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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00246


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, SUNDAY, JANtJAkt lth, I96b Pot-au -Prince, HAITI No. 37, Avenue Marie-Jeanne Cite DUMARSAIS ESTUME No. 10
~ ~ -- -- ~ ~~" ~ ~~ --- ______________ J


?-]"The COueiflxion" by the late great Haitian artist Hector Hyppolite
reflects the gentleness add innocence of its painter. This canvas, with Its
dark-skinned Christ and its equally dark-skinned mourners has won the
attention of connoisseurs in Amerlca and In Europe. (See Sloiy on page 12)
A.


TONS


OF BAUXITE


BE LOADED IN 18 HOURS


The largest vessel to enter Mira-
Sgoane, the 36,000 ton SS Richard,
arrived today to load a record cargo
of Bauxite from the Reynolds Mine
;stockpile near the town of Mirago-
.ane.
ik' Officials of the Reynolds tonipany
estimate that the bauxite consigned
i


to the SS Richard will be the largest
bauxite cargo ever exported to the
hidtir tb load the re-dij d Bauxite.
Newsmen are being flown to the
South to visit the ship and also obs-
erve th Reynolds mining operat-
ioit ad Assisiint Manager EA.
Sheets will sde tl t they get a full
briefiri oih ih bih p tion.


TAXES


Cigarettes,Liquor
Haitian taxes on such items as positions of the law concerning tax-
cigarettes, automobiles and liquor ation on products of prime necessity
are expected'to rise next week and and others, it will not be tolerant.
the Department of Commerce and of any unjustified argumentation of
Industry in a communique dated the existing fiscal measures. -
January 14 and .signed by Minister, Consequently, the Department of
Dr Herve Boyer of Commerce ad- Commerce and Industry is publish-
vises the public and Commerce in ing a list of prices of merchandise
general that in conformity with the and those who violate, or sell, con-
law of December 20, 1946, concern- trary .to the tax and prices will
ing the black market and other dis-


End of Blackout In


Sight, GlowingReport


Indications are this week that the
lights will go on again in Port-au-
Prince. Your reporter approached
Mr Everett Shewsbury, Director of
the Electric Company who declined
to elaborate on the causes of the
blackout but declared, "Every eff-


ort will be made to cut blackouts
by next mohth "if possible."
The daily blackout -during the
Cocktail Hour -between- the hours
of 6-7pm and 7-8pm- is expected
to end when the Company completes
the installation at the Port-au-Prince
plant of four diesel generators
which will be moved from the Pe-
ligre Dam site. These units will
be installed in the plant situated on
the Harry Truman Boulevard as
soon as possible.
RATIONAL) REASONS?
It is believed that the recent
growth of thd City of Port-au-Prince
together with the extra demand for
power caused by the installation of
air conditioners and 400-600 T.V.
sets has caused an increasing drain
of power on the present diesel in-


slallation.
A visit was payed to Haiti recent-
ly by Directors of the Electric Com-
pany and Stone and Webster of New
York. The representatives were
Messrs. C. H. Caughlin and F. W.
Utz; both stayed at the El Rancho
Hotel and during last week they had
several discussions with the Haitian
Government on a new contract to
supply electricity for the Port-au-
Prince area. Aside from the discus-
sions it is known that as a tempor-
ary measure to relieve the blackout,
the Company will receive the four
diesel generators from Peligre.
It is hoped soon for a solution con-
ductive to an adequate power sup-
ply a prime necessity for any
community which hopes to. develop
its industry and Tourism. The Elec-
tric Company has been conducting
its operations here since 1909.
BLACKOUT INCONVENIENCE
The nightly ritual blackout impos-
es more than one inconvenience. Al-
though traditionally, children have
(Continued on page 14)


SOAR I


&Autos
be punished in conformity to the
law.
It is asked of consumers to refuse
to pay any argumentation on the
products' taken from old stock on
which the application of the new
tax has not been applied. -
(Continued on page 16)
ALL ASYLEES
DEPART
TWO EX-SENATORS AND
BANK EMPLOYEE LEAVE
Two ex-Senators and a former em-
ployee of Haiti's National Bank
were granted safe conduct to leave
Haiti from asylum in Mexican and
Cuban Embassies this week thus
clearing, foreign embassies of all
Haitian asylees .
Ex-Senators, Jean Belizaire and
Luc Stephen who were stripped of
their positions as Senators by the
Government and accused of plotting
to overthrow the Government last
September, left for exile in Mexico
and Canada. Third man to be grant-
ed safe conduct was Fritz Perigord
who took asylum in the Cuban emb-
assy here for six months and led
this week for MVdeico.

SMATHERS
NOW COMING
Senator George Smathers who last
week suddenly cancelled his sched-
uled trip to Cuba, Haiti and.the Do-
minican Republic, has now signified
his intention of calling here on'Feb-
ruary 9 for a two-day visit inforr-
ed sources have announced.
Smathers cancelled his previously,
arranged trip following a visit to iS
office in Florida by the U.S. Amb-
assador to Cuba, Philip Bonsai.


I








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. BY

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;.7xwn of S
dld, tun
6iandinette
andadd


Traffic eanges B

Diplomats, Officials Army,
A former Washington State Troop-
S ei. pointed out the other day how
N DECORAITED strict observance of the Capital's
PRESIDENT Traffic Laws is gradually taking o'-
er from the "Horn aiit brake driv-
O o. ]M er" In the streets of Port-au-Prince.
O.H .A "Because of ho drier education
AND MERIT or program pieviousil, d rivee t s
beautiful winner of the here have been usiig the streets in
sugarr Cane Queen of the their own ieisohtdl planner," said
assuming aid smiling ICA (Pobit Podr) minl, Roy Carlson,
Fouchard, has bqen fet- now an advisor, to the Port-au-Prin-
hired by Haitfinis shnce be tratfd Department.


return with er title from Call,
Pnpmbia last week.
pureess and Radio have featured
qe than a dozen poems and eul-
oS written in horidur of HIait's
young Queen who has iceiv-
a number of letters from the
l States offering marriage pto-
sas. None of this hsd affected the
re Sugar Queen who remains
and regal.
ssed with crown and sceptre
f 6iit griey strapless dress, with
i rt, the Queen was taken
,dt honin in Peilonville in the
It' offieda limosine and
th an escort of seven motor bikes
to attend an official reception Fri-
i vda eening at the Palace from
S.30pm to 7pm. The President, Dr.
(Continued on page 2)

'. ,


Some six months ago while Carl-
son was on special leave to work
on the Washington State Safety Leg-
islat re he wa'asked by ICA,
"Would you be interested in going
to Haiti?" His answer was simple,
"Yes."
Carlson, 46, is fully capable of
handling the task he has undertak-
en. Formerly a resident of Aberdeen,
Washington, he worked his way up
from a Patrolman to head of the
Washington State Patrol with which
he served 23 years. Pleasantly spok-
en and sure of himself the ICA man
has wasted no time in getting an
extensive "education" campaign un-
derway.
Double parking, driving in the
(Continued on page 9,


being Solved Ia Port

Must Obey Traffic Laws Too!

6PAA AND GOVT
S. .. HOLD TALKS


Lieutenant Theodore and Traffic Advisor Roy Carlson
discussing placing of nei Street signs.


NO DECISION REACHED
Pan American officials had dis-
cussions with Cabinet Ministers herd
this week concerning Pan American
World Airways' Inc.'s contract and
operating the airport here. The con-
tract officially expired on Decemb-
er 31, 1959.
Awaiting the signing of a new con-
tract, the original contract was ent-
ered into on February 22, 1929, thd
interested parties have extended the
1929 contract for a period of three
months beginning January 1, 1960.
Second big topic discussed was
that for the need of a Jet airport. No
decision or comment has so far resi-
ulted from the meeting, but, it is
believed that Pan American, as most
major American Airlines, will ceasb
to operate piston driven planes aft-
er December 31st, 1960. Pan Am's
representatives at the meeting with
the Haitian Ministers were Messrs.,
John Quinn, Pan American Airways
Station Manager, Frank Powers, Re-
(Continued on page 2)


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SI-I A TTT


C TT N "


