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Haiti sun ( Febraury 14, 1960 )

Digital Library of the Caribbean Duke University Libraries
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: Febraury 14, 1960

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00250

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: Febraury 14, 1960

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00250

Full Text


B a, ". ,." -
- UNDAY, FEBUAY 14th 1960 Po -P e HITI No. AvenMaieJeanne CITE DMASAIS ESTME N.








C' " + "n s o M rl e H e a l i n g s. . .. e x e d. poarh
c...


T Suday









^ ..i^_"'U""iyM ARBY u14thlo 1960.here in. Port-u-Prince 37der divin-aeledie(ae d tr-o D heIe. edMAto IS ges .and,. i .',
S he un Th e n e 1
n 'r, o, 'i -- a-- m. ".. .






Atna-e hiraClea Bevings theorda lt




7ti.S t h sio ea' "h rnT. +++'- p...n e shre a





S.ll. si-a ....ma de ,er e Chrit .. .. .0 .. .e d" cm e ini e
'Sun + tD' '. e H "WS to ti l ........ tho "hat ',. .'.l".""
Me. Pt, ,U;..A. p
presidentf .Pe
EVANGELISTCERULLOHE.RE th" bl 'r. 06th'.











ivm in Omo g L.ts P rherdne enor P t-hu-Pwinie" o deisr!t dFneb.ruah.ew, nf".sOC, rul.'clatesparcipto In thes a- a.
FOR' MET I" NGS 4 .. . ae D r "to s: ""a t




oQthe rbnsof Mracle Heabaerie o ur e. e of Sahation of-alingsad 'by elate th l t ; -a- cn as e oi
L G-"antoursWIThII Lt t e l d.r e
Sdcan eaevange list Mo i h er ie t T. c b taedit n
I A N uo hr e o Port-s au-IPrie, a n e unter i ep td-.. '' to blad h" ereD 'oea





~ )Thuo sl: ^ m peec ot.the s sme owshipo Intern- b ruj r zt wte ioe' with sa i er n e f adp i:
on oatonale e re n de in. p s realf ttea s e he 'ts a .r emluto, : oeti me














merian. .iste's whoself are .... toche;DrHaLtian. Fim *sarlo ct.a 7a o E e d b u ntim o wan
D es t- te "uian.estr *.ca e o. t e .d .e w. . n s l h s b d ',. o n 's.d

os o i ihs ti'. Atten an ee t T hursdaye wie vahing iitr "es' s,p bo






h he iaore trs. 10H.'theR -l.'epu M. %lae,"uL- Fot -"verwa acco p i". r' j' .... -m r.1,
pk atic R'atiomes of. extroubd that -our .Chief Stat e t A gbastadr .Repy o. Charmter soo, tques" e ir+ I s, ,wrho u p. esns ...r* .eq,"jw-d to m that ate,,

.on, February 9 and are to-be e .d fl, e ,youdr'- fustriqs 0and flab?'t1 Is imilh-o[ ,
ib io N itlf t Lord; and Ldy Beaierbrook are each .n ghb until r th Gera of t. Th e or tha e
SI- ubrlicn w tohei r.- w.Lar i visit to p uonth) ti witness Cerullo,'sl h ,(Coptinu on paeto ople t n re om puintora t








i lln-i a nof' Iistl-',-oit of t ther eo in; tupicver y a c lIritd l oh-r'2hd"-' e ofen pestion or the t
S a'on t oi.' masbbe f to iur t ne. ,; .. . , c o. -of "Salvation Healing ancd a *o o, ,.. e 'an s" ack ne scllen thbo si d -
e d i. t s or y es by. Fath in Go d."' M nI h t.i t in' .eve' the r eht, l .
LOGAfNi 'rs I the.l [Aof6NtoAnTr. The.ChriaaiBs big pness MhtMARINES hTOc wLAND aat themsls atoth-ato9ur
+Gt +4rADDRHaS+ ., D A t ead OfreAFellowshd Thl nairnt. l wert it-' -. FFt.1 20TH. s.to taatbhe itatdtof rgae dorm Amgano e
hSrea pae d.r the....t it" rlati'"" i'
s 'a y ,b ft a n s 't 0 e w s t o f re u
S '. .a Haiti by President, 'Dr. Fran, large party U.S. Marines ntal orders, whether political t























.CAMPAIGNING SOUTH OF THE BORDEl adminiBtrative, have Malwas'. be A
: . uver and Se PERONAITY transmnatorittdhur through the 'regular,
[CAhaON-lre ,w.. ...ore,.ruarr'-
,.d. .e On. Thu day morning': .,of ,' Bhomme wo 'o the oen'g Fe- y-OaoTH ig ith sWil fhe .nthei adminlistrt ~ e ordo
yto ,,4aan6' the" 'finh r of' Work and engnht of.ddtl'e can -gav.the 6,qp- ores. from ithe U.S.S. Boxer. a d b av n the ..ace f aIe ,
.e.rt. ,at ;-.lo .. w.. ri.ederic Dks arx, addressvwhich "s, "replwt'd U.S.S lankin. Thu .Boidr is>.a he proper attitude&
Save tm e -YPko A.. as t b-o' President of the PeUowship 'converted Aiuraft Carrier Fand t 'by c.Gover 1. t
Shi Diectdr Gee of the Instie Dem. Shakacan of'Cafo wo te latest t hing the U. s ar- hemslves, some
dr torn day. ftebar ei an dt Dr. LthoemA dme a tactis Pn ohen uononimeblyeonc hat -and
ae + winter's +wh aNewek..oDr.nn-;',and- at-n I wil nhunmeaU s.been
4 t, D. nque .ourcan. '' ron of hetloplersb an as rtro y thab e nfm. dr-iz t. h
g ,4esno Ir grz s:.,c D0 iE E on a tour ,c lbined WIt h man- 'initlatuve, ot whcue m p'
kandWthat Putde 1t r0oeera D o the owIn, t thei reforms or prnssur
E! e _54p a d! hatians' of. er ruid.thatporChie State a ss Rpe Char me e. s, qe, in the V1 Isla rou.. ~ reported tom om thtq on
a att s f c eof te Institite General o't th Te t o''swl t enter P s t h o o D rm
U. on om n ti,. .age0 han'so e n ftre"' . te n a. ors use unethdca m aindt 4 ...
oton.'ubceho" Haiti Forel Ofdce, le. the rine harbor a'id. on .Feb. '. t' .h.
RcaP enRepublch nhega -o are going to be.,'s.- ri"tose oth elontho of rioe-'
j n .'"o u"
S.". .m. hre "fo '"h '... ey f ." to mo .di ndo toeidi nfjrefoddrefy gaatpemtlr,-beatin .go. '" "n""o their' ttl'
legd d-tok atro dedication to the wlelW re -mhe has -been- q 'ad e a]ctiiies- for 28'1. officerstand' tuid"
,"kd'eb -,accred;ed OO men ...Th, -ack of scruples41111hly.usb-,.q
-ialttoh hate tt t iaion o mbasa r .. n.Boxer w fire ti "
o -1-philosopoln'y, 'cd B 'ox T s,: -Smerwch w firte per. wohN ,-eiitte
r universe 'ont6rrow. -r.. Carlmrn(r' rw accompanied I u salnte wc w he them 'tod jas. adr t e ru
Dr.n V ghn- ias repracedf by the new First- ecrtar of t tu the aitianattry S, or they dform le their
s'bef re. .a-Dr...Laont5 -'as. Director pf 'tvel latian Em-6ass 1 ij,'`6 ir nrighbour,- o l' FOil Nitoif6io ypum 't lt r ard'-. th
IRVn t tt?,of 'Social',A~sri- g Fepubl~c:Henr SEiclai' ., authority. of -therposition or;'their
-I -" &'''61-a' _._-_- .'ell"tions.
E l~I G r o p t, d.F.o r i d a P o l i t c i a f t TVM atFrwin
,r oe"e fprceIaganst thoseca

hlung to'-serve their prIvatejinter '
zest. The . presidential or !-
-,. 'e mental orders, whether political.
4 BRDER administrative, havewa

e'k I. OF' THE. WEEK"-' channlsad ministrativeorder.
"" George A. S'tuather~ 47 year ld "I 'ta this principle forthbe of-
IIfit iDecarations .b eenoor of Firid ,ho has hcqn fort that has promised io .be o.
asS'nalor,: George A.' projecting lmslf into the Ame- tusince October 1959 to"" con-
pv.}eparted 'Port-au-Pruaw can-and South Americ' press with tnue in an amplified fermL'. 1T "
iftc'om ,on Thur~sday this 'reiu1Wty during the-course of .txis hILL COST ME NOTH1NG TO
:,6&ct flight-.o Miani. 11 country tour of, this area has PUtNISH' TILHT FORM OF SABOT.,
.0btrai. and' Latin Amer- column as the Personality of the and economic balance that I want
". s pge bat, Dr" 'Francois 'The tall Senator. born in Atlantic cilessly that infamous traffic. My
.. -nmthers deeIrn'red City (New Jersey) and bought up administration,'the principles aad
.elt econuontic, progress in Florida, called at Hlaiti, as p)1- structure of which guid& my pro-
heen"a ade. sin his last ished a Politician as he is wA- rpm, -i built on honesty toward
ago laa iti.*''groomed. n]self and the'State, anli the res-
e..p srYars, he %i advis- gpert of principles and justice. In
Ptt'the ud wa ,t wa, b.-i. .. 'wi seemingly every State's this aduudnistration, there cannot be
iaf.nd-that 'Ptesident Do. lending Deniocrat throwing hi; hat' room for lobbyists or pressure
had attainyld stability oat into the fast' approaching U.S. Pre- group.
,. He said 'that th s sidential :-race, it wa.3" fortunate 1i ask you to continue to consider
and attempt to balace that none- o~f the Lrwimer present the questions of your Department.
attprovded a mlim te at the Sm-athe'Vs' press cT,-f rence with that sense of responsibility
.3 U Governmenf ag- here asked hiM whether he' nas which have-outlined and to soh'0






L,'. < ,- .'
'-4' 4-' ,: ,








2


S I ~HAITI


SU'N'"


Haitian Dr. Saves Life


Of Woman In Chicago


Haitian -born, Dr. Farid Sada is shown checking the pulse of Mrs Helen
Gasiorowski after admi isterjng a life-saving injection at the Raven-
swood Hospital last week. Mrs Gasiorowski died and cape back to life
after split-second ternmwork and heart massage by Dr. Sada and memb-
ers of the hospital staff. Dr. Farld,' now a' resident. of Chicago, wed


Joseph of Port-atiu-Prinep Ln Miami lat'"-summer.



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'. 134, Rut do Centre

PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
i
SHOES HANDBAGS HATS

HAITIAN RECORDS FRENCH PERFUMES
HAITIAN CERAMICS

15 Years Experience in Handieraftt.
P.O. Box 975 Open Every Day
roam -8:00.a.m. To 5:00 p.m.
.


I -i
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1


L. F .Goodrich



IILVERTOWN TIRES,

Designe, to give you the best

-possible -service at no extm. t

S S.ee them today.

