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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00248


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Full Text





S Weekly
Every


Sunday
SVOL XI SUNDAY, JANUARY 31th, 1960 -

2 ev 'l 7


iwn Patrol


Crash


SFliersKilled


'A 22 year old Haitian Army pilot
N o received his wings two months
o at Graham Airforce Base in
lorida was killed Friday while fly-
..ing on a dawn patrol. With him was
..Aiforce mechanic, Corporal Jean
.Paul; their Harvard fighter plane
crashed in flames near Jeremie
'Ai.rport, Southwest of Port-au-Ptin-

The dead pilot was Sub-Lieute-
.ant, Gerald Artiste, commissioned
.: last after a 14 month intensive train-
ing in the United States.
Artiste rose from the ranks in the
Haitian Airforce over a five year
periodl and was sent to the )States
where he went through a course of
aviation and language training. He
."received his wings at the Graham
'Airforce base and returned to Port-
au-Prince two.' months ago. Corpor-
,al Paul was in his fifth year in the,
airforce as a mechanic. Both men
r were single.
This was Haiti's Airforce's first
' casualties since a Harvard with two
grew members flew into the bay
two years ago. The remains of Sub-
Lieutenant Artiste and Corporal
Paul were flown back from Jeremie
2pm, Friday.


' The National Bank of'
right) Mr Louis Smith, J
the Week), President, Ant
Jean Pierre.


Personal

This week saw the exo
Administrative Council o
tional Bank of the Republ
and it s replacement by
Council of 5 members inc
Antonio Andre, 50 year o
,who joined the Cayes bra
Institution in the thirties
dually climbed from the
be elected President this
his new Co-Manager an
choice for personality ~
week", Mr Joseph Chate
35 year old Joseph Cl
a youthful economist, ful
usiasm, drive and dedic
brings to his new post as
sident of the National Ba
of experience and bank
ledge. Here indeed is a n
(Continued on


Freres: Chick


DES
-


QUIRON TURNING

CH I,.C KEN FA


The modern Freres chicken dressing Plant in action


..... "











Port-au-Prince, HAITI No. 37, Avenue Marie-Jeanne CITE DUMARSAIS ESTIME No.12



A Beats HAITI

FIRST MATCH ENDS

WITH 2-1 SCORE

12,500 people gathered at the Syl-
vio Cator Stadium last night t9
witness a sporadically spectacular,
tussle for soccer supremacy bet-
Haitis newween Haiti's National selection and
.. ..-.p.. -" the I siting Austrian 11 who after
a slow, steady start came awaylous'
a narrow 2-1 victory. .*
Pace was a feature of the match
throughout but .t was not until the
second half that both teams really
began i to control the ball. hait at-
Haiti's new Administrative Council (left to tacked from the first whistle rep-
.eatedly, but, without cohesion and
oseph Chatelain (our choice for Persoalt ofreigter sai keep the more native Haitan's out
dus of the riM South to Puerto Lbpo Cruz and aK were thrown away by oveh r zealous'
lkcks,, everyone of which soared





f thb Na-- PERSONALITY OF THE WEEK. from Haiti this weekendshe carries attempts at goal shooting made by .:;.
li of Haiti until five years ago the o board as her Captain a very n- the Austrian team however were'rossbar.
,z"Sun" carried a weekly column dignant Honduras citizen ho at all fautlessly placed butent to pla y ked
a waiting game in the first spel




ludin M entitled, "Personality of t h e the moment is no doubt breathing sufficient fire to penetrate ,the cap-
old banker Week." Now we, have decided to sights of relief indispersed with in able hands of active Haiti's goal.
dch of the introduce a nw series of eek- ventive phrases. Cruz Thus the first spell ended stale few
then gra- ly personal OF THEhich WEEK. fromay be Captain Georges Borden of the mate 0 to 0.shooting made by

ranks to about a simple camioner, a per- M.V. Limoncito on a trip from Mi- Second half was 'pace, from start "-'';'
week and son in the limelight, someone ami to Puerto La Cruz, Venezuela, to finish and- it was obvious neith- '*.*.
nd today's who has contributed something sprang' an oil leak in a storm off er team was going to give anyth- .'!
Sof the to thp community or plainly just the Southwest peninsuar which ing away. Austrian started pressing '
laudin somebody who has got into the caused te the m losedown .of. the ships home more persisant attacks andp-
d ba news. Now we, hav dcidd to sights of relief "a'ndispersed within ablthe-ninth minteof Husehek,. Aus-
hatelain is Choice of the personality of the in jail by Captain Borden. tria's left-wing headed a beautiful-0.
11ranks of enth- week does not mean favoritism .VStory leading upon a to the Captain's ly executed shot past .the handsoart
cation and on the part ofin the Sunlimelight, but is pre- confinement started when as a rezuels. Haiti's goalie. Haitis footwork aseit-
Vice Pre- seated purely for human interest, prang' of the oil leak he took shelter r more impression e in the! secondt-
k a thfund toThs column, along with others inr plainly just bay other Southwhe small Haach spell and 'they ave the Austria started pressings
ing know- published by the Sun is not for own of Aclose d'Hainault on Jahuary some more ments, one attacks and
aeain whose Choicsale. 21.of the personality of the The Captain explained that he which resulted in sufficient confu- ':
small port after the military auth-ers to put the ball into. his. own
ation and on the part of the Sun, but is confineme (Continued on page 2) (Continued on page ) w
Vice Pre- enCte purely for human interest t of the oil Caribbean Cmore impress ie in second


ng know- published by the Sun is ot for town ofAsGen G aith ery some To Vio s moments, oneof



an whose sale. 21NTS IO eutenant General Ridgely Gai- that e Armwy, General Gaither wasconfu-'
Spage other Commander in Chief of the commandant of the arachuten play-

R M E R S Caribbean Command, will arrive at School, Fort Benning, Ga. from'..'.,
Bowen Field at 2 p.m. Tuesday, 1943 to 1945. Early in 1945'the Gen- ;:.^
February 2, where he will be met eral was sent to the Europea The-is .own

by a Haitian Army Honor Guard ater for duty with the First Allied ,.:'!
Nine years ago, Jean and Ghis- and Colonel Robert D. Heinl, chief Airborne 'Division when that orga-- -,--
laine Desquiron started a chicken of. the U.S. Naval Mission to Haiti. nization parachuted acro s-s the ..'
farm with a flock of 300 birds and ,. The General, on a three day vis- Rhine River. -,.
a lot of pioneering ideas. Today at it to Haiti, will call on Foreign Min- (Continued pn page 2)
Feres, eight miles from Port-au- sister Raymond A. Rigoyse, G-inister General Gaither was
Prince, their labor and foresight of Interior and National Defofense Drcommandant of the parachute
have culminated in the ultimatearibbean Command, will ar of Aurele E. Joseph, and General, Fort Big, Ga. from
chickenfarms 2,th modern farm- Pierre Mwhere he will be met erl ws sent to the Europen The-n. .
ing and p ago, Jessing equipment and He will also visit the Casernes borne Division when that ora-
farm with a flock of 18,000 chickens. Dessalines, Military Academy, Rif-ver
lFreres, eight miles from Port-au- ister Raymnge, Non-Cd A. Moyse, Ministerd Off-

Prince, The establishment d foresigt of large icers School and witness a parade

;,;' .. prosperous chicken farm has res- on the Champ-de-Mars. American )I .
have culminateted in a lot. of satisfaction for Ambassador Gerald A. Drew will
the Desquirns but they still have hold a reception for the General.
a burning ambition which in hise General Gaither is expected tones

B .'L."" own words is "To make the rural leave Haiti by U.S. Air Force plane
a flodistrict of Freres the chic kens. Thursday, February 4, from BowenRi
letRangeN issionedOff-



S Th e establishment of this large icers School and witness a parade



prTo this end they have already Annapon thes, Md. General Gaither has
ultaken big strides by way of rural held numerous Army pasts in thDrew will

extension. With the help of local United States and overseas. One of
the early leaders in the establish-
n. b (Continued which in hispage 11) met of airborne troops as part of t-General Gatherither is expected to
tre of.Haiti.,' Field. .




- '~ ", '~


L.


.P.
I .Ship s, '


t|cipper


Seized..
u ; (Continued from page 1)
* -:'"yorities had checked the engine
tl roube ke' ,,
With.the help of the ODVA Grand
O"'.;'Anse and, Shada radio' commilicat-
n',' with Port-au-Prince, Captain
{' ';B eDn~snt .out an'apjead to ,the
enauIa embassy for, the requ-,
f' tf funds from .the Caracas own-
of-the Limoicito. The' radio mes-
,iwas., delivered by Haiti's For-
Affairs Department to Charag
V'ffairs Russian Smitter. But; dur-
.i the-'re rela y n g of. messages a
'it- technical,, hitch ocurrei. -'
_j.ptain Borden -went missing.
AN-He;ws located spending his
day in Haiti's .National Pris-:
0...where in 'the Captain's own
', was thrown like a 'opi-
pr.isofier." He said ,he was en-'
,.ut'to Port-au-Prince to tlake, del-
yf'of-gas, oil and other fuel his
e required to continue her -voy-.
,;'"elin .on his arrival in the town'
Jpt, Jeremie the Police seized .him,
tnsported him to the Capital City
.eddhim' .
SVenezuelan Charge d'Affairs
V3 'es, s -declared his. only .com-,
St-ht a-the Foreign Office
~.'yery_ amiable in helping bring'
erelease- o, the ship's Capt-
taitaih, BQrden was released
:the -; and, flew, Satuday' to
e-e. :Fuel for the. ship preceed-
'-by,'motor vesspl. One mighty
ti say..thqt .it wil, .take
oil leaks to encourage'
Bdrden to sojourn in a Hai-'


"4


THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE AGENCY,
Place Geffrard,'Phone: 3216 or 3929


"'HAITI


S.


A. o


SUN"


Silly Season In


The -Caribbean
Editorial from MIAMI HERALD January 29,


REPORTS_. SIFTING. from the
Dominican Republic, which has a
censorship about as leak-proof as.
the Navy's bathyscaph, are. bing'
taken with a .wait-and-see attitude
in official U.S. circles.
.These reports indleate a .wide-'
spread revolt has broken out ag-
ainst Generalissimo Rafael Leoni-
das Trujillo, 'the 'aging dictator.
Between 1,000 and 2,000 rebels
have been jailed.
The insurgents are said to in-
clude members of some'old famil-
ies, which composed the ruling cli-
que --f' such a thing could exist
under one-marwrule-- .as well as
representatives of organizedd labor,
a puny force in the Dominican Rep-
ublic. ,

Later reports said five Roman'
Catholic priests had been arrested
for inciting" a ."Communist-type"
plot against 't h e government and
putting their parochial students to
manufacturing!, bombs. Some 200
bombs, said these reports, had, been
seized. -
There could be substance, to the
rumors, of course. The Trujillo gov-
ernment has been in' trouble lately.
Government employes reportedly
have gone unpaid because available
cash was- being spent for. arms. Do-
minicans in exile have been active.
;The Cuban revolutionary govern-
nent, sworn in. enmity to Trujillo,
has been threatening .its neighbor.
But "this seems to be the .hilly
season in Caribbean revolutionary
circles. School boys manufacturing
bomb under the tutelage of "Com-


munistic" priests is about, on a par
with an ambassador 'charging into
a Havana television studio to prom-
ote the nfost public- diplomatic
brawl in .history, or Cuban secret
agents ploting with a disguised' F-
BI man to kidnap a Castro enemy.
under the, eyes of. Miami. police.
To be' sure,. conditions are 'not
too happy .in the Dqminicai tepub-
lic, or in 'Cuba. But some of the
things that are happening --or pur-
ported to 4be happehing-- are pretty
theatrical. The attitude "'of wait-
and-see is 'well taken.