SUNDAY, JAN. 17TH,


PA-Gt.j l M l. CS .. .. a s I. 1 --_ _"_.l_ _
r-r


Local merchant Antoine E. Khaw- FRANTZ JEROME -- JESSIE MERCERON
ly, son of Edouard Khawly Lykes
Lines agent returned from a busin-
ess cum pleasure trip from the mid-
west and East of the USA
last Sunday. He also attended his ,
brother Gabriel's engagement on
New Year's Eve to the lovely .
Miss Helen Curasi of Bronx New
York. Helen works with Pillsbury in
New York while Gabriel is the act- :jF "'
ual General Representative of the -.; .
same Company in Lagos. Nigeria (B 1 .
W.A.) The big date is set for this 0.
coming summer local HPBA Andy
Khawly will be best man.
Frank Gaham the new third sec-
retary at 'the British Embassy arriv-
ed here last month from Warsaw,
Poland. He will fill in at the Emb-
assy when Robbie Roberts goes on .
home leave next month. Mr Robert's
wife flew home to England fast week.
end on receiving news that her fath- A. ; $
er "had suffered a stroke. Embassy o:..
Charge d'Affaires Lawrence Barker '
goes on leave in May. .
TOURISTS ARRIVED -
Some 700 hunderd tourists arrived ..'
in Port-au-Prince Sunday last on
board the Nieuw Amsterdam and '
spent a day in the Capital City.
Among the Amsterdam's passeng- -
ers were forty Travel Agents of the ,
South Orange Chapter of Hadassa. .. ...
Included in the passenger list were: '( ." .
Mr Jerry Baum, President of the
Ridgewood Paper Co., Fairfield Married last Saturday at Sacre Coeur Church were Engin
Connecticut and his wife; Mr and Jerome and Melle Jessie Merceron. The bride wore a lovely
Mrs Rod Flur; Mir and Mrs P. Wex-
ler; Mr arid Mrs Roy Fleigherfrom -dele Sassine.
New York and New Jersey; Mr and Bestman at the wedding was Gerard Leger and matron
Mrs Herb Steb. Jean Blanchet. The newlyweds are honeymooning in La Boule


PAA AND "GOV...
(Continued from page 1)
gional Director of the Latin Ameri-
can Division and Dick Abbott, Dis-
trict Sales Manager.
In the three month extension in-
terval the Pan American World
Airways has agreed to assure the
air traffic between Haiti and abroad
without reduction of its regular
flights or argumenting its tariffs for
-passengers of freight.


2 NON-COMS
TRAINING IN U.S.
Two members of the Communica-
tions service of the Armed Forces
of Haiti, Corporals Francisque Jn-
Philippe and Jn-Baptiste St-Vil Noel
are on a twelve-week study toir in
the United States.
The two non-comissioned officers
will visit New Y o rk, Washington,


WED


eer Frantz
creation of

of honour,


BACOULOU TROUPE
RETURN
Returning today from their second
engagement in Puerto Rico are the
Bacoulou dance troupe. While in
Puerto Rico the group played at the
Rami U.S. Airforce base.
Chicago and the Great. Lakes and
study the repairing of internal com-
bustion motors.


HOUSEWIVES RESTAURANTS


SERVE THE EXCELLENT QUALITY RICE

GROWN IN HAITI'S FERTILE VALLEY

OF THE ARTIBONITE




O,GD VA
A


IS PLACING AN IMPORTANT STOCK
OF HIGH GRADE RICE ON THE LOCAL MARKET
Prices for Sack of 100lbs.


"BLUE-BONNET" Grade-A .. $10.2$at the Mill: $10.50


9.50
9.50
8.50
5.80


A Discount of 4 per cent at the Mill at Deseaux(Artibo-
nite Valley) or at our warehouse in Port-au-Prince, (corner
Rue du Centre and Rue'des Cesars) will be allowed on pur-
chase of 20 sacks of rice or more.


"BLUE-BONNET" Grade-B ..- 9.20 at the Mill:
"BUFFALO" Grade-B .. 8.20 at the Mill:
RICE FLOUR ............ ....5.00 at the Mill:


IN I


QUEEN DECORATED. BY PRESIDENT

(Continued from page 1)
r *
S.. An impromptG speech was given by
Dr Duvalier and the Queen ieliej4
After the official reception-. the
Queen was given a further releiM
by SNAD and it is believed that :
painting will be.done o her."-
Mss Fouchard has reeouite -
Sean lal beautiful gifts since h '
including, a cream painted.
car presented to her by th,
ent, a gold' jewelry set '
Dessalines Sugar Mill in At
a large T.V. set in beautfL ul i
and mounted on aturntable
ed by the aitian-Am
Company .and a tuccac.~ t
uce from the gardens of .
and Alcohol Distillery.at
where the Queen did.'I AQ4

Haiti's Sugar Queen hh aca i
a invitation extended b Prrsn
Franceis Duvalier presented Mi sss De La Guartdia.to visit Panama W'd!'
Fouchard wit hthe Order of honour has also. received an invitation:..
and Merit and the rank of Officier. visit Japan.


GOBS BACK
The USS Abascon, due in Port-au-
Prince this weekend, is the first 'of
the liberty ships which will again
be calling at Haiti. The calls were
stopped over the Christmas holidays.
Juan Vialar, Director of the Bank,
Populaire Colombo-Haitienne. is ex-
pected back from a visit to Colom-
bia tomorrow.


AUSTRIA TO PLA;:;

HAITI. JAN. 30,-

FEB. I- 3.
The Austria seccor team is sched-
uled to arrive here at the end of the.
month and play three matches ag-.
ainst the Haitian selection January-
"30, February 1 and 3.


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It'.-


Britain's permanent representative on the Security Council at the
i":'United Nations arrived In Haiti early Wednesday this week and was
met at the Port-au-Prince airport by Mr Vincent of the Protocol Office.
Sir Pierson John Dixon, G.C.M.G., C.B., accompanied by his wife,
Stayed at the El Rancho Hotel during his two day visit to the Capital,
part of his tour of the Caribbean Islands. Wednesday evening Sir John
spoke at a special gathering for a half an hour in French and* showed
two films, one on British colonies and the second a description of Britains
nuclear research programme made at Brussels and England.
Sir John also met Foreign Minister, Raymond Moyse and Charge d'Af-
faires and Mrs. Lawrence Barker at a luncheon held at the British Amb-
assador's residence. Later he hand his wife were taken on a tour of
the Kencoff Mountains and also went shopping.
S The British Representative left Haiti on Thursday for Antigu -and ten
days vacation.


A GREAT HAITIAN
"We have only this week had the
opportunity of reading Mr Maurice
Duwiquet's followingg article. It is
a pleasure for us to give you a tran-
slation of the valuable opinion of
this noted music critic on our "na-
tional" artist whose name has al-
ready passed our frontiers- and
whose last recital in December '59
has left a very great impression on
the public".
It must be regretted that Port-au-'
Prince can offer to an artist of Mme
Micheline Laudun Denis' standing,
no other atmosphere than that of
the Institut Francais' large audito-
rium which Invites very little the
people to contemplation and is not
propitious to the. desirable commu-'
nion between audience and interpret-
ers.
To offer in such an atmosphere a
recital that is not bhtirely composed
of "motceaux de brayouxe" is -for
the least we may say-- a wager.
The poTst famous poets of the piano,
the ones whose names twinkle with
electrical letters in, front of Concert
Halls provided vith scientifically
calculated acoustics, would, not be
sure to give the limelights to their
accomplishments and justify their
Reputation. It would be necessary
for one to listen to those great mast-
erp plying in identical conditions
to hold a valuable standard for com-


prison. I am quite sure this one,
would, all at once, have the cons- d
ciousness of Mme Micheline Laudun
Denis' value.
Who suffers more from the lack
of well qualified criticism? The art-


ist himself, who is in the pressing
need to collect competent opinions
in order to take his hearings, and
improve his art. The genilne artist
never begs for adulatory praises,
but the justified opinions .of people
speaking his language and able to
provide him with precious informa-
tions, factors of work' and progress.
I am certainly not the one who
would pretend to play such a part.
Nevertheless at the utmost, will I


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ARTIST MICHELINE LAUDUN DENIS


S.


dare to express some personal' im-
pressions about pieces heard many
a time In the past,
I have not the opportunity of at-
rending the rising of the curtain and
I arrived jqst at.the'second piece,
the sonata in A major "Alla Tur-
ca", one of the most' famous of Mlo-
zart's sonatas, to the popularization
of which the last movement, the so
well known "Tyrkisi March" has
largely contributed. It becomes very
difficult to give of this passage an
interpretation which reveals the in-
terpreter's personality. In both other
movements, it will be noted to Mi-
cheline Laudun Denis' advantage
that she avoided preciosity and vir-


tuosity, placing the stress on die
color. Her interpretation was a poet-
ical one, with the expressive vue;
exactly felt and expressed. It is vis-
ible that the artist is on familiAr
terms with Mozart whose grace,
lightness and wit beguile her.
Concerning Chopin, one would Have
to fear frcm a Haitian pianist an
agreement to the somewhat general
conception of a Chopin exagerately
elegiac. Happy surprise! Michelin-'
Laudun Denis did not follow it. She
did not follow the over exploited
sick poet's legend as presented by


9.


traditio.i acquired lrom books. So
she le ..uts feel the true pureness
and poetry cleared of the comic-op-
era romanticism which very often
profanes them. She, has perfectly ex-
pressed.the intimate confidential ac-
cent of the genuine Chopin whicl. is
so far from languid affectation as
from coldness.
The Schumann's Papillons is f v-
ourite masterpiece for pianists aind
their feeling appears through their
interpretation. Some stress the fan-
tase and the buffoon aspect, others
its charming aspect. By her delic-
ate inannerg of playing this caprici-
ous suite with sparkling passages,
pointing out its exqulsile charm, Mi-
cheine Laudun Denis operated a
wonderful synthesis; of both tend-.
ances. Justin Elie's "Nocturne"
whose folk color emerges from since
the first measures, Faure's "Im-
promptu," Debussy's "Feux d'Arti'
fice" had all been for Micheline
Laudun Denis occasion for proving
her safety technic and her remark-
aole musical intelligence: Here'is
for certain, a pianist who, in a fav-
ourable place, would have a great.
career.