PORT-AU-PRINCE
TIRES, TUBES, BATTERIES AND
ACCESSORIES FAN BELTS,
CONVEYOR BELTS
3, Rue des Frants Forts
DISTR L IB A M NTOR
W I L L I AM N AR R


The Chicago Sun-Titmres recently
featured a front page story and
pies. o( a Chicago woman, Mrs He-
len Gasiorowski, 46, who for hall-
an-hour one ,day last week appear-
ed dead only to be bought back to
life by split second teamwork of
police, firemen and Ravenswood
Hospital., personnel.
Playing a major part at Ravens-
wood in the sayvng of Mrs Gasio-
rowski's life and later singled out
for praise by the Hospital Administ-
rator, Mr. 'Henry J. Kutsch, was
'Haitian born Dr., Farid Sada.

Dr. Sada was amongst those cre-
dited with saving the woman's life.
She recovered after a heart stim-
ulant was injected together with
the use of heart massage and a'
breathing apparatus. She is -report-
ed to -be still in critical condition
but to be "doing as well as can
be expected."

Son of the'late' Mr. Najib Sada
of Champ de Mars, Farid Sada
received his, medical training and
degree here at the Port-au-Prince
Medical 'Faculty. He did his intern-
ship at the General Hospital and
is. no w undergoing post-graduate
work at the Ravensbrook Hospital.,
Chicago.
qis sister Jacqueline Said has
'a modern-pharmacy, the St. Geor-
ge, sited in .front of the family
residence on the Champ de. Mars.


- SOCIAL NOTES -

Famed couple, Robert Mbtherwell.
and wife, Helen are visiting.Haiti
at present after arriving here 'iues-
day pr', Panaima Line. Robert is
a painter' and Professor of Art at
Hunters C#llege in New York and
writes as .an art critic for several
magazines and papers. Helen Mo-
therwelA, .well k no w n, as HeJen.
Frankenthaler, is also a painter
and last October &'on the first prize
of the Museee d'Art Moderne in
Paris. The couple are staying at
the IOloffson.

An eight' pound baby boy was
born to Mr & Mrs Jackie Auguste
on Thursday ,this week at 11am
Jackie Augifse is expected home
shortly from the North Pole, where
he is .constructing a railroad stat-
ion. to see his new son who is to
be called Jackie Jr.
S4 I1 '4U


HAVE YOU FOR
IS VALENT1

Today. February 14th, was once
a d6y set aside in -England and
Scotland when each young bachel-
or and maid received b lot, one
of the opposite sex as a "valenti-
ne" for the year. It was a kind of
mock bethothal, and was marked
by the giving of gifts. Much to the
relief of the eligible male .popul-
ation today, the only part' 6f the
custom that has remained is fhe
giving of gifts while the betrothal
part has fallen by the wayside. But
if the one has gone, the other re-
mains' with 'added fury! For seld-
om does a sweetheart, or finance
forget St. Valentine's day and not
hear about it! In fact, in many a
household, the husband always
sees to it that his M's. or Mine.
isn't forgotten either.

So for you men who have forgott-
en' and are looking high and low
for something sure to please there
is the perfume container and atom-
izer counter at La Belle Creole.
Here you'll find a wealth of things
to quicken any maiden's heart.
And whatsmore, item's that don't
leave a hole in your pocket either!
They're all moderAtely priced,
and depending n" your taste and
hers bf course, there are dozens


PAGE


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I
', i
i ,


Albert Barcdon

S .I '.
, :i
,!. .7:;

"~ "" .,'.^-&
,~ ,,.. .. '. .p.
. .- N- ,; ,'. ,. -:"


Claodinette Salim


i A-


SUNDAY, FEB. 14TH, 1968

GOTTEN TODAY
[NE'S DAY?.

to choose from. The lipstick siz
perfume holder is very popular,
it's just as easy as a lipstick tube
to carry and holds enough perfume'
for several evenings. You'll se-.
these in black with gold trim, and.
in larger sizes, designed by Step
and imported from France. Incid-..,
entall.y some of the small atomiz-.
ers by either Step or Marcel Franni .
make ideal gifts' for a lady's .' '.
ity table, for they're just the' ight-
size and come in such a decorat-
ive variety there's bound "1 to be-
something for you. Some of them'
are Aladdin-shapped cenmic base
with a squeeze type sprayer', and
just 2" high in' all, price-. 'j inre
$3.50. '
Then too there are beautifulma- -
ported Swedish Orrefqrs cysta. ,
perfume bottles in a perfectly,. lv-
ely shape with small,'-round base ..
that spout long thin, easy-to-handle.
tops. These would. certainly be a .
special joy for any gir!, I
There are tiny, tlny purse sized.
squares, some with gold or silver ,
trim, some with French scenes on -'
them,, some with Mother-of-pearts
type tops. Any oT these are ideal
for carrying everywhere as they're --
only about 1" square -for round)
(Continued on page 41 '-

l t'E
*I .-'




_-










SUNDAY, FEB. 14TH, 1960


"HAITI SUN"


Smathers Meets Haitian Press


Explains U. S. Economic


answer and in the exact way re-
quested, he would certainly give an
answer satisfactory to himself.
Questions were then .put to Sen-
ator Smatheis from the floor and
the "'Sun" has chosen those of both
world interest and of course those
pertaining to Haiti in particular
They are set out in the question and
answer form, and as they were put
to Senator Smathers.

.-' Question: What is the imme-
.diate purpose of your trip to Lat-
in A rierica?
"Answer: Mly purpose for the visit
Sis twofold, First. It is an attempt
.6,"% "to open up new and better path-
ways to more and better trade rel-
ations between the U S. and other
countries and secondly to see if
U.S. Senator, George A Smathers these countries have any specific
--climaxed his 10 nation tour of Cen- problems which can be
trail and Latin America when he resolved by action of the Con-
left from Port-au-Prince Airport di- gross of the United States of Amer-
rect for Miami on Thursday at 1-30 ica. If any such problems exist.
. p.. During his two day visit to then they are taken back to the
SHaiti Smathers held discussions U.S. for consideration by Congress.
and interviews with Prcsideiit Dr. ? Question: What problems so
; Francois Duvalier and on Wednes- far have been put before .oii and
day night attended a staz recept- %hat suggestions do you have for
Sion hosted by the Anierican Amnb- kJeir olihtionn?
assador to Haiti. Gerald Drew.:
which was attended by rnan3 merm- Answ,.er: In the nine countnces so
h bers of the business community far visited, many problems have
and Government. been put before me. These probl-
Senator Smatheis also attenderi a ems are not all alike. In each
press conference and during the country I have talked with the Pre-
course of the American Ambh:asad.- sident and representatives of the
or's reception ans,.ered nianyv and country and have had a number of[
varied questions pit to irn by problems put Ia me but, those pre.
S-those attending. In his opje;ain ad- sented have rioeni specific in nat-
dress Smathers spoke to the Haiti- ure and nore of them overall csoi-


an's present and said, "I sincerely
hope your facility at lannac-es i:-
* much better than n-nne as I regret-
ably only speak English." An in-
terpreter' stood close at hand and
repeated in French both Senator
Smathers opening address and all
questions and answers put to and
answered by him.
SHe stated, prior to receiving
.questions from the audience, that
this was his fourth tip to Haiti
which he admired as a beautiful
country and had visited on the first
two occasions for purely pleasure.
the third trip being on business
The Senator said that lie could n..i
think of a happier place to end his
10 nation tour Panama. Bogota.
Quit ?[Lima, Santiago. Buenos Ai-
res, Rio de Janeiro, Caracas, San
Juan, Ciudad Trujillo and finally
Port-au-Prince -and stressed that
the Haitian people had always been
friendly.


Sul


indebtedness which exists in the
U.S. Government today. Also the
tax rate in any Latin American
country is not equal to the dem-
ands placed on U.S. people. Last
year the U.S. Pad an unfavorable
balance of payments of 4 and one
a half billion dollars.
The U.S. pays 9 billion dollars
interest on the budget each year
and despite this still helps the Gov-
ernment of Duvalier and will con-
tinue to help it. However, the U.S.
will only help under certain con-
ditions. It likes to be satisfied that
this (Haiti) is a stable Government
which rill remain in power for at
least the duration of its elected
term and that the Government self-
disiplines itself and balances the
budget and uses. thie aid given by
the U.S to help the people through-
out the country of Haiti.
The U.S. Government has been
very friendly to the Dumalier Gov-
ernment and has helped and will
Ieip within the bounds of reason
but it must be demonstrated that
the Government has the ability, to
stabilize itself as %well as the ec-c
onomy.

5 Question: Ir your opinion.
what -hould the Uniled Stales do
to slop the Communist mo e to-
%wards and into Latin America?

Ans'.er The first thing that 'w
slhoidd do is to hopei and ask ihat
our friends aill stand b\ us Sec-
ond, w\,- hope that people wil r.-
coginize that a democratic institut-
inon is better h' f-ar titan or-n min.


corning the counti-y. I think that i-nm, and third, to combat communn-
relations between the U S. and Lat- isni the thing to do and something
in American countries are as goo, which iwe are doing, is to combat
today as they have ever been. poverty and illiteracy wherever
., Question: Did you lind in any they exist, because that is the gard-


of the countries yon have visited
that the present way of the U.S.
Tariff that should be changed in
order to increase imports and ex
ports"
Ans'ver: In one respect yes, I feel
liat the U S. Tariff Commission
should not raise duties on the im.
ports of Zinc, Lead, into the U S
and countries of importance Pe.
ru, Chile and Mlrxic. i have per-
sonall- advocated that the,' do not
increase these duties
4 Question: The Haitian public
cannot understand how the Amer-
iean Government has stipulated on
one side that it wsants to support
the Government of President Dr.
Francois Duivalier and on the other
side does not give a full economic


en in which the communists- plant
their seeds.

6 Question: There has been laik
that Latin American press is re
acting sery strongly against their
presence of the U.S. 5th Fleet off
the Dominican Coast and is sugg-
esting that this is a gesture in
support of Trujillo.
Answer: I would say that this
did not disturb me as an indivi-



PERSONALITY
OF THE WEEK
(Continued from page 1)
trip as he has swung south from
Florida on many occasions, beinr2


pport To Haiti
dual because I was told of this and become friendly with communtalic
believe that this is merely a rout- countries then let them go ahead
ine visit to the area and has noth- and try. The U.S. is not going to
ing to do with those pro or against beg-for friendship and only wants
the Dominican Republic. to co-operate with people intellig-


7 Question: Is the aid being giv-
en by the U.S. sufficient to keep
some Latin American countries fri-


ent eonugh to want freedom. Every
country that has become friendly
with communist countries lias lost
its iei-dom.


endly and will it stop them front Senator SmaL.ers was ranked by
becoming friendly with communist- officials for his speech and willing-
ic countries? hness to answer the questions put
Answer: If they want to try and to him.