US. General


GAITHER


To Visit
(Continued from page 1)
Th'e General also 'served ii the
Pacific and Mediterranean ,theatres
of operations, becoming commander
of U.S. Fdfces and Dii-ector 'gener-
al of 'the Allied Military *Gdvern-
ment in the -British-United States
Zone of the Free Territory of Tri-
este. During the Korean war he
comrhanded the 40th Division in the
Punchbowl, and Heartbreak Ridge
sections. The General was named.
Commander in Chief of the, %arib-
bean (Command with headquarters
at Quarry Heights, Canal Zone, on
March 6, 1958.


Ii


REGULATION
,AR HIRE

A. heavy blow was struck at pot-
ential tourists Friday when .the
Traffic office in Port-au-Prince, al-
ong with the .General Headquarters
of the 'Police, issued a circular to
all Hire Car operators, a circular.
which'brought cries of protest from
Tourists, officials of the Tourist -In-
dustry and the Hire Car Agencies.
The, circular, entitled "The regul-
ations of the law regarding Hire
Cr..". stated the .following forbod-
ing words. '. '
"The new regulation prevents a
tourist from hiring a .car until he
or she lifts been in the country 72
hours."
Morning newspaper, "Le Main,".
declared Saturday in a front page
two column editorial that in their
two column editorial that in their


.AUSTRIA BEATS. HAITI.,.--:
(Continued from page 1) the next 'two Will -be'.se
v, watching.
net he was immediately' replaced The 23 memberpc.of H
by Captain Stotz. One up-for Haiti nal soccer selecofion t
making'ir'; 1 to 1 'after g5 nminiite training .this week- B.'.-
X I, A.; )
of the second half. f or their three mtcx i
Ho'ti at 'this'stage pulled. outfall Vienjia Austria soccer .dV
1the stops arid pressed home attack ruled for.)iast night ad0'ie
but again' careless.-shdoting cost coming week.,As a br
them the chance of an added,sc.re. training and to relax,.'
With '20 'minutes to go, Haiti re- fray, -the Haitian.. tear
placed three men arid the change -to Kenscoff on Thursda |.
was qierited by even ..stronger at- two days pf leisure .atA.i
tacks into the Austria half. Short- Berg. .i-'
ly after the Ha.tian replacement Austria's 18 arrived-*.
Austria moved a change in forma- Port-au-Prince at 12.:'30,p
tion and 'swapped three; .ien and PAA flight 434. Ea.r
for .the "last 15 minutes the ball they beat a strong't:
movd ,from one end of the field team, Santa Fe,-by
to the other. With" only a few .min- three.
utes to go Austrias Huschek scor-
ed again this time from a centre itr
kick which, he made nro mistake '
with. Haiti tried hard to make up _________
the, deficit but the game ended
Austria' 2, Haiti 1. .
Two further .games remain uet-
ween these two teams and if last-
night's game is'an indication, then
,,. ^. ., ,, ., ,^ ^^^ j .. .. .. ... ,, A ,* ''- .'.,.. '*SS


S ,- YOU -WANT THE ''

< P A R EX C E L.L E NCE

S IN SEVICE, CUISINE AND..

M AUMOSPHMRE THEN "''

.4-.. -qa
ACCEPT THE WARM '

WELjO E AWA, G .., .";

: YOU AT TIE :"''' :i






S A N'G T AT T-

S, "



I S A N I G H T .



ONLY A T'' ',.
db-. P"- ", ..
_O_ IN A FEW r^ ......... S,


4, .,.


V.. Sensational

; AM1BERICAN VEHICLE, IDEALJ FO1 HAITI
thle LAR.K" manufactured by ST UDEBAKER-PACKARD .Corporation.
ter large nor small or rather, large and small at once ,
Offering all the. advantages,' of large cars, 6 to 7. passengers,
SStability, Comfort, Power and all the advantages of the siall, car
'."' w fuel consumption (30 to 32 miles on a ga~lloh,
Easy 'to drive, length reduced
'.. '"' Reduced rclees,.In spite' of its great luxury
I. Ideal for Haiti


GARAGE RUE 'DES CESARS PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
Ask also for' a demonstration of the PickUp and Trucks
Their 'Saving. of fuel,' solidity,, power and capacity pre


already universally known.


STRANGLING ,
AGENCIES ,1

Haitian tourism-one otf
blows it has ever been.
72 hour stipulation and i
frightening when 'lif
the -number of ..'.
stay in Haiti thrEr '
but have-in the pastkta
cars -for the dutati6 dnof
More delays have:.l
the tourist and .the' tea
hiring out vehicles. ,Bq
car can now ,be re i
itself must obtain fDoinm't
Office, a alird riyerd
the number of dayg
required by the 'hiwe^,
cids must have -thei
of hire cars licensed.-'
6nse plate with a. f l
that .no car with' a'.;i
plate may. be .reentedl' t
(Continued on


SUNDAY, JAN.




-. -J V. *' -
1L **~ **' *~'~ ** ** ?* *. .: ~ ** '~ >~
A -


rjj JAN.. 31ST. 1960


YOzung Haitian
HOPES TO TEACH
c-in 1951 when he was 13 years
SyDng: Haitian pianist, Guy
&.Mione 'burning ambition -
a to further his music-
caffion. TLast week he returned
jrtu-.xrnce after four years
ti*at the -Conservatoire Na-
,dA& Musique in Paris.'where
r d.his certificate and grad-
\with honorss,
g as Jone of Guy's ambitions
igLto fruition, now he has two
aims, to commence teach-
i-i .ti, and to give a public


Sott's musical career uegan
i started playing the piano
.ffrage-of six, under the tutelage
IB;us.mother a professeur de pia-
948 he became a pupil of
e ada Lina Mathon Blanchet.
".'{i his earlier years of piano
ir-wrote -sevFral compositions,
s.jfirst- a waltz, was written at the
tof eight.
.Aer his graduation in July of
,' 1Q9,. GuK did post-graduate work
ud er Professor, Marcel Ciampi,
erofssor to the Conservatoire Na-
4 onal' of- Paris.- He gave two con-
i..along-with other young stud-
its';1 in June'1956 at Salle Berlioz
ir.: -June 1959 at Salle Margue-
e.Gaveau.
I.-
ethirn~ig from Le Havre to Haiti
.the SS. Flandre Guy Scott gave'
a-fturther -concert and was enthusi-
caly. received by the passeng-
"',.one of whom wrote a letter
Ljpraising his performance.
.I'4O* -,Guy's plans for the future
r .blude^ a public concert in March
tfiyear and a teaching profes-
i io.lheriebye he hopes to pass on
ELf owl;dge of the piano. Remark-
.atheesults of Guy's final ex-
an, his teacher said, "His
agogique qualities are very de-
o iand .je cai, give excellent
e~e- shows sigis of a brill-
ri--' a-s" a 'onert pianist."
llbwing is a copy of .the
rising ,Guy Scott's parform-
ig his concert on the SS.

-:-

fadl6sine eot. mnoi avons reussi a
nrotstere suir FLANDRE-
a allows dedoovrir les antilles et
i'di nous faisons escale a Por-
e:Rico.
S avons eu Ie plaisir, au- course
nm soiree de gaja organisee;' a
'i ord .d'entendre un jenne pianist
ffltlen qui sur le FLANDRE re-
K darne dans son pays. Madeleine
,'shord en l'eeoutant repeter, puls
inmo, paus les musicians du paque-
pnis le commissaire avons ete
''.sults- par son jeu. C'est de Mr.
Y Scott qu',l s'agit.


D'et us eleve de Ciampi et de
itlt eleve do Conservatoire de
49 I merit d'etre soutenu
appuye car il parait come tons
;Jeuines, ne pas avoir les moyens
terlels d'argent et do relations
lispensables helas a notre epoque
rressir.
ts avons apprecie ses interpre-
Ihs de Chopin et de Debussy -
btpersonnellement j'aime autant


Guy Scott with his professor Marcel Ciampi of
National of Paris.


"1-AT TKf
HAITI S UNA 1 LiL


Pianist Returnsti'
AND GIVE CONCERT


MISSING WOMAN
WOMAN BELIEVED
IN CARIB
It was disclosed to the State Dep-
artment Wednesday that a 22-year-
old Ogdensburg, New York, woman,
once feared dead in Europe, is now
believed to be in the Caribbean
area.
A report on the whereabouts of
Harriet Elizabeth Benton, missing
since last October, was received by
the State Department from the
Amercan Consulate at Martinique.
The consulate reported that the
yacht Raider, on which Miss Bent-
on was first mate, was believed
berthed in the port of Antigua.
The skipper of the Dutch craft
reportedly said Miss. Benton left Ca-
sablanca on the Raider and was
presumed'.to be still aboard. At one
time Miss Benton was feared to
have been slain in the turbulent
North African area, but it was later
determined that a body found in
the region was thift of another mis-
sing American woman.

ATHERTON LEE
NOW HAS
JAMAICA FARM.
Atherton Lee left Port-au-Prince
Thursday' this week for Jamaica
where he intends putting in severall
weeks work on his recently purch-
ased 450 acres in the Blue Ridge
Mountains. His new property, with
three rivers, water supply and hyd-
ro-electric power, is to be the site
for his new flower industry, "Flow-
ers of Jamaica Ltd."
Lee intends keeping up his int-
erests in Haiti, a flower farm which
he has had for the past nine years
in Kenscoff.


the Conservatoire


LOANS HAITI $300,000 FOR
HIGHWAY WORK
Washington January 21.-The prudent advantage of
Development -Loan Fund has sign- unities for their economic
ed an agreement with Haiti for a ment."
$300,000 loan for a design engineer-
ing study for the reconstruction and Menapace added that, th(
additional construction of some 120 of this loan "is further
'files of highway, Haiti's southern of the continued friendly in
peninsula. the American people in the
of their neighbors in Haiti.


Signing the loan Thursday, were
Haitian Ambassador to the United
States, Ernest Bonhomme and Ro-
bert Menapace, Development Loan
Fund Acting Managing Director.
The projected highway develop-
ment in Haiti extends from Les
Cayes to Port-au-Prince. It involves
drainage and widening or resurfac-
ing of a highway in that area 6f
Haiti' where forest and fertile plains
are now only partly used.
Construction of an all-Weather
highway is expected to contribute
substantially to Haiti's economic de-
velopment.
In signing the agreement with
Haiti, Menapace recalled that this
is the third D.L.F. loan to Haiti.
He said the loans 'are evidence of
our faith that the people and gov-
ernments of Haiti will take full and

Pouvez-vous faire quelque chose
pour Ini. Je hli confie cette lettre
et lui demande de vous ecrire di-
rectement. D'avance je vous en re-
mercie car les heures agreables
qu'il nous a fait passer a bord do
FLANDRE meritent q u o n le re-


developt-
develop-


e signing
evidence
iterest of
e welfare


Responding, Ambassador Bonhom-
me said the loan is "meaningful"
to Haiti and that it emphasizes the
step-by-step 'progress and sound
planning which must go into the
economic development of Haiti.


lix


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FOUNDED IN 1805 AND INCORPORATED BY A

THE IBRITISH PARLIAMENT


ROhY CHENE7 AAD SOAS

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15 AVE MARIE-IEANNE

CITE DUMARSAIS ESTIME
Phone 2603


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aCT OF-


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**" ..'.. .'


1960 CARNIVAL
COMMITTEE CHOSEN

The organizing committee of Car-
nival 1960 is composed of the follow-
ing personalities: Mayor .Philippe
Charlier, Mme Leonie C. Madiou,
Mile Marie Lacombe, Prefect Lu-
cien Chauvet, Mr Fernand Crepsac,
Mr Jean Sassine, Mr Obelin Joli-
coeur, Mr Michel Aubourg, Mme
Fernande Madiou, Mr David Bigio, *
Mr Kurt Fisher. Mr Cemard Jo-
seph Charles, Mr Max W. Neptune,
Mr Lelio Cabeche, Mr Michel C.
Auguste; Edouard Charles de "Hal-
ti-Journal", Gerard Jolibois de "Lee
Jour", Michel Gilbert "Le Matin",
Pierre Sales "Le Nouvelliste",
Jacques Lemaire "La Phalange".