M. D;


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StiNDAY, JAN. 17TH, 1960


PAGE It


H .-1 A T T


S T IM" -






"HAITI


SUN" SUNDAY, JAN. 17T, 1960


DADLANI OPENS NEW STORE ON TOURIST


AVENUE


NEW STO:I-
This year's flow of tourists off
the cruiseships walking from the
Columbus Pier will be confronted
by "Little Europe in Hriti," a smart
I new store opened by the Dadlani's
of Maison Orientale.
Taking up the corner of Rue Bon-
ne Foi, (Tourist Avenueo, the new
store presents an attractive appear-
ance while inside is an array of ex-
otic merchandise collected from all
over the World with a big emphasis
on Indian products. Attired in a
rich and colorful sari with the caste
sign of her sect on her forehead.
Mrs Dadlani fits the atmosphere of
the chic store perfectly,
Lucky daughter of seven born to
an Indian jeweller, who dealt in


Precious stones, Mrs Dadlani accom- store and "Little Europe in Haiti"
panied her Father as he followed is the result.
his trade, mostly diamonds and rub- Only a few touches remain, to fin-
ies, voyaging around the world in ish the store. The mezanine floor
15 different countries, will contain Haitian handicraft and
She attended the Catholic sisters object d'art and a ten ton air con-
school at Yamati in Yokohama, the ditioning plant will keep the store
only christian school in Japan at iat temperate climate and dust free.
the time and later met and married Mrs Dadlani said that from In-
Albert Dadlani in Pakistan. Dadlan- dia the store would contain primary
i's family owns a flourishing string precious stones mounted and un-
of shops in Jamaica. West Indies. mounted mostly and Indian silks
'It was in 1950 that the Dadlan- were due to arrive in two weeks.
i's came to Haiti and opened Maison Other lines included handmade je-
Orientale, now a land mark and po- welry and linens, d complete select-
pular store that attracts tourists and ion of French perfumes, 13 brands
locals alike. Maisop Orientale is si- of Swiss watches and a selective
tuat6d in the centre of the city. line of English bone-chna Wedge-
It was while making a world tour wood from England as well as crys-
in 1958 that Mrs. Dadlani was bitt- tal and French leathergoods at bar-
en with the idea to open a new gain Free Port Prices.


Mrs Albert Dadlani before "LITTLE EUROPE" in Iaitl.


FAMOUS AMERICAN
NEGRO WRITER HERE
"A land of Enchantment," is how
lafonte. Bill wrote one of Harry's
here for the first time from New
York, describes Haiti. A former part-
ner in a hamburger stand in Green-
wich Village, N.Y., with Harry Be-
lafonte, Bill wrote one of Harry's
most popular songs, "Banana Boat
Song" which sold millions of cop-
ies throughout the World.
Songwriting is not Bill Attaway's
only achievement however and he
prefers to be known as a- writer.
Chief amongst his books is the nov-
el he wrote on the migration of the
American Negro from the South to
the North during the 1917-1918 World
War.
Bil is a friend of Winnie and Jean
Chenet, well known jewellers in
Port-au-Prince.


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A.- PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

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HAITIAN RECORDS FRENCH PERFUMES
HAITIAN CERAMICS
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P.O. ,Box 975 Open Every Day
From 8:00 a.m. To 5:00 p.m.
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- 4







SUNDAY, JAN. 17TH, 1960
I .,


.AG 5 ,


-I HAITI SUN
HAIlAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
C aomunity Weekly Published Sunday Morning
-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDJERICH
plonsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
MEMBER OF THE INTER-MERICAN PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1950


ST INDUSTRY SHOULD SUBSIDIZE
IIIABITITATION OF CRIPPLE AND
L P 4SAV1 THEIR QWN INDUSTRY

year's influx of tourists will be pouring into Port-
soon gad scores of crippled, bliq4 and maimed
wil ,wend their ways amopgst these tourists seek-
enies 9 continue their existence.
he result Is obvious, both to the tourist and to the tourist
raie. Visitors come to Haiti with one aim, to see the island
and to relax. It is easy to picture their disgust at being
.confronted by cripple after cripple begging for alms and
evep easier to imagine then upon returning,to their home-
lands describing being besetted by these pitiful wretches
of ocety.

Police cracking down on vagabonds is to the fore now,
but, no Policeman n .Jmatter how callous can chase one of
these poor souls off the streets or confine them in jail.
I: during the tou$$t sqp on special benefits could help in
e provision of fqpds to give'these people a better chance
-at life; something which the Tourist Trade will agree is
far preferable to having Haiti condemmed as shocking and
sickening and teeming with the cry for alms.
Ope day this week during a walk from the Post Office
to La CaraveHe, along the Rue Bonne Foi known as Tourist
Avepue, your reporter was stopped a dozen times, each time
by q pitiful case of humanity. First a little boy leading a
little girl that was obviously born without eyes. Then a
middleaged man who scurried round on his boney knees
with his emancipated thin legs sticking out behind him.
An amputee who called himself Raul said he was willing
to work but since he los his right leg, from the knee down,
during'hurricane Hazel m Jeremie he has had to resort to
asking for charity. He is one example of these crippled
people who could be rehabilitated. Another was a former
tractor driver who. led by a woman, said he had been blind
since President Estime and only begs when times get really
bad. Many of these people are prepared to work given the
chance and the right help. Will that chance be given?






-II,:


"HAITI SUN"
-_ ; -


January 14.
HAITI SUN
En Ville.
Dear Mr. Editor:
I returned to Haiti from the States
early this week and was very pleas-
ed to read the article, complete
with picture, in Time of Jan. 14:
'describing Oloffson's Hotel and new
floor show. The feature should cer-
tainly provide impetus to this year's
flow of tourists to Port-au-Prince
and yet Sir, I venture to inquire,
where are the tourists?
In past years, especially at 'this
time, the Tourist Industry has been
"Flat-out" catering to the desires
of throngs of tourists and yet on
returning here the other day *hat
do I find? The same inviting dis-
plays of goods both in the streets
and the attractive stores but preci-
ous few tourists to complete the
picture.
I very much doubt that the Tour-
ist Industry appreciates this situa-
tion and yet'the answer is in their
hands. It is my firm opinion that
what is reqiured is advertising and
plenty of it, both here and abroad'
It is well known that the tourist
likes to see what a country has to
offer both by way of entertainment
and merchandise if that country is
going to be visited by him. So let
Tourism emerge from its shell and
do all in its power to bring back
the inflof tourists who have visit-
ed and loved our beautiful island
in the past.
Until something constructive is
done,
I remain,
Querulous.

