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Haiti sun

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date:
Febraury 24, 1960

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Pages 1-2,15-16 are displaying as Feb.24th, 1960 and pages 3-14 are displaying as Feb.21, 1960.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00251

Full Text








!Hat Sun


lOc


QL' --- WEDNESDAY, February 24th, 1960 Port-au-Prn.oe. HAITJ No. 37, Avenue Marie-Jeanne CIT DTUMARSAIS ESTIME No. 15



Mi fi Refutes U.S. Suggestion



his Island not Scource of Bomb Raids


-2THUR KOBER FAMOUS PLAYWRIGHT
AND AUTHOR PAYS HAITI VISIT


-; '. 8 ,


SArthur- Kober,-famous play-
Swright and short story writer-
left Haiti on Tuesday last after
a 'tw weeks stay at the Oloff-
:son Amongst Kober's many sue-
cesses are the-play, "Having a
Wonderfi Time," the musical,
"Wishing Tou were here," and
Ni latest play which has just
recently made its brief appear-
.,oe_ on Broadway, "A Mighty
:t Was Hie." Apart from his
ay and short story writing act-
iities, Kober is a regular con-
I-rbutor to the New Yorker.
-He is shown above with Man,
aghig Editor of the Miami Her-
il4,d George Beebe, Mrs Beebe
'a d Associated Press, Latin Am-
eican expert, Morris- Rosenberg,
-and at the right, "complete with
spade beard, taking a rest on the
veranda of the Hotel Oloffson.
-


Ph ntom Haiti Club, Whiskey?
nto $1.20 A Bottle
Haiti is now producing whiskey
at the cost of $1.20 per bottle? -
4o ddle H ere well that's according to advertise-
ments appearing in local newspap-
i'n" February 20th, 1960, Miss Ev- ers this week.
w Lendra Melton of 171 West 83-
PR Lendra Melton or 171 West 83- The Ads. describe the whiskey as
t -Street New York City arrived
t reet New Yrk y ar "Sensational" and "une bonne nou-
uPPort-auPrince with her Just
",ta little Chinchila gray. relle" for tihe carnival. The new
n a ltle, who is the gray brand-of stimulation is also des-
,.torii poodle, who is the great
tn aughteo o of the world fan- g cribed as a "bon" whiskey for ev-
.nd-daughter of the world fam- pocketIncroyable but true,"
W International Champion poodle, ery pocket, "lncr-oyable but true."
L.atrpiee". Just 10 years ago, and that this superior whiskey sells
astrpiece". Just 10 years ago for $1.20 or six gourdes a bottle.
a the 20th of February Count Ale- 0 or six go s a bott.
ilPulaski was invited to bring "The Haiti Rhum Co. S.A. has
,Pulasld was i to eror a bring Bi pleasure i presenting to the public
rpiee to perform at the a 'whiskey made in Haiti and aged
enial Iriternational Exhibit Of'in the ancient barrels of American'
Mti7 Masterpiece was the first T lub Whis-
... Whiskey. Try the Haiti Club Whis-
.ffoner to appear at the opening "' o
rer to appear at the opening key elegant, extra fine Nou
eew Theatre at the Centenial neitablemen."
ikbition, which was attended by____ _______
S-President of the Republic of HAITI HAS 2 ENTRIES
ti' At the preview which was FOR BEAUTY CONTEST
.ed by Robert Wagner, .at Evelyne Dreyfuss and Marlene
time with the American Emb- Jean-Baptiste have been chosen to
MVasterpiece was awarded' a represent Haiti: at the Inter-Amer-
I of Honor which Miss Melton ican 'Beauty contest to be held in
brought wit her. Quito, Ecuador. The two young
r ,beauties of whom v.t-re candidates
ng her visit Miss Melton is for "Miss Haiti", will depart for
'ng at the home of Mrs. M. South America on Thursday morn-
allea. 15 Ri U L T AlD di i


I ng.


Haiti's Mardi Gras Is on onCubaM


Again


THREE DAYS GAY ACTIVITY AHEAD


Over the past few weeks Haitian's
have been gradually working them-
selves into the proper traditional
pitch for Mardi Gras and this week-
end the whole country gives over to
boisterous living and enjoyment of
three full days of carnival.
Masquerade balls are a feature
of Haiti's carnival and are being
organized by many private clubs.
Hotels and night clubs, down to
the humblest "tonnelle" are busy
dressing up for carnival and sever-
al are completely- changing the in-
terior of their establishment while
carnival is on.
February 28, and 29 and March
1st mean full carnival days. Each
day there is to be a parade through
.the City of Port-au-Prince wit h
floats by the score promoted by
the various business houses togeth-
er with popular bands and dancing
figures.
Elected as Queens of the various
zones of Port-au-Prince and to ride
_ floats during_ the dailu~arade
are, South Zone: Melle Yvonne Deb-
bas; North Zone: Melle Ghislaine
Canal; West Zone: Melle Marie Au-


Trujillo

Display
Ciudad Trujillo, Feb. 22nd.-Gen-
eralisimo Rafael L. Trujillo Moli-
na, absolute and unswayed leader
of this well organized sugar Repub-
lic for the past 30 years, yesterday
launched his.campaign for the 1962
Presidential Elections with the most
spectacular mass parade in this Is-
land's history.
During a 5 and one a half hour
period a quarter of a million Domi-
nican and Trujillo subjects march-
ed past. their "Benefactor de la
Patria" 'Benefactor of the Nation)
with sporadic bursts of "Viva el
Generalisuno" and carrying flags,
banners and massive signs signif-
ing the desire that Trujillo become
President in 1962 of the Dominican
Republic.
Yesterday's impressive display
no doubt bought about the desired'
boost to Trujillo's regime after the
recent bomb plot and conspiracy
which resulted in the sentencing of
121 Dominican subjects to thirty
year prison terms but left many
people wondering just how genuine
this display of National fervour re-
ally was, there was a certain
amount of sincerity noted in the
cheers and display of the people
but there was also a large amount
of apathy present.
WHOLE FAMILY
The parade was watched by Ge-
neralisimo Trujillo from a review-
ing stand on George Washington
Avenue where he was accompanied
by his wife, his daughter Angelita,
his grand daughter, Ramfis. his son
and Commander of the Air Force,
(Coutinued on pagf 2)


re Lafontant; East Zone: Melle
MyTna Chamier and City Zone:
MeUe Marie Carmel Renard.
Elaborate floats have been pre-
pared for Mpirdi Gras and those
that will carry the Queens during
the parades are, Loterie de I'Etat
Haitien which will carry the Queen
of the South Zone; Caribbean Con-
struction, Qtieen of the North; Bu-
reau du-Tourisme, the West Queen;
(Continued on page 15)

EISENHOWER

REFERS TO

HAITI'S ECONOCIY

In a section headed "Special As-
sistance," mention is made of Hai-
ti's economic situation by Presid-
ent Eisenhower in. his special mes-
sage to Congress, published in the
New York Times, February 17.
. text -of- Eisernlower's Speach
is maiAy directed at the Mutual
Security -Program for which he lists
fundamental propositions, coopera-
tive effort, the visible challenges
to the program and the special as-
sistance category as follows.
"Another category of internation-
al cooperation in the Mutual-Secur-
ity Program is the provision of ec-
onomic rescources to other nations
where such resources are essential
to the maintenance of their free-
dom and stability. This category of
cooperation we term special assist-
ance.
"I am requesting 268,000,000 dol-
lars for these purposes in fiscal
year 1961. Such provisions- will en-
able us, for example, to continue
aid to the young nations of Moroc-
co, Lybia and Tunisia, to strength-
en the stability of Jordan and the
Middle East, to combat the encro-
achment of communist influence in
Afghanistan, and to undergird the
economies in Bolivia and Haiti.
"Special assistance will also en-
able our continued participation in
such vital programs as the world
wide anti-malaria campaign." ,



$ 1,000,000


For -Grand Rue
The Government of Dr. Francoi
Duvalier is to issue one million dol-
lars worth of bonds for an interior
loan to complete the repair work
of Port-au-Prince's main street,
Grand Rue, which has been under
repair for the pastwmo years.
The loan will be repayable in
five years by the new 2 cent tax
on a gallon of gasoline. The Gov-
ernment will retain the right to
grant a ten percent discount to the
buyers of the new bonds which will
be liquidated annually.


Accusations are flying back and-
forth between Cuba and the United
States as to the location of the air
base used by-planes for the recent
spate of bombing of Cuban Sugar
mills and plantations.
- Cuba is currently suggesting that
the raiding planes are based in
Florida while U.S. State Depart-
ment officials are just as strongly
suggesting three Caribbean. Islands
as the originating scource of the
aids Haiti, the Domincan Rep-
ublic and the Bahamas.
The Haitian Government and Ar-
med Forces showed concern Tues-
day this week over the views ex-
pressed by the State- Department,
published Tuesday in the New. York
Times, and today indicated that a
communique refuting the possibil-
ity, of any aircraft using Haiti as
a base for the illegal attacks ag-
ainst Cuba would be issued.
An Army scource today disclosed
that clandestine flights out of this
Island are impossible as the few
existing airports here are militar-
ily guarded and further, none of
them are equipped -fo -fight- flying
operations. Also it is a practice in
Haiti to place empty oil drums on
ah-field runways when they are not
in use.

MAIN DESIRE
A high oicial in the Government
of Dr. Francois Duvalier pointed
out that Haiti's main desire is to
remain neutral and aloof from any
Caribbean squabble.
In a front page Editorial yester-
da., *'Le Matin" stated that Cuba
wanted to normalize its relations
with Haiti and said that the Cuban
Foreign Office had already sound-
ed out the Haitian Government with
the view of sending a new Ambass-
ador'here. "Le Matin" continued
by adding that Haiti would probab-
ly accept the Cuban proposal pro-
viding Cuba respected the diplom-
atic procedures and there were mut-
ual guarantees of respect, fair play,
and non-intervention in interior af-
fairs.
Although technically, diplomatic
relations between the two neighbor-
ing Republics have not been sev-
ered, both countries withdrew their
entire embassies staffs after the
thirtyone man Cuban based inva-
sion force landed in the South of
'Haiti- in July of last year.



- Possible Big Saving
For Haiti

'Mis. -Fritz Brierre, writer on
Haitian economic matters, in a
speech delivered before business-
men members of the International
Club de Commerce stated that in
the space of ten years, the country
could save $5,280,000 on kerosene al-
one by transforming into meth-
ane gas the sewage of the City of
Port-au-Prince.


I


, ue u r. Au a n,







AGEAM I II
r-~qim. k aA. A~ A h' '- u -


Wednesday, FEB. 24th, 1960


his brother Hector, President of the
Republic and Government officials.
Only six ambassadors were pres-
ent and t h er e was a noticeable
number of empty chairs on the of-
ficial stand. It is understood that
ambassadors were informed of the
parade last week, told that it was
to be a political parade, and that
the invitation was not an official
one. But if ambassadors were in
the minority then members of Tru-
jillo's army were not. Several tim-
es during gthe parade an enth-
usiastic subject got a little to close
to the Generalisimo's stand, the
neat uniformed officers and secret
police swarmed to the area in sec-
onds.


* 4g
4-
44i
< 4


Dressed in dark suit and dark
tie on a white shirt, Trujillo sat in
his chair giving occasional waves
to the endless line of subjects mov-
ing slowly" past. But towards the
firush of the demonstration the pace
was upped considerably and the Ge-
neralisimo's waves became fewer
and far between.
TRANSPORT IMPRESSIVE
Perhaps the most admirable feat-
ure of this homage to "El Jefe"
was the manner in which the peop-
le even from the remote areas of
the Republic were bought into the
Capital City by truck and bus, and
shipped straight out again as soon
as they had completed their part
in the parade. Transport bringing
people from the oullying country


H O'TE I

MOND!




Carnavalb


Coumb


BARBACO




Banmbo


COUSINS' B
" A- T A I T T-T f"N m


SPECIAL L S H O M


BUFFET CHAMI


.(IN C

KINDLY



H O TEL


PE


:L

MI


Trujillo's Show


districts by the thousand poured
into the City only a few hours be-
fore the parade was due to start
and was collated in big truck pools
at the rear of the large fair
grounds. Participants in the parade
were unloaded marched to George
Washington Avenue to participate
in the march past and then march-
ed straight back to the trucks and
off to their respective homes again.
This phase of the parade was
conducted so smoothly that of the
250,000 people participating it
would have been difficult to find
a hundred waiting for transporta-
tion in the motor pool an hour aft-
er the parade's conclusion. This
if nothing else made Trujillo's show
of strength an ingenious work of
organization.
250,000 is the figure used to cov-
er the attendance at the parade by
Government officials but it must
have been at least this when it is
considered that from start to-fin-
ish 12.50pm to 8:30pml the parade
consisted of one long line of people,
people and more people no
trucks, no displays, and no floats.
Besides those marching past
there were literally thousands gath-
ered on each side of the road for
the full length of Washington Ave-
nue for a distance of at least five
miles.
Only diversions offered in the pa-
rade were those of the various City
and district bands. This parade was
entirely composed of the people
and there were no military or any
other section of the armed forces
represented. Color abounded every-
where,- from the clothes worn by
those talkng part in the parade to
the impressive banners borne by
hit 111 lC~


Le Perchoir

THE RESTAURANT OF

THE HAITIAN FAMILY

IS OPEN DAILY INCLUDING MONDAYS

A SPECIAL LUNCH IS

OFFERED AT MIDDAY

FOR $1.75

AND $2.00 A LA CARTE

The menu is prepared by Albert Baroilon

SOf Switzerland.


k v'- j -r -v v


I .