1UNDER-MINISTER OF FINANCE
OFF TO SIGN INTERAMERICAN
BANK AGREEMENT
Mr Marcel Daumec, Under Secret-
ary of State of Finance departed
this week for Salvador to sign on
behalf of Haiti the Interamerican
Bank agreement.
He is expected to visit Washing-
ton before returning to Port-amu.
Prince.

1500 TOURIST CROWD CITY -
WEDNESDAY -

1,500 tourists -from four cruise-
ships filled the city Wednesday.
One of the cruiseships the Bremon
is the latest passengership afloat
launched last year she was on her
first Cruise.

.The other ships were" SS Mau-
retania, Franca C and the Stella
Polaris.


j.t J x iPAGEii S


Imal"" -








"HAITI SUN-"


J -~


Personality Of The WeekI


(Continued from pagb 1)
training and new ideas will make
.him a valuable member of the
Bank's Administrative Council.
Mr Chatelain received in 1944 his
Jaw degree in Haiti. From 1945-49
he studied in Paris; graduated
there from the Sorbohne Law Fa-
culty as a Doctor in Economics and
also from the famed School of Po-
litical Science. In this latter .instit-
ution where the basic preparation
is given to french civil servants he
%.studied problems of financial policy
under such professors as Wilfried
Baumgartner, Governor of Bank of
France, conducted practical research
z ander the guidance of the Director
a of Research of the same institut-
ion. On his return from France, he
joined the National Bank as Chief
of the newly .created Economic. Re-
search Division, kept this post near-
ly 11 years until his election as-Vi-i
ce President and Manager of the'
Bank. -
It was Chatelain who, on the
downfall of ex-president Magloire
organized the National Bank emp-
oyees into a union. These employees
had participated in the general.
strike 'thht ousted Magloire and a
few weeks later won their spectac-
ular and dramatic 45-day strike that
left the Haitian public impressed
: by the determination, dynamism
and solidarity of the National Bank's
Employees. Chatelain expl a i n e d
that the top aim of the Union" was
to strengthen professional ethics
and modernize the administrative
system towards efficiency.
In 1955, he spept a year in Wash-
ington at the International Bank for
'Reconstruction and Development, a
1year divided between attending se--
pmnars and practical assignments
S rinclding six months as economist
'on the Central American desk.
/- As its chief Ec6nomist, Chatelain
S.epresented the NIationai Bank at
-'--, 'uthber of technical meetings'
'ro4i.hobt the wprld, from 'Panama
'' Istiambul And Rio de Jhneiro, and.
as been frequently attending the
". _Annual VIMeetings of Governors of1
tie Tihfernatiohal Monetiry Fund.
In 1956;. when the dollar crisis de-
.. .-" "'-. '- '_ .. *


veloped in Haiti, Chatelain's Re-
search division where the work
had been -formerly the collection
and preparation of information for
customers, and Management's use,
came suddenly into prominence. The
job became more operational, con-
stantly' geared at devising with
ICA and IMF technicians, Ministry
of Finance officials, effective count-
er-measures that prevented the de-
preciation of the Haitian currency.
ALSO AUTHOR-
At the end of 1954, a book entit-
led "The history of the National
Bank" was, published in Switzerland
as the result of 5 years intensive
study .-its author- Joseph Chate-
lain. With the extra.duties imposed
.by his new position, Chatelain is
not sure whether he will be able
to continue teaching at the Univers-
ity. Currently he holds at the In-:
stitute of International. Studies the!
chair on Economic Development:
Problems in Haiti. Formerly he" had
for four ye.rs the chair on Econom-
ic Theory at the Law Faculty. Also:
for 5 years (1952-57) he was re-'
presenting the National Bank on the
Technical Committee of the Agri-
cultural Bank,- a consultating body
that was reviewing loan application
received at this Bank.
Chatelain is the son of a disting-
uished Supreme Court Judge, now
retired, and his forebears also dist-
inguished themselves in Haitian
politics and "diplomacy. He is the
first member of the family to enter
the banking business.
AS HE SEES HIS PRESENT JOB
The main objectives of his work,
Chatelain explains, are to orient
the Bank's operations in directions
that secure "continuous monetary
stability" and a "more productive
use" of thd Bank's lending capacity.
Chatelain considers the dollar prob-
lem to be now under control. The
concern, however, will be there for
some time to watch and prevent
any resurgence of trends thatcould
undermine .again the gourde. The
best way, for him, to get' rid of
prospects 'of this sort of trouble in
the future is not just the defensive,
watchful attitude but the initiation


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of a determined and sustained act-
ion,aimed, at increasing, through a
more dynamic and discrimating use
of the'Bank's loans, the exports and
dollars earnings of the country or
at. developing local substitutes for
imports that could save dollars re-
sources for the economy.
For a long time the ideal at the
National Bank seems to have been
solely the realization of "safe" and
profitable" loan operations with its
customers. Practical safeguards de-
veloped through years of experience
pf local conditions, based on thor-
ough investigations of the custom-
er's ability to repay, have beeh
helpful in achieving good results as
regard the "safety" and "profitab-
ility" of loans made. "This concern
for 'safety and profitability must be
and will be maintained,"\Chatelain
says, "Our resources come for a
large part from deposits we rec-
eive, that we have to repay on de-
mard, on which we are paying int-
erest. They carnpot be wasted in
careless operations. Otherwise we
would be soon out of business".
"However something more should
be added to these criteria of sound
commercial banking and that is
this concern for.the use of our lo-
ans, the type of economic activity
that is going to be actually expand-
ed with the financing we supply."
.The job of Bank manager is being
split up with Mr Andre taking care
of commercial banking and Chate-
lain concentrating on monetary pol-
icy.

Living in La Boule, now alone,
his wife and 8 year old son are in
Europe, Joseph Chatelain finds .litt-
le. time for hobbles although he ics
devoted to music. At weekends he
can be found in the rural districts
visiting farmers, small' cooeratives,
or agricultural projects and- he is
a constant visitor to Rene Laro-
che's farm a( Cabaret where along
with other professional men, eng-
ineers, agronomists, community de-
velopment specialists, he takes
great pleasure in talking with large
groups of farmers, offering advice
and information on cooperative
problems.
Chatelain's interest in cooperatives
has made him the unofficial guide
to the Fermathe pilot project since
it was begun several years ago by
the United Nations and Rene Laro-
che of the Agricultural Bank. Am-
ong those persons he has taken on
conducted co-op tours are Presid-
ent Duvalier, American Ambassad-
or Gerald Drew and Point Four
boss, Harry Yoe.
There is every sign that with the
expert advice and sound ideas in
the person of Joseph Chatelain on
the Bank's Administrative Council,
the National Bank of the Republic
of Haiti and Haitians themselves
will reap the benefits of this young
.man's knowledge.



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"
HAITI SUN "


HAITI SUN -
S&AIZIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
oo"inunity Weekly Published Sunday Morning
iT JPIUJBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
t-Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
.IDMMERMi OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
: ESTABLISHED IN 19f50


S-- HAITI SUN,
-l'.. En Ville
-. HAITI AUSTRIA SOCCER Dear Mr Editor,
That little black box featured on
i.ght, ;Haiti's soccer eleven faced a strong Austrian front page of last Sunday's "Sun"
M "gave me great satisfaction and per
id-ill 'meet them on the field on a further two o. medium of this column, I would ike
.--- -.Feb '2 and 3. Soccer is Haiti's national sport and to express my thanks to those resp-
JLone would think it meet with the spectator support onsible for the ceaseation of Gov-
Uniforbunately it does not. -ernment functionaries and employ-
1ipast Haitian sodeer, especially inter-club matches, ee s; particularly Governent ac-
.. s t o r e g me countants' gambling activities at the
thousands of spectators to the games bu't over gambling rooms of the Internation-
re"eent yepes the numbers off people in the stands has al Casino.
er For reasons obvious, the roulette
-i as hoped that with the competition being provided in heels are spinning a lot slower
now and a good thing it -is too.
ese three imatdhes between Haiti and Austria -all the old Gamuing is a scourge in any count-
epeetator fervor will return and we may once more watch ry and one form of entertainment
.'s popular sport from packed stands. Certainly there is Haiti can well do without.
-.othing lacking inm Haitian soccer from the spectator view- Second item for elimination is the
:. .slot machines .now springing up in
M. t Port:au-Prince at an alarming rate.
-,Inter-club anid the present international matches provide The poor people of Haiti have' en-
PSunnile entertainment and in the past have produced some ough to contend with and can well
-iine football players from the Haitian ranks. And with a do without the false temptations of-
tig capacity i the regn of 20,000 "Sylvio tor" gambling -No slot machines
Pot-au-Pri'e's soccerr stadium more than justifies the need -- No Casino and...
K.!for a'detcleralted support from the public. I remain,
.Socer is recognized as a fine body-building sport quite Gratified.
.aside from its entertainment value so let's give it the en- *
'!ra:gement it justly deserves.. Jan 28
.-_- _____-_ HAITI SUN


DOWN WITH CUBANA SIGN
-.One more our "axe to grind" falls and takes a bite at an
.eyesore all to prevalent amongst Haiti's beautiful scenery

C.ana _Air' Lines has definitely closed down its' operat-
Sions in Haiti, officially last week, and yet that drab, mon-
Strosity of a "Hop to Cuba" billboard remains, sticking out
likelk a sore thumb from the picturesque drive on top of

Simple solution: Volunteers should be called to remove it.




218
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En Ville
Dear Editor:
Congratulations to the Haitian
Meat and Provision Company for
not only starting their new industry
but for their intelligent construct-
ion of the cement, h kygeni.c building
where, on its completion, the Saline
women are to work making "Affi-
ha." Congrates also to Mayor Phi-
hppe Charlier for the-donation of
the City land near the sea on
which the building is being built.
It is forsight such as this that
wil make Haiti a better place to
live in,
Yours truly,
Thanks.
NOTICE
Mr & Mrs Bichara Ismery, und-
ersigned, merchants established at
Port-au-Prince, advise the public
and particularly the commerce that
the emancipation, which has been


granted to their son (minor) Nes- In consequence, they decline all
sim Ismery, gone to the States, ac- responsibilities on all actions and
cording to declaration of August 16, gestures of said minor Nessim Is-
1958 performed at Tribunal de Paix mery.
de la Section Nord, to do business, Mr. & Mrs Bichara Ismery
has been removed from this date. Port-au-Prince, 26 Janvier 1960.

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PAGE 5


a a IL -- -LP"a -


VOLET


I


:,, .,
b-; 7:





I *d


"
HAITI SUN "


'- SUNDAY,, ,AN


a-J I1-3PL 1. S 1 0 %J a


Birth Of New Haitian Tax Law Described
When asked what lead to the-dev- found him in Mtr Herve Boyer, cur- einment and Mr Alien, was formed ments, continued. A
elopment of the new fund Mr Allen rent Minister of Commerce and In- by Minister Boyer tb study the pto- presented to Coqn
Ir'plied, "For the past two years dustry who'was then the Under-Sec- ject, its incidences on Haitian econ- by Mr Clovis Desmc
I 'have been trying to promote new retary of Finances. I talked to him omy and its application if it was of Commerce anfL
industries in Haiti. I made several only once, continued Allen. "Few accepted. ."With this law,"
trips to the States and to Europe, words were necessary and I had Later another commission was -"We have taken ;th
trying to interest American and Eu- nothing to explain, nor did he take formed by -the Department of Corn- I am very pleased '
ropean Capitalists in ouc projects any convincing. He was certain we mere and Industry which gave the -from people'of -W
here. -- were .on the right path." final touch to the actual law creat- the working man- .