LE CENTRE D'ART
Founded 1944
Exclusive agents:
Alix, Amiama, Armand, Bazile,
Benoit, Bigaud, Blanchard, Desro-
siers, Domond, Duffauti Hyppollte,
Joseph, Leontus, Leveque, Liautand,
Montas, Normil, Obin, Pierre, St.
Brice, Stephane, Turnier, Vital,
many others.
17 Rue de la Revolution
From Pan American
in town one block toward


PAGE 5


A CRAFT CIT
ADVANTAGE
"Stimulus is. needed to bring
Haiti from the dead," is the opinion
of one member of the Tourist In-
dustry. "All to often tourists are
bored," and he could be right.
Haiti may advertise abroad on a
big scale but when the tourist steps
ashore in Port-au-Prince he is often
at a loss as to where to go and
what to see. Tourists come to this
Island to see its natural beauties
and enoy its hospitality, but, they
also come to buy. And it is here that
the Tourist Industry falls down.
When the tourist walks frpm Co-
lumbus Pier into Port-au-Prince pro-
per 1p sees no clearly in.cated or
pinpointed indications where to buy,
eat, see and sleep. In this respect
the job of keeping the tourists in-
formed on current snows, sights and
the best shopping localities has fall-
en to the lot of the Hotel keeper.
This he does, but there are surely
easier and more effective ways of
giving tourists and insight to what
is going on in Haiti.
One suggestion is for a Craft City
sited perhaps between the City Hall
and Columbus Pier. The tourist
walks up the pier from his or her
ship and immediately steps into a
display covering every feature of
Haitian art and hospitality. Ideal of
the Craft City would he' to feature


JOSEPH NADAL & CO.
Distributor

bay, half block to left.
Open Monday through
Saturday
9-1 3-6 -Phone '955


Y HAS
S FOR


GREAT
HAITI


the actual making of Haitian prod-
ucts in stalls set up by the various
components of the Tourist Industry.
It does not take overthought to see
the way in which this Fair could
flourish and the efp4 it wogld hqve
on visitors.
Apart from displaying Port-au-
Prince's available products and the
way in which they made, special
signs could be set up in the stalls
themselves showing the names of
shops retailing the goods and where
the tourist can find these shops. The
tourist is always willing to buy but
cannot do so unless he knows where
to buy and a pattern of signs would
leave no doubt in the tourists mind
as to where goods could be pur-
chased.
Hotels could also participate in the
fair with pictures of their location,
the type of cuisine available and
tie shows and entertainment they
provide. Even Haiti's- new Point
Four system, could be exemplified,
this is itself would give'confidence
to the tourist. Even English spak-'
ing Police could be on hand'to dir-
ect and advise visitors.
Tourist Avenue's present delapid-
ated appearance is another Tourism
sorepoint. What is to stop the store
owners from erecting gaily painted
and distinctive signs symbolic of
Haiti. There' are many a Haitian
artist capable of painting a sign
which not only advertises the store
but depicts perhaps a way of Haiti-
an life, a scene of part of the City
or even some part of industry.
Think of the overnight facelift
that could be performed on Tourist
Avenue and Port-au-Prince then
think of the impression it would give
to Tourists.

BOY FALLS INTO
HOLE
The evening newspaper, the "Le
Nouvelliste," in a front page article
on Monday January 11 under a head-
line, "Child fell into a Hole" stated
that an accident that could have
been tragic happened Sunday when.
a little boy fell into a bole.
The hole into which the boy fell
was sited in the street on the Place
des Nations Unies. -in the City of,
the Exposition, where hundreds of
c'.i!dren play each Sunday. Calling
the .attention of the authorities to
these holes the Le Nouvelliste gave
a Lst of some of the more pronmin-
ent holes and their location about
the City.


An amputee and a blind man ask for financial assistance on Rue Bonne Foi




Caribbean Construction Co. SA.

Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD

Phone: 3955. P. O. BO.. 284

:.^.,:'.=.. ,


MODERN COMFORTS WITH OLD WORLD CHARM



H 'lt IL SANS SCIUCII
IN TURGEAU RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT

A Distinguished Hotel In The Heart Of The City
Conveniently Located To The Shopping District
All Air Conditioned Rooms with Private Baths and Hot Water

New Pool Terrace with outside Bar and Swimming Pool
Air Conditionned Bar Unsurpassed Cuisine Finest Service

SHAPP Y H OUR"
EVERY THURSDAY
FROM' 5:30 AT 6:30 p.m., INFORMAL GATHERING
DINNER DANCE EVERY FRIDAY
From 7:30 P.M. To Midnight


SUNDAY


CREOLE


BUFFET


FROM 12:00 p.m AT THE POOL TERRACE


TO THE RYTHM OF "THE
MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR


SANS SOUCI CUMBO"
THE -BEST TABLES!


i
t







SUNDAY, JAN. 17TH, 1960


rPAGEuII U. ti -'


THERE'S A NEW
TREND IN CARIBBEAN
TOURISM FOLLOW
T HE FLAG-


Bahamas, in
177,867 in 1951
ward of 50 mi
British colony's


tourism -follow the flag- Puerto Rico
000 tourists in,
E. V.-W. JONES of the Miami He 000 toured withs
raid sated in a travel round trip island, under t
published Thursday slandthe 1959-60nder
-By putting .their millions on the the 1-
line, tourists are showing their un-a 40 per cent
mistakable preference for islands 'Another 1,000
which fly the Stars and Stripes and ded to the 4,1
the British Union, Jack. Pueho Rico,
Since they want tranquility along ssion predicts
entertainn a mil
Swith suntans and fim, they're avoid- entertain a m
ing Latiri American lands where po- and have 10,0
litical turbulence arid uncertainty date them.
.and sometimes anti-Americanism--
take the joy out of easy living. Its a fabulo
A .Miami Herald survey showed Wri' it of ue
the tlueen resorts of the Caribbean i r lack' f acc
this year are Nassau, Puerto Rico to-r c acc
tourists as w
a nd Jamaica, in that order. Puertomomt
Rico is a U.S. commonwealh, Nas-
sau and Jamaica are British. It as too
*ourism has collapsed in three figures fro
former favorite vacationlands Cu-fics conf
.1 ba, Haiti and the Dominican Repub- ocalrecord in
lie. on record in 1
Cuba, leader of them all prior to
. .159, is near the bottom of the list
today. Firing squad exeipions, seiz-
ure of U.S. property and anti-Amer-.
ican out-bursts by officials of Fidel
Castro's revolutionary government,
along with tirades in the propagan-
da press, leave the climate cold and
gloomy for tourists, regardless ,of
-the warm winter sun.
The tougher attitude by the U.S.
government toward Cuba worft help
attract vacationists to the island re-
public, just 90 miles south of Key
West.
Haiti, with its volatile politics and
constant threats of revolution, and
the Dominican Republic, threatened
with invasion from Cuba, have drop- '
ped out of the tourist picture.,
Big hotel companies with tilami
offices report that Cuba had a brief
upsurge during a holiday "Friend-
ship Airlift" tourist promotion dur-
ing which hotels refunded half the
ar fare, but this has tapered off
again. One company, Intercontinenal
Hotels, Inc., plans a sales meeting
in Miami this week to see what can
be done to aid business at the Hotel
National in Havana.
The Bahamas, Pueroto Rico and
Jamaica report that record tourist
crops in 1959 are- continuing into
1960.
An all-time record of 244,258 tour-
ists visited Nassau, capital of the

CIC HAS BIG-
LADIES NIGHT

The Club International of Comm-
erce held a Ladies night at the Hot-
el Sans Souci Wednesday evening
this week. Members of the Club and
their wives were entertained by the
Hotel orchestra and the charming.
young 15 year old Haitian singer,
Yanic Coupet who interpreted a
number of favourite songs.
There was a buffet supper for the
guests prepared under the direct-
ion of Mr and Mrs Georges Heraux.
the proprietors of the Sans Souci.
Those attending included: the Pres-
Sident of, the Club International of
Commerce, Mr McGurk, accompa-
nied by his wife; Vice President, Mr
Charles Fequiere; Treasurer, Mr.
Louis Noisy and his wife; the Sec-
retary, Mr Jean Claude Nadal and
other members of the Committee
and Club members.
Also attending were the Minister
of Finance, Mr Gerard Philippeaux.
the Minister of Commerce, Mr Her-
ve Boyer and his wife: Mr F. Du-
perval, of the "Banque Nationale
de la Republique d'Haiti and Mr.
SZambale of the Legation Allemande,
accompanied by his wife.


1959, compared with
8. They poured up-
lion dollars into the
i economy.

was visited by 186.-
the year just ended,
106,000 in 1958. This
he U.S. flag, expects
nter season to show
gain over last winter.
i rooms are being ad-
000 now available in
nd the tourist comm-
that by 1970 It wi
Lion tourists annually
0 rooms to accommo-


us season," said Ken
rto Rico's tourist off-
"We're turning down
ommodations as many
we're booking at the


early for comparative
Jamaica but tourist
-iried the best year
952.


PRESIDENT APPEALS
FOR INVESTORS
IN N. Y. TIMES
A full page message from the Pre-
sident of Haiti, Dr Francois Duva-I
Heri, appeared this week in the An-
nual Hemisphere Economic Review
and Forecast published\in the New
York Times. The message featured
a picture of the President along
with pics. of several Haitian Indus-
tries.
In his statement directed, to the
Foreign' investor, Dr Duvalier said
"The 'Haitian Government and my
people are ready to welcome the
foreign investor and to grant him
all advantages so that his returns
on -investments will be the highest
possible.
"1960 will bring a close partner-
ship between the Haitian Govern-
ment; the Haitian people and the
foreign investor. Wih the close co-
operation bf the Haitian Govern-
ment, the full protection of its in-
stitutions and the friendly assistance
of the Haitian ,people, the foreigA


-I







H, HOTEL


Petionnille
featuring
The Smart Saturday Night Club

LA RONDE
9p.m. Until Late Closing
The El Rancho Duroseau
Orchestra
Dancing Nightly Except Sunday From.7pm
THOSE WHO APPRECIATE
THE BEST DINE
AT EL RANCHO HOTEL
And always superb cuisine


investor will be 100 per cent suctess- all investors who want to join in-
ful. sound and safe ventures."