Yesterday's parade took the form 15 Years Experience in Handicrafts.
of a mass display of political feel- P.O. Box 975 Open Every Day
ing. First came divided groups re- From 8:00 a.m. To 5:00 p.m.





L -IBO LELE

SY GAS FEBRUARY 29, 1960




ssque -Haitian Night


)ite- 9p.m. to 6 a. m. ..

- BARBECUE BUFFET

, FOLLOWED BY


chte Paysanne


ALL BOYS A N DGIR L S

W OF THE COUSINS CHOIR

$2.00 ADMISSION

TRE $10.00 PER COUPLE
6.00 PER PERSON

.UDES ADMISSION)

AKE RESERVATIONS IN ADVANCE AT


IBO ELE


presenting Trujillo's Congress and
officials-and then groups represent-
ing various sectors of the Capital
City itself. These groups were each
represented by the well known and
upper class bracket as well as the
peasants.
Following the City groups were
the people from other towns and
Cities of the Dominican Republic,
each carrying banners proclaiming
their love of their leader, messages
of goodwill and recognition and po-
litical motions that Trujillo become
president in 1962.
X Perhaps even m o r e impressive
than the lines of people were the
signs carried by them. Hours of
work must have gone in to them.
Each bore likenesses of the Bene-
factor -from head and shoulder
to full length- and each would
have done credit to a fastidious
sign writer. Apart from signs in-
dividual groups carryed tokens sig-
nifling appreciation to their,68 year
old leader and. it was these enthus-
iastic groups that caused rapid ac-
tion on the part of the protecting
Army cover.- Scarcely an hour of
the parade had passed before a
group of girls wishing to make a


Slg^^^^^^^^^^r6^^ 6^^^^go 11,^ A g


___


"
HAITI SUN ,,


O -, f-i


I


n Im


presentation to the Be n e f-a c t o r
broke away from the line of parad-
ers and moved swiftly towards the
Presidential stand.
Over the past week there had
been rumour that perhaps in the
recent scourge of conspirators, all
the bombs intended as weapons of
assassination of Trujillo, had not
been recovered. Therefore t was
understandable that the army mov-
ed in both swiftly and surely to
ensure that all was well. Spectat-
ors moved swiftly too; some curi-
ousity seekers moved in 'towards
the official stand while others swift-
ly cleared in the opposite direction.
Generalisimo Trujillo stood h i s
ground however and graciously ac-
cepted the infrequent homages
made to him. It was noticeable
that his grand daughter obviously
enjoyed parts of the parade espe-
cially when a band came past, she
mimiked the paraders and marched
up and down the carpeted steps of
the official stand.
Now and then frenzied Trujillo
supporters genuinnely gave vent to
their feelings with voracious shouts
and acclaim for their leader, but
(Continued on page 16)


MARIE JEANNE
AIR-CONDITIONED
STRAW-GOODS FACTORY

134, Rue du Centre
PORT-AUllPRINCE, HAITI

SHOES HANDBAGS HATS

HAITIAN RECORDS FRENCH PERFUMES'
HAITIAN CERAMICS


"9
* .^
*** *


13j

,


%







SUNDAY, PEB. 21TH, 1960



Sincere

SPOT CC
The Republic of Haiti is very
: ortunate and lucky to have such
-i a dedicated, sincere and well edu-
m' .-cated man, he is a' pleasure to
-' ork with," this is the apt and fit-
1'. ting introduction given by Albert
,- 'Slaughter, Advisor to the cb-ordin-
':. ator of the Pote Cole scheme in -the
& North, to the Personality for this
I Week.
r'I.This week as personality we have
pcked a man who is the subject
gtf admiration both in Cap Haitien
and Indeed the Whole of Haiti, Ro-
.t.ert:. Bazile, Co-ordinator of Pote
.
y.e43; year old Bazile, born in Port-
ePri has an extraordinary
-d, formidable list of occupations
iBiiind; hini, all of which give an
..'.t into the character of the
-n 0hwho has moved from Engine-
: .:eing.Schotl to the. Haitian- Army,.
&l':'fmnadanft. o, the Coast Giard
;ai now, after a succession of
equally y important tasks, Co-ordin-
I'.atbr of the Pote Cole Programnie.
:,.: fit on Bazile's list was,a'course
:. in,.Civil Engiheering at the Port-
:'au-Prince Engineerng School. Be-
:"fote ,completing his engineering
....course Robert Bazile joined the Hai-
tian Army where he served for IS
-. years-attaining the rank-of Major.
:.'.ring his Army service he- was
appointed Commandant of the Hai-
:: "tiah Coast Guard.
S.:. In his colorful career, and whilst
%ik, he was still a member of the Arm-
O._ed forces, he was at one time a
rn' member of the Joint Council and
.:Dihrector of the National Lottery.
S.Shortly after the devastation of hur-
I% ricane Hazel had left its mark, Ba-
zile was put in charge of the.."Work
:'::for Food" programme from 19-
54-55. During the period he was


A. I '- I AGE 3


"HA TTT


S IT UT"


Dedicated Man


MLE SAYS


OF ROBERT BAZILE


engaged in his other activities.
Bazile was also Director of the
National Institute of Statistics and
was jhilitary Attache to Venez.Uela
and Cuba in 1957.

Early, in -1958, during the plan-
ning stages, Bazile was appointed
as Co-ordinator of the Pote Cole
.programme' and .has worked with
Chief of the American Staff. Albert
Slaughter since he arrived at Cap
Haitian from the States. All the.

PERSONALITY


Americans associated with Robert
Bazile have high regard for -his
abilities and speak of him as a
great personabty and one fitting
for out- column.
Since .the Pote Cole office in Cap
Haitien opened on the 1st of Feb-
ruary of this year, Bazile and
Slaughter have worked in close
liason and each are appropriated
and equal amount of the funds to.
wards the program, Robert Bazile's
home is in the Capital City.

OF THE WEEK


Robert Bazile -(Foreground.) standing before a shipment of Farm
Equipment from the States for -POTE COLE in the North.


Sensational


THE AMERICAN VEHICLE, IDEAL FO R H
SIt is the "LARK" manufactured by STUDEBAKER-PACKARD Corp
tNeither large nor small or rather, large and small at once
- Offering all the advantages of large cars, 6 to 7 passengers,
S Stability, Comfort, Power and aU the advantages of the small oar
Low fuel consumption (30 to 32 miles on a gallon.
SEasy to drive, length reduced
Reduced Prices, in spite of its great luxury
Ideal for Haiti


THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE
Place Geffrard, Phone: 3216


AGENCY,
or 3928


GARAGE RUE DES CESARS PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAI
Ask also for a demonstration of the Pick-Up and '
Their saving of fuel, solidity, power and capacity
already universally known,


AITI
oration.


TWO COMPONENT U.S. NAVY _
ATTACK AND CARGO SHIPS
CELEBRATE ANNIVERSARY IN HAITI
The U.S. Navy's first amphibious land off Puerto Rico on January
assault ship, USS Boxer, and the 28-29.
attack cargo ship, USS Rankin, ar- Squadron TEN is the Atlantic
rived in Port-au-Prince Saturday Fleet's first amphibious squadron
morning last week for a two day to launch assaults by helicopter.
visit. Both ships are components Flagship of the squadron, Boxer
of, six ships in Amphibious Squad- was converted from an aircraft
ron TEN. carrier for that specific .purpose
Boxer and Rankin carried a corn to fly Marines and their pssaulit
bined total of more than 3500 Navy supplies ashore.


and Marine Corps officers and men
and were joining the 13,000 men of
the "Gator Navy" in celebrating
the 18th anniversary of the Atlantic
Fleet Amphibious Forc on Satur-
day. While here they had special ca-
ke-cutting ceremonies with Captain
Herman J. Kossler, USN, "Comm-
odore" of Squadron TEN and Capt-
ain Edwin' B. Parker, USN, Com-
mending Officer of Boxer doing the
cutting honors.
Rankin, Boxer, and the 1800 em-
barked men of the 8th Provisiofal
Marine Brigade commanded by Co0-
onel Stanley S. Nicolay, USMC, had
been operating in the Caribbean
area with four other ships of Squa-
dron TEN in the first Brigade Landm
ing Exercise of' 1960. Their first
landing was held on Vieques Is-


Rankin transports supplies, am-
munition, and transport vehicles
which, are carried to the beach by
small boat, for sustaining the as-
sault forces 'during the operation,
The two ships came to Port-au-
Prince from Vieques Island off
Puerto Rico, where they reloaded
the 1800 Marines ending three weeks
of occupation hnd training man-
oeUvers.
During their Haiti visit, 100 US.
Marines and US Navy men donated
blood tp the Haitian Blood Bank.
Both ships departed the city
Mondaj morning. Their second
landing exercise of the current op-
eration is scheduled for O n s I o w
Beach, North Carolina, during the
last week in this month.


WHAT MAKES A WEDNESDAY NIGHT SPENT
SAT THE



Bacoulou Club
SO EXCITINGLY DIFFERENT? FOUR WORDS

THE

FAMOUS BACOULOU
VOODOO DANCERS
BUT THAT TS NOT ALL THAT IS OFFERED BY

THE BACOULOU
FEATURED ITEM ON THE MENU IS THE STEAK

4 DINNERS DELICIOUS
AND ON SUNDAY NIGHTS

FURTHER ENTERTAINMENT
THE
SINGING COUSINS
POPULAR MIXED CHOIR AT 11pm

BACOULOU is located at Petionville' n the Square.

P *00 00 00 00900 0000
F C


MAJESTIC AND MARABOUT


HOTELS
SITUATED ON PETIONVILLE SQUARE

PLEASANT AND COLORFUL

ATMOSPHERE


%EUROPEAN OR AMERICAN PLAN

IF REQUIRED
S. A.
MAJESTIC AND MARABOUT -
ITI ALSO OFFER SPECIALL RATES
Trucks
are 4 FOt
4^ LONG RJESIEDIENCE
4oc .-srEJ
P00 ,ooooooee O


"I m


?- ..;.


nar ~ n


5


I







SUNDAY, FEB. 21TH, 1960


cc A r -r TI C NT "


SPAGE I HAI


Santiago De Los. Caballe
.- A trip school consisted of a 10 x 20 dirt colorful picture with its two toned regular appearances of police stops
ad Trujillo floored, frame shack. The people houses, and particularly its white and check points.
st town in in the hill areas proved to be very fronted, impressive Dominican Par-
proved to non-co-operative when asked for di- ty Headquarters and as one hitch- It took just on four hours of les-
s in living reactions intended to place us back hiker said. "These people have urely travel to reach Santiago and
the attit- on the direct route to Santiago and never had it so good, with schools, proved to be a trip well worth un-
several even used the subterfuge hospitals and work for them. dertaking. Here is a city of almost
h the tak- that they could not speak Spanish Just a short distance from Alta Walt Disney setting. Each and ev-
lacing the to avoid answering questions alth- Gracia stood an impressive sugar ery house is picturesque and has
S ti form nf nuairitness. The people


car on a secondary road out of Ciu-
dad Trujillo, which nevertheless
provided this traveller with both
beautiful scenery and an insight
into the conditions existing in the
hill country. The route led through
small, rural, hilly communities
dotted at regular intervals and
each with the inevitable check
point.