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FOR YEARS NOW TOURISTS HAVE BEEN PLAGUED WITH- .-
CARTING' LIQUOR THEY HAVE PURCHASED, with. over-. 'i
Swight chargess, with custeohs problems. fh dnjfe.--ll:j- -
' swoop. La BelleCreole hps made. it possible to.hiave',.','
. liquOFpurdtbed abroad, partictitaly-.in Hiaiti,.delivered
.to your home, in most cases at prices cheaper thau you, '
can bring, it through, -accompafikd by-.all .ou-. other -
purchases.. - .
S* . ,* ,

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4* ON A CARTON OF FIVE.BOTTLEZ.,. ..
,* ..'. r u r ,
b, h" l.s"."*- Del aurN.Y. ., Iur '\


S support. tnati extent are you pre- a member o fthe Senate Sub-Corn- [' Bells Spicial Reserve Whisky ; t32.,7 f.f3 50 ,' .$tji
urter, Senator Smathers conti- pared to comment on this situation? mittee on South American Comm.- 2..laky B e F s *
Siued, Haiti had a great deal in Answer: First, I think that after- erce. S hi fl -13 5
common with the United States of all it is the people of the United 3' J. & BRare Scoch' Whisky. 300 135 ,50
mrica in such common rights States who control the Government Se-nator Smathers 'is described as 4.' Ballantine's Scotch Whisky' 32.35 .5 6.
5i 'the freedom of the press and of the United States and these peo- looking like "a road company Jack -6 QueernAnne Scotch Whisky. 31AS. .150" Ifr.f /
'eligious rights, the rights of indi- pie have a cg'eat dral of synipathv Paar." by a fellow American who 6. Gilbey'opey Royal Whisky :'31.25 ,.. 1350- .16,.90N
Vidtals and the rights of the peop- and regard for Mr. Duvalier. What saw him beina [areAelled at the .1. Sack & White Scotclh'Whisky f '32.00'. 13'.50 16.50.
Ih to have a voice in Government. Latin America fails to undc.r-stand Ciudad Trujillo Airport by G(ner- 8.. Johnamesor-Cl ***ub Irish Wh 9.90 5 1 .5 16:,
Before answering any questions is the fact that money .does not alissimo, Rafael Trujillo. Sma'thers 9. Canadian- Club Whisky ST-ST 19- 50 22 50
'-Put to him by those present, Smath- gr w on trees in the U S made his Central and South Amer- ee Gin 4- ,.-1.S 4.
r.stressed that was why he was If you took the indehtrdnrss of can tour accompanied by a retinue Heefing 21.00 24.
here'-to answer questions- and every country' in the World and of ne.smen, Radio and T.V. cam.- 1 rare istol* r 003 55 21500 28
While he may not give LIe exact Lotalled it. it wouldd not equal the era men and assistants. "- ... 01 .- '.--.'---. .-. -





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PAGE 8






"HAITI


S UN "


North sBoostedBana na
The Banana production at Cap
Haitian in the North will receive
a big boost when the new West In- T-ade
dia Frlit and Steamship Company
starts harvesting its first crop in Since the inauguration of the grown. As the company men ex-
June of this year. West India Company, some 1,200 plained, banana growing has all
Entirely "American owned, this is plants, approximately 525' to the the usual farming hazards plus the:
the first attempt by an American acre, have been planted. Land for fact that the climate has to be very
firm t6 grow bananas for U.S. trad- the banana plants is leased and tropical and the temperature must
e in Haiti since Standard Fruit left bought in Cap Haitian and the corn- never go. below 53 degrees. Since
here ten'years ago, the Company pany. has future 'plans for large the beginning of operations every-
has been underway three years. scale operations. thing has gone very smoothly' up
Men backing it are four brothers, All labor on tdie plantation 'is until a fortnight ago with the ad-
Mr. D. E. Taylor, the President, Haitian and depending on the type vent of very heavy rain 20 inch-
and his brothers Leslie, Alfred and of work being performed, provides es of rain in 4 days.
Williams of West Palm Beach, Fio- employment for from 200 400 Cap l
rida. The .Taylors have been Haitian residents. Much preparat- It will not be known for a few
as soc i at e d with the bana- ion of the purchased land had to weeks just how many plants and
na business for some years take place before planting, mainly to what extent were damaged or
in the States and Central America. cultivation and the company has flooded. Once crop gathering begins
Also .in the Company and stationed installed its own wells, seven of in June the method of planting will
at the plantation in Cap Haitian them, together with the essential ensure rotating crops which will be
are A. H.. Grigsby, H. H. Hutnhins irrigation channels. shipped to the Eastern States, start-
and A. Halldorson. .. ing with the first crop in June,


,HAVE YOU FOR- .
GOTTEN TODAY IS i
VALENTINE'S DAY? r
(Continued from page 2> .
and carry a goodly amount of per-
fume. Be sure and see the small a
petti-point ones that go so well with
the petti-point eyeiing. bags, and
the e q u a I I y small orname:ted i
round ones too.
Whether you choose the s m all
purse carriers, the atomizers, the
ceramic ones, or the crystal bott-
les, you're certain to find some-
thing In this large collection at La
Belle Creole. They're a perfect gift
t6 say "Happy St. Valentine's Day"
to someone special even it is a
day cate it will more than malce
up for momentary forgetfulness.
P.B.A.
EDUCATION
-MINISTER GIVES
$500 TO GALERIE
BROCHETTE
National Education Minister. the
Reverend Father Hubert Papailler
kept a promise he made last
month and presented a gift of $500
to the artists of the Galerie Bro-
chette in Carrefour this week. This
contribution will permit the artists
to continue construction on their
new art galleiy and work shop in
the small artist village.
It was the initiative of the Min-
ister of EducatCon who brought ab-
out a reunion Thursday of artists
for the purpose of studying ways
and means of removing problems
from the path of local artists and
also opening a discussion on their
objectives


All the engineers, plantation work- by, bought or chartered ships.
ors and office staff are Haitian and Tlie Company has also purchaser
dl were trained by the Americans the idle sugar Lariue mill at Cap
n the Company, and in the words Haitien and has purchased equip-
of Mr. Grigsby, "Both the Haitian ment from the States to set it in
people and the Haitian Goternment motion again. Pote Cole intends
lave been very helpfuld." Selling sugar cane to the mill which
It is hoped that Haiti will be suit- is expected to start operations next
ible for the type of bananas being year.


PAGE 4


..~~ ~ ---9''" -


[TREE
PORT PRI SHP


-0' ~.

Yes the new Dadlani Store on the corner of Rue Bonne
Foi is surely a "Little Europe" stocked with fine merchand-
ise from all over the world with emphasis on Indian Prod-
ucts. "Little Europe" also means Free Port Prices. (P.B.A.)



~. -~ l


- ~- .~- ~- C- 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' ~ -~ ',~ "'U 'U


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SUNDAY, FEB. 14TH, 1960


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. p I


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. ..,
- ''


I









SUNAYFEB 14H. 960"I JTT ,C iTM". PiACUC.., u


HAITI S-UN
HE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
Gerant-Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1950


PRESIDENT ISSUES STRONG WARNING
Through the medium of this editorial column, the "Haiti
Sun" wishes to express its complete approval and applaud
. the meaningful contents of the letter written on January
20th (see letter on page 1.) by President, Dr. Francois Du-
valier and addressed to the Minister of Justice for tran-
smission.
There is no doubt that the President's "warning" will
come as a shock to many, without mention, and' will cert-
ainly put a brake on the dubious and nefarious operations
to whom the empowering text of the letter is directed.
As a newspaper we laud the Presidents timely move.
Speculaters, 'Charlatans, lobbyists and pressure groups; all
are covered in the letter's contents which hit hard at the
unethical and. unscrupulous practices which' exist in the
present administration.
The by-passing of Government administrative rules in
any form or shape for the gratification of individual de-
sires, prosperity and pleasure is something to be abhorred
in any country's Governmental code but unfortunately, and
certainly not pertaining to Haiti alone, is liable to become
rife unless severe and drastic "preventative" measures are
taken.
In (this direction President Duvalier's following warning
(except from letter's -text) is timely and should provide
the necessary impetus for curtailment of the despicable
and unhealthy "peddling." "It will cost me nothing to
-punish that form of sabotage of the Government and of
social and economic balance that I want to instill and I
will puidsh unmercilessly that infamous traffic."




In The FEB. 10th 1960 DIARIO LAS AMERICAS

INTER-AMERICAN PROTECTION FOR

THE HUMAN RIGHTS

The resolution adopted yesterday by the Organization of American
States, in the sense of approving the request made by the Government
of Venezuela through its representative in the OAS, Ambassador Falcon-
Briceno, to investigate the violations of the human rights taking place
in the Dominican Republic, has extraordinary continental importance.
Modern International Law provides that the human being, the indi-
vidual, is subject to International Law, not as it used to be before, that
only the States were subject to it. Thus, wherever there is a violation
of the human rights, the international public order is affected.

The Inter-American system has taken a step forward in adopting a
measure that will become part of America's history, which is that of
recognizing categorically that the prevalence of human rights is not a
philosophical discourses delivered at the Palace of the Pan American
Union or in conference held in well known cities of the continent, but
-that it is rather a medullar part of functional Pan-Americanism. Of
course, with this the OAS is not making a generous concession. It is
facing a doctrinal and institutional reality, even if in this latter respect
it might perhaps be necessary to perfect the instruments for the vigit-
ance and the inter-American protection of the humag rights.
Both the San Francisco Charter and the Charter of the Organization
of American States have fully- recognized the obligation to respect the
human rights. And it being so, any denunciation of violation of those
- rights demands an investigation to place responsibilities, and to adopt
Collective measures which may safeguard those human rights.
1More than focusing the matter as a political defeat of the Dominican
dictatorship, we must think of the moral and juridical triumph of the
human rights within the Inter-American system. That is what is perm-
anent. The principles stay, the governments go.


-I


Caribbean Construction Co. SA.-

Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD

Phone: 3955. P. O. BO.. 284

,'r*! :


Feb. 11
HAITI SUN
En Ville
Dear Mr Editor:
The appearance on the intersect-
o n s of Port-au-Prince's busy
streets of the neatly garbed and
certainly advantageous traffic cops
is a big step towards the control
of the previously riotous traffic and
pedestrian conditions and full
marks should be accorded the Traf-
fic Department for this innovation.
However it is my observation,
and of many other citizens of the
Capital City, that these policemen
dressed as they are in the khaki
uniforms and green helmet are
hard to see by a motorist, especi-
ally at night, and at the moment
stand the unenviable chance of be-
ing run down simply because they
are hard to see.
The new traffic scheme is a good
one and in my opinion would be an
even better one if these men on
point duty were equipped with a
white helmet and white gloves. Not
only are their chances of injury
by unwary -motorists considerably
lessened but with the addition of
these white gloves their hand sig-
nals become clearer and more
pronounced once *again especi-
ally at night.
I remain,
NOT SUICIDAL.