Dr. Duvalier concluded his mes- The Times's forecast also includ-
sage with, "1960 will be the year of ed an economic roundup on Haiti
economic expansion for Haiti. The and several short notes -on the. op-
Goverrment and the people welcome ening of new Haitian Industries.


a I


- nr P


Tourists Skip Latin nations


" ,,
HAITI SUN







ala aAA UIA. raua .E


Do Your
,. .,..


16


Shopping

in Hulti

It is getting so that people are
taking vacations as much to
shop as to play golf, lounge in
the sun or just relax. And, no
wonder when you consider the
savings to be had through Free
Port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they can
i uy the same gifts, in free-port
shops, at savings up to 60% of
U. S. prices. So, for the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
wonderful vacation in ,Haiti.
Perhaps the most famous free-
port shop in the world is La
Belle Creole. located in the
heart of fascinating Port-au-
Prince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable wonderland.
full of the world's most de-
sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
ches, Cashmeres, Handmade
bags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
meras, Liquours and a seem-
ingly endless array of native
handicraft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
sider that one can buy the
world's most famous Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borel, Juvenia, Audetnars Pi-
guet--at discounts of 50% of
the U. S. advertised prices,
and it is no.ronder that La
Belle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be well worth your time to
consider a trip to Haiti.

Al Noustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhaps another reason for
the surge in popularity of
free-port shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
licy of cooperating with tra-
vel agents in their various
.promotions o increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tle of free champagne to any
visitor to Haiti who happens
to be celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
honeymoon.
SThis year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niversary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts to make
the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
mous brand merchandise.
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
sands of tourists this year will
come home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
when they went away.


ir m. ., -.


.a *
Ac p u OCIs~~a'~*~




t4h~ea


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER
P. 0. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI





AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS


MINTON, WEDGWOOD.
ROYAL CpOW DARBY,
ROYAL COPENHAGEN,
ROYAL WORCESTER,
ROYAL DOVLTON,
ROSENTHALE, SPODE,
AYNSLEE, COALPORT,
GUSTAUBERG.


GEORGE JENSEN,
HANS HANSEN, GEBO,
DRAGSTER, GENSE.



The Finest of FRANCE.
ITALY. AUSTRIA,


LALIQUE, BACCARRAT;
ORREFORS,
WEBB & CORBETT,
VAL SOLAMBERT,,
STUART. LEERMAN.


VooDoo Inspired
JEWELRY




Natlve-Insoired
SPORT SHIRTS


I,,


OMEGA, PATEK PHILIPPE
JUVENIA TISSOT, BOREL
AUDEMAR PIGVET,
JAEGER LE COULTRE,
ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO,
ATLANTA, STIhDIO,
VULCAIN.


KISLAV,
ENGLISH DOESKIN,
ITALIAN ANTELOPE.



PRINGLE, BALLANTYNE,
BERN HARD ALTMAN.
LUISA SPAGNOLI.




DANISH SILVER,
GOiL & SILVER JEWELRY
and BRAZILAN GEMS.


HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS


SCULPTURES
.f


Factory Outlet
MAHOGANY
- The Best.


GUERLAIN, LANVIN,
CARON, CHANEL.
RAPHAEL, PATOU,
BALMAIN, WORTH,
REVILLON, VIGNY,
CARVEN, LE GALLON.
FABERGE OF PABI.
JEAN D'ALBERT,-
JACQUES GkIFFE
FATH, PIGUET.
CORDAY.

MINOX,CANNON



ROYAL COPENHaGMI
ROYAL DOULTON.
HUMMEL*'



HARVEY'S BRISTOL
CREAM, All FRENCNf.
DANISH and
SPANISH LIQUIEUBS





RAFFIA BAGS
& SHOES




HAITIAN MlSIC
- Collector's Item


Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS

A World Famous RUGS & DRAPERY
Haitian RUM BABBANCOUT


Have us send gifts to your friends in the U. S. A.
without affecting your quota.- See us for more information.


t


" U A T r T


I.


~:?i


SUNDAY, JAN. LTTH, 1960


c TY TT r


lrrl F PO1


I I


- ^ .







"HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY, JAN. 17TH, 1960


.(Con
centre of
lights are
son has
the except
rians I sa
tion in th
said. "Pec
ing traffic
"They ha
these traf
,What do
national
shutting a
wheeling-
tion. Coas
gear with
cedure goi
ing off th
and stops
Carlson cc


Traffic Tangles Being Solved In Porn


Diplomats, Officials, Army Must Obey Traffic Laws Too!
tinued from page 1) drains the battery, maintains Carl- deaths. Although this was a fairly shaped on them as fre- the roads and mark ou
the road and going against son, but wears it out very rapidly.' low total when compared with the quently as other law breachers and crossings.
all problems which Carl- First step in the 'driver education populations of other cities through- although diplomatic offenders are Several of the Traf
encountered before. "With movement has been taken. A man- out the world it was not so good not fined. Carlson uses a'sound line ment's officers have b
ion of donkeys and pedest- ual entitled the "Professional Driv- when the total number of cars in of reasoning for their apprehension, the U.S. to study State
aw the same traffic situa- is in the process of translation to Port-au-Prince, 8,000 only, was taken "We excuse Diplomatic offenders, conditions and have re
e States 27 years ago," he both French and Creole. All driving into consideration, continued Carl- but, we figure if we make them a fknd of new .ideas. A
iple are the same concern- points are covered, including coast- son. come down to the office enough are Lt. Christian Theodi
c problems," he added. ing, in the hope that Port-au-Prince times to be excused then, they will ge of Traffic who is lea'
ven't surprised me with drivers will become more safety It was possible that the downtrend soon get tired of the inconvenience undergo a six month a
fic breaches." conscious. was not completely accurate as it and start taking more care when U.S. at the North West
es amaze Carlson is the In the Capital City, private cars was known, that not all accidents parking their cars." sity and visit traffic
delusion that coasting are examined every three months were reported. It was conclusive in the Mid-West and Ea
off the engine and free- and public vehicles each month. At however that the peak hours for In order to make traffic conditi- Arcel Toussaint, in char
,leads to petrol conserva- these inspect t i o n s pamphlet traffic accidents were between 4 ons smoother and to facilitate in the ett Investigation who i
ting down hill. in neutral "Handouts" as Crlson calls them pm and 7pm. In both 1958 and 1959, locating of accidents, street signs shortly, from a three n
the motor off, sime pro- are given to each driver. These 25 per cent of the city's accidents- have been made and are being put course. Two further r
ing uphill and even shutt- too are printed in French 'and Cre- occurred between these hours. A large up throughout the city. Some streets gain outside expprienc4
he motor at intersections ole and give safety tips and Traffic chart in the Traffic Department Off- at present have no names and oth- Plummer, in change of
are a common sight which regulations complete with illustra- ice was used to keep track of all ers as many as three which is not License-and License Pla
>ndemns and sheds a very tions. accidents and with the day, time very helpful to anyone. The, new and Lt. Fritz Paret, in


interesting light an.
Apart from the fact that coasting
should not be allowed as the driver
should be in full control all the
Time, Traffic Advisor Carlson says
S"The amazing thing "about all this
economy is that it is not saving
petrol at all) but using more than
by keeping the engine running.
.- "When a driver restarts his car
after stopping at an intersection a
Surge of petrol is necessary to fire
the. motor. This' surge amounts to
, mote petrol than would have been
required to sit at the intersection
with the engine running."
EXPENSIVE WEAR
So up goes the petr-l consumption
and down comes an important elec-
trical feature of the car the bat-
Stery charge. Constant, stopping and
restarting of the engine not only


"Handouts are not just trven to
the drivers." says Carlson. "A ma-
nual has been prepared for traffic
cops on point duty an' consists of
instruction with illustrations on the
correct signals and gestures.
"The men in my division, are very
keen and adapt. themselves very
quickly," continued Carlson. "Some
of the men have been trained ip,
first afd for accident work and their
attitude is very good."
ANNUAL CITY TRAFFIC
DEATHS DOWN FROM 16 TO 13
A recently completed survey of the
number of accidents and people kil-
led in the period 1958-59 shows a
gradual decrease in both accidents
and fatalities. In '1958 there were
1,700 accidents with a total of 16
deaths, slightly higher than the '59
'total of 1,678 accidents and 13


and situation of the incident it is
hoped to locate e1 the trouble spots
and in doing so keep men posted
there to prevent accidents.
CLAMPING DOWN
"We are not accepting excuses
fqr traffic violations so easy now
either'," continued 'arlson. "Most
offenses centre round parking brea-
ches and going against the lights
aihd last year we issued twice as
many tickets as in 1958.