None of these communities was
substantial in size or prosperity and
boasted small shacks, most with
palm frond roofs ,and the occasion-
al tin roof dwelling. All these little
villages however had school hous-
es which were consistently poorer
than those found en route to Ciud-
ad Trujillo and much smaller.
At Calvary, on the secondary
road, there was a small school of
21 pupils and one teacher and at
La Cabulla the rural primary


ough admitted that they did not mill with a lot ot activity going on
know the way. around it. There was no sign of
In at least one of these li t tle children working in the fields but
hamlets, naked children play- several teenage boys were riding
ing in the dirt, cried out the name on the sugar carriers.
of the benefactor as the car passed.
Schools stopped at in this area Around the mill area there was
paid no attention to the photogra- also a great deal of motor trans-
pher while he was taking pictures port and a large, sign reading,
and teachers pretended that he was "Your people adore you." dedicat-
not-even there. Many of the homes ed to the benefactor. The super
in this area had little wooden highway moved through rugged
crosses erected directly in front of countryside with lush tropical
them. growth and many trees covered
with orange blossom. Cattle roam-
As soon as the secondary hill
road was left behind and the ed across the highway irL several
road was left behind and the
main highway entered the scenery places ad many women walked
changed completely. The car was th verge carrying bundles on
--1,- their heads.


now rraveulng on the new super
two lane highway which extended
its ultra smooth surface as far as
Monsenor Nouel. Alta Gracia was


With the petering out of the super
highway at Monsenor Nonel came
a somewhat poorer road running


the first town passed on the super to Santiago but nevertheless paved
highway and presented a neat and and in fair condition. Here to6 were


themselves appease imbued with far
more character and life and win-
dow shopping is by far more evid-
ent in Santiago than in the Capital
City.
Smiling, people were to be
seen everywhere and one jeep load
of young people laughingly called
out. "Viva Jefe." The streets were
thronging with traffic and modern
cars moved past the slower but
picturesque horse and buggys which
are popular in Santiago. Many im-
pressive buildings stand m this the
second town of the Republic includ-
ing the giant baseball stadium and
the Cathedral which was open dur-
ing this traveller's visit and being
used for prayer by about a dozen
people when visited.
But by far the most impressive
sight in Santiago was the houses.
Each was neat and compact as to
appear almost doll like and many


ros


Ciudad Trujillo, Feb. 18
by automobile from Ciudi
to Santiago, second bigger
the Republic, .yesterday
be a journey of contrasts
conditions, economy and
udes of the people.
The journey started wit
ing of a wrong turn, p


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of those which fronted close on the
street had big windows through
which a person on the street could
see the beautiful interiors.
Nearly all of these houses had
large, almost approaching life size,
pictures in the form of colored
prints of Jesus Christ and' also
pictures of the benefactor. In one
store.there was a large picture of
Generalisimo Trujillo taken as a
young man.
The air of Santiago was one of
complete peacefullness and there
were no signs of any internal strife
or worry. The first poster since en-
try into the Dominican Republic
was seen in Santiago very dign-
ified and announcing the big par-
ade to be held on Sunday, Feb. 21.
(Santiago was declared to be the
town in which the recent anti-gov-
ernment conspiracy was hatched
according to 32.year old Faxas Can-
to one of the 120 plotters sentenc-
ed to thirty years hard labor. Fax-
as made the declaration to this
reporter at S IM headquarters in
Ciudad Trujillo this past Friday.)
Hitch-hiking on the return
journey as far as Vega was a Do-
minican Army Sergeant of eight
years standing who on being asked
if he intended taking part in the
parade confessed )that he did rot
know anything about it but siuppos-
ed that if a parade was being held
he would probably attend. He stat-
ed that he had been in the fighting
last year at Constanza which he
admitted-was "bloody" but he did
not think that there would be an-
other invasion as the Dominican
Army was r6ady for further att-
empts.
He added that. :'everyone is for
Trujillo," and admitted that he
knew nothing about the recent bomb
plot. He had served in the army for
a period of eight years, was marri-
ed with 10 children and was very
happy with Army life.
This Sergeant was typical of most
of the soldiers at the checkpoints
who were friendly and co-operat-
ive.
On both the outward journey and
return trip on the super highway
tolls amounting to 40 cents each
time had to be paid on an old brid-
ge which still collects tolls. When
jokingly told that our contribut-
ion would help to pay for the new
highway the attendant of the
"Puente Generalisimo Trujillo" re-
plied that it was not for the super
highway but for the bridge itself.
Travelling through the Republic
this week there was no feeling of
tension and although the benefact-
or's iron security grip is ever pres-


- I -
u-~~
=11


-L





* '


Im A. 14 10 .4







SUNDAY, FEB. 21TH, 1960 -


"HAITI SUN"


HAITI SUN
THE HAITIAN 'ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
Gerant-Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN .1950

DOMINICAN ROAD COURTESY

It may seem like a strange note to strike but subject for
this week's Editorial is the 'Dominican Republic -or to be
more explicit- 'Dominican road courtesy.
This is neither meant as a political or partial bias on our
part towards the other side of 'the 'Island 'but is meant as
a public acknowledgment and thanks to thosee Dominican's
WVho gave 'up their time and knowledge (free gratis and for
m thing) to get Your Reporter out of what easily could have
teen a "Jam."
Last Tuesday I left Port-au-Prince 'by ca.r to make the
long journey overland to Ciudad Trujiilo and the political
aird allegiance parade staged 'by Generalissimo Rafael Tru-
jillo, but this is not a discourse on the parade or the Domi-
nican situation.
'Micdway, anrd a long way, between signs of 'habitation the
car decided at a most inappropriate moment to develop en-
.gine tronibles in the form of coughing carburetor. Lacking
the necessary tools to even make a start at correcting the
-trouble it looked as if this was to 'be an all night stand -
but no, no sooner 'had the hood 'been raised for 'a tentative
look than along came a panel van with three competent
,'art-thne mechanics alboaxd.

In short, these .three Santiago residents swiftly located
-and rectified the trouble and would accept no payment
whatsoever.' Further, during the time we were stopped and
undergoing repairs at least three other cars and even a
:gasoline wagon drew ulp to see if ail was well or any help
heeded. 'So with the troi~ble fixed we were 'able to continue
to the Oalpi'tal City.


JEWISH EVANGELIST TO GIVE SERIES
OF SPEECHES AT THEATRE DE VERDURE


Feb. 15 :
Haiti Sun
En Ville
Dear Mr Editor:
Being a traveler of long stand-
ing I have in the past encountered
many strange things and many an-
noying things in the various count-
ries I have visited and beautiful W
and pleasant as I find Haiti I ob-
ject in very strong terms to being
awakened early in the mornings
and having my eardrums attacked
viciously at periods throughout the
day by that local form of adver-
tizing "'Sound Trucks."
They say that it pays td adver-
tise but it will not pay any of Hai-
ti's bu-iness houses if they destroy ULYSSES GRANT
tourism -by driving tourists nmad
and quite possibly momentarily 'DAILEY, M.D.
deaf. This banshee-wailling of loud- Dr Ulysses Grant Dailey, former
speaker, street advertising is one Honorary Consul for Haiti in Chi-
form of product boosting Haiti can cago is recuperating from an ill-
do without. It has been banned in ness for which he "as hospitalized
many Cities throughout the world at Canape Vert Hospital. Upon a
-,recent isit to Chlcarno lip was hn.


andu suggest rtat it e uanneu in
the fair city of Port-au-Prince too.
I remain,



"MASQUERADE BALL
AT THE COURT-
OF KING HENRY"

is the title of the BIG BALL which
will be held at the HOTEL SANS
SOUCI on FEBRUARY 26th at 9.00
P.M.
This will be the great event of
the season and will open the series


Alas that was ,not the finish. On the return journey of Masquerade balls during CAI
Tuesday this week, the car cdhose a very sharp corner to NIVAL TIME.
blow the left 'front ,tire and do its best to 'put itself and A sumptuous B dFFET SPPE s
will be gsered at midnight. Mask
passengers in a ditch. Normally a puncture evokes little are "DE RIGUEUR"
Time or trouble providing one 'has a 'spare and a suitable Tickets are limited and are.
jack -- we 'had the spare 'alright tbut the jack refused to sale now at the HOTEL SANS SO0
lift the car off the ground. CI and HERAUX TOURS on RI
OWce -again ,the people of Santo Domingo came to the
rescue, this time in the Iform of three 'cars, all offering
Sacks and ample 'assistance. 'So once again their courtesy en-
abled us to realdh 'home again instead of spending the night SW S, AT H
in a cane field. Spi
Apart from all this mechanical assistance these people
showedd the utmost courtesy df the road and regard for
the opposite driver -- once again, our thanks.



HOTEL SANS SOUCI


R-

R
ks


ie


I


A N N'O U N C ES IT'S




Big Masquerade Ball
', .




ON FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26th 1960 AT 9:00 P. M.



% SUPER AT MIDNIGHT

$ 3.00 per Person.


TICKETS IN LIMITED NUMBERS ARE NOW ON SALE AT:

HOTEL SANS SOUCI and at HERAUX TOURS RUE PAVEE S

COSTUMES ARE REQUESTED, MASKS ARE "DE RIGUEITR"

t- -


nored nith a testimonial dinner
sponsored by the staff of Provident
Hospital of which he was former
Chief of Surgery. There were sev-
eral hundred in attendance. Many
prominent speakers gave glowing
testimonials prasing his outstanding
accomplishments and fifty years
service to the science and art of
Surgery.
For many years, Di. Dailey was
a nimember of the Mayor's Commis-
sion on Human Relations in Chica-
go. He is a member of the Govern-
ing Board of the International Col-
lege of Surgeons, and American
Medical Association. He has seIv-
ed as president of the Nationml Me:
dical Association.
He has contributed over fifty art-
icles to Standard Medical Literat-
Lire.
In the Surgical Society of Ma-
dind, the ITniversit;, of Bordeaux
a.-d simil., sc'.c:i;; e in .-arioujs
parts of the \world, lie serves as one
of their distinguished members. In
19-4, Dr. Dalle\ gave a series of
lectures on th.r;:: disease at ;':
School of Medicine of P-au-P. Sev-
eral Haitan physicians have taken
post graduate t'aming in Chicago
under his tutelage.
Some years ao he was decorated
by the Haitian Government for his
services to the country
Dr. Dailey performed mission
work for the US Govt Inlurmation
Service in India. Pakistan and Afri-
ca.
Dr. Dailey holds honorari- degree


from his Alma Mater, Nor t.


Evangelist Mrs. Irene Hanley,
noted missionary to the Jews will
be the speaker at Theatre de Ver-
dure February 26-28 at 6:30 p.m.
every night except Sunday, when
service begins at 4:30 p.m.
Mrs. Hanley,- who is sponsored
by the Haiti Inland Mission, has a
burning message which will inter-
est all classes of people includ-
ing religious leaders, Jewish, Cath-
olic, and Protestant.
She is often invited b, Rabbis to
speak to her own people, and they
hear her gladly. Ministers of many
denominations recommend her high-
ly.
A cordial invitation to hear her
message is extended to all.


AMERICAN EXPRESS
CREDIT CARD
PUBLISHES FIRST
COMPREHENSIVE
CARIBBEAN
DIRECTORY
New York A special directory
of more than 2,000 addresses where
services can be charged in Bermu-
da, the Bahamas, the Caribbean,
Mexico, Central America, Colomb-
ia and Venezuela has been publish-
ed by the American Express Credit
Card Service.
Cardholders on a tropic holiday
can use the directory as a guide to
hotels, shops, dining, entertainment,
car-rental, sightseeing and other
services. It is a handy supplement
to the American Express compre-
hensive domestic and foreign serv-
ice establishment directories which
list more than 40,000 participating
commercial organizations.
A first run of 1,000 copies of the
directory was distributed on board
the SS Hanseabc which left here
with a capacity crowd on the first
of four "Credit Card" cruises of
the Caribbean in which passengers
a;e able to charge all purchases
and sen-ices including passage be-
fore sailing and shore excursions
at port of call. The Caribbean' di-
rectory also will be distributed on
the remaining sailings..
The number of cardholders of the
American Express Credit Card has
mounted to about 750.000. The Car-
ibbean directory may be obtained
free upon request at American Ex-
press Credit Card. 30 Church St.,

ern University, Havard and Univer-
sities.
He as received honorary mem-
bership in Societies of Madrid.


