this hemirs-
has, many times in the past attack- in America, has no place in demo- phere by courageously reporting ab-
*ed political leaders with an almost cratic government. As history has uses of the press with the high re-
hysterical degree of vilification and often reminded us, good govern- solve that "the people's voice shall
baseness, demonstrating an irrei- ment recognizes its responsibility not be silenced."
ponsibility that is destructive of all to the people whom it serves, and THE PERSONAL character of
the ends that enhance a free press. honest officials respect criticism by the Latin American is one highly
In an atmosphere of governmental the people as a wholesome factor sensitive to world opinion. His
instability, officials in power have that mares for democratic repres- strong, individualistic spirit and
suppressed opposition newspapers, entation. fine sense of personal dignity is
which, during the fervor of politic- A TRAGIC example of the tyran- highly susceptible .to the voice and
al passions, have attacked the gov- ny over freedom of expression in thinking of those who speak out
eminent vehemently and even smut- much of Latin America has been against regimes of force and. intol-
erance. .Thus, within the Inter-Am-'
erican System, reasonable and pru-
can lose lit there. Neutralism or an intense 'Yankeephobia' dent pressure must be exerted to
Could hlut u badly. The day will come when the Russians influence the promotion of press
will make their bid for Latin America." freedom.
Every American Republic must
Latin America is not 'one separate entity, but a combin- join hands withits neighbor in
nation of 20 different 'nations each distinct 'from the oth- meeting the challenge to provide
ers in many ways, with varying needs and problems, 'and at an economic, social, and cultural
different stages of political development. Haiti is one of environment that will best serve
those nations 'and already Eisenihower has recognized it for to press te true freedom of the
S, i press and maintain a constant vi-
Epecial aid. gil, against its abuse.


S MODERN COMFORTS WITH OLD WORLD CHARM


JIICTit t SANS SCI)UCI1

I MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR THE BEST TABLES!

A Distinguished Hotel In The Heart Of The City

Conveniently Located To The Shopping District
All Air Conditioned Rooms with Private Baths and Hot Water

New Pool Terrace with outside Bar and Swimming Pool

4 Air Conditionned Bar Unsurpassed Cuisine Finest Service
"HAPPY HOUR" EVERY THURSDAY

FROM 5:30 TO 6:30 p.m., INFORMAL GA THERING

DINNER DANCE EVERY FRIDAY

From 7:30 P.M. To Midnight

I 3UNDAY NOON CREOLE BUFFETS

AT THE POOL TERRACE .
,/, ,,v ,. ., ., ...,. .,- .o ," v ,, ..


S &PAVf F .


f


ee
HAITI SUN"


I




' ", "' ,' ,-., .:. Y .. .; "
a,. ''


"HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY, FEB. 28TH,. 1960


NEW YORK POST TRAVEL LOG

Hear. Now. From
Haiti

By RICHARD JOSEPH

Every time a political situation in' Haiti simmers down -as it has been
doing for more than a year- American visitors come down in droves
and return home'enchanted.
Some of what they fall in love with in the small island country is
fairly obvious the dramatic scenes of 9,000-feet-high peaks dropping
down to the sea, luxurious resort hotels with swimming pools set like
jade pendants in the midst of tropical vegetation, and the perpetual
springtime of the climate, where summer and winter are only three
or four degrees apart.
It's never cooler, than 70 or hotter than 85 in the main resort centers.
If you want to cool off you drive up the mountains a couple of thousand
feet, and if it's raining you drive around to'the other side of the mount-
ain for the sunshine.
The first thing most visitors do is to head straight up from the Port-
au-Prince harbor or airport to the suburbs of Petionville and the mount-
ainside restaurant of Le Perchoir, which means "perch" or "roost."
Perching or roosting 3,000 feet above the countryside over which you've
just traveled, Le Perchoir provides a spectacular view of Port-au-Prince
and the sea.

Other attractions of Haiti are more subtle, and- you have to be there
a short while at least to get with them the simple friendliness of the
peasants and the continental sophistication of the elite, the summer-
tim p-and-the-living-is-easy mood of peace and relaxation, and the truly
astonishing beauty of so many of the upper-class Haitian girls.
Even the work-worn peasant women, carrying on their heads 50-pound
baskets of vegetables 15 or 20 miles from their mountain arms to -the
Port-au-Prince market, pad along the country roads with a graceful,
swinging stride that's poetry in motion:
Unfortunately these are tough -things to get across in a travel folder,
so .Haiti's renascent tourist industry is making its pitch along more
prosaic but nonetheless attractive lines.


2 Haitian Beauties For Contest
in Ecuador


Two "Ravissantes" creole beaut-
ies have been selected to represent
Haiti at the Inter-American Beauty
Contest to be held at Quito, Ecuad-
or. They are Mile Evelyne Drey-
fuss and Mile Marlene Jean-Bap-
tiste.
The Ecuadorian Embassy in Hai-
ti has assured their round trip voy-
age and the two representatives
leave Port-au-Prince at 10am this
morning for Quito. The beauty com-
petition takes place in March from
the 4th to the 10th.


Marlene Jean-Baptiste


TOOK A PEEP:

LOST HIS JEEP
Having "stationed his jeep in the
safety of the yard at his office,
Wilfred Justin was very surprised
to discover that a mechanic had
"'emprunte" his vehicle and then
smashed it up in an accident at
the corner of Rue Mgr. Guilloux
and Rue. Dehoux. Not content with
this effort, the mechanic injured
himself and broke the leg of a
passerby Wesner Theodore.

. Dr. Jean Duvivier, Dermatolog-
ist, has opened his clinic on Ave-
nue Lamartiniere in Bois' Verna.
He is considered ,as being one of


Deputies Chamber

Votes on Pensions

$300

The Chamber .of Deputies recent-
ly voted on a project of law depo-
sited on their bureau by the Infor-
mation and Coordination Minister,
Payu Blanchet, according a special
pension to citizens'Jean Price-Mars
and Antoine Pierre-Paul.
Deputy Lucien Beli2aire added to
article four of the proposed law the
,clause to make these pensions "Un-
transferable and unseizable." Art--
icl s one and twvo of the new law
sti ulate that Messrs. Price-Mars
and 'Pierre-Paul receive a monthly
pension of 1.500 gourdess.
the best specialists in the treat-
ment of skin disease.


Sightseeing, for example. There's enough to see in this small country -
S tQgive you eyeball fatigue for the next 40 years. First offt in Henri Christ-
ophe's fabulous citadel, sticking up out of a mountain peak about 20
oiles from. Cap Haitien, in the northern part of the country. Fabulous
Shas. been applied lately to everything from-a 10-room motel to a chopped ,
chickenn liver sandwich, but here's one noun deserving of the adjective.
La Citadelle 'as built by Henri Christophe -a Negro servant who be-
came a general in Haiti's revolutionary armies that overthrew the
French- to withstand an atftck that never came. Fearing a return of
Napoleon's armies, the Haitian emperor set about building a fortress Evelyne Dreyfuss P CO TROPI 103
strong enough to hold off any assault. B NTiR ATIONAL 6-BAND RADIQ
e picked a site high in the mountains above his capital and put hund. MATERIAL AID Lsten to the High-Fidelity brilliance of this PhilHo master .model.'and
reds of thousands of his subjects to work. Men, me ad you'll think you're in the studio, so keen and clear is every programme.
res of thousands of his subjects to work. Men, omen and children FOR MISSION ON But that's only one of this model's many flue features; others. include:
cut timber, quarried stone and dragged cannon, ammunition and supplies ILE D~E LA TORTUE Complete short wave and standard broadPast reception on 6 Bands.'
up the-tortuous mountain traits. Thousands of them died along the way, The now. famous humanitarian of finished cabinet. 2ft. wdth- th rich wit
.td iHenri Christophe got his impenetrable fortress built. The French the Island, La Tortue (Tortuga Is- "
ever came, but Christophe destroyed himself by firing a silver bullet land), the Rev. Father Pierre Ro- High-Fideity sound from speaker network of duo-cpne front speakerr.
n" o his brife Phtbodtx has o retu rned to Haid and' dynamic side spe aker. "
.Into. his brain. tn. Built-in antenna.-.'
"after an eight months visit abroad. Separate bass and treble audio' controls.
You'll think you're destroying yourself, too, when you ride a burro up During his travels ovh r his nat .
-the trail to the Citadel, but the ride and the sights are worth it. Nearby ive France, Father Rioux gave con- .
ferences and showed films on the .. ." _. ,...
s another of Haiti's great sightseeing attractions o- the magnificent missionary work and misery exist- H '
ruins of Sans Souci, the palace that Henri Christophe built to rival the ing on .ortuga Island, once the ,
SVersalles of the French he hated and feared, but tried to imitate. infamous home of 'the equally in--
' j Cap Haitien, the former capital of Saint Domingue, France's wealthiest famous pirate brotherhood that ra- ,
colonial prize, today dozes contentedly in the sunshine. It is yourjunp vishedthe Spanish Main. efforts a r FIRESTONE INTERA ERICA
Father RRoux' efforts have re-
off point for the Citadel and Sans Souci: and Cohata, the Haitian air line, suited in an important amount of ,
.will fly you the 200 miles from Port-au-Prince in a DC,3 in about an material aid for his clinic on the N. [, -
hour and a quarter. Island apd a color film on Ile de .adio
Another Haitian legacy of French colonialism is one of the best cuisines La Tortup made by Gerard Lescot, P e ,
thanks to a grant of the Interna-
in the Caribbean. Dining at the leading hotels and restaurants, you'll tional uoa de Commerce, will te W .
enjoy specialties combining French culinary traditions with Creole aug- sen -hortly over Tele-Haiti, Chan- 'N W .J .
(Continued on page 13) nel 5.