"The main principal in traffic law
enforcement is that everyone must
comply with all laws and regula-
tions and be treated in the same
manner for violations." In this res-.
pect Carlson and his men are treat-
ing all without discrimination. Di-
plomatic and official cars and Ar-
my vehicles ,get tickets


signs are simplicity itself aqd are
marked Rue.... for streets running
East and West and Ave.... for
streets running North and South.
Ultimate objective of the Depart-
ment is, with the aid of clearly mar-
ked streets, to make, spot maps
showing various types of :accidents
and where "selective enforcement"
is necessary.

Many more improvements have
been planned for Port-au-Prince traf-
fic including extra traffic lights in
addition to the five existing sets,
eight two-way radios for Department
motorbikes which will have a spe-
cial channel and be tuned to a tran-
smitter-recelver in the patrol cars,
and a machine which is due for de-
livery this month and will be used
to paint stripes down the centre of


F


it pedestrian

ffic Depait-'
een sent to'
Side traffic
'turned with
Long their
ore, in ca
ving soon.
course in
:ern Univer
departmenW
st CoasCLtV.
ge of Acid-,
s due back.
nonth U, 3..i
members to
e were Lt.
the Drivers
ite Division,'
charge Mot-


or Cycle Patrol, who recently re-
turned from Panama after a three
months course.
Lt. Theodore .sums up the wave.
of enforcement, with these words.
"It is a sound system for the secur-
ity of the people and everyone has
an interest to observe these laws."
By the time Roy Carlson and his
willing team are through reorga-
nizing Port-au-Prince's Traffic..
troubles, dented fenders, squealing:
brakes and high petrol bills should'i
be a thing of the past.




I *A
spaia -s


PAGE.8


_ ~








sU] fDA, JAN,1TT i


Art And Art Sales Flourishing In Haiti


FiJEN RODMAN


Robert St Brice and Prefet Dufaut. man concluded, that the. Haitian downward economic spiral that has ficially opened just before Christmas,
Among the collectors "whose discri- arts, if properly nurtured and, en- only recently begun to take or turn and headed by an Italian maestro
mination rivals that of Rockefellers courage, may some day replace for the better, never ceases to be as- with visions of equestrian collosi in
and Lewisohns" Mr. Rodman men- coffee and sugar '-which can be tonished at the flourishing sate of bronze.
Lioned Roger Coster of the Grand grown more economically in other the arts. To those, however, 'who are fam-
Hotel Oloffson and Bishop Alfred countries- as Haiti's major "indus- The hotels may be half empty, the ilar with the persistent originality
Voegeli of the Episcopal Church; he try" and (along with tourism which overloaded electric, system may be and occasional triumphs of Haitian
called them "Maecenases of Haitian is attracted by the art renaissance) suffering mightly from "le black- art, the most refreshing aspect of
art". But the greatest credit of all, the Cathedral St. Trinite being al- out," and the once anxiety-breeding this new upsurge is the emergence
Mr Rodman concluBil- belongs to, ready a far greater tourist attract- national telephone may have lapsed of a group of "sophisticated" paint-
DeWitt Peters, Founder-Director of 'on than the Citadelle -ma9 lead into blissful silence, but artists ers whose pictures are 'beginning to
the Centre, who pow plan ,ln coop-, the way in-the economic salvation (comparatively, considering that compete, both in quality and in de
eration with Bishop Voegeli. to es- of Haiti. Mr Rodman expressed 'the Haiti is the size of Vermont, with a mand, with the best work 'oT the
tablish a Museum of Modern Art for hope that the Government may soon population hardly greater -than Chi- world-famous "primitives." Outstan-'
Haiti, and .who for years has been follow the great example of Mexico cago's are creating as no where else ding among the former are Gesner
saving the best- pictures of the out- and open its major public buildings in the World today and selling Armand, Antonio Joseph, Luce Tur-
standing artists lest, they be bought to the mural and sculptural work of their creations. nier and Jacques Gabriel, all but
by tourists and leave the country such "unquestionable geniuses' as GALLERIES ABOUND the last of whom have studied ab-
forever. These pictures and Monsei- Obin and Bazile, Jasmin Joseph Hotels, bars, even garages, are "road. Abelard, whose pre-Christmas
gneur Voegeli's will form the nucl- and Liautaud,' Turnier and Armand, covered with murals.: Where there show at the'Centre d'Art was a vir-
cus of the Museum, and Mrs Rod- Bigaud and -Gourgue. were. two galleries five years ago, tual sell-out at prices from $300 up,
man expressed the hope'that Mon- there are at least a dozen today. is a subtle colorist whose charact-
sieur Coster and other Haitian col- HAITI REVISITED: Even the clothing shops and markets eristically Haitian imagery emerges
.l*ctors will sbme day leave their sell pictures. Exhibitions abound., magically from what first appears
pictures and sculptures to such a ITS ART STILL Haitian collectors of Haitian art to be a wholly abstract surface..,Jo-
national museum too. FLOURISHES an upheard-of phenomenon in the seph and Mlle Turnier, who have


Mr Rodman concluded by saying
that whereas' economic conditions in
the Republic have been troubled as
a result of political upheavals in
recent yeats, and in consequence of
the inability of the big airlines to
land Jet planes without adequate
runways, artists are selling their
creations in quantities and at high
prices Lndreamed df in more prosy
perous years. This proves, Mr Rod-


(Reprinted from "The New York early days of the "renaissance"
Times" of, Sunday January 10, 1960 when sponsorship was strictly Amer-
with omitted paragraph and correct- ican and all buyers tourisms ts --
Ions of errors by the.author.) are beginning to buy outstanding
works; and one of the leading Hai-
by SELDEN RODMAN tian newspapers recently printed a
Port-au-Prince, Haiti series of articles advising them
The visitor to Haiti who has read what to acquire (and when to un-
vaguely of recurrent revolutions in load) for "Investment." The Govern-'
the Black Republic, or who witness- ment itself is getting in on the act
es,with his own eyes the familiar with an "Ecole des Beaux-Arts," of-


been with the Centre from its incep-
tion, are just achieving maturity:
Joseph as a painter of the Haitian
scene in low-keyed but brilliant
greens and yellows, Turnier as the'
first of Haitian expressionists with
an 'eye and heart for the sufferings.
of the peasants. Gabriel, still expri-
menting in a variety of styles, could .
some day surpass the other three.
(Continued on page 10)


A WONDERFUL NEW VORLD OF FORDS


FOR 1960


eight-year-old daughter QRIANA
At the Club Interantional. de Com-
merce Wednesday December 30th
1959. Selden Rodman well-known
poet and art-critic, discussed the lat-
est developmnents Haitian art, and
the great role that .Lr: may come
Sto play in the future economic de-
,velopment .of Haiti. The author of-
'' "Haiti: The Black Republic" and
"Renaissance in Haiti" and also
the initiator-director of the mural
painting of the cathedral St. Tri-
nite in 1950-51, Mr Rodman, who
was here to write of Haitian art for
the New York Times. expressed the
opinion tat Haitian art today is
fiburishing as never before, and'with
a vitality greater thant that of any
other country 6f comparable size in
the world today. As evidence of this,
he cited the lumber of new galleries
that have opened, the spreading of
: _mural art, from its inception at the
Centre d'Art in 1949 to every hotel
and almost sizeable store and even
garage, and the beginning of im-
portant private collections of Haiti-
an art, and even of articles on the
pob]ems of collection in the Haitian
press. He said that whereas five
years ago Max Pinchinat and Re-
land Dorcely were the "internation-
al style" artists working with much
assurance in Haiti, today'there are
many, and 4 of them -Gesner Ar-
.mand, Luce Turnier, Antonio Jos-
eph and Jacques Gabriel- are al-
'reidy producing work that can hang
: with distinction in the most discrim-
.- '.inating galleries of New York, Mex-
ico or Paris.