EMBASSY OF THE REPUBLIC
OF LIBERIA
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
COMMUNIQUE

In the February 6th, 1960 edition
of "La Phalange," under the title
"Is Truillo preparing to leave San-
to-Domingo?" it was reported that
a journal in Caracas, "El Mundo,"
wrote among other things that the
_Government of Liberia had granted
Visa to Generalissimo Trujillo and


his family to go to Liberia upon the
request of the United States Gov-
ernment.
The Embassy of Liberia in Port-
au-Prince, Haiti takes this occa-
sion to inform the -public that the
information is false, malicious and
unfounded and that no application
has been made to the Liberiap
Government for Visa in favor of
the above mentioned persons.
Port-au-Prince, February 8, 1960.


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AT THE POOL TERRACE
4


New Traffic Measure
- This week, smartly dressed
and executing traffic signals
with precise movements, traffic
_ops appeared on all major in-
tersections of the Capital City.
Further innovation o wards
smoother accident free traffic
flow was started this week with
school children in their senior
years attending traffic courses
at the Lycee des Jeunes Filles.
When they have learned the cor-
rect methods and signals the
children will take over the dir-
ection of traffic in front of their
respective schools. This new
measure is in line with the traf-
fic "spruce-up" now in motion
in Port-au-Prince to ensure saf-
er traffic of motorists and ped-
istrians.


BLU t atDaag
on the label






















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Served eCxa/MsI v at Haiti's Leading
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THROUGHOUT THE WORLD


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S-.SUNDAY, FEB. 14TH, 1960


a
HAITI SUN"


PAGE 5








HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY, FEB. 14TH, 1900


Cap Haitian has Its Tourist Problem

International Air Port To ProvidefSolution?


What is the current controversial selves at the disposal of the Cap's
-,subject most open for discussion hospitality for any length of time.
in Haiti' Tourism. A fortnight ago A resume of their activities shows
the "Sun" published an article dis- that two, man and wife, arrived at
cussing the pros and cons of tour- Cap Haitien per daily flight from
ism -in our Caribbean Isle and par- Port-au-Prince on Saturday morn-
ticularly the failure of this year's ing and went straight back on
tourist trade to come up to expect- the same flight. Third visitor could
-ations; well Port-au-Prince has not almost be counted as a permanent
got it on its own Cap Haitien is resident. She is here in Haiti for
all but devoid of tourists. the 18th time and speqt a week at
Sthe Cap. On Monday it looked as


sentative and it must be mentioned
that a more enjoyable five days of
hospitality and .places of interest
would be hard to equal elsewhere.
So "next comes the inevitable ques-
tion what is the matter with
Haiti and why is there no tourists?
In search of an answer Your RPp-
orter spoke to many ,residents of
Cap Haltien and without exception
was given the same reasons for the
drastic decline of tourists in Haiti


SLast weekend Your Reporterif things were pieng up. Eight in recent years. These reasons.wi
paid a visit to the North with the tourists were scheduled to arrive, bT set forth presently.
intention of seeing if tourists were but cae. the daily plane and a
frequenting the historical city of gum total of only three visitors. Leopold Sanchez is a 62 year-old
Cap Haitien as they certainly have Haitian who has been prorninmt in
done so in/the past, in a These three mafie a trip to the the North's Tourist Industry for
total of five days spent at the Cap, Citadelle which they thoroughly en- many years. A number of these
informed sources plus observations joyed, but returned next morning years he has conducted his own
on the part of Your Reporter made to the Capital City, simply because tourist business and is agent in the
a grand total of seven tourists in- inquiries in Port-au-Prince had fail- North for Pan American and most
cluding yours truly. ed to extract any information as other principle airlines, and is a
to other places to be seen in the member of IATA.
Alas, even this negligable numb- North. Seventh tourists during those Here surely is a man who with
er of tourists did not place them- five days was the "Suns" repre- his vast experience in the tourist


WHEr.r? Right on your farm!
How many extra acres would you
have if you could si coth off that -.
gully clear out the fence row .
move those rocks .'doze off brush .
and trees? What about a ditch to ;-
Sdrain the land a pond for irri-
gation or stock watering? Figure
how much more money you'd make- :,.
each year . how much more satis-
fying your farm would be.. .how ,
much better you'd farm how
much more valuable your farm
would be if you could do all t
these things.
It's as good as done when you own
a Cat" Diesel Farm Tractor!
At low cost. using your own farm .
power. your own help, and your spare
time ... you can do all these jobs. M



HAYTIAN TRACTOR


& EQUIPMENT CO., S. A.
MAURICE BONNEFIL,


Manager, Chancerelles.


Yes, sir, that same Cate Diesel
;, Tractor that will help you plow,
'.4, disk, harrow, or pick up to 60%
more than a wheel tractor of similar
horsepower that same Cat Die-
sel Tractor that works through the
slick, low spots where wheels bog
down .that same Cat Diesel Trac-
tor will do all these extra jobs for
^3 you! We'll gladly prove every word
' -with a demonstration on your farm.





I I
Wf@ -----------------------------------------
For free literature "Clearing for Crope," mail coupon to ua
I farm.._ares with...--acre of crop land:.--..--acre
to clear I have the following tractor -

E Check here if you want a representative to call and
arrange for a demomatralion-no obligation.
0 Check here if you are a student.

Name
AI


L ---aCity----. a---- a ------J


world and as head of the Cap lai-
tian Tourist Industry should know
what is the reason and explanation
for Haiti's dwindling influx of tour-
ists. His comment on the critical
situation, "Once we thought noth-
ing of getting 500 and more tourists
a month in Cap Haitien now we
are lucky to have four visitors a
day."

Mr. Sanchez spread further light
on the drastic state of the tourist
industry by adding that "In 11 years
of the tourist trade on my part, it
has never been as bad as it is at
present. Since the end of 1956. todr-
isTs have been coming here in gra-
dually declining numbers and it is
expected that this year will be the
worst in Haiti's tourist history."
However, Sanchez did more than
bemoan the lack of visitors to Cap-
Haitian he gave several clear
and valid reasons for their absence
and the solutions necessary to curt-
all the rapid' decline. His answers
to the tourist problem are the ans-
wei of every resident of Cap Haiti-
an who was approached.
"Two words' answer the main
question of lack of tourists In-
ternational Airport. We have a com-
paratively new and suitable airport
here but It needs extension and the
addition of Tower, control equip.
ment and lights." (Cap Haltilen's
existing runway is 5,000 feet long,
150 wide and is in good condition.)
Mr. Sanchez continued, "If we
had an International Airport our
tourist problem would be solved.
It has been suggested that tourists
coming direct to Cap Haitien would
mean a decline of tourists in Port-


au-Prince, but, what tourist would
leave a country without seeing the
Capital City?"
"We know of several airlines who
are interested in making Cap Hai.
tien a regular call with their big
four-prop planes but of course they
cannot do so with the existing air-
port. Pan American in particular
has done a lot to help us in the'
past including the featuring of the
Citadelle on a calender 2 years
ago."
Two further tourist problems tie
up with the Cap Haitien airport
says Mr. Sanchez. At present there
is only one flight daily by the Hai-
tien Airline. Cohata, and this can-
not cope with tourist potential. Also
without proper facilities Cohata is
unable to land at Cap Haitien some
days owing to mist and general
weather conditions.
Tourist preventative is also bought
about with the private planes. San-
chez has had many experiences of
private planes wanting to land at
Cap Haitien but they find that first
they have to visit Port-au-Prince
to get a clearance before coming
North. This is hardly conductive to
a productive tourist trade. In the
past, private planes attempting a:
direct landing in Cap Haitien have
resulted in the owners being arrest-
ed. Potential from these planes is
pheonomenal. The Flying Club of
America is an organization with -
thousands of members, many of
whom make tours of the Caribbean
from Miami.
Finally on the Ail port question,
Mr. Sanchez maintains that there
are many foreign investors interest-
(Continued on page U)


HOTEL


MONTANA

PETION-VILLE


WEEKLY ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM :

' TUESDAY: 7:30 pm. to Midnight Creole Buffet under ,

the Stars on the Terrace with excellent Dance Band. .4
At 9:30 pm. Meringue Lessons by Lavinia Williams..

WEDNESDAY: 7 pm. to 8:00 pm. Complimentary get- .

together Punch-Bowl Party. .41

FRIDAY: 7:30 pm. to 1 am. ,- Gala Dinner-Dance in

Cocktail Lounge. Show at 10:30 pm. No cover.

o-arge.

EVERY NIGHT: 7 to 9 Oocktail Hour with nati
Combo.


PAGiE 6


ilk Ajl'%A~ w







SUNDAY, FEB. 14TH, 1960


"HAITI


Deo our


-


Shopping

in Haiti

It is getting so that people are
taking vacations as much to
shop as to play golf, lounge in
the sun or just relax. And, no
-wonder'when you consider the
savings to be had through Free
Port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they can
buy the same gifts, in free-port
shops at savings up to. 60% of
U. S. prices. So, for the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
wonderful vacation in Haiti.
Perhaps. the most famous free-
port shop in the world is La
Belle Creole. located in the
heart of fascinating Port-au-
Prince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable wonderland
full of the world's most' de-
sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
ch'es, Cashmeres, Handmade
..ags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
Silver, French Perfumes, Cq-
meras, Liquours and a seem-
ingly endless array of native
i bndicrlft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
sider that one. can buy the
World's most famous Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tjssot,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
guet--at discounts of 50% of
the U. S. advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
Belle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be well ~worth your time to
consider a trip to Haiti.

i. At Noustas, Presidenit#'-4 La
S..Belle Creole and Haitfiaost
vigorous promoter of to'dtism,
J is perhaps another reason for
the surge in popularity of
free-port shopping. His ad-
v ...ertising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
- -leadinig U. S. publications and
h .- e continues to pursue a po-
S.licy of cooperating with tra-
S:vel agents in their various
promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
S tle of free charppagne to any
visitor to Haiti who happens
to be celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
- honeymoon.
-:This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
S niversary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts 'to make
Sthe world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to.
shop. the store will hold a
-two month long sale offering
..ven greater discounts on fa-
,, .us brand merchandise.
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
'. sands of tourists this year will
7 tome home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
When they went away.





"3. :-,.


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER


P. 0. Box 676,


PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI


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ds*vfl.


MINTON, WEDGWOOD.
ROYAL CROWN DARBY.
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Nj-


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LUISA SPAGNOLI.



DANISH SILVER,
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and BRAZILAN GEMS.


HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS


U


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r V-


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JEWELRY




Native-Inser ed
SPORT SHIRTS


L SCULPTURES


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MAHOGANY
- The Best


GUERLAIN, LANVIN,
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SUN`"


PAGE 7


+


I


LA


0,&o 00


. A- .







SUNDAY, FEB. 14TH, 1960


et LT A T'TT CIT Ij "


PAGE.8


Up to this point, third in a
series of three articles written
by Professor Sidney W. Mintz of
Yale University. the professor
has described a major feature
of Haiti's economy the mark-
et system its internal functi-
ons, the complex and varieing
forms of Pratik and the effects
of different types of market
goods on Pratik relationstiips. In
this final article the implications
of price uniformity for the Prat-
ik phenomenon are discussed
and finally Pratik relationships
between intermediaries whol-
esalers and retailers of agricult-
ural products are dealt with.