Rent.And Drive A Volkswagen Qrspos.





FREE. HOTEL, PIER AND AIRPORT DELIVERY AND PICKUP

TEL: 3591-OFFICE: EXPOSITION NEAR ROND P6NT

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PAGE 6










SUNDAY FEB. 28TH, 1960


"
HAITI SU N,,


Do Your

-,-" --

Shopping

in Haiti

It is getting so that people are
taking vacations as much to
shop as to play gof, lounge in
the sun or just relax. And, no
wonder when you consider the
savings to be had through Free
port-Shopping. A couple whb
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they can
buy% the same gifts, in free-port
shops, at savings up to 60% of
U. S. prices. So, for the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
'wonderful vacation in Haiti.
Perhaps the most famous free-
port shop in the world is La
Belle Creole. located in the
heart of fascinating Port-au-
Prince, Haiti. Here one -can
find a veritable wonderland
full of the world's, most de-
sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
ches, Cashmeres, Handmade
bags, -Gloves, Crystal, China,
,Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
meras, Liquours and a seem-
ingly endless array of native
handicraft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping-cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
sider that one can buy the'
world's most famous Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
guet--at discounts of 50% of
the U. S., advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
IBelle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive wat h it might
i4. be well worth your time to
consider a trip to Haiti.

Al Noustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhaps another reason for
the surge in popularity of
-free-port shopping, His ad-
vertising in support of travql-
shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
licy of cooperating with tra-
vel agents in their various
promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the-most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tle of free champagne to any
visitor to Haiti who happens
to be celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niversary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts to make
the world conscious of the
.advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
-two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
ous brand merchandise.
SEveryday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
sands of tourists this year will
.Come home from vacations in
tHaiti, richer, in a way, than
When they went away.




'3 \


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER
P. 0. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI


Save 40 to 65 %4-U
^S E..T!IA-a


AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS


.7
~1 ~


*%.3.


Q I.


MIINTON, WEDGWOOD.-
ROYAL CROWN DARBY.
ROYAL COPENHAGEN,
ROYAL WORCESTER,
ROYAL DOULTON,
ROSENTHALE, SPODE,
AYNSLEE, COALPORT,
GUSTAUBERG.



-GEORGE JENSEN,
HANS HANSEN, GERO,
DRAGSTER, GENSE.



The Finest of FRANCE.
ITALY. AUSTRIA,


LALIQUE, BACCARRAT;
ORREFORS,
WEBB & CORBETT,
VAL SOLAMBERT,
STUART. LEERMAN.


OMEGA, PATEK PHILIPPE,
JUVENIA TISSOT, BOREL,
AUDEMAR PIGUET,
JAEGER LE COULTRE,
ULYSF NARDIN, RIVO,
ATLANTA, STUDIO,
VULCAIN.




KISLAV,
ENGLISH DOESKIN,
ITALIAN ANTELOPE.



PRINGLE, BALLANTYNE,
BERN HARD ALTMAN,
LUISA 'SPAGNOLI.




DANISH SILVER
GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY
and BRAZILAN GEMS.


GUERLAIN, LANVIN,
CARON, CHANEL,.
RAPHAEL, PATOU,
BALMAIN, WORTH,
REVILLON, VIGNY,
CARVEN, LE GALLONN.
FABERGE OF' PARIS.
JEAN D'ALBERT,
JACQUES GRIFFE
FATH, .PIGUET,
CORDAY.

MINOX,.CANNON



ROYAL COPENHAGEW.
ROYAL DOULTON,
HUMMEL.



HARVEY'S BRISTOL
CREAM, All FRENCH,
DANISH and
SPANISH LQUIEURS.


HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS


VDo o Inspired
JEWELRY




Native-Inslired
SPORT SHIRTS


SCULPTURES


Factory Outlet
MAHOGANY
- The Best.


RAFFIA BAGS
& SHOES




HAITIAN MUSIC
- Collectors Items


Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS

World Famous RUGS & DRAPERY

Haitian RUM BARBANCOURT


4.
t


Have us send gifts to your friends in the U. S. A.
without affecting your quota.- See us for more information.


I


rfy .


PAGE 7


j~~ullvjL, A~~~, aA xJ PJL


. A- -


Av '402




I 7i = ,


"HAITI


SUN"


SUNDAY, FEB. 28TH, 1960


TI
the
ferr
their
stood
try
towi
muc
the
of t
this
in t
Som
chose
orat
of t
inmi

Ce
Loi
Law
the
bane
obta

i Tl
com
niva
mid
holy
man
fror
Len

M
"Ra
its
sing
hips
Tl
pose
ed


"RARA", Still Rooted
As Told By MARC PETIT odd singers wearing "Caraco pin- are entoured by the "Rara" adepts,
dingre" (flowered kimonos split in that is to say, the crowd. Each sing-
he "fara" or "Loa-Loa-di" is front and joined together by multi- er launches a sufiable song songs
Rural Carnival. It is the pre- colored buttons; covering a white composed according 'to such and
ed fete of the countryfolk, after shirt, embroidered, and trimmed in such a scandal that has occurred
r parish fiesta, let it be under- fine lace. This robe is gathered ab- in the locality, such as: theft of a
d. It is organized in the coun- out the waist of the singer -with a goat, a lamb, a cow or other fam-I
s id e and the outskirts of the belt oT the same material; a banda- lily scandal. The crowd response in
ns of Haiti. The "Rara" is as na, blue, red, yellow or green, at stamping on the ground with theirI
;h- an ancestral inheritance as will, covering their hair, revealing steps cadenced according to the
voodoo. In spite of the battle only their eyes of four "souffleurs rhythm of the song: this is called
he church against the "Rara", de bambou" (men whistling the "foot charge".
tradition still remains rooted through bamboo reeds) armed with At each street corner, a circle Is
the customs of the rural folk. a baguette to mark the cadence, formed. Men and women singers,
ie pretend that this is their way, and of three or four "Rois" (Kings) hand in hand, sing, swinging,
sen by themselves, to commem- wearing a tunic and shoulder bands stamping the ground in cadence,
e the holy days, in the manner of spangles; multicolored cocked "baillent chlqua," (partners walk
the Jews. thus is created the hats; an iron baton called "jon". backwards and forwards keeping al-
ity with the Clergy. These "Kings" veritable juhglers, ways face'to face), while the "ma-
who manipulate their instrument jor-jon"' performs unimagi n a b i e
certain people call it also "La with an unqualifiable dexterity are
dit" (meaning that only the called "Major-jon."
authorizes the coming out of During Holy Week, there is a
"Rara". In fact, the "Rara'p rush to the fural districts and the
d can go out only through first cities of the provinces to see the
ining legal authorization. parade of the ara bands. The ,
country folk desert the city for their
ie exercises of the "Rara" respective localities. No more vend-
imence one week after the 'Car- ors in town crying in the street:
3l and ends Easter Sunday at "Min pois, nmin duriz, min mais-
night. It is above all during the moulin, min z'oeuf fres" (Peas for
days that it takes on, in per- sale, rice, corn-meal, fresh eggs.) -
ience, its frolics; that is today The city folk who own vehicles go
a Monday after the close of the all the way to the Artibonite, to
t period uli to Easter Sunday. Carrefour Dufort or to Leogane. In
these localities, the "Rara" is more
ost of the city people like the animate and the "majors-jon" more
ra" because of its originality, experienced. r
allure; particularly the choir of At Leogane ard at Carrefour Du- __.1_1 __
ers and the cadence of their fort, the "Rara" differs complete- -
in singing and dancing. ly from the other' rural sections.
he Rara Bands are usually corn- "The charges aux pieds" (beating
ed of three large tambours call- the ground with their feet) replaces
"Tambour Baca," of three "ba- the tambours and the bamboo. The JOSEPH NADAL CO.
ers" (drummers); of some 20- "major-jon", Chiefs of the bande, Distribu4Or


Ru al Custom


tr i c k s, causing the spectators to
tremble with fright, for example:
launching the "jon" five meters in-
to the air, then catching it when
it comqs down on his forefinger,'
making it twirl at a dizzying speed,
passing it between the rungs of. a
chair and then between the legs,
the whole stunt accomplished in.just


declare, "Pas ,de Careme sans le
"Rara" (Without' the Rara there
would be no Lent) declare the peas-
ants.
The rural folk are as much att- *
ached to their "Rara" as they are
to their person. It is an integral
part of their life. So, from Holy
IMonday' almost all the maids ab-


a few seconds. 'andon their "jobs" to go home to
.their native communities; even if
Without the Carnival, there would. it means looking for another job -
be no Holy Week, the city people 'AFTER the Rara.


SI IF YOU WANT THE .
''PAR EXCELLENCE'
IN I SERVICE, CUISINE .AND
4' ATMOSPHERE THEX
S' ACCEPT THE'WAM .
4 WV. VELCOEA A]WTNG A=
SYOU AT THE J.



.Quisqueya.

A NIGHT ,AT THE



WQuisqueya

IS A NIGH T TO' .
4. BE REPEATED *
ONLY A NL.EW MINUTES FROM
,. .. TOWN TI N O IN'V11LLE

*5 ~As. As.As.A'. A'As A'.A'.. A A


~. ~- .~


I '. .