The popular artists, Mr. Rodman
.'continued, have been world-famous
7r' many years, but it is encourag-
ing to find that their work, with
few exceptions, is even better than
in the early days of the Centre.
Aniong these he mentioned master-
pieces by Philome and Senaque Ob-
in (whom he visited in Cap Haitien
last week) Jasmin Joseph, Enguer-
rand Gourgue, Georges Liautaud,


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SSUqDAY, JAN. 17TH, 1960


PAnGv 9


I


"M1-A TTr r %TTIM"







PArE I0


lATin' q in


ART AND SALES...
(Continued from page 9)
0


It is equally encouraging to find
that the "Old Masters" of Haitian
popular art -the painters Philome
and- Seneque Obin, Castera Bazile
SBigand Benoit, Adam Leontus, Pre-
let Dnfaut, and 'the sculptors Jas-
min Joseph and Georges Liautaud-
have, passed that danger point at
which so many self-taught artists
either become "confused" by alien
influence or repeat themselves. In
this category, only Wilson Bigaud
and Toussaint Auguste, who were
among the inimitable muralists of
the Cathedral St. Trinite, have (mo-
mentarily, one hope) 'ceased to pro-
duce. The others are as good or
better' than ever, Jasmin, who ex-
ecuted the great choir-screen of fir-
ed open-work blocks for St. Trinite,
has been painting a series of pict-
ures in which well-populated islands
surrounded by coral seas assume
the sapes of fabulous birds. Du-
faut's masterpiece, similarly afloat
but in the sky, depicts Heaven and
Hell Heaven a vision of his nat-
ive Jacmel complete with Poste-Te-
legraphe and Gendarmerie. Another
great picture of recent vintage, by
Enguerrand Gourgue who specializes
in diabolism, is a Crucifixion with
the Cross in the foreground seen
from behind; in the background
winds a fiery river on which boat-
loads of Haitians contemplate Christ
with devotional candles held aloft.

This last picture is in the outstand-
ing collection of Alfred Voegeli, the
Episcopal Bishop who
turned his cathedral over
to the "primitive" painters nine
years ago. But the Bishop's collect-
ion is now rivaled by that of Roger
Coster, proprietor of the Oloffson
Hotel, among whose chefs d'oeuvre
is an unforgettable, Seneque O b i n
"Masonic Funeral" containing scor-
es of individualized portraits, two
beautiful Armands, three startling
"apparitions" by Robert 9t Brice,
the Dnbuffet of Haitian painting, and
a half-dozen sensational pictures by
Bourmond Byron, who apparently


works at his best only for this dis-
criminating collector.
OBIN ENTERTAINS
I visited Philome Obil, the grand
old man of Haitian painting, in his
tiny house at Cap-Haitlen on the
north coast Christmas day. He en-
tertained me with a "fete" at which
a dozen beautiful young girls
sang carols, the master leading
them from behind an open door,
and then pouring a quart of Cinzano
(exactly, and to the last drop) into
seventeen champagne glasses. PreL
cision, the key to Obin's art, was re-
flected still more strikingly in an
elaborate grapewine fabricated en-
tirely of braided rope, the leaves of
green paper (dentelle, with the veins
painted blue) and the clusters sculp-
ted in beeswax, which emerged
from a pot of sand in the corner
and "grew" -on branches of dimin-
ishing thickness- all over the cell-
ing and out the-windows to the bal-
cony.

DeWitt Peters, to whom the major
credit must go for Haiti's iridescent
burst into the firmament of modern
art, plans soon to crown his sixteen
years as founder-director of the Cen-
tre d'Art with the establishment of
a museum. Attached to the magnifi-
cent new Episcopal College on the
Champ de Mars, it would probably
have as its nucleus Bishop Voege-
li's collection as well as.the Centre's.
for the Centre has been withold-
ing for years its best pictures lest
they fall into the hands of tounsts
and leave the country. Meanwhile
the JBishop, who is quite possibly
the most dynamic and peripatetic
operator in the Caribbean area,
plans to complete the decoration of
his Cathedral already Haiti's No.
1 tourist attraction with the paint-
ing of the nave and aisles.
(Selden Rodman, as co-director of
the Centre d'Art in 1949-51, directed
the mural painting of the Cathedral
St.-Trinite. His recent books Include
"Haiti: The Black Republic" and
"Mexican Journal.")


PRESIDENT CALLS
SESSION OF 38T
President Doctor Francois Duva-
Her called Tuesday the fourth extra-
ordinary session of 38th legislative to
ratify list eight government pro-
jects.
Eight projects before Congress
are: 1. The contract for completion
of capitals main thoroughfare the
Grand Rue. 2. Law on exportation
of cacao. 3. Autonomy accorded
Port-au-Prince's City Council. 4. In-
heritance law. 5. French-Haitian
commercial agreement. 6. Agrarian
law. 7. Agreement for loan accorded
for study of national highway Port-
,


NEW PAA SCHEDULE
TO ADD STIMULUS
TO WINTER SEASON
New stimulus has been added to
winter tourist-season by Pan Amer-
ican W6rld Airways' new combined
jetliner and piston-engine plane ser-
vice that slashes travel time bet-
ween Port-au-Prince and New York
to 4 and one a half hours%
Haiti's easier accessibility is made
possible by Pan Am's 'big Boeing
707's that speed over the 1,600 miles
from New York to Ciudad Trujillo
in 3 hours, 15 minutes, connecting
directly with Super-6 Elippers that
fly the remaining 160 miles in 50
minutes.
The combination trims 2 hours 30,
minutes from the time needed by
piston-engine planes over the same
route.
The new service operates twice
weekly in each direction on
Tuesday and Friday. Beginning
February 2. the flights will he doub-
led, with -additional roundtrips on
Saturday and Sunday.
The schedule makes it possible
for New Yorkers to eat breakfast at
home and lunch in Port au Prince.
Jetliners depart New York at 8:-
30 a.m., arriving Ciudad Trujillo at
11:45 a.m. The connecting Clipper
flights leave Ciudad ,Truillo at 12:-
15 p.m., arriving Port-au-Prince at
1:05 p.m.
Return flights leave Port au Prin-
ce at 1:40 p.m. to connect with jet-
liners departing Ciudad Trujillo at
3:30 p.m. and arriving New York
at 6:55 p m. All times are Eastern
standard.
I-


LES PUUS BELLES MOSAIQUES
HAITIENNES



S PLACE GEFFRARD
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FOURTH EXTRA SHIP SAVES TWO AT SEA
'H LEGISLATIVE Aboard 8 JERUSALEM In Car.
au-Prince--Cayes between the Hai- bbean-The Caribbean cruise ship
au-Prince-ayes between the Ha Jerusalem rescued t wo engineers.
tian government and the Develop- o ad ee ser injured i
ment Loan' Fund of Washington. 8. who had been serio injured in
Ratification of decrees taken during anexplosion aboard te 1,d32-ton
period of full powers accorded the P nian r.
executive by the legislative chamb- C l-si
ers for a period of six months bet- The rescue took place 200 miles
ween July 1958 and January 1959 off Haiti when the Jerusalem receiv-
not withstanding contracts sanction- ed an SOS from the tanker and
ed by decree that have been affect- rushed back 85 miles at full speed
ed by forecloser. for the daring midnight rescue made
in seas so high the rescue lifeboat
The special session was the first crashed repeatedly'against the side
prisee de contact" for President Du- of the C:.ryssi.
valier's newly app4nted Cabinet and The victims were engineers Spav-
members of Congress. ros Zanbounis and Konstantinus Gi-
Senator Victor Nevers Constant at nis. both Greeks. They received first
the opening notified his colleagues aid in the lifeboat from the Jerusal-
that he was departing January 17 em's doctor, Armm Gudman, who
for Tokio as Haiti's Anbassador Ex- later performed emergency surgery
traordinary and Minister Plenipoten- for their fraCtures and internal in-
tiary to Japan. juries.


I-I


IN=%


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'


SUNDAY, JAN. 17TIH, 1960


"
HAITI SU Ns


z







SUNDAY, JAN. 17TH, 19(



Tuidreds


Through

-'. '.e very effective mechanization
"-..f fishing' boats promoted by the
series Department of the Govern-
.ent'of Jamaica. under which up-
of 500 outboard engines have
installed in fishing canoes< is
ssed in a report issued by the
Fbod (nd Agriculture Organization
thb,! united Nations (FAO), Rorhe,

S report, whicfr has been pre-
Sar by Mr. Jan-Olof Traung,
':Chief of the'. Fishing Boat Set tioh,
JFisheiies Division, FAO, points out.
'r-that the mechanization of Jamaican
fishing craft has been made possible
-by the:Government Loan Scheme.
.. "The Fisheries Department of the
: Jamaican government has impdrted
.-outboard engines and made them
Savaillable to local fishermen on very
.easy tkrms,". stated Mr Traung.
.I '~he fisherman has'oply to make
.'a ist payment of 10 per cent on
A.ithe'prie of the engine and then has
'~18ndnhs in'which to pay the bal-

V I,
'A .