The implications of price unifor-
mity for the pratik phenomenon are
interesting. Each of the retailers
of a certain product in the market
may be 'expected to have pratik;
they make these pratik and hold
them essentially by giving more
for less. But they remain in const-
ant competition with other sellers
of the same product, in terms of
their asking price. To see how this
is done requires long periods of
watching at the side of particular
market women. Such women do not
advertise their pratik. The pratik
buyer comes to his (or her) pratik
seller and inquires after the price
of a certain good. The price quoted
does not vary from that quoted to
any other prospective buyer. But
when the sale is consummated, the
pratik buyer gets the product at a
lower price or rather, and more


"PRATIK "


typically, gets a greater quantity
for the same price. Since this occ-
curs only with pratik it should not
be thought that the intermediary is
lowering the going price of her
stock on the open market. The go-
ing price rises and falls in. relation
to supply and demand: price con-
cessions of the sort described here
are additional to general supply-
demand-based changes, or they
may be thought of as occurring
within -the field of these wider
changes.
The upshot of this is that two
sorts of competition, very different
from each other, are occurring in
the same setting. The first sort, and
more important, is the competition
of -the open market, revealed by
the emerging uniformity of the ask-
ing price at any one time for a
given product in a single market.
The second sort is the competition
for pratik, proceeding behind the
screen, of apparent price uniform-
ity. It may be assumed that not
all buying pratik are granted the
same measure of concession, nor
even necessarily the same kind of
concession. Intermediaries admit-
both to having buying pratik and
to concealing the details of their
pratik relationships from their com-
petitors; these relationships are
pervasive at the same time that
they are partly hidden.

PRATIK INTERMEDIARIES
It remains to discuss pratik 're-
lationships between intermediaries.
These are various in nature, but


, Powerful


only one category will be treated,
namely, relationships b e t w e e n
wholesalers and retailers of agri-
cultural products. Many agricultur-
al items, such as dried grains, le-
gumes, and fresh fruits and veget-
ables, are bulked by intermediaries
who buy from numerous small pro-
ducers and wholesale to retailers
who break bulk in selling to consu-
mers. Such a series includes a mi-
nimum of four participants:. prod-
ucer, bulker, retailer, and consum-
er. It is to the center of this ser-
ies that attention is now directed.
Credit extension and concessions
in quantity are the major means
of tying retailer pratik to the whole-
/

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saler. Price reductions are also em-
ployed. Retailer pratik are to be
found mainly in the capital, in and
around the big markets, and in the
provincial cities. Since the bulking
intermediaries carry relatively lar-
ge stocks, they will make pratik
with numbers of retailers. Though
the quantities of any one good car-
ried by a bulking intermediary and
those purchased by any single ret-
ailer vary enormously, the relative
scale can be suggested. An onion
bulker from the north will usually
carry from about seven to about
twenty sacks of onions to the cap-
ital to wholesale.
These sacks hold approximately
fifteen to sixteen No. 10 full cans of
onions when filled to bursting. A
'Port-au-Prince retailer may purch-
ase one sack, or two, or even six,
for resale by the pound or canful.
The bulking intermediary will buy
onions from the producer at, say,


Force
U.S. $7 the sack, and resell at U.S.
$9, if the market is very brisk. For
her trade at large, she will reduce
the quantity of onions in each sack
by one or two cansful, and thus put
together enough onions for an ex-
tra sack.
When reselling her onions at the
U.S. $9 rate, she may provide her -
pratik with one of. two kinds of ad-
vantage: reduce the price per sack,
or refill the sacks to their original,
overflowing. She may also be wiJt-
ling to sell to some of her establish-
ed pratik on credit, giving them
a week o rten days to sell off and
repay her in the form of cash.
Sometimes 'these credit arrange--
ments include a carrying charge
or interest, other times they do ".
not. -
A bulking intermediary with many
retailer pratik may -be able to dis.
pose of half or more of her stock
through her pratik. Since onions are


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"HAITI SUN"


PAGE 10


itt


CONSTITUTION OF THE REPUBLIC OF HAITI 1957
CHAPTER IV
Public Law
Article 16.-Haitians shall be equal before the law, with the exception,
of the privileges granted Haitians by birth.
Any Haitian shall have the right to'take an actual part in the Govern-
ment of his country, to hold public office, or to be appointed to govern-
ment positions, without distinction as to color, sex, or religion.
As far as appointments and terms and conditions of employment are
concerned, the State Civil Service Administration must refrain from grant-
ing privileges or favors or showing discrimination.
Article 17.-Individual liberty is guaranteed. No one may be prosecuted,
arrested, or detained except in the cases and manner specified by law.
Furthermore, no arrest or detention may take place except under a
warrant issued by a legally qualified official.
For such a warrant to be executed:
1) It must formally state the reason for detention and- the law
punishing the act charged; .
2) It must be served on the prisoner and a copy must be left with
him at the time of its execution, except when the accused was
apprehended flagyPnte delicto.
No one may be kept in prison if he has not appeared within forty-eight
hours before a judge designated to rule on the legality of the arrest and
unless such judge has upheld the detention by a reasoned decision.
In the case of a misdemeanor, the prisoner shall be referred to the
justice of the peace, who shall then pronounce final judgment -
In the case of a crime or an offense, he may, without prior permission
and in a simple memorandum,, petition the senior judge of the civil
court of the district, who shall, on the basis of the verbal opinion of
the Public Prosecutor, render forthwith an emergency decision on the
legality of the arrest, without postponing the case or taking it in its
turn, to the exclusion of all other business.
In either case, if the arrest is judged illegal, the prisoner shall be
released, notwithstanding an appeal to the Court of Cassation.
Any force or coercion that is not necessary for the apprehension or
detention of a person, or any moral pressure or physical brutality is
*frbidden-
Any violations of this provision are arbitrary acts against which the
injured parties may. without prior authorization, bring action in the
competent courts against either the principals of the agents, whatever
their position and whatever the body to which they belong.


The Haitian Pantheon
by HERBERT GOLD, weliknown American writer who spent a year in Haiti.
- -. i U. Th.-f i'_ .nd.. t P 'A, iA Ai. -


This -is the third of 25 titles of the Constitution of the Republic
of Haiti as translated from "Le Moniteur", Port-au-Prince, Haiti,
December 22. 1951. The "Sun" will publish a Title per week of the
Constitution as It appears in the original.


VOODOO, by Alfred METRAUX.
(Oxford University Press)
This study by a European anthro-
pologist is the best I have read on
the much-maligned Voodoo religion,
which was created by a relatively
modern accident of fate and found
a home in the troubled little Carib-
bean Republic of Haiti. Metraux is
a writer with excellent gifts of curi-
osity and expressiveness; and be-
cause of the larger implications of
the practice of Voodoo, his book is
for more than the sensation seekers,
the specialists, and old Haiti buffs.
Haitian Voodoo bears some rela-
tion to the superstitions of Harlem
and New Orleans and the Voodoo of
certain French colonies and com-
munities in South America, but it
is the specific product of Haiti,
whose African slaves produced a
successful revolution against Napo-
leon. (Haiti provides the only in-
stance of Negro slaves winning
their freedom by force of arms; the
Haitian state has now existed for
more than 150 years.) Haitian Vood-
oo is not black magic, designed to
do good to oneself and evil to one's
enemies, although magie noire also
exist in Haiti, just as magical prac-
tices exist side by side with Christi-
anity in other societies. Voodoo is a
religious rather than a purely mag-
ical enterprise, created in a spirit of
rebellious adaptation to the impact
of French Catholicism upon the Af-
rican religions carried by the slav-
es to the Antilles. Like other reli-
gions, it provides a structure of be-
liefs that can explain the mysteries
of life and death; it offers rituals
of thanksgiving and consolation.
sanction for such social acts as
marriage, and a sense of icommun-
ion with others.
In its double origin, Voodoo par-
allels [slam's ability to adapt Chri-
stian and Jewish elements to nat-
ive needs. Grande Erzulie, the god-
dess of fertility, is represented by
an ikon of the Virgin. She -has
sonie of the characteristics of the
Virgin, including an abstractly for-
giving nature and a mothering love,
but she also expresses a vigorous
erotic nature. In other words, she
suits Haitian needs. Papa Legba,
the Guardian of the Crossroads and
of Journeys, is usually represented
by a picture of St. Christopher; and
by a mysterious instance of" cross-
cultural infiltration, in the isolated
town of Port-de-Paix I once found
Damballah Ouedo, the great snake
god. represented by a photograph,
clipped from Life magazine, of Har-
old Stassen.
Because Voodoo depends entirely
on oral tradition, there is consider-
able variation in the practice of its


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Voodoo pantheon is stretchable;
there are loa or minor gods who
descend from pirates or the heroes
of Haitian history. Animal sacrifice,
usually of chickens or goats and oc-
casionally, in very important cere-
monies, of bulls, is still a part of
the ritual, but this does not imply
human sacrifice any more than the
taking of the Host does. However.
direct action -in this case, wring-
ing a chicken's neck and letting its
blood fountain out- has a more im-
mediate effect on participants thdn
conventional and stylized European
religious gestures. Possession by
the gods has an important place in
Voodoo ceremonies. When the loa
descends into your body, you be-
come him (or tier); it is said that
you are the god's horse, and you
speak with the god's voice. Still,
the relation of communicant" to god
is one of both respect and amiable


even argue with the god who seeks
entry into his body. "No, no, I'm
too tired, I was your horse last
time. I don't want to, you embarr-
ass-me!" Sometimes the god des-
ists and either sulks or rides anoth-
er horse, but usually he demands
his privilege, enters the body, and
leaves the communicant exhausted
after a spell of activity in which
the horse speaks with the voice of
the god and performs his charact-
eristic acts. .
A Haitian psychiatrist, Dr. Louis
Mars, has argued that this religion
provides a kind of national health,
since it permits neurotic desires to
be relieved by living out fantastical
impulse. The effeminate man 'can
be possessed by a female loa and
behave like an imperious or amor- -
rous woman, and then return con-
soled to his everyday duties as a:
(Continued on page 12) *







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PAGE 13


Cap Haitian-Tourists
Continued from page 6) ists by way of sightseeing. There
ed in promoting businesses m the are inumerable historic French
North and he personally knows of Fortresses in good preservation,
two who would build substantial colonial houses ,the residence of
Hotels providing a more efficient Pauline Bonaparte. site'of the last
air service could be provided. Ap- battle for Independance and of
pi'oaches have bt.en made in the course the Famous Citadelle -
right quarters concerning the im. stronghold of King Christophe to-
provement of the Airport to Inter- gether with his palace at Sans
national standards, but, as yet north. Souci.
ing has been done. Tourists would find no difficulty
filling in a week at these places
It may be questioned, "Is Cap alone, but Cap Haitien has more
Haiten capable of handling and to offer including the Indian caves
looking alter the wants of tourists at Dondon and a wealth of beau-
in large numbers?" The answer tittl beaches where ample swimm-
can be found in any of the three ing and sun are available.
Hotels at the Cap, all of which Another/"big" in favour of the
have individual inducements more North there are no beggers,
than capable of looking after the which tourists object so strongly
most fastidious visitor. There is too. I oca authorities ensure that
the Hotel du Roi Christophe, a very they are kept off the streets and
old and beautiful, both in itself and Ihus aloid making nuisances of
its situation, building which has themselves.
been modernized at has ample And the o'd story concerning the
rooms and hospitality for a large road connecting the Cap with the
number of tourists. Then there is Capital City, well Your Reporter
the Hotel-Mont Joli, a smaller but took this route and had no discom-
delightfully situated Hotel only a forts at all,


few minutes from the City with
a panoramic "view of Cap-Hai-
lien, and finally yet another com-
petent and 'well situated Hotel,
Becks. At present these three hot-
,els are all but empty and in .the
words of their owners. "Struggling
to stay open." .
Apart from a fund of hospitality,
Cap Haitien has much to offer tour-


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these places df intense tourist in-
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ing and in this Cap Haitien is not
on its own Port-au-Prince's tour--
ist trade is suffering badly too as&
has been pointed out previously.
But the tact must be faced that
tourism is rapidly declining in Hai;
ti and something will have to be
done to correct it.