"Each time I was confronted with
a wall, called guarantees, because
we could not offer them the guar-
antee of the Haitian Government of
the guarantee of the National Bank
of'Haiti due to previous agreements
*with the Import and Export Bank,
World Bank And Monetary Fund."
The actual idea of the fund came
to Mr' Allen while on a promoting
Gerard en -' 'trip' last July .i Paris. In his own
S words .he had "Just knocked my
-.INVESTMENT FUND iead against the wall" and was
The official paper of the Haitian feeling discouraged when by accid-
Government "LE MONITEUR" on ent he met Mr Fortune. Bogat, then
." December 24. 1959, published a new Pres. .of the International Business-
Sc-,. reading a special furid- called Man Club, who was vacationing in
Speial: Account of Investments., Europe. Bogat took Allen to a side
This- ftind is to be deposited at the walk cafe.and listened to his idea.
'- Agricultural Bank and-will be used When Allen had completed s ex-
'to create and develop industries planation Bogat agreed that it was
using agricultural products of Haiti a good idea and suggested that he
7 and thence will increase the nation- speak to the Businessman Club ab-
al.-.revenue. To Augment this speci- out it. "Bogat told me," said Allen,
al account, an internal tax of 6 per "If wewant to develop our country,
cent and 4 -per cent on imported then we- must start in our count-
luxury and semi-luxury articles i ."
wi l be levied.
On July 14, 1959, Allen returned
"I am happy, very happy, to see to Haiti to try and convince people
thlt..the new law' is in effect now that through new taxes an economic
because --for the Government and development fund could be created.
fo-. r ie--- its means the start of the "At first I thought the work would
eal economic development of this 'be easy," said Allen. "I decided to
co untryy,' said Mr Gerard Allen, write my speech for the Business-
:.man who conceived the idea of the man Club while I was on the plane.
s special fund some six months ago, My Writing keep my fellow passeng-
when Your Reporter. interviewed er awake, Mr Boris Lockak, Vice-
.-. hi. this week. a President of Gibbs and Hill Inc. of
S. New York, and so I told him of my
.Gerard Allen, in his late thirt. plans and hop es.
es, is a member of the Chimber
*. f oamierce andb one of the sev- "He told me my task was a diffi-

~ n," the board.appointed to much better;or a country to make
decide utilization of funds for the certain sacrices to increase its re-
net Investment Fund. venue, thence its welfare, than to
Ste.-is Greneral Manager tef A- beg all the time for economic aid."
".len and Baussan, Steamship Ag- On his return here Allen approach-
.ents -and is also Preaident of ed some officials and blends in the
Societe Nationale de Commerce Government and told them of his
(SONACO) which represents se"- plan, "From the skeptical looks on
oal big American firms. Six, their faces. I realized I didn't have
years ago he helped start the In-of winning their support
ternational Businessman Club of they could see ontl one thing new
whichh he is "a past president. taxes." _
Six months ago Mr Allen con- APPROACHED BOYER
ceived the idea of the Special acn- Still not getting anywhere Allen
count of Investments and in this decided, "Perhaps someone of my
Interview describes the fund and generattion with the same back-
isinstittio, ground would understand me? I
its institution searched for that one person and


-. IN HAITI SHOP


IN HAITI SHOP
AT


FISHER


Boyer offered to speak to Presid- i
ent Dr Francois Duvalier about the-


plan saying that Allen's project was
in line with what the President
wanted for the welfare of his peop-
le.

Next. step by Allen was to ex-
plain the project to members ,and
guests of the International Club of
Commerce. His speech was well re-
ceived but to ensure its impact Al-
len sent a copy of it to the Chamb-
er of Commerce and asked them to
study it and give an opinion. On
July 30 he received their reply and
their full support. July 31, bie off-
icially submitted the project and
the approval of the .Chamber of
Commerce to Herve Boyer.
. The following'week, a commission
composed of Mr Louis Decatrel and
Mr Erick Bondel, respectively Pre-
sident and 'ice President 'of the
Chamber of Commerce, Mr Yves
Montas of the 'Cour des Comptes',
Mr Franck Thebaud, Vice Presid-
ent of the fiscal Department, Mr
Eugene Grasberg of Klein-Saks, ec-
onomic advisors to the Haitian Gov-


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Shopping
in Haiti

o'.4ii getting so that people are
i tai r g vacations as much to
-i hap'-s to play golf, lounge in.
-%.th-a'sunm or just relax. And, no
0. _'vMider when you consider the
savingss to be had through Free
SiortShobpping. A couple who
~ n ily might spend $500 on
irste as gifts finds they can
-pythiesame gifts, in free-port
osbops, at savings up to. 60% of
86.$.; prices. So, for the $250
l, 0or sb fhey-save, they enjoy a
... wonderful vacation in Haiti.
Perhaps the most famous free-
.'--:port shop in the world is La
t Beile Creole.' located in the
yeart of fascinating Port-au-
i Prince, Haiti. Here one can
I~eind a veritable wonderland
_tt.full of the world's most de-
: Rled -methandise. Swiss wat-
avhes,. -Cshmeres, Handmade
'M gs, Gloves, Crystal, China,
r -SilverzFrench Perfumes, Ca-
^-'&ras, Liquours and a seem-
? -C' ingly endless array of native
i SJ dieraft -- make La Belle
C eolee more a shopping cen-
dr than a ordinary shop. Con-
r C.-wbrld's, most famous Swiss
gouatches Patek Philippe,
Megaa, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
? Wvadaf, .Jaeger Le Coultre,
o'.Borel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
'et-at discounts of 50% of
A._. aS11 ". .advertised prices',
it is no wonder that La
ela'le nCreole -is famous. The
roamBopplies in ina, Crystal
m44 tAh n rest every fine brand
lois represented. Before buying
as. expensive watch it might
lbe well worth your time to
'.7-copsider a trip' to Haiti.
:'i- A1-Noustas, President of'La
cBlele Creole and Haiti's most
iVigrous promoter of tourism,
4iA perhaps another reason for
4-.e Surge i- popularity of
:L free-1port shopping. His ad-
ngevertiing in support of travel-
0iE ho1pjn g has appeared in most
Sj 'A 'leteig U. S. publications and
e o.tinues, to pursue a po-
0i? f'licy of cooperating with tra-
t;el agents in their various'
0eironiotions to increase tou-
r tni. 2mnong the most popular
ovatios he -has created is
practice of sending a bot-
Ale- of free champagne to any
-itor_ Haiti who happens
&, 'obe celebrating a wedding
lalliwverrary or to be on a

his- year La Belle Creole is
|.i 1tlf celebrating a 10th an-
y and- Al Noustas has
Q!V 16e4., his efforts 'to make
Q41 world conscious of the
h, fntakgeqa.- of traveling-to-
;The-store will hold a
month long sale offering
itten greater discounts on fa-
brand merchandise.
Iay exclusive items will
selected to be sold to visi-
jirs ittprices that will as-
Aound them.No doubt thou-
ks of tourists this year will
OFb e home from vacations in
kjlit richer, in a way, than
!2Fen: they went away.


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Haitian RUM BARBANCOURT


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'AGE. IT S- UN ', ISUNDA AN. ST
TIK, ..W;..


Pratik is a. Paramount feature very limited economic significance. various goods is often sharp,: and for Its plentiful -supply. of labour, ects: the rate at .which prod
of the struggle to secure the right Thus, the countrywide trade meth- where the system of units of meas- tii" relatively. carqe suily of bap- flqws toward- demzaid areas
to render service or, "Haiti's insH- ods of Pratik. Professor Mintz es- tire, is either variable or apparent; itl, Its agrarian -ad non-indastri- helps to .establish pces 'to so
tutionalized personal economic re- cribs Pratik, as follows, "A pratik ly inconsistat. .. er, and it low produce ext m -It canevenafL.ct tendeni
lationship," states, Professor Sidbey is a favored customer either buyer All these conditions typiy Haiti iv y. Onil these cunts it s the eg sin.t rq uci61 Hn- a re
W. Mintz, from Yale University and p r seller. Oe has pratik and one an Internal marketing .and under ariJ ba' last develoPed area unsptis demand is. c6mmun
here to study Haiti's market syst- makes pratik over time." He con- sucbcircumtances, relationships of for- "~,eoi. Ac4ordlngly it is no b. to 'th peasanti''-of'a region,
: 'em; in a paper devoted' to the tinues -sayhi, that the degree of the Pratlk kind not only stablUze surpris that Htl has the lw st :the,- high offers iiitermediaries
practice of Pratik. intimacyand mutual benefit which sequences of particular dyadic eco- s tan or f .ivi and per cpita make for' stock. This infona
. In his study, professor Mintz characterizes pratik ,relationships norole transactids.but l ,taken income in the ari and b intactr, can influence subsequent plantifij
points out that one of the main varies significantly; but in all cas- together, afford greater order to if-la probably, at the bottom o, the Intermediaries can also. help
the system as a whole. listifor the whole of Latin America. bring remote areas into firmer co
SThis is the firSt of three articles to be published from po fs o ntnus at Conpact and- core-untcaatbet wit th s a itho
paper entitled, r Haitan Personalized Econ- by no. means exclusively Haitian, ween the countryside and. Its ad- cotintion itis important to n
omie Relationships," written by Professor Sidney -W. or characteristic of undeveloped cente an bt that the intermediaries travel
Mintz of Yale University. The professor recently return- economies 'alone. It is often said-a the vabts egsts tof ea consider ormous distances by any rnea
ed to the States from a study in this country of the aiti- that in Western europe and th' ade d pgreeita tshs to h cost possible. in search of profit In
an Irket systems. In this first article, Professor rinsi United States,.econoicb activity system. This of course -doestrib nt mngso, they open.regions andt
en a sIsa Primpersonal, aidd based purely ork; sse n-. This o ff cuse does' not creasethe Aikelyhood -that road
discusses a major feature of Haiti's economy. -the mark- price- buying and selling are alleg- imen, of that official com- trucks ateid .devielopment active
et s se andinr-th. whole icati or mail, are, carriedinto f -O
et system- and describes its internal functions with an edly unaffected by personal censid-. br tha smaye ilt will -follow. --
introduction to Pratik. -erations. telligence .along with other items B.YING-CUSTitOMS
-TT a certain. extent this may be of rumor arind ae w-s are spread Cosuption, bo of finish
features of Haiti's economy is its es, since they are intended to stab- true, says professor Mintz, and it throughout the nation by. the truck- goods and of 'purchased agriculti
internal market system, maintained ilize and maintain one's role in'disn is certainly true in higher indus- ers and distributive intermediaries. a-l produce, .exhibits certain panr
by thousands of intermediaries, tributive activity, they are built up trialized countries than in a count- The regions of Haiti -manifest i.i- lets tob ro4uction. -The Haiti
most of them women. His explan- over time and have economic value ry such as Haiti. Yet in certain, gntficant differences in' many reg-. peasant .is acciistgmed- to sellt
action of the markets and their syst- to the participants. As such, they situations and in particular lines of yards and the distributive system much of, What he produces '.
ems and in particular Pratik gives play a part in adding to the regu- economic activity, the personalized ifelps- to .keep these regions in corit- might venture..to.,guess more thL
an interesting insight to the trans- larity and patterning of internal economic relationship is quite char- act, The countless thousands of wo-- half -. aid tb buying rnuch of w l
actions conducted in Haiti's mark- marketing activity. acteristic of more advanced econ- men and the hundreds of truckers he:consumes. But ;;he..characteris
ets every day. STABILIZING EFFECT omies. HaitiJ at least in its intern- engaged in the purchase, transport allyu buys what h be needs in sAi"
Retail stores take a definite sec- In an economic system typified by al market system, appears to be and sale of-agricultural produce arid quantities.. Whether if be maill
ond place to markets, even in the largely unscientific agriculture and an intermediate betweenthe pri- -finished goods -throughout the Rep- rice cornmeal, root crops, green
cities; in the countryside, such stor- poor. technology, primitive transport itive and the advanced capitalist public spread the news 'and carry it salt, spices, cloth; kerosene, soa
es are of almost no importance in and communications facilities, feeb- extremes. home, using their business associ looking bils or anything else, I
economic life. In the Capital City le and dispersed demands and very u ates in various places as points of purchases small quantities wit
of Port-au-Prince, and in the-pro- numerous producers and mid- Professor Mintz carries on ir his contact. Though-itinerant, they all small sums of money. Such buyi.M
vincial cities such as Cap-Haitian dlemen each with scanty means, the study with sketches of some of have d. "home, base." The inform- habits area n-a 1 og. s with
and Les Cayes, temporary storage distributive process has a marked- those features of Haitian life which action they carry moves through ac. practice t of selling off produce i
depots and import houses are tied ly uneven and irregular character. may affect the nature of the pratik c stomed channels ar does a' very regularly, again in small quanti
in with the market trade, but, for This unevenness is magnified when relationship. large portion of their stocks. ies.
most Haitians, retail stores have seasonal variation in the supply of He states "Haiti is well known This marketing intelligence aff- Thus, the agricultural product i
end lac tomarets evn i thelarelyunsienifi agiculureandan ntemedatebetwen,.hepri-fi" hd gods-hroghot~te RpTric crnmal,{oo Crps, ee