; *. ,

.* -.. .... A .'






































TaTRAO DE






Gran
i .E
4.*--^-


PAGE. 8


- -- -- -- --


v, r f v v v










SUNDAY, FEB. 28TH, 1960


"' AITI


Climatic Changes On Tou.


BE PREPARED TO
(Exclusive in your area) ler bag 3ou


Be prepared to lead a double life
.wheri you take off on a tour of the
Antilles and South America.
; Sartorially speaking, that is.
o In'the lands to the south, geog-
raphy often says "tropical" while
at the same time altitude is pro-
claiming "sub-polar." One report
niay be gaily casual and your next
-Clipper stop as conservative as a
.Philadelphia lawyer.
Visitors in Port-au-Prince, Haiti,
for example, will do their souvenir'
shopping in the tropical warmth of
. the sea level business, district of
:the city. But they'll probably ,be
St' saying in a hotel in the suburbs
:2,000 feet above sea, level where
the air gets a little nippy, especi-'
ally at night.
Standing in Z4e lobby of the' Hotel
Carrera in Santiago, Chile, vaca-
tionists can watch gay groups de-
pa, a 'ting-imultaneously from the
hotel,- attifed. for either skiing or
skindiving. The snow-covered And-
-s slopes and the famed beach res-
.i, of Vina del: 1vNar are botji oply
a couple of hours' drive from the
.eapital. .' "
This presents something.' of a
Challenge for assemling' a suitable
two-week wardrobe that wouldn't
..' /give a packh6rsp palpitations.
But it can.,easily 'be dbne, ac-
pording to the international- travel
experts of Pain American World
Airways. And well within the free
', baggage allowance of 66 pounds for
firgt class or 44.pounds .for tourism
travel.
The first thing tb .do is get'a grip
,on yourself. Better yet, gel 'two
grips. One 26-inch case, and a 'smal-


your Clipper.
your belonging
sense than one
er case is hand
you might neec
and is good for
en route. You
small bags you
in a pinch.

Incidentally,
necessary in to
a heavy make
you. Jets get
so fast your m
'chance ot weaj
'pact and corn
handbag will be

Before you st
yourself-and p
try to cram yi
of peanut butt
books you won
you'll never wi
that you can't
cial for every.
Otherwise you'll
with- everything
the Buenos Air
stocking 'gap f
rTiticaca.-
It may corn
dome, but ever
and-dancing-in-t
the border A
Latin America,
cities in Souti
conservative a
sister cities in
er resorts, inc
'Caribbean, are
grounds of the
weird weskit.
Some of the


yVO.IU IL


LIVE "DOUBLE LIFE"
can hand-carry on are Caracas, Rio de Janeiro, Mon-
They will hold all tevideo, Sao Paulo, Santiago, Lima.
s and make more Bogota, Quito and Mexicp City.
big bag. The small- More on fthe light, sporty, inform-
,y for carrying things al side are such spots as Montego
d to get at in flight Bay, Ciudad Trujillo,. Port-au-Prin-
overnight side trips ce, Havana, San Juan, St. Croix,
can aso carry two Barbados, Martinique, Guadeloupe,
irself if you have to Antigua, Port of Spain and Pana-
ma. Somewhat in-between are Cen-
traJ American spots like Guatema-
ladies, it's no longer la, San Jose, Tegucigalpa, Mana-
)day's jet age to. lug gua and San Salvador.
ip kit on board with
where they're going This is where haberdashery that
iakedp won't have a can double in class comes in handy,
r off. Lipstick, corp. especially if you are going to .do
b tucked into your much counti'y-hopping. The ladies
e enough. will do well to build their ensemble
around a coordinated color scheme,
art packing, prepare mix in at least one conservative,
a r e yourself. Don't tailored dress and .a couple of cock-
our bags with a lot tail separates among -some light
ter you won't eat, cottons or cotton-dacron mixtures.
't read, balbriggans Some .of the new light knit suits
ear. Resign yourself are handy, especially since they
have something spe- can be packed rolled, to save space.
possible occasion. For the- men, a good mixture is a
I load yourself down c o u p I e of conservative business
g from a tiara for suits, .with a brace of mix-and-
es opera to a knitted match slacks and jackets.
for fishing on Lake
As important as what to take is
e as a surprise' to what not to take.
ry day is not fiesta- Bermuda-length shorts are all
he-streets south of right for the younger set in some
number of spots in of the more relaxed resorts, but
notably the larger all hands should lay off the
h America, are as short shorts. Similarly, the ladies
nd" formal as their could better leave their slacks on
North America. Oth- the racks unless they are planning
luding many 'in the extensive mountain climbing expe-
the happy hunting editions or speleological safaris.
blazing bdlero and DON'T TAE: Halter tops, tight
m o toreadors,,mink, bikinis, water pur-
more formal spots ifiers (local water is almost always


drinkable, or if in doubt, bottled
varieties are available), flatirons,
crinolines, a medicine chest (inst-
ead take aspirin which will take
care of a variety of migrains, and
a small bottle of kaopectate for
The Bug known variously as Mon-
tezuma's Revenge or the Inca Two-'
Step.

Here's a suggested wardrobe that
will stand the weight and wear test
for those who are going to spend
a couple of weeks -roaming the
south-of-t he-border range:

WOIEN: Four cotton or cotton-
dacron dresses, 2 cocktails separ-
ates, one tailored black woo* dress,
2 nylon blouses, a lightweight' jack-


if-


PREETZMAN-AGGERHOLM,


r
et, sweater or warm stole, 2 night-
gowns, 1 robe. 4 changes of ling-
erie, 6 pairs of stockings, bathing
suit, beach wrap and 3 pair of
shoes--one pair of daytime pumps,
1 pair of walking shoes and a pair
of evening sandals. A lightweight
suit is excellent as a Clipper trav-
eling outfit.

MEN: Two conservative suits, 2
jackets, 2 pair of slacks, 5 dress
shirts, 4 sports shirts. 4 sets of
underwear, light pullover sweater,
2 pair of shoes loafers are handy,
they can double as slippers or
beach sandals), bathing suit.
P.S. to the ladies: Isn't handy
bustles went out before air travel
"came in?


DISTRIBUTOR


E NIIC7


1FAY ii N- HA II iI


V1 5. RENT a CAR


AMERICAN EXPRESS AND DINERS CLUB CREDIT CARD HONORED
DECEMBER 15th TO APRIL 14th

DAILY RATE
7 7 24 HOURS


$9.00 PER DAY


PLUS 10c. PER


MILE


Weekly Rate

$45 PER 7 DAY WEEK

PLUS 10c. PER MILE

All Rates Include Gas


Oil And Insurance


FREE


Road Maps


INFORMATION

PICK-UP AND

DELIVERY FROM


hotels

Air Ports Piers


FORB RESERVATIONS, ROAD MAPS AND SUGGESTED ITINERARIES, WRITE OR CABLE

AVIS CAR REA TALKS
P.O. Box. 69,.
PORT-AU-PRINOB, HAITI.


SUN"


PAGE 9


JOHNNIE WALKER
SBn lp2,p-st l going strong
i nl, u


Availa


Minx


OPEL


Volkswagen
Kabriolet


offitc, tin
'P. ORT RL, -ppiN.,


NEXT TOTR'
f, I Ni ,i' CkNA Nk


!a'I
;incair as Satio


."" ,..hr ". -.: X y .", r",. -:.


-i


iDbel










"tHAITI SUN"


SUNDAY, FEB. 28TH, 1960


There are the fifth and sixthtitles of the Constitution of the Republic
of Haiti as translated from "Le Moniteur", Port-au-Prince, Haiti,
December 22, 1597. The "Sun" will publish a Title per week of the
Constitution as it appears in the original.




TITLE HII
DUTMS
-SOLE CHAPTER
Civic Duty and Responsibility of Government
SOfficials and Employees
Article 39.-Civic duty is linked to citizenship and civil and political
rights.
Civic duty is the aggregate of the moral, political, social, and econoim-
ic obligations of a citizen, toward the State and the country. \
Article 40.-Before assuming office, a government official as defined
by law shall solemnly swear on his honor conscientiously to perform the
duties of his office, to be" loyal to the Republic, to enforce and cause,
to be enforced the Constitution and the laws and regulations put into
effect under the Constitution. A' record of this oath, signed by the
government official, shall be prepared and a copy issued to the person
concerned for all necessary and lawful purposes.
Article 41.-Government officials who know of an internal revenue
violation committed by their subordinates must report it to the com-
petent authorities as soon as possible, and, if they fall to do so in a
reasonable time, they shall be considered in the light of receivers and
prosecuted as such. *,
Article 42.-Government officials or employees who enrich themselves
at tHie expense of the National Treasury must return to the State what
they have illegally acquired, without prejudice to their criminal liabil-
ity under the law.
Unlawful enrichment may be established by evidence and may be
inferred, in particular, from any facts and circumstances indicating a
marked disproportion between the means (fixed and floating, assets)
of such official and the amount accumulated from the salary or emo-
luments received in connection with his office. The assets of the official
or employee, those of his wife, and those of his minor children shall
be considered as one unit in determining the increase in question.
Those officials and employees whom the law specifies must declare
the amount of their assets to the clerk of the civil court within sixty
days after entering upon their duties. The competent public prosecutor
may take any measures he deems necessary to verify the accuracy of
the declaration.
Article 43.-An official guilty of the above-mentioned crimes may
benefit only from the ten-year limitation, which shall begin on '.he date
of the termination of his duties.
Article 44.-Violation of these constitutional provisions are specific-
ally punishable by law, and the liabilities incurred on that count may
not be forgiven. Nor may the guilty official be granted pardon or conm-
mutation of his sentence.
TITLE IV
NATIONAL SOVEREIGNTY
CHAPTER I
Powers to Which the Exercise of Sovereignty Is Delegated
Article 45.-The national sovereignty shall reside in the whole body
of citizens.
Article 46.--The exercise of this sovereignty shall be delegated to
three powers: the Legislative Power, the Executive Power, and the
Judicial Power.
They shall constitute the government of the Republic,. which shall be
essentially civil, democratic, and representative.
Article 47.-Each power shall be independent of the other two in its
duties, which it shall perform separately.
None of the powers may delegate its duties or go beyond the limits
prescribed for it.
Each of the powers shall be responsible for its acts.