GIVE YOUR ROOMS THE

FRESH NuEW r LOOK
--*-^*HMA


7 OCRI asAS' .1
TWICE Ts -
nnw rw Iw, mm uas' %_
I I TWROCE s BEAUTY
APPLIED THIE NEW ROLAERK-E R WAYI


JOSEPH NADAL Agents


PAGE 5


__ __







SUNDAY, FEB. 21TH, 1960


The Fre
S LORD BI[BETT
famous British lawyer who from
194 to 1950 was a Judge of the
King's Bench Division of the High
Court of Justice, London, and from
1950 to 1957 was a Lord Justice of
Appeal.
One of the dearest possessions of
the British people is the right to
think and speak freely, subject to
the rule of law. With this great
right go other kindred rights, the
right to publish freely without any
government permission by licence
or otherwise, the right to worship,
as conscience dictates, without out-
side interference, and, in a word,
the right to enjoy the kingdom of
the mind in perfect hberty.
These things have been bought
with a great price. Abraham Lin-
coln could say in the famous speech
at Gettysburg, that the Founding
Fathers of the United States had
brought forth a new nation "con-
ceived in liberty"; but the free-
doms we enjoy are the result of
centuries of bitter struggle.
People speak of Magna Carta as
though it established the essential
freedoms in the thirteenth century,
when the truth is that the Barons
at Runnymede had no idea of free-
dom as we understand and enjoy it
to day. B ut in the seventeenth
century, when the battle for liberty
was at its height, Chief Justice
Coke used Magna Carta as a great
rallying cry in the struggle for the
Petition of Right, as it was later
used to secure the Bill of Rights
when the century drew to its close.
Great Benefits
From the right to speak and pub-
lish freely inestimable benefits
have come to Britain. Knowledge
has grown from age to age, poli-
tical differences have been resolv-
ed without bloodshed, the dignity
of the individual has .been maintain-
ed and preserved; and all our lit-
ertture for centuries proclaims the
blessings of true freedom. Yet, with


edom of Speech and of Opinion
all this, there is no law in Britain words were printed and published. ly or obscenely; he must-nQt in- but is designed to preserve the
that guarantees free speech. The But in our day a man may say terfere with the citizen's right to wider rights of the individual mem-
great writ of Habeas Corpus en- what he pleases, and if anybody a fair trial: and he must exercise ber of the community and to in-
sures the freedom of the indivi- has cause to complain of what is his right and privilege to speak form the Press of what may and
dual from unlawful arrest, and the said, then a jury will decide. In one freely without injuring others, what may not be done.
Judges' Rules protect him from op- of the last cases of Libel tried by The freedom of the Press in Brit- Licence Abolished


pression of any kind when under
lawful arrest; but no statute spe-
cifically guarantees free speech or
the freedom of the Press. In the
evil days of the Court ot the Star
Chamber in the seventeenth cent-
ury, a man could be imprisoned
for six long years merely for say-
ing'that the merchants of England
were "screwed and wrung" as in
no other part of the world. So late
as the end of the eighteenth cent-
ury. Even Lord Mansfield sought
to say that the printer of the Let-
ters of Junius, who had been char-
ged with publishing a seditious lib-
el, was not entitled to a verdict
of the jury deciding whether the
words were seditious or not; and
the jury must just say whether the


Lord Goddard before he retired in
1958 from the office of Lord Chief
Justice of England, he re-affirmed
the great saying of Professor Di-
cey the great constitutional lawyer.
Freedom of speech consists of little
more than the right to say what
twelve ordinary citizens deem it
proper should be said.
Freedom To Speak.
Freedom of speech, therefore, is
freedom to speak, subject to the
laws of the land that preserve the
balance between the rights of in-
dividuals, and the rights of the
members of the community of
which the individuals are a part.
The citizen must not defame his
neighbour by spoken or written
word; he must not speak seditious-


IN CAP-HAITIEN THE RENDEZ-VOUS IS AT


HOSTELLERIE


DU ROI CHRISTOPHE


COMPLETELY AN RECENTLY RENOVATED

New Monumental entrance and new reception office
Air conditioned rooms with private baths and hot water-

Air conditioned Bar

Filtered water pool with outside Bar

Large tropical garden with parking

Top quality french cuisine .

Evening dance every Thursday

With the Famous Jazz SEPTENTRIONAL


,OA, PANTAL dg AITI,


FEXQUISITE OF SELECTED
Desins Rl Em fIl ush
AND SUPERB S- AND FAMOUS
Quality. -.a.anesos .A -* Stsat.
GRAND RUE. s it PHONE': & Ga 4


HTH


IN HAITI SHOP
AT


F1HER


'S


HAITI'S LARGEST FREE PORT PRICE


SHOPS AND MAHOGANY


FACTORY


1) GALLERIES FISHER ACROSS FROM NEW U.S. EMBASSY

2) ART & CURIO SHOP FISHERS ACROSS FROM CUSTOMS HOUSE

SAVE UP TO 60 Per Cent ON IMPORTS
AND, BUY HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS
STRAIGHT FROM THE FACTORY
ON THE RUE DU QUAI
(AM. EXP AND DINER CLUB ACCEPTED)


ain is also very highly prized, al-
though it may sometimes be abus-
ed. But the immense benefits that
flow from a free Press make t
essential to maintain that freedom
at all costs. There are a few stat-
utes that confer benefits on the
Press, but there is no Press Law
in any ordinary sense, such as ex-
ists in some continental countries.
The newspapers are subject to the
ordinary law of t h e aldnandin,
ordinary law of the land, and in the
last resort a jury will decide whe-
ther any publication complained of
is proper to be published or not.
Newspapers are also governed by
the law relating to Contempt of
Court. If a newspaper publishes
statements calculated to interfere
with the fair trial of a citizen, or
publishes words tending to defeat
the ends of justice, those respons-
ible can be brought before the court,
and fines and imprisonment can be
imposed.
It is important to observe that
the code of law that has been built
up by judicial decisions and by:
statutes, such as thhe Defamation
Act of 1952, and by tile procedure
in Contempt of Court, is not design-
ed to limit the rights of the indi-
vidual or the freedom of the Press,


It is sometimes said that the
freedom of the Press dates from
the abolition of the Licensing Act of
1662. That Act 'made it unlawful
to publish matter without a.previ-
ous licence from the government,
and when Parliament refused to
renow it in 1695 so that people-
could publish as they wished, the-
true freedom of the Press really
did begin. But, not unlike the Ba
rons at Runnymede in 1215, Par
ligament had no thought of the im
mense benefits that were to result
from the abolition of licensing.
Parliament was concerned only
\with the abolition of a monopoly of
the foreign book trade which the
Port of London then enjoyed, and
never gave a thought to the free-
dom of the Press.

But whenever freedom of speech
and rnting is being considered it
is uell to keep in mind the famous
\words of a famous IrisH advocate,
John Philpot Curran, spoken in
1790.
"The condition upon bhich God
hath gi\en liberty to man is eter-
nal vigilance: which condition it
he break, servitude is at once the
consequence of his crime, and the
punishment of his guilt".


1,;- 7-, (




F. ..CLASS PASSENGER SERVICE
FIRST C


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- i


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j


PAGE 6


"HAIT 1


SUN"


DISCOVER THE FASCINATION

OF HAITI


Through Its Postage Stamps

For complete information in Haiti

Stamps and other details which will be

furnished you free of charge, write to

P.O. Box 723 "PORT-AU-PRINCE


rv


_______ ____


1~
1=


.. _- .W .






SUNDAY FE.2T,190'H II U "PG


Do Your


Shopplrg

in Haiti


It is getting so that people are
taking vacations as much to
shop as to play golf, lounge in
the sun ot just relax. And, no
wonder when you consider the
savings to be had through Free
Port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they can
buy the same gifts, in free-port
shops, at savings up to 60% of
U. S. prices. So, for-the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
wonderful vacation in Haiti.
Perhaps the mostfamous free-
port shop in the world is La
Belle Creole. located in the
heart of fascinating Port-au-
Prince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable wonderland
full of the world's most de-
sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
ches, Chshmeres, Handmade
bags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
meras, Liquours and a seem-
ingly endless array of native
handicraft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
sider that one can buy the
world's most famous Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
guet-at discounts of 50% of
the U. S. advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
Belle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might.
be well worth your time to
consider a trip to Haiti.

Al Noustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhaps another reason for
the surge in popularity of
freq-port shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
licy of cooperating with tra-
vel agents in their various
promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tle of free champagne to any
visitor to Haiti who happens
to be celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niwvezary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts to make
the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
mous brand merchandise.
Everyday exclusive items.will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
sands of tourists this year will
come home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
when they went away.


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER
P. O. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI





AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS


MINTON, WEDGWOOD,
ROYAL CROWN' DARBY.
ROYAL COPENHAGEN,
ROYAL WORCESTER,
ROYAL DOULTON,
ROSENTHALE, SPODE,
AYNSLEE, COALPORT,


* I-
.1


GUSTAUBERG.



GEORGE JENSEN,
HANS HANSEN, GERO,
DRAGSTER, GENSE.



The Finest of FRANCE,
ITALY, AUSTRIA,


LALIQUE, BACCARRAT;
ORREFORS,
WEBB & CORBETT,
VAL SOLAMBERT,
STUART, LEERMAN.


OMEGA, PATEK PHILIPPE
JUVENIA TISSOT, BOREL,
AUDEMAR PIGUET,
JAEGER LE COULTRE,
ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO,
ATLANTA, STUDIO,
VULCAIN.


VISLAV,
ENGLISH DOESKIN,
ITALIAN ANTELOPE.



PRINGLE, BALLANTYNE,
BERN HARD ALTMAN,
LUISA SPAGNOLI.




ffB DANISH SILVER,
GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY
and BRAZILAN GEMS.


HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS


VooDoo Inspired
JEWELRY




Native-Inlnred
SPORT SHIRTS


S&


SCULPTURES


Factory Outlet
MAHOGANY
- The Best.


GUERLAIN, LANVIN,
CARON. CHANEL,
RAPHAEL, PATOU,
BALMAIN, WORTH,
REVILLON, VIGNY,
CARVEN, LE GALUION.
FABERGE OF PABIS.
JEAN D'ALBERT,
JACQUES GRIFFE
FATH, PIGUET,
CORDAY.

MINOX, CANNON



ROYAL COPENHAGEI(
ROYAL DOULTON,
HUMMEL.



HARVEY'S BRISTOL
CREAM, An FRENCH,
DANISH and
SPANISH LIQUIEURS.





RAFFIA BAGS
& SHOES




HAITIAN MUSIC
- Collector's Ite


Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS

SWorld Famous RUGS & DRAPERY
Haitian kUM BARBANCOURT


Have us send gifts to your friends in the U. S. A.
without affecting your quota.- See us for more information.


PAGE 7


SUNDAY, FEB. 21TH, 1960


"HAITI SUN"


Q'Ruuu ^e aetedfe s o


*M I -B--------



e^Ww^/a~c


4


t


J .


afe '0






























crisis be-
previously


Dieanis, ai
di Freud


t le u'ao"" votia atta a level o
gain psychism that varies according to
self- the receptive state of the individu-
al ahd with thi subjective impact
nces of the religious atmosphere. And
which the external aspects of the crisis
rit- are linked to a body-technique in
anti which the propelling expression is
obviously limited by the physiolo-
nd in gical proficiency of the dancer-be-
t, liver.


God is re-


**" r 1vu s 3res-
3cesses of tho-
and condensa- v
there is clear a
cation with an o


rows; t sings out the ope
happier tomorrow.
In the light of these circus
es, identification assumes its
aspect, thereby falling inti
fields of psychiatry and ethn
for the loa crisis must be v
as a religious, dramatic and
phenomenon in the frame
a collective performance.
Before the final chapter o
study of'the phenomenon of
sion can be written, it will 1
cessary to define, statistically
economic and social conditi
loa subjects; and I beliveith
thesis of socialized identify
offers an excellent common
for cooperation between ett
ists and psychiatrists.
Socialized identification, the
of possession, associates two i
which, to Western minds, are
sed and even contradictory:
one hand, an intimate mysti
nerience in which profound


ssion assumes
as the cult-
ecomes more
Sin increased
reminiscences
vociferous or
ay gesticulate


Main oFf;ce
In'PETiQ-',V:LLE

Sinclaip Gas Station
5 hoYL jjStC,,nC 4rolft (III
PET!ONVILL Liictet,.
PkChP 174-56
i/A5w
_7Z oot&-,
mvm


Off ice itt
PORI -AU-PRINCE

AN& 4I&M I
NEXT TOTt CA BwiAl
0P.P.T1,0YAL B",NKj'(ANAtV,

Phone:396




S- '*i*.**.*a
p :


"HAITI SUN"


'SUNDAY, FEB. 21TH, 1960


l Space restriction last week prevented the "Sun" from publishing a
INcomplete chapter of the Constitution of the Republic of Haiti -1957-
so this week we have printed the concluding articles of Chapter IV,
Public Law.