"- .A' -1960..' '
s-UNDAY, -JA N. : 1s T '1960


'1


he rHaItian Mark
.. typical of Haitian peasant..,holdingi ween intermediaries and keeps the by the results
S.means an uneven flo.w.of.stock in- cost- of these services to the econ- views with Haiti
t.o the household.QThis stock is.mark- omy as a whole at a minimum. The So far, every
eted in the same fitermnitanJ fsh- constant search by large numbers vie wed has a
ion and the.-m0vement, of cassh-of distributors both for supplies to pratik; and all o
i l-grought'the hands .of the family-be bought-up for resale, and for that the purpose
heads is correspondingly irregular. .loci of demand, helps to keep supp- ties is to secur
'rhits periodic release of stock- to ly and demand in a more balanced channels of trad
Sthe market is partly a function of relationship -as reflected in price means for create
the highly seasonal nature of Haiti- chafiges- than would be the case pratik is by the
an agriculture, of -the diversified were the number of distributors ar- omic concession
character of that agriculturee; ,.of tificially reduced. It also serves to such concessions
the.chironic shortage of cash'in the enhance the importance of the pra- uilateraUy, or tl
peasant household, and the lack of tik relationships which are the maj- omic-purppse foi
efficient or adequate storage tech- or concern hery. ants.
niques. It may. also be conditioned PRATIK RELATIONSHIPS It will become
:.1by a learned --Athat-is, cultural A pratik may be either one who sions (in the fon
preference foir small scal" and --ir- sells to a distributive intermediary ity, credit, or 'ott
!'.regular expenditure of cash' assets or one-who buys from a distribut- by intermediaries,
. for consumption. In any case, both ive intermediary. Since some pro- and to consumers
I. production and' consumption patt- ducts pass through the hands of intermediaries. *
erns are marked by irregularity more than a single intermediary,.-these concessions
and smallness of scale. It'is seas- pratik relationships may tie togeth- more assured pa
enable, then, that. the dlistributive er producer and middleman, or and demand. In e
:- system which ties these activities middleman and middleman, or mid- diary will be se
together should reflect them in im- dleman and consumer. For prod- some portion of I
.portant ways. ucts which are bulked by an inter- in' a theoretically.
Sa _-- mediary near the source of supply, situation, in retur
Having indicated, how producers and broken in bulk for resale by ure of assurance
and consumers are united- through a retailer, the bulking intermediary able both to acqu
-the marketplace, Professor Mintz may have pratik relationships with to dispose of it.
continues explaining how the.mark- numerous small-scale producers on This point desi
etplace and in effect t h e the one hand, and with several re- if only to clarify
W. whole s y s t e m of-- distrib- tailers on the other. al economic moti
ution, is st a ffd by intermrfe- Moreover, just as the producers hind pratik relatii
diaries. He points out how these are may have pratik relationships with are by no means
the living links between producers more than one bulking intermedi- economic, or eco
and consumers. On the one hand ary, so the retailers may have pra- al; quite the count
they bulk produce 'when buying it tik relationships with numbers of -their existence
up; on the other, they .break bulk consumers.' It w-ill be seen that Haitian market
in resale. They render additional these ties, then, form vertical webs cognition of the
Sand incidental services, as noted, or networks of economic associat- of the economy.
at the same time. The presence of ion. Except in the i
.. ..ep-.n the I


an o"er supply ot individuals al-.
- ways ready to provide such serv-
ices sharpens the competition bet-


The rationale behind the establish-
ment of pratik is clearly economic
in nature. This has been confirmed


ing and lending
antees that a !
will persist and


ITI SUN"'


Oa scores of. inte
an market women
such woman inti
stated that she li
f them make clear
of forming prati
e and solidify th
e. In general, fi
ng and maintaining
granting of econ
s. But obviously
,cannot be granted
hey serve no econ
r one the partlulp


erves some stress
the wholly ration-
ives which lie be-
onships. These ties
uneconomie, non-
nomically irration-
rary, in fact, since
demonstrates the
woman's clear re-
general character
instances of grant-
money, the guar-
pratik relationship
continue to be mu-


S. -.


Sysfemz ~ __
r- tually beneficial tarn out to be whom they boy, if those others a
n. personal and customary, rather producers. Intermediaries who bi
r- than legal and contractual. Here, from producers do not, apparent
as too, however, there is revealed no uniformly make pratik of them. R
ir lack of economic rational. Dishon- trailers -intermediaries who sell t
Ik esty on the part of a pratik will to consumers- are like intermed
ie end the' tie, and women who be- aries between intermediaries, hai
ie have unethically in such relation- ing bilateral relationships. But o
ig ships soon threaten their own. stak- the consumer side, the nature of th
i- es in the distributive process. pratik arrangement will differ.
y .No market woman Interviewed so (Next week Professor Mintz des
d far has denied having pratlk rela. cribes the various and comply
i- tionhips with those whio "buy from forms of Pratik together with thi
p- her hand"; some, however, fall to effects of different types of market
have these ties with those from goods on Pratik relationships.)
[I-


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Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD


Phone: 3955. P. O. BO.. 284

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OF HAITI

Through Its Postage Stamps

For complete information in Haiti

Stamps and other details which will be

furnished you free of charge, write to

P.O. Box 723 PORT-AU-PRINCE
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,The section published here is the first Title of the p4tutea
Sjthe Republic of Haiti. Each week for the IAterest of o.r reile*e tue
n" wlH feature a translated section of the constitution as it Atp-*
J pers in the original. III

Port-au-Prince, Hal, Decembpr 22, 1957,)
CONSTITUTIONN OF THE REPUBLIC OF HAITI 1957'
PRAMBLE .
TM HAIMANPEOE PROCLAIM.
......THE 'PRESENT -J.NSdTr. i.UNoS

In order to establish their rights, their liberties, their sovereignty,
their national independence, and the democratic principles that are to
7,..b the foundation of their life;
Tp>define their .civic duties and their responsibilities;
'To establish a balance between' the Fowers of the State;
To -get up an efficient civil service organizatoin;
To put thq public fihances on a sound basis'and to develop the national
FT' --economy;
SToensure social jlutite and, to protect labor;
i To obtain the benefit of an education for all Hditians without distinct-

'To 'protect Jhe health of urban and rural populations and to guarantee
cial, security; "
-To strengthen, internal peace; -
To establish thus a socially just, economically free, and politically
-. independent Haitian nation.'
S-
dr '' A' Territory Of The Republic
-Article 1: The Republic of Haiti is one, indivisible, free, sovereign,
r indepdendent, democratic and social. --
.?-_'- Port-au-Prince, its capital, is' the seat of its .Government, but this may
be 'doyed elsewhere on case of "Force Majeure".-
'- All the. ilabds ivithfn the boundaries established by the law of nations,
-',:'" of, which ,the. principal ones are La Tortue, La Gonave, L'lle-a-Vache,
U : Leas-Cayemittes, La Navase and La Grande Caye; are the integral part
.:bf ,the .Republic which is inviolable and may not be- aliehated by any
:'- Fraty: or convention.. '-
.r P Article 2:. The territory' of the Republic is divided into the following H
.",ife.depdttments: The Northern,.Department, the Northeastern Depart- i
m..:.ientj the Northwestern Department, the Department of the'Artibonite, a
'i Cenltal 'Departrpent, th6 Westen departmentn, the Southeastern Dep- i
a,:..rtment, the Southern Department and Department of the'Grqnd'Anse:;
eJbo underies .of these Departments are fixed by law. d
'. Each department is-suibdivided into districts, each district into com- r
.- miune', and each commune into wards- and tiral sections.. -
nu-iriber and bounderies of these subdivisions are fixed by law t
r. 'w hchalso regulates their organization and functioning. c

-- .. ghts d





Haitian is aitia- .by birth. Every individual born in Haiti of an unknown t
their and a mother who is herself a native Haitian is likewise Haitian
by birth. e
S.- Article 5. The life and liberty of Haitians are sacred and must be a
'" respected by individuals -and by the State. m
'It shall be Ase duty -ol the State also to ensure to the .citizens of the a
t'.-Republic an education, economic weell-being and social jusce. e

r ^H- -M.'3 ,E II. P
Civil and Political Rights is
W; .-Article 6:. The aggregate of civil and political rights constitutes citiz-
.





The exei*ise of--civil rights, 'which are independent of political rights, h
i ', regulated by law. '.
A.' Article 7'. -The exercise, enjoyment, suspension, and loss of political ei
ght rgulated by law.- i"
8.- Artie l8. Seiffrage shall 'constitute a right and duty of citizens, with d
tb'e'exiceptiuns specified in the present Constitution. w
-. -Art-ile 9.. AHIaitans of either'.sex who are .twenty-one years of age fr
shall- enjoy their political and civil rights if -they meet all the conditions oK
aiddown by the Constitution and by 'law.
ob


: "" FESTIVE "FESTIVAL" -
A fine flour for cakes newly mide by "Caribbean
M11.s Inc." has been distributed to grocers this week.
try it -.ask your grocery for that cake flour
'tival". It's the best in the house! o
8".. rt xe.ton pc~d l h rsn osiuin


TOURISTS TO' HAITI GET LIQUOR- CHEAP, '1ELIBV.
f4212 AMRiCAN HOMES. 1Y LA BExLL C
The vacationer in the Caribbean carrying it from_ place to place. ies, means that';
no longer has to lug his "five bott- Airlines also shy away from accept- leading, brands c96'
les of liquors" with him as he ing bottle goods as regular lugg- ance, at $2.70 ja
island-hops his way to a U.S. ,Port age because of the possibility of his purcltse i -t"l
of Entry. La Belle Creole, Haiti's breakage and advise the traveler clearing houie; .if
leading free-port shop, now- makes to personally carry this item. Aie York City. or pi-
it possible for the 'U.S. tourist to lines, however, require it .to be for homdi deliver ,
purchase liqudrs at tax and duty- weighed and quite frequently the will -deliver '. ij 3
free prices and them pick. up his tourist finds that savings realized -to the following ,t
purchase in New York, .or for a on the free-pert purchase are negat- Massachusetts,, .Co
small delivery charge, have it sent ed by excess baggage costs in tak- Jersey, Illinois,:aag
directly to-lis home. ing It home. -. C. Other cleariht"l
Customs regulations allow the La Belle .Creole's new service, sently beiig bpenfi
traveler who has been abroad mhore. -worked out with Customs authorit- S. cities. '
than 48 hours to bring ,in one gal- ., ...:'
Ion of liquors duty-free. But unlike .-
other free-port purchase it can not ', -
be easily mailed or shipped back to
the U.S., creating the nuisance of .. r f '-i