WAH IT! SCRUB IT! You cadit mar its Matchless Beauty!


S THI FINEST FINISH FO. WALlE AND MATCHING WOODWOSIK.
JOSEPH NADAL Agents


ODVA'S Tomatoes are Exported to United States


(PRESS RELEASE)
At "Moreau des les" (Artibonite
Valley) over an acreage of 42 hect-
ares, tomatoes planted under the
impulse of Agronomist. Garvey
Laurent. administrator 'of O DV A
and of Mr. Norman Ward, Senior'
Technician of ODVA and cultivated
under George Haguiwara's manag-
ement, HADO's specialist, are be-
ginning to be harvested. This large
plantation which has been carried
out with the cooperation and part-
icipation of the, peasants of this
area, pwners of the largest parts
.of the land,-will produce approxi-
mately around 3 and a half mil-


lions of pounds of tomatoes, the
profit of. which will be shared by
the owners and ODVA in the pro-
portion of respectively 60 and '40
percent.
However abundant are the planta-
tions, however rich .is the crop, the
most important thing for the prod-
uce's is A.ot to plant and to harvest,
but to sell their produces. Now
thanks to-a mission luckily perfor-
med by Mr. Charles Wiggin. Tech-
nical Director of ODVA in various
countries of our hemisphere, a 11
grade "A" tomatoes are already
reserved for export by foreign buy-
ers, the rest will be offered on the


local market, and all those which
are not sold will be forwarded to
the canning sechon to be transfor-
med into juice, paste, catchup and
other preserves.
It is thus estimated "hat 1 mil-
lion of pounds of' this year's crop
will be sold on the local market
or abroad and that 2 and a half
millions will be processes at "Clai-
re bleureuse" plant of Poterie, near
Pont Sonde.

Harvest began in the middle of
January and up to February 15,
,30,000 pounds of tomatoes have been
sold in Port-au-Prince. By the SS
"ANCON" of Panama Line a first
portion of 10.200 pounds of Grade
"A" tomatoes were shipped to the
firm, CARBON BROTHERS
of New York on February 22nd.
By the same steamship, 275 pounds


of peppers from "Morea udes Iles"
EANbook, BAHA"GUIDE TO TE ERBB- have been shipped to V.S. FRAN-
EAN, BAHAMAS AND BERM-States.
UDA," is on the book shelves. Mr.
Fodor has 18 different guide books Vegetable crops will increase dur-
on Europe .and his comprehensive ing March and Aprli, and every
first book on the Caribbean is an- week a larger quantity will be put
other major recognition of the ris- on the market for the benefit of
ing importance of the Caribbean in ODVA's Haitian and foreign cust-
the field of, travel. omers.
At the present time, CTA is work-
ing with Sylvia and Lawrence Mar- ,Dr. PRICE MARS
tin on their revision of "THE
STANDARDS GUIDE TO MEXICO i INTERVIEW
AND THE CARIBBEAN." WITH GAILLARD
Of course of steady popularity Roger Gaillard published an int-
these last few years has been resting interview in "Le Matin"
"THE FLOWERING TREES OF with elder statesman Dr. J e a n
THE CARIBBEAN" by Alcoa Ste- Price Mars on the teaching of Hai-
amship Company. and Paul.Knapp's tian literature.
& Fritz Henle's "THE CARIBB- I Dr. Price Mars explained the ne-
EAN A JOURNEY WITH PICT-'cessity of teaching people to read
URES." and write so that they 'don't go
The Golden Caribbean is really deep into the night Of ignorance.

is an open book of invitation to sol come a clientele as well as a nev-
many countries so foreign, yet so er ending source of writers because
very near! the raw material is good.


This year has been quite a year
for travel books on the Caribbean.
No longer will the traveler have
to wonder where and what is the
Caribbean. *
,In early September Sydney
Clark's always popular, "ALL THE
BEST IN THE CARIBBEAN," was
released, having been completely
re-written.
In November, Helen Auble 's
"CARIBBEAN VACATIONLANDS"
was revised, and this pocket-size
paper-bound book, is receiving wide
acceptance.

Then early December. the Car-
ibbean Tourist Association pointed
and released its trade annual, "THE
GOLDEN CARIBBEAN" which is
pripted-in loose-leaf form for addi-
tional regular supplements on the
individual Caribbean counties and
islands, giving complete detailed
information to the travel agerst,
transportation companies and the
trade.
And now, Eugene Fodor's first


LE CENTRE D'ART
Founded 1944
Exclusive agents:
Alix, Amiama, Armand, Bazile,
Benoit, Bigaud, Blanchard, Desro-
siers, Domond, Duffaut, Hyppolite,
Joseph, Leontus, Leveque, Liautaud,
Months, Normil, Obin, Pierre, St.
Brice, Stephane, Turnier,. Vital,
many others.
17 Rue'de la Revolution
From Pan American
in town-one block toward
bay, half block to left.
Open Monday through
,Saturday
9-1 3-6 Phone 2055


PAGE 10


Caribbean is Well And Truly
Booked"









SUNDY, FB. 2TH, 960~HAI1 SU PAE I


' CROPS GROWING
AGAIN AFTER
DROUGHT AT
JEAN-RABEL
In March of last year the food
situation in Jean-Rabel and kwov
< neighboring Arrondissetnents .was
.desperate. There, had been no rain
to. speak off for more than a year
and .famine threatened the lives 'of
some 45,000 people.
SThe earth in these areas dryed,
'schriveled and cracked and when
a couple of slight showers came
there was no seqd left .to plant in
the soil. Many of the people frorn
migrated in search of work to oth-
er parts of the country and the si-
tuation was such that even the
hardy farmers who remained -be-
gan. to think of it as hopeless..
Duri g this period of severe
drought and, famine; help finally
7' came to the stricken families and
' returning. from the area this week,
Pastor Wallace Turnbull stated that
things were now looking much bet-
ter. CARE, Church, groups. U.S.
Surplus food and other agencies
have, given, assistance to farmers
and families of tie area and at last
the crops are again growing well.


ASINO. FORMS'

M' UNION
The employees of .the Internation-
al ,Casino of Haiti met on February
15 and following laborious discuss-
ions. formed a union to be known
as "Syndicat of the Employees' of
the Casino." The Union Committee
is composed of the following' empl-
oyees; President, Antoine C. Jac-
ques, vice president. Mme Marie-
Ange Poite\ie\ general secretary,
iEdner Edouard, treasurer. Gerard
Chrispin, counsellor. Jacques St.
Lot, .delegate, Edner Lafontant.


-. ~----

S PORT-AU-PRIKNE


Fl


The newspaper "Le Jour" made
a worthy suggestion this week by
stating that during Carnival and
the Sunday's proceeding it, it has
become a regular habit for concer-
ned parents to launch radio appeals
for children lost in the' crowds ga-
thered for Mardi Gras.

Result of these appeals is that
it usually causes emotional upset
in many families and "Le Jour"
suggested to the parents that they
delegate somebody t? look after
children of a young age and furth-
er, strictly control young children
movements as a preventative to
them getting lost.

By doing this., parents will not
only be rendering a service to the
Police, butL to themselves and to
other families who may become
distressed at hearing-news df this
nature on the radio.