CONSTITUTION OF THE REPUBLIC OF HAITI ,-- 1957

(PUBLIC LAW CONTINUED)

Article 18.-No one may be removed from the jurisdiction of the judges
assigned to him by the Constitution or by law. A civilian may never be
amenable to any military court whatsoever, nor may a member of the
armed forces, in a matter of ordinary law, be removed from the juris-
diction of the court of ordinary law, execpt in case of a legally declared
state of siege.
Article 19.-No domiciliary visit or seizure of papers may take place
except by virtue 'of the law and in the legally prescribed manner.
Article 20.-No law may have retroactive effect, except in penal matt-
ers, when it is favorable to the offender.
A law is retroactive whenever it takes away vested rights.
Article 21.-No penalty may be established except by law or applied
except ini the. cases determined by law.
SArticle 22.-Citizens are guaranteed the right of ownership. Erpropri-
ation for a legally established reason of public utility may take place
only on payment or deposit of a fair and prior compensation to the order
of the person entitled thereto.
Property also entails obligations. Its use must be in the general interest.
The landowner has the duty toward the community- of cultivating,
working, and protecting the soil, particularly against erosion.
; The penalty for (failure to fulfill) this obligation is provided by law.
Property rights do not extend tq springs, rivers, or other- bodies of
waAAr, or to underground mines or quarries that constitute part of the
;.' public domain of the State.
She law shall establish the regulations -governing freedom to prospect
aiid the right to work underground and surface mines and undergrourld
carries, ensuring the owner of the surface, the concessionnaire, and
-.'-.' the Haitian State a fair share in the profits derived from the develop-
p" ~nt of these natural resources.
S..The. law shall limit theq maximum depth or the ownership right.
S:- '-Article,23,-F-ieedom to work shall.be exercised under the control and
'.' permvision of the State and shall be regulated by law.
However, subject to the exceptions and distinctions established by
'.'l. .law, no, iniporters, commission agents, or manufacturers' agents may
S.. 'r: gage in retail trade even through an intermediary.
: -The law will define what is meant by "intermediary.''
Ci-I;Le..::rld 24.-Every worker shall be entitled to a fair wage on complet-
.s ".'4. hsi apprenticeship .and to health protection ,,social security, and -the
-"i.' "'li-ei.g of his family to- the extent of the country's eqoniomic deve-
nt.. '.
... ,t. shall be the employer's moral obligation to contribute; according to
-; i ,i means, to the 'education of his illiterate workers.
t' -Every .worker shall have' the right -to participate, through his repre-
I e' ,.?tives ;in the collective determination of working conditions, every
wrker shki be entitled to rest and leisure.
Sy-:. "'Every worker "shall have the right to defend his interests by trade-
''-mion. action Each worker shall join the union of his trade.
ii Aual, leave with pay 'shall be obligatory.
SArticle .25.-Capital punishment may not be imposed in political matt-
,:i4p. .rf, except for treason.'
: -The crime of treason consists in taking up arms against the Republic
M'"' Haiti, 'joining the declared enemies of Haiti, or giving them aid and
,:-'-^^ TOn F. '

t.:'Article 26.-Ereryone shall have the right to express his opinions on
y 'matter and by any means within his power. The .expression of
9a' pinion, whaetver form it takes, may not be subjected to prior censor-
'ship, unless a state of war is declared.
Abuses of the right to expression will be defined and punished by
law, without 'prejudice to freedom of expression.
t'..: Article 27.-All faiths, and religions shall likewise, be free and r6-
'li...;:- cognized. Everyone. shall have the right to profess his religion and to
'i.' worship, provided he does not disturb the peace.
: No one may force another to belong to a religious society or to
.. follow any religious teaching contrary to his convictions.
Aricle 28.-Since marriage helps to..maintdin good morals by con-
', tributing toward a better organization of the, family, vjhich is the.
foundation of society, the -State must, by every means, facilitate it
and encourage its spread among the people, particularly in the peas-.
ant class:
The law will specially protect Haitian women.
Article 29.-There shall be freedom of education in accordance with
S.the law, under the control of the State, which should see t4' the moral
.and civic training of ybuth.
Public education shall be a responsibility, of the State and the Com-
S munes.
Elementary education shall, be compulsory:
Public education shall be free at all levels.


TE

tion
A
crime
,or o

Ar
unar
obse
to o
Tl
tirel
Ar
part
Th
one
Th
ons,
ing.

Ar
or n
An
proci

Art
Th
(of t

'Art
comp
and
recon
citizen

Art
on cc

Art
matte

Art
stituti


technical and vocational training must become general.. PHENOM NA OF...
everyone must be given an equal opportunity for a higher 'educa- (Continued from page 9) '
,solely on the basis of merit. mysticism, of which the loa crisis"
article 30.-In the cases Specified by law, the jury is' established in is a part, leads to a direct seizure'
ninal matters and for political offenses committed through the press of an individual by the gods,
iherwise. through possession. The various
eis. gods are incarnated through the"
medium of their believers, in ac-
:ticle 31.-Haitians shall have the right to assemble peaceably and cordance with a typology that is.
rmed, even for the discussion of political matters, provided they carried forth by tradition; the Vo-
rve the laws regulating the exercise of this right, without having dun faith guarantees its ultimate
cohesiqn. The types of divinities who
obtain prior authorization. '. "make up the ceremonial: appears.
is provision does not apply to public gatherings, with remain.en- have a primary fuintion in the re-
y subject to the police laws. ligious ceremony; and the- Vodun
ticle 32.-Haitians shall have the right to unite and to form,politictal initiate is riot playing a role, but
is totally identifying himself with
ies, ,trade unions, and cooperatives. is ot.ally idnifig himself with
es,,trade unions, and cooperatives. God. This is not a performance,
is right may not be subject to any preventive measures, And no but an incarnation,an a ll-invasive
may be forced to join an association oc a political party experience, a "possession."
ie law will encourage the formation, of political parties, trade uni- AA distinction must be made be-
tween, ritual possession, and sick-
and cooperatives while regulating the .conditions for their function- tee ritual possession and sick-
ness-p6ssession with generally oc-
', curs outside 6f the ceremonial at-
S mosphere. As for the pathological
ticle 33.-The right of petition shall be exercised personally by one scoria displayed in some loa crises,
nore individuals, never in ithe name of a group. it cannot be regarded as a perma-
h'ent characteristic --one that is..
y petition addressed to thd legislative body must follow the regular typical of.all criseuts- it mus
dure permitting a decision. i t st be
dure permitting a decision. related to, the private and strictly
I personal case. history of the indi-
ticle 34.-The secrecy. of letters is inviolable. iiual.
e law ill determine what agents' are responsible for the violation The "drama" of Voodoo -andc.'
he secrecy) qf letters entrusted to the mail, we use that orbe viewed in its uxnieta-.
meaning- must be viewed in juxta-.
position with the problems of rthe
ticle 35.-French shall be the official language. Its use shall be ardiety-ridden Haitian, consumed'.
ulsory .in the government ohices. The law will determine the cases by economic distress. Only in this.
conditions in which the use of Creole shall be permitted and 'een light can we art p the ula l impact l:
mmended- in order "to protect the material and moral interests of be bound to agree that, if only fromi
*ns who have not an'adequate knowledge of the French language. the .viewpoint of the mental health
bof'a people waging a heroic strug-.
icle 36.-The right of asylum shall be 'granted to. political refugees gle against the pit-falls of ignoir-
anqe. and misery, 'this catharsis is,
condition that they obey the laws. of the country. effect and miseryths caais is,
The e'thno-psychiatric evaluation'
icle 37.-Extradition shall not be granted or requested..in political of the.social and .economic factors .
rs. involved in the loa crisis, there-
lore, calls for the rejection of the,
c4;'barge of bysteria>.. I believe we
ide 38,-The law may neither add to'nor derogate from the Con- acge o l yu.etia.h I believe ie
icah conclude that the phenomenrfo
ion. The letter of the 'Constitution must',always prevail. of o possession Voodoo, as it oc-
c6drs with the afore mentioned cha-
racteristics, and within the frame-
wotk of Afro-Haitian mentality,
Smay be accepted as a normal phe-'
Snomenon

LE CENTRE .D'ART
Founded .1944-
A Exclusive agents:' !
A raA'5 Allix, Amraa, Armand, Baz e.
on ,the label Beoit, Atau7 'Blanchard, Desro-
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a.. ., ;osieph, Lentes vei ,' aa tad, i.
l. ~a s. Nlin *m..Obin, Plirre, St. S i
SBrie, : Stephane, E/Urew, ; VItal,, -.


-1 *u -e Revolution .
S.. rom .Pan -merican
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SCk bay h f to Ileftk'
SOpen Monday ,'through'
P Sa -u I

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Served axwsivnv at Hat's leading -
SWOTLS RESTAURANTS & BY CONN01iSSf .'
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- -- I. ~ r. -J
*- '1u --'
' -: fr


PAGE 10






,SUNDAY, FEB. 21TH, 1960


"HAITI


'ACTIVE LIFE AT 50 ERIC ETIENNE


WANTS TO BE


50 year old, Eric Etienne, a Cap
Haitian resident, has led a busy
nd active life engaged in a diver-
ted list of jobs which in the near
'ltre he hopes to culminate by be-
ig a farmer.

S'Born in Cap Haitian on July 10,
SEtienne went to Lawyers
ool in the Cap where he gra-
tdited in 1930 and commenced
jactice as a lawyer. He soon de-
:ided to drop from this profession
however and next took a job as
.iprovidor to the Marine -Corps from
93 4- pc p ied tbh mar-
ines e t vegt.blep from a n d
~ purc ed by him in Ouanaminthe,
tclos to Vertieres, where he still
Shas acres of land.
Ajljgh Eric has had a long list
of jobs he has always
'aded fto be a farmer and has
heli pnitto his Vertieres land since
ey i'930. Next occupation for him
wa as a teacher at the College
N otr e ame where from 1934-40 he
taught -pupls, French Literature,
-Latin, Greek, Spanish and Astrn-
'omy in a Philosophy class. Not con-
.tent with this impressive list of
objects he also taught science and
physics.

,- From College Notre Dame Etien-
.ne went to teach at the College In-
oternational du Cap Haitien, from
.1944-46 and during the whole time
She was teaching also acted as a
", tourist guide for the Colombian and
" Grace shipping lines where he ac-
...cumulated the fantastic, knowledge
E: of Haitian History which, he canl
.still expound easily today. During
Shis' course as a tourist guide Eric
- male many famous friends, many
of whom on returning home wrote
Shim glittering letters of thanks.











I" "' .






L7 lo -


A FARMER

nong the "personalities" he acted
guide for were, Julian Huxley,
rector of UNESCO, the first Mrs
ithony Eden, Marcos Perez Ji-
enez, Ex-President of Venezuela,
Isgar Rosenborg, President of the
tied Nations Mission sent for in-
stigations to Haiti, in 1945, Gov-
nor Adlai Stevenson and General
muel Sheppard, Chairman of the
ter-American Defense Commis-
mn.

n his position as head of the Go-
rnment Tourist Bureau, Cap Hai-
n, from December 1947 July
59, Etienne headed several im-
rtant delegations overseas inclu-
ng a trip to Madrid as a member
the Haitian delegation lo the 27
convention of ASTA, in October,
57. During the convention he was
charge of the Haitian Exposition
the Plaza Hotel, Madrid.
Since completion of his work with
e Government Tourist Office,
ienne has become Chief Reporter
the Cap Haitian newspaper, Le
*uveau Monde and is also the
ench teacher and in charge of
inslation for the American mem-
rs .of Pote Cole.
Eric Etienne is a married man
th six children ranging from ages
months to 11 years and is defi-
tely a very proud family man.
still likes to meet people very
ich and enjoys taking friends
nsightseeing tours.
3ut, there is still the one job in
e left for Etienne he is deter-
ned to become a farmer and
tie down to work on his own
i acres and he will probably do
too. Finally believe it or not he
s yet one more job he is the
[aiti Sun's" correspondent in the
irth.


e troI ambio4 dole la bands da
Ioulement don. une traction ef w )
S* 6curit6 suppl6mentaires. Un f
h A i positif de silence .rdmt I. diff
riti b6ruits d6sagreable dua P"%E
andi que la construction 16g&6r C
Suuper-Cushion Sans Chambr*
d rmt B absorbr les cahoots do is
toute. Vous aurez moins de puw N
'plat. moims de delays parce. que
S Coitruction Grip:Seal exclusive do
Goodyear 6limine pratiquement leo
Screvaisons habituelles.





.: .. s m a mm
-.'- l .

,' ,:" .L

-us,,. B p,


Port-au-Prince, Haiti This bar-
gain-crammed city is one of the
best places in the Caribbean to
pick up lifetime treasures.
Here, handmade mahogany fur-
niture sells for half the U.S. price,
exciting oil paintings by gifted,
self-taught artists are as low as
$35 and wood sculptures that are
real works of art range upwards
from $10.
Getting a solid mahogany coffee
table or desk back home poses no
.problem. Pan American World Air-
ways' low cost Clipper cargo serv-
ice makes the total outlay for such
items well below the U.S. price.
Coffee tables cost about $25. Desks
run as low as $50 with $75 the aver-
age for one with drawers on one
side, bookshelves on the other.

Tourists unfamiliar "with these
facts confine their buying to ma-
hogany salad sets or trays. A 10-
inch salad bowl costs $6, and 11-
inch bowl $8, and a 19-inch one is
$20. Individual salad bowls run
atMund $1. A medium-size, compart-
mented tray cost only $5.
Now popular with tourists are sets
made of unpolished taveneau wood
on which hot or cold food -may be
served and which, unlike the ma-
hogan. sets, may be washed. (Po-
lished mahogany may be wiped
with a damp cloth but must be
dried immediately. A salad bowl
of taveneau, 15 by 14 inches costs
$5 75 with scissor servers .priced
at $1.75. Taveneau trays range
from $3 to $10.