Pointing out just how drastic the
situanon is Mr. Sanchez remarked,
"This year our tourist cruiseship
trade is expected to be lower than
ever before. And even this seas-
on's allotment is not stable. We
were supposed to have 15 ships cal-
ling at Cap Haitien and now find
that only 10 of the previously sche-
duled 15 are coming."
Admittedly, troubles in the Car-
ibbean have turned aside many po-
tential tourists and induced theiem
to visit th1 British Colonies which
are doing a booming trade, but
many knoM\ledgeable people in the
tourist industry feel that not en-
ough is beinm done by Haiti to pro-
mote tou-isin back t.j its previous


As Leopold Sanc;,ez pointed out.
"We must look. at touiiism in a
Narion ll wa., and not individually.
Cap Ill.itipr '..anLs Port-au-Prince
to have toiristL. just as much as
it warits tourisltr I-iil but we h.:jst
work together and sto.n t'.'e gradu-
ail.' increasing decline."
It is lImn,%n that past visitors to
this Isliad have enjoyed their vis-
&t here and the hospitality extend-
ed to them but the facts must be
faced. Haiti's tor.'nsm is on a rapid
decline and sonmthi.g has to done
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SUNDAY, FEB. 14TH, 1960


C T IT "


PAGE 12 "" "AI- i I I J ---


Th
(Continued from page 10)
man; the braggart can become a
favorite horse of Ogoun Feraille,
the noisy god of war. When hyster-
ta is rewarded and not guiltily re-
pressed, and in fact is given some
aesthetic shape, it ceases to be
hysteria.
In addition, Voodoo music, sing-
ing, dancing, and drumming, the
making of r i t u a I flour drawings
and the drama aroused by frequent
confrontation with immensely will-
ful powers provide a-natural social
expression of artistic talent. The
powerful man can become a priest,
and carve out his little domain for
invention; the ambitious woman
can become a mambo. Sin and vir-
tue play directly upon the Haitians
bbdy. The gods punish the guilty
Ogoun Feraille caused a terrible
swelling in the jaw of my house-
-boy; penicillin did not cure it, a
dentist found no abcess, but it dis-
appeared when he paid an overdue
visit to, his mother. (He became'
the god's unwilling horse, and I
heard Ogoun Feraille's voice in his
own abashed body lecturing him on
the duty owed a mother.) The gods,


as always, are somewhat slower to
reward the virtuous.

In Haiti, Voodoo and Roman Ca-
tholicism have been locked in close
battle for two hundred years. Ca-
tholicism is the official religion of
a state whose presidents have
sometimes been secret practitioners
of Voodoo. People on the street de-
bate the degree of legitimacy pro-
vided children'through a marriage
sanctioned by the Church as against
that by a Voodoo houngan. The hab-
it of the elite class has been to
deny the existence of Voodoo; when
the drums begin to sound in the
hills surrounding Port-au-Prince,
they refer to "quaint country danc-
es." The Church has vacillated bet-
ween silent ignoring of Voodoo, fe-
rocious repression, and occasional-
ly -the historic method of mission-
aries in premedieval Europe- as-
similation of the pagan gods as de-
vils, haunts, bogy-men. So far, the
syncretic attack has produced a
few good Cathblics among the elite
and a great deal of semi-derisive
use of Christian myth and 'material
by the practical Haitian peasant.


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the crowd, in white suits or robes
prescribed for a solemn Voodoo
ceremony, streaming down f r o m
the hills in time for Mass.,
Voodo9 is a subtle influence in
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sident Francois Duvalier's quarrel
with the Church may be obtained
by Dr. Metraux's. expression of

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thanks to his former country doc-
tor for his "ethnological" help. The
younger Haitian poets, looking to
be more than imitators of the
French, have taken to exploring the
realities of Haitian life in the Cre-
ole language and t his means
taking seriously the religion of the
great mass of the people. One ex-
pression of this movement is the


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poet Felix Morisseau-Leroy's Cre-
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priest.
Dr Metraux has written a rem .
kable book. detailed, illustrated, '
and thoroughly documented, and in-
fused with a special sympathy for
the Haitian people.








IDAY, fEB. 14TH, 1960


"HAITI


fathers Vouches That Trujillo Won't Invade Gubal
gI~-~~- Vouch 's n a


flowing reprint story from
M herald, written by Her-
writer, Leo Adde, is a
n by Senator George A.
,who left Haiti attep a
day visit on Thursday, that the
Republic will never in-

-nta-linrlce, Haiti Though
are neighbors and enemies, the
niican Republic will never -in-
Cuba, Florida Sen. George A.
tlmrs predicted Wednesday.
.,Smathers said, Castro may
-at the Dominican Republic
r he and his revolutionaries
-red at-home."
ihe attack occurs, the Florida
M .said, Trujillo's well-discipl-
itmy will chew up the Cub-

mn.-Snmathers' observations were
o-ver noise of plane engines
ikaj .hour hop from Ciudad
oillo .to Port au Prince.
I[Sthexrs is winding up a 10-na-
tour on trade problems.
His conversation, since he reach-
edthe Caribbean Monday, has stay-
K. close to the imminent trading
."military and political blows in
ie, United States, watery backyard.
"mathers was still trying to form
- own judgment on what he des-
R)bed as "an astounding convers-
1On" Tuesday with Strongman
tjillo.
The 'senior dictator (circa 1930)
bthe world promised Smathers
that he will give his subjects a
choice of real democracy mi the
J19G2 elections.
r Encouraged by the fact that Tru-
.Uo made a rare visit to his air-
*prt to see Smathers' party off.


Smathers said, "The old boy must overrun Cuba" will take over un-
be sincere." less Trujillo acts first to end hus
"Vanity is the dictator's point," dictatorship.
Smathers said. "I believe I touch- TrunJllo said he will order two-
ed him where he can feel it." party municipal eleclons iitlun
Smathers said before the talks he one year, and nation-wide democ-
would try to point out that "a de- ratic elections in two or three years.
posed dictator is like a raggedy The Dominican Republic has been
refugee from a bill collector, runn- under one-party rule since 1930.
ing for cover. It just isn't dignafi- "I believe Trujillo means what he-
ed." says," Smathers said after the con-


Smathers' toned-down pitch at the
actual conference sounded like this:
"When you go. by natural causes
of otherwise, all these statues and
pictures of you around your count-
ry will be torn down immediately
unless you bring about an orderly
transition from dictatorship to de-
mocracy "
Trujillo stiiened as Smathers
spoke and then he agreed to turn
his government over to popular
rule in two or three years.
. Smathers recalled the Ipst time
he visited the Dominican Republic,
in 1957. Trujillo refused to see him.

Trujillo Promises
Smathers Democracy!
The following is a reprint from
the Miami Herald of February 11
of a copyright story written by Leo
Adde, Herald Staff writer. The text
has not been changed in any form.
Cludad Trujillo Generalissimo
Rafael Trujillo has promised to
turn his one-man government into
a genuine democracy.
At a cordial but no nonsense con-
ference in the Dominican strong-
man's palace. U.S. Sen. Smathers
warned Trujillo that "Communist
ultuLrc-es of the same kind who have


ference. f
T e rei.ator- ad'ed that he feel-
Trujillu will have Ume to mal:.-
good on his promise.
"Trujillo is completely in charge
here," Smathers said. "There is
no prospect of a revolubon of any
kind. Trujillo's army, most power-
ful in the area, is apparently com-


pletely loyal."
Trujillo and cabinet minister Ma-
nuel dtie Moya freely admitted the'
existence of a January plot to set
ofi. bombs in 200 Cindad Trujillo
buildings.

Smathers attributed the plot to
"leftists elements" inside the coun-
try. De Moya said. 137 persons, all
"sons of prominent families," have
been arrested and convicted. lHe
said the total did not reach thous-
ands, as once reported. Sentences
were nearly all for 30 years.
Told that the trials were "fair
and the convicted conspirators will
be allowed to appeal the judge_<'





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Easy to drive, length reduced
Reduced Prices, in spite of its
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Ar


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Ask also for a demonstration of the Pick-Up
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ie small car


verdicts." Smathers suggested that United States' main objective in
Trujillo invite Florida Attorney Ge- the Dominican Republic should be
neral Richard Ervin to sit in the to "aioid making the same mistake
court-rooms and watch the action. here that we did in Cuba."
'I happy accept," Trujillo said
"You will be the first dictator in "There. we watched a reasonably
history to become a champion of friendly dictatorship swallowed up
democracy" if you bring about, free by a completely.., unfriendly one
elections Smathers told him. which follows the Communist line,"
Trujillo answered he will keep he said.
hands off the tree election p:-'cess, I
and indicated he will- not rn. for Smatners said he was subject to
president again. **pressures" to pass up Ciudad Tru-
jillo as -he had Havana on his 10-
Earlier, as he got off a plane nation tour. He did not say what
troa San Juan. Smathers said the fthe pressures were.


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SUN"


PAGE 13


11


- LM- 1--".


. . ... .... ...... . . . .










PAGE 14 HAITI SUN "


Colonel W. C. GODFREY, Resid-
ent Manager of HYDRAULIC EN-
GINEERS S.A. has announced that
his firm is commencing their dril-
ling operations this week on the
first tw.o of their many contracts
in Haiti.
The first well on which drnilingl
operations are startling is in the


and g.p.m The Company announced
also that their operations in the
North will lbe-i'i short ', s 'well
,s in LES CAVl: anid UiRBECK
plainr Thj. Iraitt.i w.i k will in-
clude a water system for the OB.
LATE MISSIONA\RIES at their
Seminary an CAMP PERRIN.