SHOPPING INTELLIGENCE
EUROPEAN ~
FIGURINES
AVAILABLE HERE
Time was when the collector' of
figurines had only subject matter
to choose from... Today there is no
dearth of subjects, but quality has
been' added with a capital "Q". For
Rosenthhal's figurines are hand-
crafted by well known European
sculptor-artist-creatoys. Then the
tiny statues. are hand painted in
natural warm tones, with some
_dUubed in.. bright color accents.
They're finely executed in the very
best chin-rltand are perfect in det-
ail. It's no wonder more and more
people are finding a delight in col-
ecting figurines from all over the
world. -,
Haiti's visitors will certainly be
pleased with the wide, variety of
Rosenthal figurines for their collect-
on. There are :animals, birds and
even butterflies to choose from. The
matter are particularly lovely and
brighter than you might expect .with
billiant spotl of different colors
lowq the backs. The butterflies are
rather flat statues, while'others are
aller, like the many fawns. These
ire really s!" delicately colored in
he whrm brown-reddish shades that
inly their size reminds you they
aren't real. A small black and
white goat will be a frolicsome ad-
rition to. your -display, as will the
rio 'of loveable dach-shund puppies,
rie small duck is especially app-
'aling and several' larger ducks
have outstanding, feather shades.
Birds'range,from.an 'all white and
'ery .large ,dove to cocky roosters
o parakets to wild birds... and all
'ith the same deft coloring. A lov-
ly robin has an almost orange-red
front but in ever so pale a shade,
vhile another crown-tbpped bird is
'arked every noW and then with
n electric blue feather, yet is nev-
r bright in the overall coloring.
Finding Rosenthal figurines at
ree port 'prices is something both
'ort-au-Prince residents and .tour-
tst will want to take advantage of.
o why not stop tomorrow ih La
Belle Cieole and select one of 'these
exquisite tiny statues for your
ome, and even find another for
our next birthday gift? Rememb-
r too that one of these china figur-
nes would make an excellent gift
o bring back to some friend who.
didn't make .the trip with you. And
ith the wide- va-iety to choose
'om, you're bound to please every-
ne-s taste... and at the same time
ot tread heavily on your pocket
Cok for- these treasures are at a
rice a free port .price!


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Sweeping ahead with all the zip. sparkilaE
hugging stability inherentt In its breed.',t. d.
Magnette wils outright on performance aloi'
thrillingw sports saloon has mchorertoflt
continental styling... panoramic vision.i
for luggage. ,.''the luxury:ofreoil leathpr,nmuhj
flawless craftsmanship throughout.-Come" i



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Telephone 3184- 247 '

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)'D Y, JAN. 3LST, 1960.
JuN. 3 T 1960 -"HAITI SUN" PAGE 11




SDecon ing Haiti' s Chicken Centre

--(Continued from page 1) The feet of the birds are pure stored min it thLPbAo SNFi,, ,L .. -


.V. .school teacher, Fritz Mvionsset they
rgAmdzed a farm of one thousand
S'-', dickens -at the rural- school. Thus
'. :began an association with the local
peasants which has flourished since
"its: inception.
Begun four ,years ago with the
.A.id ual purpose of helping the peas-
4;i- _.ants earn a living and- also fanii-
0: iarmige them with modern chickens
.a-far .m.ing, the rural scheme of deve-


protein and they are 'given free to
the people of Freres to help supple-
ment their diet and they love it.
BIG FREEZER
In the city at Rue des Fronts-
Forts, Desquiron's firm -Poulet
Hatien. S.A.- has a big 15 ton
freezing plant for the storage of
frozen chickens together with a feed
mill with a capacity of 150 sacks
a day. The high-protein concentrat-


.


-Abov'e is a scene of the Desquiron's modern, assembly line, dressing
plant. Local workers are hired for the plant's processing which
'." has a capacity of 2,000 birds a day.


cost price.
Further advancement will be
made with the construction of a
chicken hatchery. At present the
day old chicks are flown in from
the States by Pan American Cargo
Clipper. It is not feasible to build
the hatchery as yet as the eggs
would suffer greatly from interrup-
tions; and until the supply-of elect-
rical current is reliable the hatch.
ery wilJ be left in abeyance.
When the original farm was start-
ed nine years ago the only frozen
chickens in Haiti were those import-
ed from the U.S. and these sold for
a dollar a pound. Today there are
no more imported chickens and
Jean states .that since he started
supplying frozen chicken "We have
had as our prime aim to lower the
price of the Poulet Desquiron with-
in' the reach of the "plus grand
nombre".
The frozen birds were first sold
at ninety cents a pound and over
the years the price has been conti-
iually lowered till .today Poulet
Desquiron sells at 50 cents a pound.
The goal has been set in 1960 to
bring the price even lower to 15
cents per. pound. This too will be
helped by the installation of the
grain silo which will aid in curt-
rig costs.
It is also hoped that the reduction
1n price will create a greater vol-


ume of sales which in turn will
compensate for loss in profit and
help create more of the peasant
farms.

The influence of the Desquiron
chicken raising is felt as far away
as the rural communities of Cap-
Hatian, Hinche and Jeremie where
corn is purchased for the chickens.
Of course, the more chickens pro-
duced, the more raw -materials that


will be bought. Yet another goal has
been set by .the Desquiron's for
this year they hope to produce
a total of 100,000 chickens.
The Good King Henry IV of Fran-
ce was constantly dreaming of es-
tabUishing prosperity for the people
of his Kingdom. This is evidenced
by his favorite slogan "La poule
au pot chaque Dimanche." (a
chicken dinner every Sunday is also
the Desquiron's motto.


MARIE-JEANNE

AIR-CONDTMIONED ,

STRAW-GOODS FACTORY


134, Rue du Centre
SPORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

SHOES HANDBAGS HATS

HAITIAN RECORDS FRENCH PERFUMES

HAITIAN CERAMICS

15 Years Experience in Handicrafts.
P.O. Box 975 Open Every Day
From 8:00 a.m. To 5:00 p.m.


IT-lopment follows a simple pattern.
.4The Desquirons provided the peas-
,-aits. with the baby chicks and the
-necessary feed on credit and when
"fhe chickens matured, b o u g h t
.F.the-m oack from the peasants lear-
ng.-.them with a clear profit of
;-nore than $50.00 a month more
r, -than they could make on two car-
r. eaux. (6 acres) of Petit Mil (Mil-
".'-let) a month.
.-What was begun as an experiment
c. created such interest -that a leader
.:of-: the peasant community of Fre-
res, Mr- Christian Lespinasse, de-
-cided. to go along with a similar
form of farm and did so with
S.1,000 broilers. Not only were the
,--peasant community interested. Mr
-George- Dreyfuss a retired engin-
.-ee-set ,up a 6,000 broiler farm
half a mile away from the home

-KEEN COMPETITION
C..-Competition between these farms
ri very,-keen, all are under the
"t.ine strict supervision and use the
t-same feed and rearing methods to
se&- who will produce the best "PFou-
"ilet-Desquiron". This week, the "fin-
81'.plans are being drafted for an-
,other wo peasant chicken farms
,?- 1,000 broilers monthly each -
,o ^his own farm Jean has 15,000
iUers. Interest in the Desquiron's
iarn.- g system increases rapidly
'.Od now peasants as far away as
Me3otte-under the direction of rur-
Steacher Dassace have voted and
decidedd to approach the Desquirons
ipr chickens.
'here is even a waiting list of
.pehsint farmers who want to try
ths-. hand at chicken raising and
f .e peasants, amounting at pres-
...ei t tola dozen will be taken on just
" soon as the market demands in-
,-.Qeas, which Jean Desquiron hop-
'will be soon.
the broilers mature at
tt weeks of age they are pro-
cesd in a clean, modern dressing
] .where they are killed on an
bly line basis. Capacity of
Plant is 2,000 birds killed and
i ..";ssed and only local peasants
,..nployed at the plant for the
sing .work. They have prov-
tbe skilled and efficient work-


es combined in the chicken feed is
imported from the States from the
J. T. Gibbons Corporation of New
Orleans. Gibbons have formulated
a special concentrate adopted to the
climatical conditions of Haiti and
these concentrates are expertly
mixed in Port-au-Prince by mod-
em machinery and with local raw
materials.

Another big advance has been
planned by the Desquirons "'Qu
immediate plans call for the build-
inM of a silo to store 1,000.000 pounds
of grain." Reason for this huge
silo is that grain in season can be







PAGE 12 q

BIRTH OF NEW TAX DESCRIBED

(Continued from page 6) million people; whereas, the Domi-
necessity and the sense of this law. nican Republic consumes' 65,000 PA
"I- Jav.e dreamed of this law as ons of sugar for 2 and a half billion A
part of the planAification program people. We have a wdrld quota of Gl
.: o the 'Government to increase our 45,000 tons unfilled and an Americ- of
,- .. ts, reduce imports which we an quota of only 6,000 tons which Pr
Sca produce here and thereby the U.S. would certainly increase Fla
create as much work as possible as part of their contribution to the Fre
for the non-employed people. This stabilization of the Haitian econo- ies
is a big task and one which dem- my. These figures are facts and vas
; ands a great deal of effort. prove the necessity to increase out T1
sugar production. er
S "It has been proved by interna- cei,
tional experts sent here to study "It is well known that the land. ics.
our economic problems as well ad in Haiti is divided into small parc- in
by Haitians who are interested in els and statistics show that 80 per one
such problems that the sugar indus- cent of the rural population own Chu
,9 try in Haiti should be developed their own land. The aim of the Gov- '
:because our farmers are used to ernment is to increase their stand- T
this crop, the revenue per acre for ard of living for the benefit of the i
.N- sugar cane is much more than for collectivity. We can attain the ab- the
V. any other cultivation known row in ove goals by forming co-operatives h
*whc
'. tif and also from-this industry of production with the farmers the
S will come the greatest help for our which will sell to the new indust- firs
unemployment." ries." famr
and
Mr Allen then gave the figures When asked who would create the Sail
which cover Haiti's annual imports.. new industries Mr Allen replied, Hal
$11,800,000.00 "Private capital will create thesevia,
1,000,000.00 of milk, butter, cheese industries, either 100 per cent Haiti- Wei
1,700,000.00 of pork meat an and or in association with afr
400,000.00 of cooking oil foreign capital. It has been suggest- ,bert
300,000.00 of cotton thread ed that corporations be formed and duri
*,. 6,000,000.00 of textiles shares sold to the public. This will
1,800,000.00 of fish be a new experience for our peop- C
;., 400,000.00 of tobacco le, but we can teach them that if dep
... ,a project is accepted by the Tech-- isi
i 11,800,000.00 of fish nical Committee of the Investment hi
S'Giving a resume on these import find, the potential success of that to s
tA"_ res *Mr Allen continued, ."If new industry is guaranteed, atior
; aiti's import statistics are anal- "When a corporation can supply
-- yed it.can be seen that many other 25 per cent of the needed capital,
small industries which will not re- the investment fund will participate any
.. quitf mucli capital can "be created for 75 per cent at long terms not ors
to reduce our imports. We produce exceeding 20 years for the bal- and
57,000.tons of sugar, consume 45,000 arice." of A
SO'- fo 'Ppul on o0 Mr.. Allen is at the disposal of e










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SUN'


SUNDAY, J


Royal rtists Visiting Haiti Fo
t : ," a h a : = "- o* *a'1k
, hA AND COUNT 'i'lTfh Q T:'*
-i~rtt- P_ asha oft M'a Tan le0h ElI* -'


-


* ; .: .