I AND SUPERB AND FAMOUS
'Qualilij. -TAue Soods< = Sisal.
S RAND RUEi Aenc a9 tt CCLL41 eMtirS te.. PHONE: 2 4 |


IN HAITI SHO


IN HAITI SHOP
AT


SHER


Radio Appeals For Lost
Children Cause "Upset"


IN CAP-HAITIEN THE RENDEZ-VOU IS AT
HOSTELLERIE DU ROI CHRISTOPHE

COMPLETELY AND RECENTLY RENOVATED

New Monumental entrance and new reception office
Air conditioned rooms with private baths andhot water

Air conditioned Bar

Filtered water pool with outside Bar

Large tropical garden with parking I

Tpp quality french cuisine

Evening dance every Thursday

With the Famous Jazz- SEPTENTRIONAL


.!iI


'S


HAITFS LARGEST FREE PORT PRICE

SHOPS AND MAHOGANY FACTORY

1) GALLERIES FISHER ACROSS FROM NEW U.S. EMBASSY

2) ART & CURIO ,SHOP FISHERS ACROSS FROM CUSTOMS HOUSE


SAVE UP TO 60 Per Cent ON IMPORTS
AND BUY HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS
STRAIGHT FROM THE FACTORY
ON THE RUE DU QUAI
(AM. EXPR. AND DINERS CLUB ACCEPTED)


il


Press Honored With


Luncheon By-Departing


Spanish Ambassador


NEW FOOTBALL
FEDERATION
COMMITTEE
APPOINTED
The National Council of the Foot-
ball Federation met" on Wednesday
this week with the view to renew-
ing its Federal Bureau.
A ft e r laborious debates, during
which the status of the resigning
members of the Football Federat-
ion Comm'nittee were examined, a
vote to renew the Committee was
passed and the "urne" gave the
following results: President, Colon-
el laniel Beauvoir (Police Chief),
Secretary, Hubert Legros, treasur-
er, Arnold Blain of Aigle Noir. The
two counsellors appointed w e re,
Hermann Louis-Charles and Afsene
Amisial.
A delegation was formed by Mr.
Beaulieu, provisional president, to
inform Colonel Beauvoir of his ap-
pointment as he was absent .when
the vote of choice was made. The
installation of the new committee
took place on Thursday afternoon
at .5:30pm. I


gloire, spoke on behalf of his col-
leagues.
On Thursday this week Foreign
Minister, Raymond Moyse, decor-
ated the distinguished Spanish Di-
plomat in the name of the Haitian
Government with the order of "Ho-
nn.eur et Merite" with rank of
Grand Cross.
Ambassador and Madame depar-
ed Haiti Friday afternoon at 3:30
pm for Ciudad Trujillo where they
will take a ship for Spain. On his
arrival liome Ambassador Spottor-
no will assume an' important post
in the Spanish Foreign Office.-


P.O. Box 723


PORT-AU-PRINCE


moVwEAu rT


SANS CHAMBRE


Ls wrofrn am s-rt de ta ban&e a
.ouleme.t done une. traction e aitne
s6curi6-suppl6mentaires. Un img6niesm
'dispositff de silence .riduit les dff-
rents braits desagreables du pneo
andis quoe la construction regaire d
Super-Cushion Sans Chambre oal
permitt d'absorber les cahois die i
route. Vous aurez moins de p0ss A
plat, et moins de d6lais pace que
CoCstruction Grip-Seal exclusive de
Goodyear elimine pratiqueoatel.Il
crevaimoas habiueles.



,.ODAICAR-
-l A^ __ m u_^ U Q U Jng l


Departing Spanish Ambassador,
Jorge Spottorno, honored the press
on Wednesday afternoon with a lun-
cheon. The departure of Ambassad-
or and Madame Spottorno, who
were here in Haiti for a period of
over three years, means the loss
of two competent bridge players to
the Turgeau Club and Diplomatic
circles. I
During the press' luncheon Amb-
assador Spottorno declared that the
reception table was already instal-
led in Madrid to receive the num-
erous friends of Haiti. Dean of the
journalists present, Mr. Felix lla-


DISCOVER THE FASCINATION

OF HAITI

Through Its Postage Stamps

For complete information in Haiti

Stamps and other details which will be

furnished you free.of charge, write to
S -


p


, ,0;


SUNDAY, FEB. 28TH, 1960


" HAIT 1I


SUN"


PAGE 11 '








tt-U "SNAFB 8H 94


Airport Entertainer Kenol Preval Gets
Education Chance


4*'


A typical knowing grin is
displayed by 8 year-old Ke-
nol Preval as he sits outside
the Airport. For months Ke-
nol, in his massive boots andl
oversize shirts and pants,
keep airport personal amused
with his sparkling humor and
nature and he made many
friends. Now he has been giv-
en the chance of a thorough
education at the Reeducatio-
nal Centre where he has been
for the past month.


B.F

B. F. Goodrich

SILVERTOWN TIRES

Designed to give yeou he bee

e service at no eO t!fl.

'Anj^^ them^B i^^M^


PORT-AU-PRINCE
TIRES, TUBES, BATTERIES AND
ACCESSORIES FAN BELTS,
CONVEYOR BELTS
3, Rue des Fronts Forts
DISTRIBUTOR
WILLIAM NARR


. AM

71*.si
Lv\^


I... New! Sensational!.


JEWELS
38


AND JEWEL ROLLER BEARINGS


On Sale At: Canap6 Vert

Aux Cent Mille Articles

Dadlani's Maison Orientale




Ic II (I IC 1 -


MUSICAL FAREWELL
FOR PIANIST
MICHELINE LAUDUN
DENIS

An appropriate farewell part was
given last week for the departure
of pianist Micheline Laudun Denis
at the home of the Jules Blanchers.
It was a musical night with all
the, "melomanes" of quality pres-
ent. Recently return from Europe
artists Micheline Dalencour, Marga-
ret Fouchard. Guy Scott, Mrs Du-
rand and Benjamin and Mrs Henri


COMMOTION IN
THE SENATE
Senator Ulrich St. Louis, caused'
quite a sensation at the Senate by
claiming that the sessions were be-
ing held continuously in "Huis,
Clos" close session, while thd
session of the Chamber of Deput-
ies were public. It was explained
to him that this decision was taken
while he was ,ambassador to Ven-
ezuela.
Borno. Micheline Laudun has dep-
arted for Germany where she will
study piano for a year.


SUPER SEA-HORSE V-75, SUPER SEA-HORSE 40
SEA-HORSE 40, SEA-HORSE 18, SEA-HORSE 10
SEA-HORSE 5 and a half, SEA-HORSE 8. .


PAGE 12


Up until recent weeks Kenol Pre-
val was practically a permanent
fixture at Port-au-Prince's Airoprt
and could be found at all hours of
the day engaged in a variety of
entertainments which assuredly en-
deared him to the Airport personal
and may visitors.
Kenol would dance, recite a vood-
oo ritual, and generally make witty
remarks all at the age of 8
years. From time to time workers
at the airport would give him a
little sustenance and these kindly
donations were sometimes supper
taken home by Kenol, often the sole
provider, for his mother and five
brothers and sisters. His father de-
serted his mother some time ago.
In his heavy, oversized boats,
shaven head and hand me down
shirts and pants this young man of
the world presented a comical pict-
ure, but Kenol, young though he
is, displays bright intelligence and
marked politeness and often receiv-
ed rides home to Cite Simone Du-
valier with friendly taxi drivers
and Airforce personal.
Kenol's bright intelligence was
swiftly recognized and it was de-
cided to give the boy a chance in
life -school and a new environ-
ment.
For the past month Kenol Preval
has been a pupil of the Carrefour
Reeducational Centre on the out-
skirts of the City where some 300
boys are given an education and
the chance to learn worthwhile
trades.

A recent visit to Kenol confirmed
that he is definitely enjoying the
new life and he mingles readily
with the other boys, clad in blue
denim shirt and shorts still a
little oversize. He appears to be
keen on his classes and moved
straight, back to them ,when his vis-
itors left.
It is certain the airport person-
el miss Kenol's smiling countenan-
ce and humorous chatter but they
will no doubt take satisfaction from
the fact that he is being directed
in the right direction towards a
chance on life.


FOR RENT: FURNISHED HOUSE
(June thru September 1960)
located Morne Hercule Petion-
vuile.
2 bedrooms, livingroom, dining-
room, swimmingpool, garage,,Dutch
furniture. Servants available.
-Phone 2353 officehours.-


,!


SUNDAY, FEB. 28TH, 1960


"HAITI -SUN"




, '* 'I.


>UNDAY, FEB. 28TH, 1960


I "HAITI -SUN"


PAGE 13
_ I _r .