Chief among Haiti's exports is
sisal and this product is made into
a variety of attractive items. There
are handbags and hats at $5 a set,
bedroormi slippers and beanies cost-
ing a dollar, luncheon sets for $2.
Items in rush fiber and straw also
abound. Gay hats, perfect for beach
or gardening are about $2. Eye-ap-
pealing ard -practical baskets, use-


JOSEPH NADAL & CO.
Distributoti


(ul as decorative notes in halls,
sut porches or even living rooms,
run from $1 to $3.50. Native dolls
atop the ubiquitous burro, run from
50 cents to $2.50.
Virtually a free port, Port-au-
Prince also offers tourists a varie-
ty of the world's fixury goods. For
example, Swiss watches run from
$10 to $250, petit point bags from
$10 to $60, and Swedish crystalware,
English china and German camer-
as are approximately a third less
than the Stateside price.
Manyp a woman outfits her
wardrobe .in Port-au-Prince. Hand-
embroidered dresses range from
$15 to $65; blouses from $3.50 to


$22, and skirts from $6.50 to $25.
Men are just as eager to buy the
sports shirts with gay Caribbean
designs that sell from $3.50 to $7.
An exciting addition in Port-au-
Prince stores is handmade copper
and brass jewelry with voodoo mo-
tifs. Sample prices are: earrings,
$1.75; necklaces, $6.50 to $15; bra-
celets, $3.50 to $12.50, and cuff
links, $1.50 to $5.

-Practically no tourist leaves Hai-
ti without several bottles of per-
fumes when half ounce bottles of
"Femme" are $F.50, "Arpege" $5,
"Joy", $1-, and an ounce of "Rock
Garden" is $10.50.


r ..


You know

it's a really fine

Scotch when it's

JOHNNIE
S WALKER




JOHNNIE W
S Born J1o20-*til qoin


PREETZMAN-AGGERHOLM,


PI









qg strong


DISTRIBUTOR


SUN"


Haiti Shops Abound With Treasures


PAGE 1


Caledonian Insurance Co.


FOUNDED IN 1805 AND INCORPORATED BY ACT OF

THE "BRITISH PARLIAMENT


ROh YCHEaE7 AAD SOAS

AGENTS FOR HAITI
16 AVE MARIE-JEANNE

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Phone 2603


_









PAG 12'~HSUN" n F


Being Left Stranded Can Make For Fun And


Games

"Fun and Games" could be used
as a wide coverage term for the
activities 2 weekends ago of Kyona
Beach proprietor, Pierre D'Ades-
key and four of his guests during
what started out as a fishing trip.
Seems that Pierre, together with
Art Pinder. All American athlete
and great fsherman, Marjory
Steele, wife of Huntington HArtford,
millionaire of Great Atlantic and
Pacific Tea Company grocery
store, Frank Satnstein, Director of
the Jackae Gleason Show and Spec-
taculars and friend Dona Westphal.
movie actress better known as Do-
na Mae, all boarded the 31 foot
Kyona Queen and set out for La/
Gonave Island early Saturday for
a pleasant days fishing.

All started out well and Art Pin-
der even caught a sailfish with a
Hawaiin sling but alas came the.
unforseen in the form of a broken
down engine on the part of the
"Queen", leaving the party of five
stranded on La Gonave. Art Finder
and Marjory Steele decided not to
accept La Gonave's hospitality and
headed back to the mainland per
sail boat. This tnp was later descri-
bed as very "hot." the couple left
at 12 noon on Saturday and hit Ky-
ona beach 6 hours later at 6pm.
Came Sunday morning and Pier-
re's wife Future, who incidental
stayed up very late Saturday night
waiting for the appearance op the
shore line of Pierre, started to real-
ly worry and despatched one of the
employees at Kyona to Gonave in
a 13 foot dingy with 30 horses of-


___________________--- I


-sWW-s


Pierre D'Adeskey (steering) Dona Westphal and Frank Satinstein about

to disembark after their fast trip across from La Gonaie.


outboard attached to the stern.
Some considerable time later Just
when Future was considering cal-
ling out the Marines the vibrant
roar of an outboard was heard and
Pierre, Sarinstein and Dona West-
phal stepped out of the little craft
after a fast and rough trip across
the ba-. Then came a big rush of
packing and departure as Satins-
tein and Dona had to catch the
3-30 pm plane from Port-au-Prince


now is to get the K.\ona Queen back
somehow from La Gonave might
end up another party.


INVITATION TO


ENGLISH


SPEAKING


COMMUNITY


to San Juan they made it. The clear Saturday sunshine and
spacious facilities of Montrouis Se-
Only survivor left of the party minary Beach attracted more than
Sunday afternoon was. Pierre and 10 members and children of the
he explained that although the Ky- English Speaking Congregation of
ona Queen broke down they really Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Satur-
had a good time on the Island with day, February 20.
the aid of dancing, a full moon and The picnic is one of a series of
Taffia cocktails. All that remains Parish programs organized by the


Fly fast 4-engine Delta DC-6's with
complimentary meals at appropriate
hours and a radar-guided Velvet-Ride.
Direct connections at
New Orleans for Memphis
St. Louis Chicago California


Phone: 331:


Non-stop to

SSAN JUAN *37
Lv. 5:15 pm-Ar. 7:52 pm Sat.

I HAVANA $49
Lv. 1:15 pm-Ar. 4:00 pm Sun.
One- stop to

NEW ORLEANS
Lv. 1:15 pm-Ar. 6:15 pm Sun.$9720


Ticket Office: Jos. Nadal & Co. Bldg.,
/I~r Err as your Tra el Sent-
3 or e Jos. Nadal & Co., General Agents
o' or see your Travel Agent


congregation Another activity is
the open house to be held Monday,
Feb. 29, at the Petionville resid-
ence of Frs. Spitz and Burrowis.
from 6 to 8 pm. al members of the
Congregation are invited to attend.
English services are held every
Sunday at 10 a.m. at the Cathedral,
with Holy Communion being cele-
brated the first Sunday of each
month. Sunday school for children
and a discussion group for adults
are held each Sunday following the
half-hour service.


The Rev. Fr. N. Caryle Spitz,
dean at the Seminary, is priest in
charge of the English Congregation.
The Rev. Fr. Henry N. Burrows is
canon organist.
Choir rehersals are held each
Saturday morning at 9 a.m. at the
Cathedral, and any. person interest-
ed in joining the choir is invited to
attend.
The English services, while des-
igned for English-speaking resid-
ents in Haiti, also welcomes visit-
ors and tourists, Fr. Spitz notes.


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Lunch Dine Have Cocktails
By The SEA-SIDE

-00-

KYONA BEACH

-00-
DEEP-SEA FISHING EXCURSIONS

Swim, Spearfish, Snorkle, Water-Ski
And Sail In Safe Coastal
Waters From Kyona
-00-

HAVE YOUR PARTY AT KYONA


L


m


SUNDAY, FEB. 21TH, 1960


"HAITI SUN"-


PAGE 12




-~r ~


"iNDAY, FEB. 21TH, 1960


"HAITI SUN"


NEW YORK POST TRAVEL 'LOG Visitm1g
LVisiting
S Hear. Now From Last weekend arrived here from
N a New York lovely Miss Kharlene C
Haiti Aldino, Shoe Designer for City Shoe
Corporation, f r o m San Francisco
SM. Jay Jaffee, the most prominent
By RICHARD JOSEPH Shoe retailer in the U.S. and from
-have been calm and peaceful in the visitor's Haiti for a good Los Anigeles, M. Bernie Bernstein,
"?" Shoe. Manufacturer, President of
Snow, and once again tourists are flocking back to this mountainous hoe acturer, President of
of Hispanil. Amano Footwear Corp. They were
of Hispaniola. guests of Mr. and Mrs. Julius To.
aiti has had more than its share of political turbulence during its mar and Dr. and Mrs. Leonard
yeaold history (Columbus discovered it in 1492), but every time Taicher here.
quiet down, tourism picks up where it left off before the trouble Last Sunday arrived here under r
the recommendation of Engineer
Roger Jeanty' and wife Francoise
7.he fact is that Haiti is a place very difficult for the visitor with a of Toronton, lovely Anna G'is a
th voront o, lovely Anna Gci-
se of life and color not to fall in love with. There's a drive about mour and'Shelagh Vansittart. Bru- t
iti, a feeling of surging. movement, that picks the visitor up and nette Anna Gilmour, bountifully
im along with its rhythm. suntaned, is the beautiful wife of
Ic sAi ar. David Gilmour an Importer in
,e ,oiifnrast between Haiti's tourist success story and the failure of David Ginitour an IMaporten in
modern furniture and Manufactur-
.e nilhliboring Dominican Republic to attract many visitors is a final er of Hi-Fi sets. Blonde Shelagh
4:ifof the accusation that American pleasure travelers are basically (maiden name Gilmour) Vansittart
Wmob died sightseeing eyes and ears, enthusiastically disinterested in her sister in law is the charming
W,; W .wife of an Investment Banker. They
midtand the people of the countries they visit. wife of a estistent Banker. They
..7 -, were guests at the Oloffson. Anna
s1:- -was very much interested in the
i and the Dominican Republic share the Caribbean island of His- art and dances and Shelagh in the
ahioaafter Cuba the largest in the West Indies Haiti takes up the hadicrafts.
westernn third of the island; the rest is the Dominican Republic. So that Guests at Kyona Beach this week
attraction of Caribbean winter weather is obviously the same. The Dom- re VIP. Horace D. G i I b e rt
President of the Miniature Preci-
pican Republic has a better, newer chain of hotels throughout the country, President of the Miniature Pre-w
sion Bearings, Inc (M. PB.) of New
tst a richer and much tidier place, and the police of Dictator Trujillo York and Keene, New Hampshire
aintain order in the streets. Moreover the Dominican Republic has and his wife, Packaging Engineer
ent a lbt of money on tourist advertising and promotion. Robert Kurtz and his wife Swance
,: Nevertheless American visitors still rush/to Haiti whenever the political of White Plains, N.Y. Baron Fre-
W- derick William L. Wagemann of
climate. is favorable, and they stay away from the Dominican Repub- Palm, Beach and New York City,'
lie in fruly impressive numbers. Miss Dale E. Frank, Interior Des-
" The answer, pretty obviously, is that they-prefer the swirling,- colorful, igner of New York and Engineer
-noisy, somewhat disorganized but thoroughly real life of Haiti to, the Harry Waters, Inventor of the elec-
72L tric organ and others.
7'enforced cleanliness, the police-imposed order, and the cultural sterility trc organ and others
Sadictato-ridden land. A gay party was held Friday
Sa dictator-ridden land. nite at the Atramovitz the lovely
villa of Frank W. Wilson at Gros
'-,Let's forget about the politically minded tourist who wouldn't be seen Morne. Natan and artist wife Mirt-
i.dead in any dictatorship. The fact is that the trappings of dictatorship za were perfect hosts to a party of
just plain make the average guy nervous. The rigorous customs exam- twenty.
Just plain make the average guy nervous. The rigorous customs' exam--


.inatio (for seditious literature!) the uniforms all around, the omni-
'present police, the pictures of The Benefactor you see every time you
turn your head,-- you know, Big Brother'is watching.


A tthe Olotfson UOste-
trician gynecologist, Dr. Arthur C.
Lawrence of Patterson, New Jersey
and wife Evelyne; President of the
Overseas Travel Agency Corpora-


Haiti This 'Week

Contractor, Bill Wallrapp and wife Medicine. Author of' seven books
Jean, Advertising man Peter Prin- and over two-hundred articles on
be and Publishing businessman, Bob blood and related matters, Dr.
Suelflow. They are all Islanders. Ponder will return to Nassau Coun-
Sol Dworkow, of the Benton E. ty Hospital, Mineola, N.Y.
Bowles Advertising Agency, and his Mr. and Mrs. Eber Arthur, par-
wife, Estells are guests at the El erits of Cultural Affairs Officer
Rancho and were amongst the Theodore S. Arthur of the American
crowd attending the Oloffson Show Embassy, are enjoying a vacation
on Monday night .this week. in Haiti. The Arthurs, who live-in
Dr. and Mrs. Eric H. Ponder will Janesville, Wise., played host this
return to New York on Saturday, summer to Haitian visitors Dr. Ra-
Feb. 27. Dr. Ponder, who stayed oul Pierre-Louis, dean of the Fa-
at the Hotel .Sans Souci, is an ,ex- culty of Medicine, and Mr. Leslie
pert hematologist and taught for Manigpt, head of the Ecole des
three months at the Faculty of Hautes Etudes Internationales.










t A -unique andnew service prouidrd kH.8 Cr.0e 4 -
saves you time tno y an.i ergy. .
.