TURGEAU area and is designed Among their nther inltet-esing
to supply adequate water for the programs are an engine-ring study
immediate vicinity which is partly ton dispose of \tasic w.,or at Ilne
built with many other homes in of the large mills near PORT AU
process of construction. The well PRINCE and the survey for a
will be designed to provide for the lanr~. (raianige p sti-'m in the i(i.lL
present as well as the future re- IDE SAC. These studies A til be por-
quirements in that locality. f[.i med by the technical staff of
Their parent organim,dioi. C. \V
The second well on which they 'LAUMAN CO. of BETHPACE,
will commence drilling operations NEW YORK which firm h as -icen
next week will, be for irrigation in the water business for Io0l', i-,ji
purposes in the CUL DE SAC and years.
,v41 be designed to field d one thous- The President, M. Ht E. I.,L'-
. ... T .. .. .. _. ].-_ .-------


MAN, who is also president of Hy-
draulic Engineers, is president of
the Water Contractors Association
of the United Slates and is an ad-
viscr in Hydraulic matters to the
UrLited States Army. He has dev-
clopedl and patented many devices
which ha e considerably advanced
hydraulic engineering. They main-
tain rlieir iwn permanent staff of
engineers, geologists, hydrologists
and bio-chemists
' The I.C..\ of WASHINGTON fre-
quently sends various visiting Hy-
draulic Engineers from foreign
countries to the LAUMAN plant
for a few weeks of observation of
American methods. One of the re-
cent visitors to BETHPAGE is Mr.
ROGER OLIVIER, Technical Dir-
ector of the Service Hydraulique of
Haiti, who spent a few weeks in
BETHPAGE last fall.


To the right of the picture is Mr. Gerard N. Miartnon, couic'ilior of the United Shoe Associatoii, a. A.., .iati,
pronouncing the rwelcomring speech at the insp-etion of thie rc v andr niodern .shoe factory at Martissant on
Wednesday. At Far left is Mlinister of Industry aid Ciminierce. Mr. Here Bo.er; next to him are Mr. Cle-
ment Vincent, Chief of Protocol, Mr. Antonio Andre. President of the Administrative Council of the Natio-
nal Bank, and Mr. Nicolas G. Martino, (Miroialine), P'res.ident of the Administratihe Council of the United
Shoe Co. S .A.


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HOTEL


Petionville
featuring
The Smart Saturday Night Club
LA PONDE
",9p.m. Until Late Closing
The El Ranclo Duroseau
Orchestra
Dancing Nightly Except Sunday From 7pm
THOSE WHO APPRECIATE
THE BEST DINE
AT EL RANCHO HOTEL
And always superb cuisine


SUNDAY, FEB. 14TH, 1960.
;A


I









.AY, JFEB. -14THl 1960


=; .* ,o ,, ,' '
,: -:' -* % '.- ' .
e., -.. n. .
,lval wed Jean Claude vacationing- here at present and is
.-in New York- yesterday, staying at the -Oloffson'. Mr. Kober
i.'Ahg couple had planned their is a frequent contributor to the New
f.4or April but decided to% Yorker and is apcknowledged as a
tithe "'ltar last night. -Members good play-wright. .
ati'.large polony attended the \ ..
:i'both are from Port-au- Amongst .his many successes are
andi Jean is graduating the play, "Having a Wonderful
iy'ftom"Corne4l Hotel School. Time,"-and the musical, "Wishing
,.; '" ou were Here.'; Complete' with a
,':. .spade beard, Kobei has a distinct-
.oine.Van Veeof oCourtrai was ive sense of- humor and is resting
ei.lis week singing the praises here after, witnessing his 'latest
he'Flemish Linen manufactured play, "A. mighty man was He,"
:Bis factory. He was here for making its Broadway debut. ,
weekss, on a propaganda-, tour ,. .
j",his linen and stayed at the .
j .Haiti .during. his visit. Alix Rigaud and MeUe Farmer-
, 1.. are Fiancee.
, ..-*''" ,* . .. >
[,tat the Oloffson this week Guests at Kyona Beach, at,. pres-
jBuyer Sam Becker and- his ent are Frank Satnstein, 'Producer
9T.'oth .fim:.New. Jersey and of 'the Jackie Gleason Show and
NEugene (Atlas, an orthodontol- Spectacular and Art Pirder. all-
tfrdrn Staten' Island, New Y6rk. round Athlete. of Arerida' anrd the
,Atlas was accompaniped by his greatest fisherman of the new
..,.,.,. \ world. Also guests of h6sts', Pierre
-..r' ..'. * *^ arid'Tuture D'Adeski'iS the distin--
:,... . .-i. guished Mrs Marjorie Hartford,
7,ier^Dloffson visitors are BBC wife of ml.ti-milionaire, Huntington
X'U.ehaes Kinsolving and his Hartford and the glamourous act-
'RO-a, of the Department of ress. Dona Mae.
oh o.tfie Herald Tribane and,
yn at Law, Richard'tC. Fra- *" *
,airimaTn. of the- Venango Haiti- lost one .of its dearest fri-.
"IRpublican Committee and ends in the Tourist' Industry with
wife. .Josephine ,of Franklin, the death this week, suddenly in
i', Hawaii, of. Al immons. Mr. Sim-


Raoul Blumberg, Assistant General
Manager of the' Washington Post
and Times Herald.
"
SThe National Follore 'd Group
which was declared Ais being "be-
yond competition" at the recent
International Fair of Sugar, in Cal,
Colombia, received enthusiastic ap-.
plause when they gave their floor
show onboard the SS. Victoria dur-
ing her ra'aldeni cruise here last
week. Members of the press cruis-
ing with Victoria included., Mafia
Fusco, Globe anr dMail, Toronto,
Canada, Virginia Puzo, Saturday
Review, New York, Mrs Evelyn
Heyward, Mrs Irma Michellson, In-
ternational. Trade Review, New
Ybrk/ Alfred Rubin, Philadelphia
Daily News.
..... * "'.,.
Visiting Haiti last week for. sev-.
en days were Dr. Moses Coletnan,
a Dentist from, Glen Cove, Long
Island,' .New 'York' accompanied by
his wife, Dr. Henry Weiirreb, Phy-
'sician fro Glen. Cove and his wife,
Leon Freemad of Newton Massach-
usetts and his wife and Mr and
Mrs Joel 'Clarke of Wabamr; Mass-
achusetts. .. ,
.' * '
Here. this week.- are Mr and Mrs
Goran Holmquist, respectively Pre-
sident ad Vice-President of Bon-
rdnier Inc., an art'.gallery in. New
York. The Holmquits were here
abmut four years, ago with two of
their five adtughters and this .trip
were joined-by their daughter Eli-
zabeth who married, Alexander. Al-
drich, a.' Deputy Police Comnmssi-
6nerin New- York.- '
'\ 4 *' -...*
SSol' "Rubensltein, King of Maiden
Form Brazier, and his wife, Bee
are guests at the El Rancho. They
are friends of Dr and Mrs Eugene
Atlas of Staten Island, ,New York,
who is also in'Haiti visiting.
' '' .
WLawyers, Horce C.'Jeffers and
Worra,F. Mountain Jr' are here
visiting an .old friend and former
barrister-, BLishop A.. Voegeli.


SIF YOU WANT THE -
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o
A'ATMOSPHERE THEN.,
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r ':':S ,W . Cto t. *,n .




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"HAITI" SUN'N'


,N ,G, ...B --
NEW NIGHT CLUB.
DJOUMBALA OPENS
Djouinbala Club, .is the name of
the Chououne-type night club'
that has' sp-routed on the road to,
Fr ,, five minutes from Petion-
ville. Built by a group of Port-au-
Prince businessmen,'the new club
,Nas opened last night with music
supplied by the Orchestr& Jazz dds
Jeunes. .
,Constructor of 'the- club was Ed-
gar Breton. It is_ the first night
club in this area and is expected
to draw the City crowd. It will be,
opep. nightly with Hi Fi music and
one dollar entrance fee will bI
charged on Saturdays when the club
ill have an orchestra..- .


PANAMA LINE PANAMA
CANAL 00..,
Tne SS "Ancon" of, the= Panama
Line will arrive from New York at
7:00 a.m. February' 15th, 1960.
On board are a total of 111 ps-
engers of which ,theI "following 23
will disembark at Port-au-Prince:
-Mr. Kthanase Auguste, Mr. Mar-
die H. -Balgedonow, Mr and Mrs
Claude Caminulle, Miss Vella Freda',
Mr,and Mrs krthu?.M. Henricksen,
Mr and. Mrs Henry T. Parret, Mr
Aristide Petoia, Mrs Francoise 'Pl-
gniat, Mr and Mrs W. M. Reifsily-.
der, Mr Roger Riviere," Mr apd'.
Mrs Franck Schaefer, Mr and Mrs
Hans Stecher & Daugher 19 years,
Mr and. IVMrs Eugene Strassbrger;
Mr jean Villard.'


"^' | I


P A ,
S -. ,




t"\" '-A' r


IS

i^ I .S


i, ".N
. .,
4^^.^^^ .^ ^


N C.E'.





..
N" CI E









D, -
ly-



r 0

ROM
^^^^^


mons was the founding President
of'ASTA and had: oneof theIlargest
Travel Agencies in ,New' York.' He
also ran many cruises to Haiti each
,year and gave Haiti many tips'on
how to promote tourism. .
--In Port-au-Prince' this week yvas


,. *" * $ '
yRose, T'. V. Producer
,In) "of New York' arrived
cntly wih his wife Lanvar.
'ar.staying at the,El.Rancho.
! -.. rk. , .r .d
:. , -.1.f
B.l.:Kober,, well known and
cr. New -York story. writer, is
B^". .r ".-*'


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SATURDAY 9:30 P.M. TO 3:30 A.l.
.4A M UST.. ! !

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DANCING IN A REAL EXCITING
THE GREATEST -SHOW ON THE


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ISLAND!