NEW YORK POST TRAVEL LOG Charles Dejean & Co. Complete First 20 Years
(Continyed from page 6) M C o "'
Q oaons and innovations. Tlp result are often gaStronomically speck- I t pusines
.acular, especially when accompanied by the fine French wines and li- '
.ueurs available at bargain prices. The month of February brings nations are also maintained 'with Civil engineers, for the study of
Said bargain prices are another 'of Haiti's attractions for thb visitor, about- the anniversary of a firm towns of the Republic such as Jean plans and calculations of strength
established in February 1940 by habel, Miragoane, Pilate, Hinche. on steel Structures.
,Fport-au-Prince is a free port, so you'll find the usual undutied deals in Mr Charles Dejean The present Limbe and Le Borgne.
ternational shopping specialties including Scotch whisky, British china firm "harles Dejean & Co." has Charles Dejean & Co. and its af- Two additional members of the
-land woollens, Danish silver, Swiss watches, Japanese and German cam- just. completed, its first twenty filiated Companies: Materiaux de personnel are presently in Switzer-
rap, etc. years in Business. Construction S.A. (MATECO), Mai- land for two years pursuing their.
About this voodoo business. For the most part, it's been terrifically son Raymond Flambert, and Scie- Industrial Engineering studies. An-
It is, basically, a region, an attempt of imple This firm has now become a pro- ide Nationale S.A. are employing other member has just returned
ver sensationalized. It is, basically, a religion, an attempt of simple sperous institution oh the national more than .250 people. This firm is from the States where he followed .
.arm people to make their peace with the nature gods 'whose influence commercial market with a prestige essentially a Haitian Institution and for 2 years training Courses on In-
on their life and death is everywhere -in the rains that feed their crops progressively growing in its re- a vivid symbol which pays homa- dustrial Plumbing and Welding..
'4and the storms that wash away their precious topsoil, the sunshine that lations with Iriternational trade. ge to local- labor bott in the admi-
. brings the crops to ripeness and the drought that burns them to death nistrative field (36 employees of Other members of the personnel
brings the stalcrop. Theo ripeness and the drought the godsot bufertility, life and On the International plan, this various grades) 'and in the Indust- are constantly taking trips to fanim-
op the stalk. The voodoo religion placates the gods)o fertility, ie and firm is maintaining cordial relati- rial section (Fabrication of. blocks, iliarize themselves with 'the latest..
'.,death, and sets the peasants straight .with the souls of their ancestors. ons with- its suppliers of various aluminum jalousie window, nails, Sales Techniques and. study newly
SSymbol of Haitian, voodoo, and of Haiti Itself, is the drum. Played with merthandises coming from the Un- iron bed, Steel Structures and Fur- developed ar t ic l e s. Present-
e t hands and feet, the drums are completely and typically Haitian. In, ited States. Germany, France, En- nitures.) ly, Mt. Ernst Oriol, director of the
they were the telegraph of the slaes, and the berty gland, Holland. Belgium, It a ly, y Raymond Flambert branch store, is
colonell days they were the telegraph o the slavesSpain, aweden, Finland, South' Afri- Always at the "avant garden" of making an observation trip,in Jam-
;,,ell that gave. the signal for revolt. ca, India, Philippines, Canada, Me- Social Progress, Dejean & Co. was aica. Three weeks ago Mr. Guy.
T' oday they are the Haitian counterpart of, the factory whistle, calling xico and Puerto Rico. the first Haitian Institution to es- Martin spent one month in the Stat-
ithe peasants to a combite where neighbors work together to clear a field tablish a savings Funds for its em- es where he had been invited by
or planing and then beating out the rhythm of the work songs. They are the sole distributors of ployees. Besides advantages offer- John Mansville to follow a tr aiun.g
Comes Saturday night, though, and they're the peasant's combination products from world wide reknown ed in the IDASH Program, the per- course and to study latest sales te-,
Comes Saturday nfims such as Dupont de Nemours, sonuel of this firm is granted the chniques concerning products, fabri-
of a Scotch and sodh and a snare drum, relaxing him after work and John Manville Corp., Mannessman privilege of a group life' accident cated by John Mansville.
pounding out a beat of pleasure and excitement music for the African G.M.B.H. insurance policy.
dances that are a reward for his long labor in the terraced fields along -Whereas the legal minimum rate There is no 'doubt that this- irm-
dances -side. On the local market among the for 'Commis" fixed in the Labor proved method ol trade is .the basjc.
the Haitian mountain-sides. 300 Engineers and architects, there legislation is 40 dollars per month, condition for thb success of. his
S remain very few who have not yet the minimum starting salary has i firm.
*w I'* jIA Tfl n Ji Tr 1 called for the services of this firm. been set at fifty dollars' at Dejean On the occasion of this 20th -
i M "' :l ... i- i Travelling representatives of De- & Co. Through a bonus system, ac- ruversary, the "Haiti Sun" wishes
'" ..-' jean & Co. visit 'regularly our larg- cording to a fixed percentage, the to present to Charles Dejean & .Co
est cities of the Provinces namely employees participate in profits its management, personnel, prm ti .
S" Cap Haitien, Gonaives, Cayes, Je- earned at the end, of the commer- pals and representatives its best
,reihie, Jacmel. St Marc, Petit Go- cial year Furthermore, this firm Compliments and wishes for contin-
r!;! -^W L u ave, Port-de-Paix. and constant re- engages in its regular employ, 3 ued success. ,
Muniqpii~~~~~- andix narider contan rreitdl dih~e


mv, ''you'i lt 'np Oiey a,-tH-e ryv" : .... -. D-:


Avt UP TO 071 GiNfAT$


.V...E H T*


tNi IG VERWEIGHT
,,: .' ,a.


; PROBLEMS


,,RS NOW TOURISTS HAVE BEEN PLAGUED WITH
F -tsUOR. THEY HAVE PURCHASE, With overT
t", chb rges, with customs proBlems. (r one fell
Slta Belle Creole has made it possible to have
Siquor purchased abroad, particularly in Haiti, delivered
1: 'to your home, in most cases at prices cheaper than you
-can bring it through, accompanied by all your other.
S purchases.
., .

S, '" /Ir*'i what 'vu Sairc
S: ".'. ON A CARTON OF FIVE BOTTLES
,- ... -,. BDel. our N.Y, YoTur
.Price* warehouse Home*
A^ Bel's Special Reserve Ohjsky. $32.20 $13.50 $16.50
:. Hanky Bannister Ffnsi
cotch Whisky 29,90 13.50 16.50
;, i'& 8. Rare Scotch Whisky 33.00 1350 16.SO0
; Ballantine's Scotch Whisky 32.35. 13.50 16.50
Queen Anne Scotch Whisky 31.45 1.3.50 16.50
Gilbey's Spey Royal Whisky 31.25 13.50 16.50
l Blak & White Scotch Whisky 32.00 13.50 16.50
olin Jameson *** Irsh Whisky 29.90 13.50 16.50
Canhadan,.Club Whisky, 31.50, 19.50 22.50
Beefeater i 28:45 .11. 1.50. 14.50.;
el 44,25 :.- .21 00'. 24
46.OW n.o0


* .j


CDOltf


4-Engine Tourist FIhtds


Fly fast 4-engiw Delta DC-6's with
complimentary meals at appropriate
hours and a radar-guided Velvet-Ride.
Direct connections at
New Orleans for Memphis
St. Louis Chicago California


Phone: 3313


Non-stop to
SAN JUAN *37
Lv. 5:15 pm-Ar. 7:52 pm Sat.
IAVANA $49
Lvf 1:15 pm-Ar. 4:00 pm Sun.
One- stop to
NEW ORLEANS
Lv. 1:15 pm-Ar. 6:15 pm Sun.$97 20


.Ticket Office: Jos. Nadal & Co. Bldg.,
Jos. Nadal & Co., General Agents *
or see your Travel Agent


~yj. .


h ,


.,! ; '. ..
UV
.4.,


C,
.1


Lunch Dine Have Cocktails
By The SEA-SIDE'

.-00-

KYONA BEACH

-00-
DEEP-SEA FISHING EXCURSIONS
Swim, Spearfish, Snorkle, Water-Ski
And. Sail In Safe Coastal
Waters From Kyona
-00-
HAVE YOUR PARTY AT KYONA











SUNDAY, FEB. 28TH, 1960


"HAIT1


SUN"


Grand Rue Face-Lift' Starts March 2


(Continued from page 1)
THE SOLUTION
"We had to put an end to it.
The purpose of the Government has
been to find a solution to that si-
tuation. The solution consisted first
in an examination, then in the pro-
ject vote of the law of November
1959 establishing an excise duty
of 10 centimes 2 cents per gallon
of gasoline. That law defines also
in clear and neat words, the use
the said tax will be put to. It will
be used to finance a vast program
of roads and particularly the ach-
ievement of the completion of work
on the Grand Rue.


in return the bones for the inte-
grating of the' loan.

People in the know were talking
about it, but this morning the Min-
ister of Finance and Agriculture
announced it officially and inform-
ed the press representatives pres-
entt h a t, "The industrialist and
Merchant, 0. J. Brandt has per-
sonally offered to buy the issue."
The press members subsequently
learned that the President of the
Republic, Dr. Francois Duvalier,
had formed a ministerial commis-
sion to engage the necessary ne-
gotiations with Mr. Brandt.

This commission was made un of


"The problem was not yet solved the ministers of Public Works, Com-
however and it is to this end that e n u Work o-
merce and Industry, Work and So-
t h e Government b a s decided toci Welfare, and Finance and Ag-
launch on the interior market a se- cl r, Lamartinere Honorat,
ricul t u r e; Lamartiniere Honorat,
ries of treasury bonds guarant- Herve Boyer, Frederic Desvarieux
eed by the 10 centimes a gallon ad Gerard Philippeaux. The mem-
bers of the commission, said Philip-
peaux, have consigned their work
"It is known that the law in ques- in a protocol dated February 13
tion authorizes the State to issue and to an addenda dated February
bonds up to one million dollars and 13 and 16. This protocol enumerates
the shares are of 5,000, 25,000, and the conditions, dispositions and .the
50,000 gourdes. We invite the read- mode of application and the result
er to refer back to the law publish- of negotiations.
ed in a previous edition of 'Le Nou-
velliste'." Mr. Brandt, acting for the ac-
count of others, has taken the en-


OFFER TO BUY ENTIRE ISSUE gagement of buying the entire is-
sue of the loan and has signed at
Minister Philippeaux continued, each occasion, with the.represent-
"It is tomorrow at a special cere- ation of the Government, the proto-
mony and after the legal formalit- col and the addenda.
ies, that the shares will be jointly
signed by the Secretaries of State MEASURES OF SECURITY
of Finance, Public Works and the
President of the board of the Natio- For the printing of the shares,
nal Bank. At the same monient measures of security were planned
Mr. 0. J. Brandt will pay the am- and the work was done at the Gov-
ount of the issue and will receive eminent Printing Office from


Thursday Feb. 18 to Saturday Feb.
20 at mid-night under
the personal control or the Under-
Secretary of State for Finance, Mr.
Marcel Daumec, assisted by Au-
guste Toulme, Leon Perodin and
George Isidore of the Superior
Court of Accounts.
To offer even more security to
the printing work, declared Minist.
er Philippeaux, the Armed Forces
of Haiti sent officers to the print
shop who were relieved every 8 hrs.
At the end of the operation the
Minister told us that the Judicial
apparatus, at the request of the
Ministers of Finance and Public
Works, went to the Printing Office
in the person of the Assistant At-
torney General, Voltaire St. Felix,
wh6 at the close of the processs
verbal" named Mr. Augustin Viau,
Director of the Print shop, "guar-
dian" of the lot of 124 shares which
were placed under seal.