< W II TO` R6fli ON STATES 'll
P.: TO 65 T UST)NGS :




SNO LUGGING.. : ,
I OtT S

SNO OVERWEIGHT

I. '


NO CUSTOMS PROBLEMS
L


4
.!I


a Haiti, on the other hand, is a place where the poor walk proudly. They tion ot washington, u.C. Mvi. wil-
iam Greenough 11 and his w&ife.
iare proud of their country's position as the first of the independent tam Greenough ad his wife
S nations, and the son This Travel Agency is one of the FOR YEARS NOW TOURISTSHAVEBEEN PLAGUED WITH
-egro nations, and the second independent nation in the Americas. largest in Washington, D.C.; Bill
iAnd so they're naturally sensitive to anything that might seem to in- and Jean Wallrapp of Long Island, CARTING LIQUOR THEY HAVE PURCHASED, with over-
itige their freedom. N Y. Wilbert Watkins and Arthur WBeht charges, .with. customs problems. In one fell
,If their country i poor, it is still their country, Haitians will tell you Sebastian of New York; Dentist Ben i SWoop La Belle Creole has. made it possible to have
Kopek, Mrs. Jean Unternvser, Bu I liquorIpurChased abroad, particularly in haiti, delivered
spiritedly, and if at times they have been exploited, it is their own dKoper i Mr Gerla and hris lo el liqurpurchased abroad, particularly in Haiti, delivered
o did the exploiting. i re NGer and his lov' to your home, in most cases at prices cheaper than you
did te e g. e rom N. Y. can bring it through, accompanied by all .your- other
Ii. Ts-ls/a nation, the visitor soon finds out, not another island depend- Friday here aboard the TS Han- purchases.
:.eTcy of a great power. A small and weak nation, it's true, but one with seatic VIP in Real Estate-Mr. Her-
bert Jacobson of New York City
its-wn. language, its own culture and tradition, its unique history and a beautiful ife CaNrl; Textilet
i~lt own land, much of it barren and needing irrigation and reforestation, Tycroon martin Foss and his char- llrt' -' whtr TO .Sf'Sa,
b lit completely and absolutely its own. ming wife Florence of New Cana- ON A CARTON OF FIVE BOTTLES
. Foreigners seeking to help Haiti and take part in its development an, Connecticut. They were greatly N.Y. el. our N.Y. Yoer
Must dlo soon the Haitian' own terms, with a scrupulous respect for impressed by the beauties and Price* warehouse Meme
aan contr in a things. The 19 years of Haiti. 1. Bell's Special Reserve Whisky $32.20 $13.50 $16.5
iUatian control in all things. The 19 years of American' intervention ?r. and Mrs Hary. Wilson in the 2. Hanky Bannister Finest
.Letvw'een, 1915 and 1934 were years of great material advancement for Candy business in Detroit, Michig- Scotch Whisky 29.90 13.50 16.5
"Haiti, but for the Haitians -especially of the upper classes- it is a an travelling along with gorgeous -3. J. & B. Rare Scotch Whisky 33.00 13.50 16.5
period of bitter memories. blonde Dorothy Voss, (Mr. Wilson's : 4..Ballantine's Scotch Whisky 32.35 13.50 16.5
STh Haitia eit are a t,' a h sister are among the ne\ guests 5. Queen Anne Scotch Whisky 31.45 13.50 16.5
SThe Haitian elite are a tall, 'slender and handsome people. Many of of the Beau Rivage. 6. Gbey's Spey Royal Whisky 31.25 13 50 165
of the Beau Rivage. 6. Gilbey's Spey Royal Whisky 31.25 13 50 16.5
"'-them combine the delicate features of 18th Century French courtiers Among the new arrivals at the 7. Black & White Scotch Whisky 32.00 13.50 16.5
with all the hre and vigor of African tribesmen. While overthrowing Oloffson are. Insurance man Robert 8. John Jameson *** Irish Whisky 29.90 13.50 16.5
Trench political and economic control, Haiti has remained faithful to Boyar and his pretty artist wife. -9. Canadian Club Whisky 31.50 19.50 22.5
Carol Dealer in Trucks. Jack Berg- 1. Bee6feater Gin 28.45 ..11. 50 145
,.Trench culture and learning. The wealthy Haitian speaks a beautiful Carol Dealer in Truc s Jack er 11. Che Heerinn .445 21. 0 642
Trench and sends his children to French lycees and universities. Insurance man Eugene Friedman 12. Crarhbuie 46.00 -"25.00 28.0
'(Continued on page 16) accompanied by hs wife. Selma. Harvey's Bristol Cream Sherry 33.55 2.1.50 24.5



RentAnd Drive A; Volkswae Or Snortsca


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FROM SOUTHERLAND TOURS

FREE ,HOTEL, PIER AND AIRPORT DELIVERY AND PICKUP

TEL: 3591-OFFICE: EXPOSITION NEAR ROND POINT
.. w V ,," v ". '" ,i ..,. -,, ,, ,.,, ,, ,, _' w ,- ", .