P~AMS -- rdand UL *^w* *t:-- --
joui, son--offe'" late strongman
Morocco, stopped off in Port-au-
nce froni his cruise on the SS.
ndre with his -wife, a former
inch actress, to look at-the beaut-
of Haiti and put them on can-
t&-


'asha is a recognized paint-
e recent Paris exhibition re-
the acclaim of French crit-
hopes to give an exhibition
on in April under the patr-
f his friend, Sir Winston
I, another artist.

loroccan couple are. stopp-
e at the Castel Haiti with
it and Countess De.La Salle
on their fourth trip round
Id. This however is their
p to Haiti. The Count is a
French antique collecir .
Iso a pointer. Count De La
s many friends among the Relaxing by the Castelhaiti's swimming .jool are -!
people including the Mora- the Count and Countess De La Salle and the wie,
dal, Pierre Liautaud and actress, of the Pasha of Marackech El Glaoni, seated at
families The Count is also ":
of Ambassador Lucien Hib-
* of the cleverest students
is days in Paris. CALEDONIAN INSURANCE CO. '


mount and Cduntess De La Salle
arted yesterday for. -Miami to
t with friends; the Pasha and
wife will return to Martinique
oak up- more Caribban inspir-
i. I

interested or potential invest-
-either Haitian or Foreign-
can be contacted at the office
llen and 8aussan or telephon-
it 2679. ''


HERE 1


IERTZ


R. CHENET & SONS AGENTS FOJR"


The CALEDONIAN, well known
and worldwide Scottish insurance
company has nominaTed the Firm
'Rony Chenet & Sons as their Re-
presentative in Haiti, The CALE-
DONIAN was founded in 1805 and
incorporated by Special Act of the
British Parliament and had been
interested for q u it e sometime in
developing their insurance activit-


lies .in our counfry-T.i
NIAN offers a wi


surance coverage AnF
of the Chenets who1Aii
ans in the fiel.4of i
that they are faithful"
motto "TRADITION 'C
fore the-time of railwa
ships, the CALEDfONI
isfying Polycyholdes-'.,


~HAIT


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S. A., .
....? :-*'


HAITI!


A A A-L A A A


Av


"-






IiAY, JA. 31ST. 1960


"HAITI SUN"


jEG YPTIAN-
S CONC
i -..Vhuisday last week, Madame As-
i4-ra- Wlleke-Messerlian, Egyptian
iranist, gave a buffet- supper
mbers of the local press and
~~ tems for her guests from
forthcoming concert to be held
*gbruary 3 at the French Instir-
Ie concert will commence at
pim. sha because of the Ca-
S .music next door which begins
"pm.

aine Willeke-Messerlian, wife
"German Cultural Attache in
i,',spoke of her career as a
.st .which began in Egypt where
e S aS ;born pf German-Egyptian
ents. Her career led her through
pia, Turkey and Germany
h- C.-tshe met her husband who
fmIY :e time held posts with the.
ZGin Legation.

"'Slhe has been in Haiti now for 2
ears and 2 months and gave her
first Haitian concert at the Hotel
1iMontana a year and a half ago. She
Sas been described as a brilliant
.,.young pianist with .an exceptional
sense- of- style 'and remarkable of
.-eyboard and as she herself ex-
$ 'pains ,prefers such composers as
Bethoven, Bach and Brahms alth-
o7-ugh -she has-an interest in ancient
egCnposers but with modern tech-
5aiucs--She is also very interested in
Haitian folklore.

'.During the reception at her home
X-inIPetionville onl Thursday, Madame
MW'ieke-Messerlian played for Th e
'newsmen the first part of the con-
?-'ert she has prepared for February
^.rd'- '

SI adame Willeke-Messerlian's pro-
.griam for this concert will include
Ioi by Haendel, Mozart, Schu-
.ert, Babadjanann, Klhatchadourian
ad dChopin.


OR
RT


PIANIST TO GIVE
EBRUARY 3RD


Madame Astra Willeke-Messerlian


PAINTER
TO


JACQUES
FIND SELF


Young Haitian painter, 24 yeat
old. Jacques Gabnel, left Portau-
Prince Wednesday for Paris where
he intends to paint and find his
measure. He expects to be go.ic
from his homeland for at least five
years.
A 'versatile young man, Gabnel
once sang both solo and in the De-
jean Choir where his fine bass-bar-
ritone voice was well received. He
started his painting career with the
Foyer des Arts Plastiques in 1956
although it was not until he return-
ed from spending a year in New
York in 1957 that he started to


GABRIEL OFF
IN PARIS


,paint seriously and accelerate his
work.
In his recent article on Hainan
art published by the New York Tim-
e. Seldon Rodman mentioned the
work of Gabriel as primising. Prior
to clippering to New York Thurs-
day from where he will take a
s ip 'o France he sold a number
of his more recent works, some he
left ,e.und with Carmel Heraux of
Q.risqueya .and some he took along
with .hin) to Europe. A quite, sing-
le, = Port-au-Priicien, Gauriel is
classified as an artist of the mod-
emn style.


Hotel Choucoune

ENTEkTAINMENT PROGRAM...


ie Wine Dau

EVERY NIGHT WITH A LOCAL, EXOTIC
4 PIECE BAND FROM 7:00 TO 9:10 P. M.


Ice


Special! Special!


THER PUNCH


BOWL PARTY


JRSDAY 7:30 P.M. TO 1:30 A.M.


DANCING DINNER UNDER THE STARS ON
7 "THE ROMANTIC ROOF-GARDEN
7 PIECE BAND STARRING
OUR YELOPHONIST MICHEL DEGROTTES
ATTRACTIVE AND DELICIOUS BUFFET AND A SHOW


-Cabane CJhoucoune
SATURDAY 9:30 P.M. TO 3:30 A.M.
. *MUST !!!

| e Gala Night


DANCING IN A
THE GREATEST


REAL
SHOW


EXCITING
ON THE


ATMOSP HERE
ISLAND!


PAGE IS


I Ill


IS OPENED


THE HAITIAN FAMILY

DAILY INCLUDE MONDAYS


A SPECIAL LUNCH IS


OFFERED AT MIDDAY

FOR $1.75

AND $2.00 A LA CARTE


The menue


is prepared by Albert Barcilon


1 Of SWitzerland.


JET CLIPPER


SERVICE


TO NEWYORK


Fight time from Ciudad Tr iflo:
3 hours and 25 minutes to fNew Yor"
S ava hoprs over conventional piiton travel
Departures every Tuesday and FrTftilyt
1;:40 PM on Super-6 Clippers* for imme.-
diate connections In Ciudad Trujillo with
Jet Clippers. Or, if you prefeiryou havbyour
choice of direct flights on Super-6 Clippeim
via Ciudad Trujillo on Sundays. For rese.-
vations see your Travel Agent or Pan Am.

Itnr ALrm:E COanr
WORLO'8S MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE
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xmHVI..AS N


-' **

*SUNDAY, -JA-N


S"- CARNIVAL QUEEN

tIdose eOr ELECTION
COOMMITTEES CHOSEN
.. ,Six queens, representing the varl-
ous districts of the Capital will be
selected for Carnival 1960.
.. ..The various election Coqimittees
are composed of:
SOUTH ZONE.;-
Dr Roger Rousseau, MM.. Renie
S1 .Avant-guarde actresses Vania and Masha Stillman of Greenwich village Chames. Osner Apollon, Ernst Cas-
't- clad in pigtails were here for a week at the Quisqueya.... Luce Turnier' seus, Jacqueline Laforest and Waag.
.--. whose one-man show is currently hanging at the Centre d'Art left this NORTH ZONE.-
'week for Washington and Paris. One of Haiti's most outstanding modern MM. Joseph Volcy, Pierre Cadet
painters-will visit with her sisters in D. C. and France... The new and Max GuerrierP; Mines. Fortuna
SGuery, Yolande Pasquis; Miles Lina
Meat Tycoon Gordon Duval is down from New York for ten days to see Lahens and Simone Charles.
the new slaughterhouse begin killing... Eugenie Denis, a member of EAST ZONE.-
B, the Simldor Choir flew to a secretarial job with the Haitian Embassy in Mmes Claude Raymond, Kurt Fi-
Washington Friday... Arthur Vincent formerly of Port-au-Prince and the sher, Max-iAntoine and Yvan De-
*.-- .... nis; MM.-Carl Behrmann, Edouard
S Savoy subsequently spent a year in Jamaica with Kaiser Alhminum Co., Craan arid Marcel -Ducasse.
-and is now back'in the States in the substantial income bracket... Rosa- WEST ZONE.-
lie McCahill a long-time visitor.to Haiti is back at the Marabout paint- Mmes Louis Dalencour, alax
ing... Frank Collin resident inspector of the London Assurance is -ver Chauvet, Roger Armatd," Gonzales
., Jean-Louis;- MM. Aptoine Boulos,
-from Jamaica settling some jumbo fire claims He is lodged at the Ibo Harry Tippenhauer and J. Wilbert
-, -el.e...- Guy Horelle who is now a cocoa planter in the North flew, to Neptune. <,
Miami- Thursday on business... ZONES OF THE CITiES.-
Larry Gluck and his wife are down from the fridged North for their ines Denise Andre, Josephine
Francis, Louverture Poissor. and
s. second honeymoon at the Villa Creole... English-born President of the Andre Fontus MM. Alphonse Fe-
i:: ord Uiniversity'Press (Princeton University), Mr Brett Smith spent rere, St-Armand Dimanche and 'Ls.
a-9' *a'"week at tle.Oloffson with his wife fore-going tea for rhum punches.. Ovide Craan.
Joseph Hage clippered to Miami Thursday... Carl B. Pavsner Assistant
: itfr of Mo or-News is back for the weekend. He leaves next week for PAA.PROMOTING ITALY
TO COLONY HERE
]-: &. ifs-native Detroit... February 5 a group seeing South America with Mal 'Wings to Italy, a Pan American
S Hanson will arrive for two days-at the Riviera. Same day another group World Airways film was shown last
i-+ .' with Travel and Transport -lours of Minneapblis will arrive... Yet another Thursday night at the Nicolas Mar-
4-. troop- of 'pre-convention ophthalmologists from Minneapolis will steam tin establishment on the Grand
Rues as part of the local PAAts
..' o'Port Wednesday and depart Friday for the Convention in Caracas... staff promotion of travel to Italy
'- The Sam Abitbols of Port-au-Prince who were once prominent in Moroe- for members of the Italian colony
can society were happy to meet with Pasha El Glaouni and his wife here... in Port-au-Prince. Christian Ger-
main .of PAA who is charting the
S' campaign informed that it' is only.
'IN T O W N -T H IS W E E K $793.80- Port to Rome round trip.
... -(Recounted by Aubelin Jolicoeur)'
:."'ahd'Investor from Chicago, Ed. Sarnaki and his lovely wife Diane *.,., I
re spending a week at the. Oloffson. Ed. is interested in starting busin- II Il "
s ..s here in Haiti which be considers to be an Island of great future.
~o'-ohn C. Cohdliffe'of Celebrity 'Tours Inc. of New York and his wife
;'-. ,oppdd here Monday. John was studying the possibility of sending more -' -
to, Haiti.
ay 'party was formed here this week by Jan Strauss, talented dress
S:, signer. from New York; who brought here Building Contractor, Edward .
:.' pson and his wife, Fred. E. Brenner and Mrs Brenner, Childrens'
-Books Publisher, M. H. Rhein and 'his-wife, all from New York and Mr .
and Mrs Carl Zwerer of Miami. Jan Strauss, who has studied in Paris,
speaks beautiful French. She took 'the Simpsons to the, Villa Creole,
where she' stayed and the rest of the party stayed at the Ibo Lele. a Ei iUS BELLES MOSAIUES
;. : Wiss -rmia.Drosch, of the La Belle Creole's New York office, arrived HA. rl INNES
..ere for a four day visit onboard the cruiseship Olympia. She was taken
about town and country by Terry Noustas. TF
(Continued on page 15) LC GEFFRARD e

SNew! Sensational!