CONTROL COMMISSION


Mr. Philippeaux also announced
the formation of a control commis-
sion composed of Yebert Dambre-
ville, Chief Engineer of the Public
Works, Mile Celine Dorce, Admi-
nistrator of the Public Works Dep-
artment. Assistance will be given
them by Engineers, Felix St. Vic-
tor, Louis Perpignand, Alix Nau,
Guy Douyon, Maurice Elie and
Fritz Pressoir and Accountants,
Franck E. Vernet of the Superior
Court of Accounts and Luc Olivier
of the Department of Public Works.


WORK TO BEGIN MARCH 2

Concluding his lengthy speech
Minister Philippeaux declared that
"The Minister Lainartiniere Hono-


Sensational


THE AMERICAN VEHICLE, IDEAL FOR HAITI
It is the "LARK" manufactured by STUDEBAKER-PACKARD Corporation.
Neither large nor small or rather, large apd small at once
Offering all the advantages of large cars, 6 to 7 passengers,
Stability, Comfort, Power and all the advantages of the small car
Low fuel consumption (30 to 32 miles on a gallon.
Easy to drive, length reduced
Reduced Prices, in spite of its great luxury
Ideal for Haiti























THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE AGENCY, S. A.
Place Geffrard, Phone: 3216 or 3929

GARAGE RUE DES CESARS PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
Ask also for a demonstration of the Pick-Up and Trucks
Their saving. of fueL solidity, power and capacity are
already universally known.


.iI


rat and the contractor of the work, case of "force majeure" act of
Engineer Adrien Roy, have alrea- God, the Grand Rue will be com-
dy taken all steps for the work to pleted within pix months.
begin on Wednesday the 2nd. of
March. In answer to the question of what
is meant by case of force majeure,
Immediately\afterwards Engineer Engineer Roy explained, "Either a
Roy put himself at the disposal of tremendous rainy season or a case
the newsmen and furnished certain of international war."


(This article was reprinted from
the newspaper "Le Nouvelliste" of
Friday, February 26th.)


ODVA RICE FLOUR WITHIN REACH
OF EVERYBODY'S MEANS

In order to increase and enlarge purchases by the consumers of its
highly vitamined rice flour, ODVA has just decided to offer this product
in small bags of one, five and ten pounds.

The prices, at the ODVA sale's office, situated at the corner of "Rue
du Centre" and "Rue des Cesars" will be as follows:

Bag of one pound ................ Gdes: 0.35 or $0.07

Bag of five pound ................. Gdes. 1.50 or $0.30

Bag of ten pound ................. Gdes: 3.00 or $0.60








HO T EL


Petionvifle
featuring
V" The Smart Saturday Night Club

LA RONDE
9p.m. Until Late Closing
The El Rai*ho Durosean
Orchestra
Dancing Nightly Except Sunday From 7pm
THOSE WHO APPRECIATE
THE BEST DINE
AT EL RANCHO HOTEL
And always superb cuisine


4

WHAT MAiKES A WEDNESDAY NIGHT SPENT
AT THE



Bacoulou Club
SSO EXITINGLY DIFFERENT? FOUR WORDS,



FAMOUS BACOULOU .
VOODOO" DANCERS

BUT THAT IS NOT ALL THAT- IS OVERED BY

THE BACOULOI
FEATURED rTEM ON THE MENU IS THE 'STEAK

DINNERS DELICIOUS
AND ON 'SUNDAY NIGHTS

FURTHER ENTERTAINMENT
4 THE
4 SINGING COVtSINS
4 POPULAR MIXED CHOIR AT 11 P.M'

BACOULOU is -located at Petionville on the Square.


I .


6


information of a technical order.
It was at this stage that we learn-
ed that the cost of the works will
be $1,630,000 and that barring a


vl lV VV N,1V ;*,;*, v V v v V V r


PAGE 14





SUNDAY, FEB. 28TH, 1960


" HAITI SUN"


{i Joseph report


I


h
hz
P
t
l


The Colombian Beauty Queen is not coming to Haiti. She, life Clau-
dinette Fouchard has been invited to Panama. Miss Fouchard has de-
.clined the Panama invitationT.. Mrs. Joseph Assali, still in her twenties,
was flown to Miami Thursday for specialized medical treatment. She
was accompanied by Dr Gerard De Catalogue... International Casino
lease holder Cliff Jones, former Lieut. Governor of Nevada, is in town 1
-with his wife. His Casino may pass into new*hands bientot... John Zuccat
from the Daily News',(New Yorl) printing dept. is down with his wife
honeymooning at Montana... Nanolte Vieux is back from Switzerland and
two years in Italy. She is living with the family in Tote de I'Eau..\ Paint I
around town this week is being applied to the interior of the Sacre Coeur
church and the traffic lines and pedestrian crossings... The SS Antilles is
expected here on March 7th...
The Bacoulou troup is spending' the Carnival in Trinidad on the in- I
vitation of the Trinidadian Government... Genevieve Auger a star of the
famous Jack Paar TV show is back in' Haiti on her second sejourn in
a year.... Here for 2 weeks the vivacious French actress has completely
recovered from breaking a leg in Canada... Andre Nelson, Vice President e
of the New Casino Union according to members asked for his holidays
and got a permanent leave. The union reacted and tle 36 members went"
on strike Friday night... Colonel Franck Bayard. Haitian Military attache
in Washington returned to his post Friday... Coffee Exporter Georges
Reinbold flew to the States yesterday... Joanny P. Maglio Consul of Haiti
in New York flew to Manhattan Friday... Jacques Dorismond has taken
up his duties as Counsellor of the Haitian delegation' to the United Nations.
-Carmel Heraux and Ernst Hollant were married in strict intimite at the
Villa Quisqueya in- Petionville Saturday Feb. 13... Mr. and Mrs. George
Perry (Gros George) have named their first child, a daughter, Pascale...
Robert Wilson of NBC News is'expected to arrive here Sunday and stay
at the Villa Creole till March 2... Betty Taicher is down for Mardi Gras
with friend Marian Locks of New Jersey... Kharlene Aldino a noted Ame-
rican Shoe designer has been stopping with the Gros Morne Tomars and
-designing a new set of styles for City Shoes here... The Petionville Club
awarded tennis trophies this past week, to Grace Anderson for the girls
singles and Pastor Bob Turnbull men's single. Paul Tomar received
a wrist watch and can of tennis balls for the children's singles...
Back on their annual Ma rdi Gras visit are New York notables of'
TV and National Mag. fame: John Nolan seventh visit since 1947. Nancy
Bryan of Fortune, Countess Dechapelle, Bruce Vorhees, Patricia Carlson
of the Carolinas... Mrs Golo Chauvet is leaving for Europe on the SS
Antilles on March 7. She 'will visit with her daughter Josette in Switzer-
land... The Jacques Martins were visited by Chevalier de nuit Thursday
night. The well organized burglars are now in the linen business... Trav-
-el agency Citadelle in a half page ad in "Le Nouvelliste" Saturday
.listed the formalities required for a Haitian wishing to travel abroad.
An excellent public service. Passport for one year costs $25, two years
335.10 and five years $45.10... The Yarmouth Castle was in Port yester-
day with 350 tourists. The SS Bianca E departed this morning at 3 am
after a day in Port... Mrs Florence Zrinsky-Friedman active New York
executive is beginning to look like a commuter to Haiti. She is back
at her tropical second home the Montana... The Jules Michaels from
Malverne New York also Montana patrons have named their race horse
"Haitian Holiday". They are down for a month... To wed March 5 at
Eglise St. Pierre at 6pm are Mile Nicole Valbrune and Antoine T.
Renaud... The next football team due here is the Brazilian eleven...
Hfaiti did not take part in the Central American and Caribbean football
Championship in Havana... Cendrillon is the new Canape Vert Beauty
Parlor...


JEAN GOSSELIN
COMPANY OPEN
HERE MARCH 4.

The French Repertory -Company
"Jean Gosselin" arrive here Wedn-
esday from the French Antilles to
open their eighth season at the Rex
THeatre in Port-au-Prince. A press
conference followed by cocktails
will be offered at the French Instit-
ute from 11:30am to 1:30pm by the
trench Cultural Attache and Mrs.
Frederic Martin on Tuesday of next
week.
* The Company's first play will be
presented on Friday the 4th of
March and is entitled, "Lorsque
I'Enfant Parait of Andre Roussin."


SNEM TO DECLARE

WAR ON

MOSQUITOES

APRIL 7th

The reopening'of the SNEM (Na-
tional Service for the Eradication
of Malaria) is set for April 7th to
coincide with World Health Day.
according to a recent declaration
of Health Minister, Dr. Carlos Bou-
los. At this time it is believed that
President Dr. Francois Duvalier
will outline a vast new health pro-
gram for Haiti.


1t111 JWtli


The n e w Haitian Craft Tourist
Store of Mrs. Janine Chaunet on
Rue du Quai is the latest in ultra-
modern-shopping and comfort. The
new store is fully airconditioned,
has a bar and features a complete
range of merchandise %sith handi-
craft items in lil price ranges.
CAMION ENROUTE JACMEL
-LA VALLEY DE BAINET-
CATCHES FIRE PASSENGERS
DEE OF BURNS
A traveller brought news to the
Capital City last night that a large
Camion on the Jaemel and La Val-
lee de Bainet road caught fire and
an unspecified number of its pas-
sengers perished in the resulting
blaze.