PA' GAfi&


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S ,I ," .- " . ,' ',


PAGE 186 SN "HAIT I SUN "M s DAY, FE. 14T. 196'

p ? DR. -LOGAN SPEAKS AT DEDICATION....
lL -S(Continued from page 1). University, 1933-1938. Professor 6.
ward Faculty. History at Howard University since
(Continued from page 1) Gospel Business Men's Fellowship hed], but that healing comes ronr The speaker has served as'assist- 1938 ahd Hpad of' the Departmentea
give you our ways and the peace International and have not'been alt- God in t nme of his son, Jesus ant secretary of .the Pan 'African since 1942. ,
6o Jesus Christ in your hearts." ered in any way, Christ." erullo explained, "Each Association and was a member of 'Ph. D., Harvnrd University, 1936.
At the Thursday evening meet- Following prayer for the salvat- night I will demonstrate the mir- the United States National Comm- Autho. of: i: 'p o B a i
ing. the "Sun" listened as..vangel- ion of sinners and the healing of acle power of God." mission for UNESCO. A former mfi- ia.. a "eathp 'of tte-
ist Cerullo. speaking through an the sick, many people gave testirg- Testimonys of,more healings were ber of the)board of editotir>of Hli- di a ...tates With Haiti, 177-1 894
interpreter Rev. Bernard La- ony to their healing (first meeting givert at tle second meeting held panic-American HistoriCaf Review', ( r t'i iyof North-.arolina. Press '
combe, Port-augPrince Church of held on the 10th of February.)' at the Sylvio Cator-stadium on Feb., he has also served bedl"i$r ,- 1" .", '.,... '
God Pastor called for raised "Among- thed miacles tak i n,g ruary 11 and the following are ex- pacities with, the .Jouri1 l' .I a.i dates tain World
hands aid bowed, heads to the sev- place, following prayer for, the sick tracts taken from the press release History and Negro Js4trica tll litica(Es" lic 'Affairs Prxes, 19-"'
eral thousand people present. Many in the "name of Jesus Christ, was issued by the campaigners and cov- etin:, During World Wai I he was 4').
of those present appeared to be ih the restoration to full sight of an ering- the meeting. a lieuten .t. tin the U.S. Army. The Negro and, the Post-War
the lower income bracket and a 11-year-old boy who -had been blind "Thirty-five-'persons rushed from ', I World (Minorities Publishers, 1945).
large -numbe were members of from birth.'He was Henry Pignac. a crowd of 14,000 Jast night at the '.A leading Negro spokesman and The Negro in American Life and
evangelist cilts in Port-au-Prince. son f RaouI Pignat. First Avenue, Sylvio Cator Stadium to testify to prominent American citizen, Dr. Lo- Thought: The Nadir, 1877-1901 (The
Numerous women wwere carrying Bolosse, No. 52. complete healing from deafness, or gan is much in demand as a piubl- Vial Press, .1954). '
babes in arms. "39-ear-old P.. rt-au-Prince La partial dqafness following prayer ic speaker His gracious .personal, The Negro In '6te tlnited States:
A the meeting was reaching 3its ar-od Prt-a-Prince law- by the American evangelist Morr'i f ity and keen .insight have won him A Brief History D. 'Van Nostand,
Climax a threateyrng rainstorm irheS. St reuse, Rue des of Cerullo. -. the respect of countless audiences. 1957).- a I '
i droe h tnof 'the Stadium crowd Miracles said he was healed of Edited and contributed the first
towards .the exists .and home and partial deafness which he'had for sold- ast night nearly 10,000 Pr chapter to What the Negro want
at this juncture evangelis Cerullo4 d one ha eas sod-ns waved 'their, hands indicating CU CULU a symposium by fourteen Neg
th e r ain t.e r re p o r te d b e in g h e a le d , t ss-w
called far thd rain to hold off and re, Sergeant. Mbe ng heasedtme, acceptance of"Jesus 'Christ as Iheir VITAE OF DOCTOR leaders (University of North ,Car-
for the wind to abatl until tb peop eare Mn m personal avioutr.One of the ,most RAYFORD W. LOGM AN olna Press, a Mou '
7 le had all reached the safety of sd he ured amazing of the innumerable mir- AN Editedl The Memoirs f a Mont;
their homes. Dri& g the' iiull be- of .stomach trouble and Sergeaht ales by he God was the cello Slave (University of Virginia ,.
fore the' storm Cerullo 'pointed out Acette Geore, 19, who was und- begim g haig for Ben La- A.B.. Ph Beta Kppa Williams. Pre .1951).
how. some of the crowd had return- treatetata ita e, Peo lle who was llege W sown. Massach Author of numerous articles and.:;,
ted. to their seats -r- barely' mom- and reported mplete relief frrippled that he ad o be- car- use 7 book reviews in scholarly journs
'K irs ate a torenia ~the--pain of. kidney and heart trotb- so crippled, that he hpd 'i, be- car- ,1 91.' . "" '
". ehnts later a torrential rainstorm .e pand heart u. red. After prayer, however,. he First Lietenant of I~anLry, 372- magazines of opinion ,.- .
b 'Wke. le s *' ; walked back and fbrth, giving every nd" Regiinent of Infantry in -France, Member of the ard of Edito .;
..ne f the most. unusual testim- faith for 1I' Lcoinplete recovery. April 918-August 1919. o the .Hispanic Amnerfca "Historic-
Entran to the Stadium is' free ones was that of Rene Fils', 27, of "A Chch of oqd Minister, Aroif.s e 1 ,
ad' their has1 beqn nr collections Rue de la Reunion, who said he Amilear who hpd been da his Secretay 'and. Interpreter of See. Fulbright Research Fellow in Pa- 1
S or contributions, and from o- ohs- was' completely led Z total right ear 'for 13 years, testified to ond Pa i-Afican Cogres. Paris, ris, .1951-1952., o ..
etvatons.- on Thursday night, most deafness causedby a bulletwound co mplete healing." 121; Thir, Londo, 923; New Mide. a study of conditions In
of the congregation knew that the incurred, on December 16, 1958."- Yorkl' 2. Fidch West Africa and ,i'Liberia.,
evangelist and. his. party were 7ay- .. Speaking through an interpreter, Cerullo conieludted the meLeting by Deputy Secretary. Pan-African summer of .1953. m '
ing. their wn way. the Denver, Coloradr evangelist pro- saying, "Thiq is not magic, it L Association, Paris, 15t-1924,- Has travelled also inr most .of
-:t. o '. ugh the claims of miracles missed Abe powbr of God for ,the helig by the power of"Go._It iq Professor' of Hitoy,.and, Head Western uprope, IMexico, lom-6
haVe'iot beerksubstanated 'by' this leting of cripples;on the: following a matter of, faith in God apd in ot the Depart.ent' of History, Vir- bia, Venezaela, ThI. Netherlands, .5
i Wlpapr",it is,re that evangel- e-fingJ "'I yt' believe the Bible G(i's son, 'tisus Chrst, who is ginia Union: universityy 1,925-1930; Antilles,, Cuba ,and he .Dominican
'ist Moris Ceradlo has bought a and act pon'it," he said, "You the one who will set you fie;e, i Professo 'of History apd Head. of Republic. This is Dr. Logan's 4th:
S-certain. elation to. members of many will see blind eyes Open, ddaf ears o'y will' onlya believe." the Deartment. f ry,.. tlanta' visit to Hiti. ., .
-O*-the poorer.famiies.of Port-auL- unstppedt.crippls wark, and every W, 0 0. 0 Q.' 00 a000
'.-' .. ce. -s- .' -." ..seas will e haled'. "TheW is . .. !.. :. '
'7- .. The following extiacts have bden power in God's d rd .
t"" en from 'the press releases giv- The evangelistrepeatedly eplain-' '
e ;' to us this -week by the Full ed that he himself has no power to / t SAAY EVENING' POST -',
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ANA ,F .-H,1A9'0.3q J 1 P,


Haitian


0. utespeculative, yielding good
profits sometimes glutting the mar-
S ket at certain periods, pratik with
retailers is decidedly advantage-
Sns to the bulking intermediary.
S CHARACTERISTIC SHAPE
pratilt relationships seem to have
Sa characteristic way of taking
shape. A bulking intermediary will
call over a would-be buyer unfa-
miliar to her and invite her to bar-
I gain. After some talk, if the seller
" likes- the buyer's manner, she will
make a-very reasonable selling off-
er. As the sale is consummated, she
I will ask the buyer if she buys re-
gularly on that day and at that
L. place. If the answer is a friendly
: affirmative, she will say meaning-
S ly: "Wait for me. I always come
on this day. I come from such-and-
such a town. I come here with the
truck called so-and-so. I keep my
stock here, at the depot of Madame
X." With more talk, an understand-
ing begins to emerge.
r Each woman will carefully watch
the other's behavior on subsequent
occasions, until there is genuine
mutual trust. When vaunting the
solidarity of a,pratik, an' interme-
'' diary will say: "When I go to
Port-au-Prince, my pratik never
lets me sleep 'n the depot I
sleep in her house" Or: "When X
promises to buy eggs for me, she
Sides them from the other women,
and will not consider their offers."
A buying pratik who knows her
selling pratik is coming will wait
.' at the proper place and time, re-
;". fusing to buy stock from others
that she is sure her pratik is carry-
i" ng.


To the extent that her stock is
committed in-such arrangements, a
selling pratik will refuse to sell to
others until she has met her pratik
buyer. Since it is difficult to dis-
cover just how much stock is so
committed in a particular instance
one may be led to believe that the
selling behavior of intermediaries
is random or whimsical, and that
they may refuse to make certain
sales because of some irrational
streak.
It should be clear, however, that
personalized economic relationships,
while they modify somewhat the c
nature of the distributive process,
arise precisely because intermedia-
ries understand the basic character
of the Haitian economy so well.
They are not acting irrationally, but
very rationally indeed, given the
terms of the system.
A. final point may be considered
here. In the brief discussion of Hai-
tian agriculture undertaken earlier,
.nothing was said of the economic
and social arrangements by which
work is done. Actually, not enough
is known of such matters altogeth-,
er to speak with assurance. But,
it is probably tair to say that in
the Haitian countryside there is
considerable economic individualism
in agriculture, and little institutio-
nalized cooperation. If this is true
in agriculture, it appears to be ev-
en truer of marketing.
Combines of infermediaries simp-
ly do not exist, and intermediaries
seem incapable of forming such
combinations in order to bulk pro-
duce on a larger scale, reduce ov-
erhead, purchase rucLks, fix prices,
or otherwise act collectively in their
own group interest. Intermediary


market
activity, then, has a highly frame
mented, almost atomized character
er. And yet, the pratik custom ol
viously plays an integrating role. ]
is built up out of series or chain
of dyadic relationships which pei
sist through time, and are found
on mutual trust for mutual advani
age.
In some cases, ritual kinship a
well as ordinary kinship ties ar
intermixed with pratik relation
ships, reinforcing or underlying;
them. 19 It may be, therefore, tha
some observers of Haitian rural so
city have been too ready to sei
I


System
g- the absence of integrating social
t- forms serving various ends. Ties
b- of the pratik kind, in fact, may be
It most common in those societies in
s which wider and more formal soc-
r- ial devices have never existed or
d have fallen into disuse. The kom-
t- bite and corvee Wvork societies of
old have nearly disappeared from
s Haitian agriculture, to be replaced
e by day labor in most cases. 20 But
i- much notice is still taken of these
g disappearing work groups since
it they have somehow caught the ima-
- gination of observers and visiting
e planners.


Pratik relationships, partly be-
cause they occur mainly within the
distributive system rather than
wholly within production, partly be-
cause they seem fragile and trivial
alongside the work societies, have
received little or no attention. It is
at least worth considering whether
cooperative organization in a count-
ry such as Haiti might not be real-
ized more directly by careful pri-
or analysis of dyadic relationships,
than by the marshalling of nostal-
gic suppositions about an institutio-
on now nearly vanished from the
scene.


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Phone:396 ll


SUNDAY, FEB. 14THi, 1960


"
HAI T-I SUN "


PAGE 9