JEWELS



AND JEWEL ROLLER BEARINGS

SOn Sale At: Canape Vert

Aux Cent Mille Articles

Dadlani's Maison Orientale








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PAGE 14


LECLERC EX-PAI
REOPENED TO. TH
Retired Army Officer, Roger Pra-
del and his- wife, who operated the
Panorama Inn on top of the.Puil-
boreau Mountains on the main high-
way to Cap Haitian, have reopened
Leclerc to Tourists.
Habitation Leclerc, or Leclerc as
it is commonly known, is the hist-
orical; homeland grounds where the
beautiful sister of French Emperor-
Napoleon the 1st Pauline Bqna-
parte, once lived. Pauline was mar-
ried to General Leclerc who arriv-
edin Haiti in 1801, appointed by his
august and powerful brother-in-law
to pacify the colony of Saint-Domin-
gue.

Pauline Bonaparte made Lecere
her favourite residence and did ev-
erything To rVale it into a comfort-
able, and 'palatial' home. Ruins still
remain of what was once her house
and- her favourite swimming pooL
now given her name, has beed re-


JUNE BONA
E TOURIST ,
constructed and adQ
pes and sculptures
period during wHich
There a -lIrgg4i
ing Pauline. -bathi
on a sofa and anrj
yard stands ahni;'
wth water- flowing
which served to.i.
From the fountain c
residence of Pauli
in part by the' ce6le
Katherine Dunham.."-
forest on the groun4
over 14 acres andj
old majestical.-tre
Park of the resid&i
to ha.e been a.a
place of Paufiine-S

Leclerc overlooks
and offers to ther 1
swimming pools, 1ai
through a tropical
a bar-specializing, i
"~..


"
HAITI SUN "


CA




I -
'4;


-SUNDAY, JAN. 31ST, ,1960


a
HAITI SU N"


S,, J ijA 1 J


4
-." i-. 'T ,' 6










S. Embassy. The Fabri

.dCques 'and Margarita erand fly
Sto Fsco farewell party-buffet supp-
i-.at their Petionville home last




-fslmr.r-Bob and Carl Fambry ini
L3of : U.S. Embassy. The Fambri-

i'S d their otwo and a half year
.assiigrment "here Friday 'and fy
6rl-ime,toe; Frisco for a.well deserved"
vacatiopa..- .

ercerly ladys matron o Honor PAA
s' marrily to ilerad Bailly ino
i :30. ,p'.m. ,.ceremony at .the Sacre
eu church in Turgeau last night.
,, "' .' *- -
".The" bride's, mother. Mrs Andre
ercier was .matron of Honor and
.Pierre Dor-inique' was --bestman.
i.-le, 'ying couple are honeymooning
at'tb'e Baily, vla in Kenscotf.


i- uand rs Jean "Pichot" JPeri-
liord who were irarried January
&' 3rd are setting up house after
jhhir TKJertscoff honeymoon.

.Arriving tdday for a visit to Haiti
'Mini Congressmgn, Danny
"asceUl 'Aqto-dealer, Dick Flincher,
husbandd of famous film star Gloria
Is Haviland, and Ken Nash. Amer-
-elcn",lus iesiman and President of
_e Iiew, Fertilizer Plant here in
pg.auL-Prince.'


'Happiest man in the Anmy this
ff i' Lieutenant Claude 'Edeline
o S'dse -wife :Josseline (daughter of
o 'f el' and Vrs Max Bazelais)
r ented him with their first baby.

'trapping eight pbund boy named
., a c .
i9tor Assail flew to Miami Thurs-


"-'.l .Washington the eminent Ame-
ian 'roving Ambassaddr was in
n .this .past' week. He met with
sident' uvalierand' Ambassador
i'ald Drew. ',
I
ild re Apaid the father of Haitian
.'elevis.on is'back to Tele-Haiti aft-
a five day rest from over-work,
St.Canape Vei" Hospital.
a gi l "
O, swald .Brandt left for Jamaica
4 '. ._..


4-4 4,
4*.
[

4", .4,..

"4


r
4-I


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'..:" j '" ^' DEEP-SEA FISHING EXCURSIONS

Swim,. Spearfish, Snorkle, Water-Ski

SAnd Sail In Safe Coastal

Waters From Kyona



AVEA YOUR PARTY AT KYONA
dir. =- ~ ] l


last Wednesday. and returned Sat-
urday. He says the newest
and largest hotel there now, the
Arawak, with 300 "rooms is booked
solid for the Winter knd is build-
ing 50 more rooms. Oswald, ip one
of the largest stockholders 'in the
Arawak.

Over thb week-end the rain-guage
at Chatelet des Fleurs recorded 4
millimeters of satisfying 'rainfall, a
combination of low clouds from the
"cold-front" .with. r a i,n developed
around heat?boosted particles of
silver-iodide.
t *
The Leslie Brandts. are on theirr
Prst winter' vacation in tIeir nat-
iv\e laiti in'four years. They now
call' Montreal home.
.5, l
The Jacques Martins in -Village
Willy Lam0the -gave a Jumbo Hot-
dog roast' beside their olympic
,swimming-pool last night..
S ', 5 5 *
Mrs 'George Spain is down. front
her home in Charleston South Car-
olina visiting daughter .Mary Abb-
ott and' her J.amijy in Petionville.
*
The birth 'of Charles Bigio [1
here at Maternity Bourand Wednes-
day set off rejoicing as far as Ar-
gentina. The. first son of Mr and
Mrs Ben' Bigio tipped the scales at
seven and three quarter pounds.

Mrs David Betsh, pew up from Rio
Thursday to see her first grandson.
i ,

The Harry RifcHins are back
from the U.S. for a two month hol-
iday 'at the Villa Creole their
second home. '
'

Dr Guillermo Samane of the
World H e a I t h' Organization left
Thursday, on a trip that will take
him to Miamii and Mexico.


The" famous French singing team
Poret have been named to the map-
agement of the Riviera Hotel. Clau-
de Angelucci has been named assist-
ant manager and-Rachael Loman
is manager.


Last night at 6:30pm at St .Pidr-
re's Church in Petionville, Miss
Jacqueline Jiha, daughter of TMr
and Mrs Habib Jiha was united in
wedlock HaderJiha son of Mr and
Mrs George Jiha, of Colombia.
The bride wore a beautiful goavn
of Chantilly made for her by her
sister Helene H. Jiha, the material
being a present to her from her
cousin, Toya Boulos.
Bestman was Mr Nassi BabQun
and Matron of Honor Mrs. Sami Saa-
ti. The bridesmaids were; Helene
Jiha, Ena Abourich, Evelyne Assali,
Vina Boulos, Carol Joseph, Carol
Francis, Toyo Talamas, Alice Iz-
mery, Georges Khiar, Eddie Joseph,
Tony Arti, Joe N. Talamas, Susy
Hilton, Leyla Mourra. Cattina Ri-
chard, Kaimeh Izmery and Thesa
Cassis.
After the reception, held in the
salons of the Club. Haitiano-Arabe,
the newly weds departed for their
honeymoon in Kenscdff.

STRANGLING
REGULATIONS...

(Continued from, page 2)
Further, agencies are not permitt-
ed to leave huie cars constantly'
parked in the yard of a Hotel whe
they are not tented to tourists. Any
person wishing to rent a car must
apply at the office of the agencies.
It 6ias been pointed out .this week
that some of these new regulations
are contrary to agreements' signed
abroad, e.g. I. United Nations' Con-,
ference on Road and Motor Trans-
port .,held' in Gneva, Switzerland
from August 23 to .September 19,
1949, see page '24. Chapter 5, and
2. Arrete Sur La, Circulation Des
Vehicles, Extrait hu Moniteiur-
Number 62, du. Lundi, .March 19,
1958. I
Voices amongst the Tourist Ind-
ustry are hoping .thht the Traffic
Department will have;second
thoughts about the regulations and
it is generally felt that the free-
dom of the movements of tourists is
being curtailed and will have farI
reaching" effects on the, Tourist
Trade.
PANAMA LINE PANAMA
CANAL CO.
,The SS Ancon of. the Panama Line
arrived from New York, at 7am
yesterday. On board were a total
of 82 passengers of which the follow-
ing .1S disembarkedd.at Port-au-Prin-
ce: Mrs Gaby Baptiste, Mr ahd
Mrs, I. W. Bianchi,, Sister Yvonne
Boivip. Sister Albanie Darveau,
Miss Claire Dodard, Mr Roger Cau-
rin, Mr and Mrs Andrew Geishec-
ker, Wfiss Amanda Mouscardy, Mr
and Mrs Edouard Peloux, Mrs Cle-
omie Pierre-Louis, Mr Raymond A.
Roy, Mr Jean, St. Hubert, Rev., J.
Jack Sharkey, Mr ,and Mrs Roger
Stiles.


in 7own..

'.
(Continued from page 14)
Director of the Schweitzer Hospital in Deschapelles. Dr. Mosher Kat, '
and his wife, stopped at the Oloffson Wednesday along with Attorney.
Seymour Gloger and Mrs Gloger.

Mr John Brett-Smith, 'Publisher of Oxford University Press in N ew -'-'
York and his wife Catherine are spending a week in Haiti.

Dr Carl E. Mosse, Pediatrician from New York is here for a foitnigit's '-
stay accompanied by his wife. They are staying at the Oloffson.
Honeymooners, Drummond Hadley and Diana are guests at the Olof-
son. Both are. from St. Louis where Drummond is a student in E
and Diana is studying Anthropology. ,

Alex and Hope Neuburger are current guests at the Montank while '"
on their honeymoon. Alex is a Production Manager in parts for costUi e '.
jewelry, in New York. ''
Must be the week for honeymooners. Millard and Susan Kaen ate '
enjoying a seven day honeymoon trip here. Millard is in the Hardwake'," ,
business in New York. -

Haiti must be the place for honeymooners.' too. Yes, two mor 'Nb '
and Lois, Braile, they are staying at the- Ibo Lele.,Neil .is a. Sales Rep're. .
entative. .:
Bulding Contractor Douglas Valentine and his wife ro.m New' ,setu,
are spending a'week in Haiti and are staying at the OIoffson.. They-.
travelling along witl School DireCtor, Walter Duchard pnd his'ae.i.'
Duchards are also from New Jer'sey. .
', "-.' 4.. 1 ..


Dr Patrick Lynch, an X-Ray Specialist from Yakima, WashingtM.' ".:
and his lovely wife Nancy are guests at the Oloffson for- seven: d ,
are retired Essd Standard Oil man.from New Jersey, Sam Hdrtzel 'ad.'
his friend Jules Ross, also retired, a New York resident. "? ,': "

Leonard ,Golub, manufacturer and his wife from Rosyin Hegt
New York are in" -aiti for a wveek..

Mrs Margareta von.' der Leithen, wife. of a German' Diplomat 'of Bq .'.
arrived aboard the SS. Flandres and stopped here for a seven teiy .....':'
with Mrs Renate Wilson, wife of Dr Max Wilson, iq the VW-sqtiii.. .
at Brise-Tout (Route Freres) *Mrs von der' Leithen is on her. .way'ltb'' ..'-
Mexico to visit a relative. .


















S. ',
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H* PTEL 4.v

A;ik TA I A i .....




WEEKLY ENTERTAINMbENT PBROGRA :' '''

TUESDAY:. 7:30 pm. to Midnight Creole Buffet under
the Stars on the Terrater with excellent Dante Band..
At 9:30 pm. Meringue.Lessons by Lavinia W'illim.

WEDNESDAY" 7 pm. to 8:00 pm. Comnlplimentary get-
together Punch-Bowl Party. '.'

FRIDAY: 7:30 pm. to 1 am. Gaqa Dinner-Dance in
Comktail Lounge. Show st 10:30 pm. No cover-
charge.

EVERY, NIGHT: 7 to 9 Cockbail Hour with native
* .Comnbo.


*.*:. I...; *. ... -.. .. .'
; "" '" f "' .: "" =N A.'
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4 '

Lunch Dine Have' Cocktails

By. The SEA-SIDE

N -00E-


KYONA BEACH


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