U.S. SHOE MEN
AND WIVES HERE
Acting in the best tradition as
hosts, heads of the Montana Hotel
have hung out a sign at the Hotel's
lortals reading. "Welcome Shoe
Men and Wives," an invitation to
he group of important shoe peop-
e here from the U.S. for a Mardi
Gras vacation.
The shoe folk staying at the Mon-
ana are, Messrs., Arthur Woekel,
President of Paul's Shoe Co. Divi-
slon of the International Shoe Co.;
Roy Bowen, President of Bowen
Shoe Co., alpo a division of the In-
ternational Shoe Co.; Ray High-
barger. Vice President of Interna-
tional Shoe Co., St. Louis. Mo.;
Jack Haimes. Vice President Edi-
son Brothers Inc.; Martin Unger,
President Ansonia Shoe Corp., Di-
vision of Shoe Corp of America:
Clarence Jacobs, Vice President of
William Hahn Washington. D.C.:
Milton Harting, Vice President. N.
Hess & Sons; Ike Fierrnan. Presid-
ent of Famous Shoe Bar in Bir-
niingham, Ala.;- and Nicolas Stern.
)f Caribbean Modes Inc. With the
exception of Mr. Stern all the shoe
executives are travelling with their
wives.
1


HOTEL


MONTAKA
PETION-VILLE


WEEKLY ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM :

TUESDAY: 7:30 pm. to Midnight Creole Buffet under
the Stars on the Terrace with excellent Dance .Band.
At 9:30 pm. Meringue Lessons 'by Lavinia Williams.
WEDNESDAY: 7 pm. to 8:00 pm. Complimentary get-
together Punch-Bowl Party.
FRIDAY: 7:30 pm. to 1 am. Gala Dinner-Dance in .
Cocktail Lounge. Show at 10:30 pm. No cover-
charge. "
EVERY NIGHT: 7 to 9 CoclAil Hour with native
Combo.


PAGE 15


GA YEST




MARDI



CRAS

IS AT



Cabane Choucoune

Feb. 28, 29, March 1st.


CANADIAN AND SWISS ENVOYS cho Hotel accompanied by Mr An-
VISHIING HAITI derson. Ambassador for Switzer-
Canadian Ambassador, Allen C. land to Canada, Haiti, Cuba and
Anderson, accredited to Haiti and the Dominican Republic, Mr. Wal-
Cuba is in the Capital City at pre- ier Bossi is also on a visit -to Haiti.
sent and is staying at the El Ran- 8:30 pm.-Show


JMARIEJEANNE

AIR-CONDITIONED
-- ,STRAW-GOODS FACTORY

134, Rue du Centre
PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

SHOES HANDBAGS HATS

HAITIAN RECORDS FRENCH PERFUMES
HAITIAN CERAMICS

15 Years Experience in Handicrafts.
P.O. Box 975 Open Every Day
From 8:00 a.m. To 5:00 p.m.


,,J *








I Alll16I ItIIAiTIJ 'SUN" SUNAYfFB. 8T, 96


'60 Mardi Gras
(Continued from page 1)


what is normally "this day of rest."
But, if you can't summon the cour-
age to face carnival in person, their
do the next best thing switch on
your TV set.*Yes, this year Tele-
Haiti is filming Mardi Gras and
screening it over channel 5. Those
people on the neighboring islands
with TV sets will be able to join
in the fun.
Hotels, Cluns ania atner organize.
nations have realized that it's carni.
val time again and for weeks many
Port-au-Prince Hotels have been ad-
ding color to their interior decor-
ations for the big event and there
is scarcely a night club or Hotel
that is not holding special carnival
balls, parties, fancy dress gather-
ings or shows.
A lot of these nignt cluhs have
gone to a great deal of expense
and time "dressing up" for carni-
val and it has been reported that
the El Rancho has spent close on
$3,000 -disguising itself as Paris,
complete with Eifel Tower and
side-walk cafe.
Mardi Gras 1966 it's carnival
time again and every night Port-
au-Prince resounds to the bright,
colorful music of the many bands
in strong competition with each
other and as early as last Saturday
(the 20th) bands were viewing for
top honors in the Meringue cont.
est organized by the Municipal of
Port-au-Prince.
In a run-off contest on Saturday
last at the Kiosque Occide Jeanty
the judges decided with all "im-
partialite" to award first prize for
top tune to the Meringue entitled,,
"Mardi Gras pas perdu Bande ou
qui Ti Ta To," played by the group
Ti Ta To and the second prize to
the band group dragon with their
meringue entitled, "Lumiere Rou-
ge."
-Bands are a feature of any car-
nival and as it's carnival time ag-
ain all the popular bands are out


in force altogether some 15 of
them, each band group with its
following band of "fans."
The North, South, East, West,
City and Petionville zones of Port-
au-Prince are all represented in this
years festivities by lovely examples
of Haitian feminine beauty and
each zone's representative will ride
in the parades on colorful floats
as they make their way through
the City. A jury.especially picked
for the purpose this week chose
Miss Solange Duperval as Queen of
Petionville City and the newspaper
"Le Matin" in describing Miss Du.
perval stated, "With her beauty,
ter sex appeal and sa grace juve-
nile, she %will grace one of the flo-
ats offered by Maison Emile Ha-
kime." /

SNAD. the Haitian Society of Ar-
tists, knowing that it's carnival
time again are taking full advant-


age of the happy proce
tonight, as they did th
nights and will continue
and Tuesday nights, with
semble Latino" and grand


For all kinds of French pe
visit Haiti's Smartest India
Select your favourite per
from our large collect


JEAN PATOU
rHPI.yTI A DI nfRID


Ij l i 1iiioj li Ill

We offer you the u
brands at free

S" 'LE GALLON

CARVEN

LANVIN NL

CARON

CHANEL

RAPHAEL

etc... etc...
MILOT





WHERE THE LOLUEST, PRICE, IS


vorld's
port pri




NA RI(


YACHTS COME BACK
(Continued from page 2)
Cruising from Nassau, parties
can go in any one of four direct-
ions,, for the Bahamas archipelago
is more than 750 miles long and
contains about 200 islands and
2,000 smaller cays. East is Cat Is-
land and San Salvador, where Co-
lumbus landed first, also the lower
tip of Eleuthera, which stretches
100 miles north like a beckoning
finger.
Abaco and its hundreds of small
islands, directly north, is a favored
cruising area, as in Exuma to the
south and the Berry Islands, Cat
Cay and Bimini to the west. Two
veteran charter skippers in the Ba-
hamas, Capt. Art Crimmons of the
Traveler and Capt. Lou Kenedy of
the Bahama Alpha, say that des-
pite their many years of Bahamas
cruising they are constantly find-
ing new and more entrancing anch-
orages.
Also using Nassau as headquart-
ers are the schooner. Lazy Jack,
the big Gulliver and' the Olad. In
the winter the fleet swells i with
yachts which cruise Maine waters
in the summer, including the Mal-
abar X, Courageous and the Red
Head. Bahamas costs are about the
same as those in Antigua.
Out of St. Croix in the' American
Virgin Islands are more than a
dozen good charter sailing yachts,
including t h e Mandoo, Barnabus
and Comanche.
Other fine craft can be found at
Panama, with the option of sailing
in either the Atlantic or Pacific.

carnavalesques in their fantasy
gardens at "Bis de ia Rue Audain."
Each of this series of balls has
been a "blow out" and it is obvious
that all members of SNAD are out
to enjoy themselves.


And the fishing here is terrific,
which is not unusual when one re-
members that Panama means "ab-
undance of fish" in the old Indian
dialects. .
These seagoing innkeepers will
not mix their parties and their
craft are chartered to one party for
a set price. Reason is that casual
aquaintanceships d o n o t always
work out. It is preferred that part-
ies of guests who know each other
well get together on their plans.
Then they can find the proper


charter sailing yacht through yacht-
ing m ag a zi n e advertisements.
through their local travel agents or.
in ,some cases,, through Pan Amer-
ican sales offices.
Most, however, will get advice
from friends who have taken such
charter vacations. And, once they
return refreshed and boasting a
major suntan, they'll plan the same
sort of vacation again and again,
for there is something about a va-
cation at sea that spells R-O-M-
A-N-C-E in large capital letters.


redings and
e past two %
e tomorrow The SATURDAY EVENING POST said:
h their "En- A .
id balls and I "One of the highlights of Port-au-Prince night life
show..." i.

rfumes
n stoge the
fume
ion '


HOTEL Oloffson


famous as
gces Aow




i G herie "


EVERY MONDAY AT 10 P.M. SHARP

We recommend that you reserve for -

DINNER and SHOW.........$5.00
4 Dinner will be served from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. 4
SEntrance for show only: .$2.00 Limited space 4




LyV, PRICE


SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCASION IV17!


THE WORLD


___ FAMOUS


N1ANDKERC4IEPS






SLIBERTYPAis


SUMMER
BLOUSES ,






FREE PORT S.HOPPINC-r CENTER
53.55.RueduQuai
SDrvesses and. Shirtt made on order
and delieered in 24 ours
S W se ship Ho fhe states ,


d


o o o o o s o o o w o o o


SUNDAY, FEB. 28TH, 1960


"HAITI 'SUN"


PAGE 16




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