PAGE 13


~~~~


--










PAGE 14'
Ii


J. STERLING LAVILLE APPOINTED

TO NEW. DELTA POSITION

Delta Air Lines today announced
the appoIntment of J. Sterling La-
ville as manager of Delta in Cara-
cas, Venezuela. Mr. Laville, a nat-
ive of New Orleans, Louisiana has
been a popular member of the com-
munity for the past three years
since he was appointed manager
of Delta's interests in Haiti and
the Dominican Republic.
Laville, who has been employed
by the company for 15 years, will
be in charge of Delta's operations
office at Maiquetia. He stated that
',e is very reluctantly leaving be-
hind fond memories and friendships
which he will always cherish.
Mr. Doyle H. Payne, J. has been
named the new Manager of Delta.
A native of Atlanta, Georgia and -
a graduate of Emory Univ\ersity, will give him responsibility for
Payne has had' the responsibiliWt Delta's operations and sales offices
for Delta's interests in Puerto Rico in Haiti and the Dominican Repub-
and the Virgin Islands for the past lic, as well as the territory he now
6 years, but his new assignment covers.


B. F. Goodrich-

SILVERTOWN TIRES

Designed to give you the best

Jpqcble service at no extrq heot,


PORT-AU-PRINCE
TIRES, TUBES, BATTERIES AND
ACCESSORIES FAN BELTS,
CONVEYOR BELTS
3, Rue des-Fronts Forts
DISTRIBUTOR
W I L L I A M N A R R


A bachelor, Payne is active in
the community, in San Juan. He is
a member of the Santurce Rotary
Club, San Juan Cham'ber of Com-
merce,"Vice President of the San
Juan Junior Chamber of Commer-
ce, Founder and President of the
Skal Club, Founder and Past Pre-
sident of the Airlines Association of
Puerto Rico, Chairman of the Ag-
ency Investigation Board for the
International Air Transport Asso-
ciation, World Chairman of the Pu-
bhlic Relations Commission of the
Junior Chamber of Commerce, In-
ternational, a member of the Bo-
ard of Directors of the Travelers
Aid Society, a charter member of
the International Society of Avia-
tion Writers, and Past President of
the San Juan Committee for the
Facilitation and Coordination of In-
ternational Civil Aviation.


Free Zone
For Haiti?

It has been planned by the Inter-
national Club of Commerce of Port-
au-Prince to send a delegation of
its members to Panama to make a
comprehensive study of how the
renumerative free zone in the Pan-
amanian Republic operates.
If it is feasible the delegation
will, on its return from' the Panama
visit, recommend a similar z one
in Haiti which would be another
step towards the rebuilding of the
economic structure of this country
with iescources already available.
Willingness to form the delega-
tion has been siguified by five mem-
bers of the Club of Commerce.
They are Messrs. McGurk. Fequi-
ere. Germain, Nadal and Guerery.
When the group departs they will
be accompanied by the President
of thd Haitian Chamber of Comm-
erce, Mr. Louis Decatrel. The idea
the International Club of Commer-
originated when, at a luncheon of


New! Sensational!



S 39 JEWELS



AND JEWEL ROLLER BEARINGS

On Sale At: Canape Vert

Aux Cent Mille Articles

Dadlani's Maison Orientale -


SS ,


n itn, .
I R RL--,PR R GA U


ce, held on Wednesday, July 1st,
1959, Mr John Cusick, Manager of
the Panama Line office here, made
the suggestion that a free zone be
established in this port, similar to
the one in operation in Colon, Pan-
arqa, and in Staten Island, New
York. Mr Cusick added that it
would be easy to set up a free
zone here on the area where La-
Saline existed and on the surround-
ing ground.
At that meeting, Mr. Decatrel
declared that he knows the Admin-
istrator of the Fcee Zone in Colon,
and it was he who proposed that a
Haitian commission be sent to Col-
on for first-hand observation of its
operation. He explained further that
it would be useful for the commis-
sion to include an agent of the Dep-
artment of Internal Revenue.
It was made public at that time
that the formation of such a Zone
would be studied further by a com-
mittee of the Club of Commerce.


PANAMA LINE PANAMA
CANAL CO.'.
The SS "Cristobal" of the Pan:a
ama Line will arrive from Nei
York at 7:00 a.m., February 28th;i
1960.- -
On board are a total of 102 pass-"'
engers of which the following 4I
will disembark at Port-au-Prince:-=-
Mr & Mrs Joseph Becker; Mr
Robert A. Burdick; Miss Elizabethk-
Burdick; Mrs Theresa Chery;-Mr
& Mrs 'Arthur Coheh; Mr & Mrs
Wetmore Dawes; Mr & Mrs Leo.
Dowd Jr.; Miss Rosa L. Ebenstein;
Miss Velia Freda; Miss Ellen M.
Hickey; Dr & Mrs Louis Hyppolite;
Miss Suzy Jean-Jacques; Mr &
Mrs W. S. Konecky; Miss Jean Mc-
Caugherty; Mr Aristide Petoia; Mr
& Mrs Wdlia Poole; Mr Frederic -
Poole; Dr & Mrs Sidney Ross; Mr
& Mrs Hans Steeher; Miss Mary
H. Stecher; Mr David Talamas; Dr
& Mrs Alan Teaze; Mr & Mrs Nor-
man Walton.


,Anfon


I-

ICNEE


RUE PAVEE


SUPER SEA-HORSE V-75, SUPER SEA-]
SEA-HORSE 40, SEA-HORSE 18, SEA-HI
SEA-HORSE 5 and a half, SEA-.lOR
*" ; I "
H'
1t-*.


HOTEL


Petionville
featuring
-- The Smart Saturday Night Club
LA RONDE
9p.m. Until Late Closing
The El Rancho Duroseau
SOrchestra
Dancing Nightly Except Sunday From 7pm
THOSE WVHO APPRECIATE
THE BST DINE -
AT -EL RANCHO HOTEL
And always superb cuisine




SEE THE SENSATIONAL-
NEW 1960
JOHNSON OUTBOARD MOTORS
AT e


- -


SUNDAY, FEB. 21TH, 196U .


SUN"


~
i
i-1
-

I "

?!
;;;
I .


--- IHr~- '1
ai
I6:


"HAITI







I Wednesday, FEB. 24th, 1960


" HA ITI SUN"


4All the talk about the Cabinet falling is a big "canard" Le Matin said
yesterday and stated that the President was very satisfied with his
woung ministers... Cie Gosselin, the French repertory company is return-
aig to Port next week for their eighth season here... David Scharf, Choc-
olate maker of the Haitian Manufacturing and Specialty Company re-
rned from a trip to the States last weekend... Yves and Marie Joslel
Gardere flew abroad on vacation this week... Since President Duvalier
clamped down on the land stealing there has been a flood of open letter
1-fronr-all over the country regarding land swiped by lobbyists... news-
papers are beginning to denounce misusing of government funds. This
-week a lot of words were written about a government jeep that was
repaired for $300 and,then sold to the repairman for a cool $60.. Something
.is brewing at the Haitian football federation, The treasurer resigned
i*then the President. The $500 hotel bill for the 18 members of the Aums-
:trian team is still unpaid. An unnamed three member provisional com-
imittee replaces the two that resigned... The new lottery director has
J:been enjoying a newspaper polemic with an anonymous. Motive of the
'feud is whether the old or the new director upped the Gros Lot (first
:prize) to 100,000 gourdes. The new one admitted the old one had printed
two nionths of-tickets in advance, but it was the new one and-not the
-old one that made it known to the public which means, he says that
-carried out the decision and the old one did not intend to... "In the em-
brase" (flaming) Caribbean the Government of Haiti has decided to
-walk hand in hand with the U.S." Finance and Agriculture Miifister
'.Gerard Philippeaux... The Guarde of Cayes is twenty-nine years old,
which is quite an achievement for a provincial newspaper... The new
I-c'arnival band formed by Ricto Forbin is called "deranges".. Joseph
SBagnidy has returned to print. He deals daily with the realizations of the
SGovernment in Le Jour... President Doctor Francois Duvaller spoke on
Sthi dighity of man and mind at the Architects and Engineers dinner at
4Villa Creole... Congress has signed the Franco-Haitian agreement...
SPhilip Bottfeld's position as consultant with the Tourist Office is not
S'clear... The public is seeking info on the Caribbean Rice Company
. '-with a capital of a half a million dollars for the cultivation sof rice...
. "Nouveau Monde" stated this week that all those who thought it would
-be enough to be interested in Ethnology to receive special treatment
.will be "vont dechanter" disappointed when they learn that the proles-
sors of that faculty get their salary with a delay of sometimes two
&:'months... One million dollars is to be spent for the eradication of mal-
.:aria. Haiti's contribution will be $200,000... The Chambers voted a new
i.law on Cacao and the removal of the tax on sugar if and when the
worldd market price should go under five cents a pound... Finance Under
SSecretary Marcel Daumec is home from signing the Inter American
:lBank agreement in Salvador... An Indian Trade delegation spent two
ldays here last-week.. M. Milford one of fifty young athletes taking part
nin a field day at St Louis'de Gonzague stadium ran the 200 meters in
3 seconds and 5.10 and the 100 meters in eleven seconds...
SMr Earl McQuaig of the West Indies Telephone Company is over from
'Ciudad Trujlld visiting debtors... Ned Burks who joined the New York
Times last September from the foreign staff of the Baltimore Sun is
Expecting to visit Port after his C.T. tour. He was formerly a corres
Spondent in Germany and Central Europe... Cliff Roell is down from Pa
.-visiting his college friend Andre'Kawley. They attended Penn. U. twelve
years ago... Theo Duval the Haitian abstract painter is off to work in
Ithe French legation in Los Angeles, California... Issa El Saieh expects
tao have the opening of his Rue du Quai Art store early next month... Pa-
R,-I
r cila Roy is fiance... There were a number of shop lifters amongst the
cruise passengers who disembarked here Monday. While the SS Station-
-dam, Jerusalemi and Flandre were in harbor a number of leading stores
..-report the tourist took their signs literally and walked off with Free
2Tort watches and even liquor... The Gerard Rouziers are expecting their
third addition... Colonel Franck Bayard, Military attache at the Haitian
Embassy in Washington is visiting home with his family for the first
r tine in a year... Roland Vorbe visited Miami on Insurance business...
Mr. George Salomon is the new Secretary General of Foreign Affairs...
: Daily Le Jour complained of the Tourist shops using a Jazz band to at-
t.tract customers are sending their neighbors mental with the continuous
i'music... R. P. Jacques Clervil Cure of Dame Marie is reported as hav-
ing placed a petition of the population of that locality, at the bureaus
4of the Chambre des Deputes denouncing to the President the cacao mon-
l'iopoly accorded to a certain group who do not pay 40 centimes the pound
_for cacao... HeAding4pr Addis Abeba is former Health Minister Senator
t Elysee who has beer appointed Ambassador to the Court ol
irnperor Halle Selassie... General Antonio Kebreau Ambassador to the
V'.ican is being transferred to Italy. Ambassador Jean Duvigneaud
& "ng across town to take the General's old Post... Pianist Micheline
T-adun Degfs left Friday for Germany where she will study piano or
scAholarship for one year... Mr and Mrs Robert Nadal returned lasi


S-.

,.- ,. -


week from a brief trip to Europe... The new Camion "Toujours Im-
maoulee" property of Pharaon Tervil was immobilized last week when
it broke the drive shaft crossing the Rue Americalne cane express way...
Colonel Marcaisse Prosper Port-au-Prince Police Chief from 1946 to 1956
was accorded a Gdes 900 pension by Presidential decree in accordance
with the law on military pensions last week... For the Carnival of Stud-
ents Saturday Feb. 27 a contest has been organized between all the stud-
ent bodies University and High-schools for a "Student Carnival hymn".


ODVA RICE FLOUR WITHIN REACH

OF EVERYBODY'S MEANS

In order to increase and enlarge purchases by the consumers of its
highly vltamined rice flour, ODVA has just decided to offer this product
in small bags of one, five and ten pounds. 4 4


The prices, at the ODVA sale's office, situated at
du Centre" and "Rue des Cesars will be as follows:
Bag of one pound.........................
Bag of Five pound........................
Bag of Ten pound................... .......


the corner of "Rue


Gdes:
Gdes:
Gdes:


y,
0.35 or $0.07
1.50 or $0.30
3.00 or $0.60


q HOTEL -

MONTANA

PETION-VILLE


WEEKLY ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM :


TUESDAY: 7'30 pm. to Midnight Creole Buffet under
the Stars on the Terrace ,,ith excellent Dance Band.
At 9:30 pm. Meringue Lessons by Lavinia Williams.
WEDNESDAY: 7 pm. to 8:00 pm. Complimentary gee-
together Punch-Bowl Party.

FRIDAY: 7:30 pm. to 1 am. Gala Dinner-Dance in
Cocktail Lounge. Show at 10:30 pm. No cover-
charge.


EVERY NIGHT: 7 to 9 Cocktail Hour with
Combo.


native


OFFICE BUILDING
UNITED STATES OPERATION
MISSION TO HAITI.(USOM)
Feb. 19, 1960
Introductory, remarks. Mr. H. Yoe
Blessing Monselgneur Poirier
The Honorable Gerald A. Drew
Dr. D. A. FritzGerald
His Excellency Gerard Philippeaux
Mr. Raymond Pierre-Louis
Dr. D. A. FRITZGERALD.-
Dr. D. A. FritzGerald, occupies
the position of Deputy Director for
Operations in the International Co-
operation Administration. In this
position he directs the operations
of the worldwide program of ICA,
Dr. FntzGerald has been associat-
ed with the International Coopera-
tion Administration and its prede--
cessor agencies since the beginning
of the Marshall Plan in 1948.
Dr. Fritzgerald has been one of
the world's outstanding authorities
on agricultural commodities for
many years. He served as Chief
Food Consultant on President Tru-
tan's Economic Mission to Germ-


any and Austria in 1947. During the
same year he also served as a
Special Consultant to the Secret-
ary of War. He was Secretary Gen-
eral of the International Emergen-
cy Food Council from 1946 to 1948.
Prior to thaf time he was Director
of the Office of Foreign Agricult-
ural Relations of the Departmeit'of
Agriculture. He is graduate of-the
the University of Saskatchewan,
Iowa State College and aavard
University, where he received, his
Doctor's Degree in Economics. He
also served a number of years as
an economist with' the Brookings
Institution.
In addition Dr. Fritgerald is
highly respected throughout b o t h
the executive and legislative bran-
ches of the U.S. Government. His
many years of directing the world-
wide operations of ICA have gain-
ed him respect throughout the
world. Because of the heavy press-
ure of his work, it is seldom'that
he is able to visit individual count-
ry programs. Therefore we feel very
fortunate that he has been able to
arrange to visit Haiti at this time.


CARNIVAL...
(Continued from page 1)
Tele-Haiti. Queen of the East; Cur-
acao Trading, Queen of the City
and the USANA- will carry the
Queen of Petion-Ville.
Last Saturday night a carnival
meringue contest was held at which
11 meringues were presented. Win-
ning tune was presented by Jazz
TI-TA-TO with Jazz Dragon runner
up. 15 bands are to take part in
the Mardi Gras cortege and the
following nine leading Port-au-Prin-
ce jazz bands are included, Diabo-
lo, Arroyo, Deranges, La Ronde,
Titato, Nirvana,'Dragon and Zobo-
lo et Yoyo.


PAGE 15


GA YEST




MARDI



GRAS


IS AT



Cabane Choucoune

Feb. 28, 29, March 1 St.


Io l







PAGE 16

NEW YORK POST...
(Continued from page 13)

As members of a ruling class in their own nation, they bitterly resent
what they believe to be American racial attitudes, and many are com-
pletely unaware of the improvements in racial relations that have been
made.

And so, as an American visitor, you're likely to be greeted with warm
smiles and friendly hospitality by the peasants and working people,
with polite reserve by the upper-class Haitians, until they've had a
chance to look you over a bit and see what your feelings are toward
them and their country.
Which is not to say that you won't tbe treated with the utmost courtesy.
The Haitian upper classes are exquisitely mannered. They go in a
great dealfor hand-kissing, the use of monsieur, madame or mademoi-
- elle in practically every sentence while addressing strangers, a liberal
sprinkling of merci and s'l vous plait in all conversations, a chivalrous-
ly protective attitude toward their women, and all the other accoutre-
ments of the old-fashioned politesse of aristocratic France..

All this though, is very much background stuff, and you can keep
it all the way in the background if you want to. You can make your
trip to Taiti just about anything you want it to be, from a strictly-for-fun
escapist's holiday, featuring Mardi Gras and the Carnival season (this
year's peak will be between Feb. 28 and March 1) and fishing and fine
resort living at some of the loveliest mountain or seaside hotels you'll
find in the Caribbean, to a real serious sociologist's expedition to study
native customs and voodoo.
Probably, though, it will be somewhere in between. Most Haitian


vacations are.
People go there to get away from the pressures of American big-city
living- and to relax and enjoy the easy-going atmosphere and the beauty
of the island.



Caribbean Construction Co. S-A.

Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD

Phone: 3955. P. O. BO.. 284




For all kinds of French perfumes
visit Haiti's Smartest Indian stoje
Select your favourite perfume
from our large collection

JEAN PATOU
I- CHRISTIAN DIOR
We offer you the world's famous
brands at free port prices


LE GALLON I
CARVEN -
LANV IN NINA RICCI O
CARON
CHANEL EVERY MO
RAPHAEL
4 _We recommend Ut
etc... etc...
MILOT DINr
SDinner will 1
SEntrance for shove



it THE LOWMvSr PRICE, IS -THE OMLLVPRICF
41>


5,U1W


i Cherief


NDAY AT 10 P.M.

hat you reserve for

ER and SHOW.........$5.00
be served from 7:30 to 9:
w only: ....$2.09 Li


-"C,
~ -V,


w--

SHARP


.. -' .,-,

00 Pp.m
mited-spale:. .


.. :* :
... ; :


SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCASION


~ ~ ---- .' '^ ^ Ar i
: jT ;i^



-' .
. -. .. .. ,
, .. ...


'. .. ..-. _. :., ~-',
: ---,. ,.,:-,. ; ,'"'; ./S .:.;-^J


*


^


"HAIT SUN" Wednesday, FEB. 24th, 1960 -

TRUJILLO'S SHOW.... cuyos de la Cordillera the fly of the various City schools. In th
continuedd from page 2) by night campesenos, named after crisp uniforms and lead by zestfuli
the little native animal who comes college bands, the. school groups,-
for the most pat the lines of Do- out at night. This display by some although vastly silent, were pre-
minican citizenry were orderly and 2,000 men, each brandishing glist- cise and made a fitting limax to
quite contrary to te offal an- ering machetes, was the only show the procession.
quite contrary to the official an- e .



ers of the Secrerolice.fcibly handed in at nd negligent waves of the h
nouncer, strangely quite. This un- acneralslmo Trujillo surprising
most effective one. It was obvious gl.

diusual aspect of a parade intended that the a e ere vividly resembled thtd of an age

es directly before and after the Be- Last of all, after a five hour Archbishop sprinkling Holy water
nefactor's stand, whispered in the wait, came the pupils and students benevolently on his duiu flock
ear of likely passing candidates. -.
"a cheer for Jefe," and other such
praises for Trujillo. ///// ////
POLICE "CHEER LEADERS" MEN'S SHhIRTSi
This of course inspired the desir-
ed effect and usually led to ragged CARVEG
bursts of "Viva Jefe," etc. It must
be admitted that these "cheer lead- HA KER ES
ers" performed their appointed
tasks admirably and were not con- 7
tent just to stand whispering on the
side of George Washington Avenue.
Practically w it h out exception, B y JARO
each group that passed the official
stand had its ranks generously L I
sprinkled with gun-toting members IPARmIT
of the Secret Police clan, These -
cheer leaders, all of whom would
have done credit to an English Ser-
geant Major on the parade ground,
distinguished themselves by an en- u aiss
thusiastic lifting of the right -arm
as they passed in front of the Be- BLOUES
nefactor cheering revealing at .
the same time a holstered lethal
weapon strapped to the right thigh.
Despite all this infiltration there
was, it must be admitted, several
stirring displays of affection on the -
part of the people especially the FREEPORT SHOPPINCi CENTER
unknown with the transistor radio 53.55.Rue duQuai '
tuned in on the parade who cheer- i
ed madly only to have his voice D sses and. ShirtmadeonordeI
bounce back through his radio's and delivered in 24 bours.
loudspeaker seconds later. W ship to fhe Shates
Late in the parade came the Co- V


The SATURDAY EVENING POST said:
"One of the highlights of Port-au-Prince night life
Sis the Oloffson's uninhLbited Monday night flow
show..."


the-



HOTEL Oloffson

4 h


'. ,;




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