"0 "HAITI SUN"


of Fishing Craft Mechanized


Government Loan

FAO REPORT POINTS, WAY TO Uj'tURE
FISHERIES DEVELOPMENT
.POSSIBLE IN rAITI


ance. Furthermore, he is able to
buy teady-hilxed 'gasoline free of
ddty, but an extra shilling per gal-
lon is charged while the fisherman
is paying for' the engine."
TECHNICAL ADVICE AND
ASSISTANCE PROPOSED
Mr Traung has made a number
of recommendations for the further
development of fisheries in Jamaica.
based on his observation of fishing
,craft, gear, equipment, methods and
so on, during his visit to the island
at the invitation .of the Government.
These recommendations include pro-
posals for the design and construc-
tion of experimental types of fishing
boats which, equipped with inboard
engines, living quarters and ice
holds for storing fish, would be able


to operate at more distant fishing
grounds, staying at sea for several
days; the introduction of new fish-
ing methods; employing an engineer
to investigate the possibilities for
developing fishing ports and improv-
ing beach landing facilities for fish-
ermen; and employing a gear tech-
nologist to test out new fishing meth-
ods.
"Although such excellent progress
has been 4nade in mechanizing' fish-
ing canoes and other craft for oper-
ation i .the nearby waters, there
remains a great deal of investigat-
ory work to be done to determine
the possibilities of the more distant
fishing grounds," Mr Traung said.
"For instance, little is kpown at
present of the bottom conditions oh


1-L


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You 'TER6P L3-gDea -'


Scheme

the distant banks and in the deep
waters and I think'it would be a
good idea to equip some of the
vessels regularly plying these wat-
ers with echo sounders, so that obs-
ervations of the bottom conditions
and 6f the presence of fish .could
be reported to .the Fisheries Depart-
ment.
TWO 3ft. PIWTOTYPE BOATS
PEING DESIGNED
"There is a need to consider such
local conditions and to experiment
with various fishing methods before
a' suitable new type of fishing boat
could reasonably be introduced," he
continued.."We have, therefore, re-
commended that two 35 ft. prototype
boats shbujd be bdilt to test out new
fishing methods and to determine
whether they are of the right des-
ign from the point of view of oper-
ation, economy of running and so
on. We have also proposed that these
boats could be used, along with oth-
er craft, by a master fisherman -
gear technologist to carry out ex-
perimental fishing. We are now des-
igning the boats at the request of
the Jamaican Government, and have
suggested that they should be built
in Jamaica, preferably with the ad-
vice and assistance df a naval ar-
chitect from FAO.'
"If the prototype boats turn out
to be an economic proposition and
point the way to bigger fish land-
ings in Jamaica," added Mr Traung,
"then they may well provide an
example which could-be followed by
the authorities In other islands in
the Caribbean."

TRAINING SCHEME FOR
FISHERMEN SUGGESTED
Another proposal made by Mr.
Traung in'his report is that, with
the introduction of larger craft and
new fishing methods, a number 'of
yo4ng intelligent fishermen should
be trained to handle the boats and


PAGE 1

carry out fishing 'with new types of .,
gear and eqwprxenL. The expert con- "
cerned with the training o; such fish- ,.:
ermen would, at a later sate, orga-,'':..
nize training centres to spread know-
ledge and.technological 'know-how'.
In the course of his report,. Mr.. .'
Traung commented that the designs
and shapes of.the present popular ,
fishing craft, such as the ddg-oIt ;,.:
canoes, are extremely'good.
IGH SPEEDS ATTAINED i ..
BUT COSTLY ON FUEL
"They have a sharp bow and flat '
run and a shape which 'conforms
with modern ideas of hull design,"
he pointed out. "When they are
equipped with outboard motors, the
canoes sail at high speed because
of theit good shape. A speed of 10 ,
knots is riot uncommon. Such high
speed is necessary because there is
no ice-storage in the\ small craft.
* "Unfortunately it is expensive to
run craft at such high speeds be-
cause it means high consumption .
gasoline," he added. "I have not said
this in the report but I hope that ,
somebody one day will develop an '
out-board running bn kerosene or
diesel oil which would cut down
running expenses."

Apart fron\ the introduction of new
boats and new fishing gear, equip-
ment and techniques, Mr-Traung has
suggested that an increased catch
could be made by the.use of more
pots per fisherman. As he points out,
power hauling of pots in deep water
might increase the number df pots
operated per man. There also. possi- .
abilities of extending the lift of pots
by using metal frames, nylon links 4
and plastic floats, if tests should
prove this 'an economic proposition., ,'
At present, there are estimated
to be some 6.500 fishermen using "'"
2,900 craft in Jamaica. It is believ-
ed that these fishermen land some-
thing over 7,000 tons of fish annually.
This falls far short of local gem-
and for fish' and some 14,000 tons
of salted cod and other processed
fish are-imported each year, so that
there is a considerable market open
to the -local fisherinen if they can
increase tell catch.


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Christ Is Dark-Skinned At WashingtonCHURCH Exibit


The traditional ecclesiastical at-
msosphere of Washington's National
Cathedral was broken recently when
40 color-drenched canvasses by a
group of Haiti's outstanding primit-
ie painters were put on display in
its' Museum. The Museum, like the
rest of the imposing building, is
Gothic in design. Its walls are. spl-
id masonry, its ceiling a series of
heaven-pointing arches. Here now
were Biblical scenes with a Carib-
bean background, a dark-skinned
Christ surrounded by equally dark-
skinned disciples.
Visitors shared the reactions of
the many 'tourists who have seen
the murals by these same painters
in the Episcopal Cathedral at Port-
au-Prince. "For every dissenter...
there are many who are quickly con-
quered by the ingenuous portrayals
of Biblical stories and by the un-
sophisticated manner in which the
artists have woven the timeless, uni-
versal spirit of religion into the life
and background of their own peop-
le," wrote a U.S. journalist at the
time the murals were unveiled. Hai-
tians themselves who attend the


Cathedral feel a natural kinship
with the qible scenes pp.ited in
familiar everyday terms.
Like most primitive artists, the
Haitian painters use picture 1angu-
age to tell their stories finding
their inspiration not ozly in the
Bible, but also in folk life, history,
social occasions and even voodoo
practices. Everything is put on can-
vas as having occurred in Iaiti and
as it appears to the uqtaught artist,
who may be a dock worker, a wood
turner, or a peasant farmer..
Haitian primitive art was encour-
aged and brought to the attention
of the art world about 10 years by
two Americans who went to work in
the Caribbean island at about the
same time. One of them -Bishop
Alfred Voegeli, of New Jersey- was
sent to Haiti as missionary director
of the Episcopal Church in 1943.
The other -DeWitt Peters- went
to Haiti to teach English under the
auspices of the U.S. Office of Inter-
American Affairs. Having studied
art in Europe, he was amazed to
find that there was little artistic
expression in Haiti. Immediately, he
took steps to start ah art center in


Port-au-Prince and was backed by from the Museum of Modern Art
pope prnriqeqt local residents as in New Yor*.' Many of them are
well as by the U.S. government. He being offered for sale for the bene-
resigned as a teacher to devote full fit of the Episcopal Church in Haiti.
time to scouring the countryside for Bishop Vqegeli and the Centre
talent.. Peters did not find much d'Art are presently collaborating q.
that was in keeping with the Eur- series of projects in which the tal-
opean tradition, but he soon learn
ed that the Haitian hills were doted
with potential untaught artists.
Within a .few years he had discover-
ed and attracted to the Center, Hec-
tor Hyppolite, Philome Obin, Ri-
gaud Benoit and others who are
now well known. In their canvases.
Peters discerned a rare freshness
of vision and an intensity of feeling
that soon achieved international re-
cognition.
The success of the Center's paint-
ers led to a suggestion.that they do
the murals for Bishp' Voegeli's
cathedral. He gave his consent im-
mediately and, urged thq artists to
paint each subject in terms mean-
ingful td themselves. Nine artists
were assigned to the project of I
whom all but two can be described
as primitive painters. Th7 finished
murals are very original, very Hai-
tian, none of them remotely ress- -
embling religious paintings of the
past. For instance, in his portrayal Y ntod Irot
of the Ascension, Castera Bazile .r *rom
the most purely religious of the ,
group- included two young boys, Ol
nonchalantly playing ball in the Agenlb
street while everybody else gazes NE A GAE ATIONAlE. SJ
upward at the dark figure ascend-
ing into heaven over the local roof- IORT.AUIPRINCE
tops. HAI9T W.I,
The paintings in the current exhib-
it have been selected from the per-
manent collections of the Centre
d'Art, from private collections, and
U --


ents of the group of' artists will be
psed not only to reate additional
nuals, paintings and sculptured
pieces for the Cathedral ibit also.
for new churches, chapels and.
schools being built throughout the-
island republic.


Si proffl amelior6 de la bad d&
pylement done une traction n uw;
'icurH supplementaires. Un ingenier
'dispositif de silence, r6duit les &fr I
aents bruits desagreables du pemi
tandi que la construction 16gere di
\uper-Cushion Sans Chambre hd
perunet d'absorber les cahots de
rouse. Vous aurez moins de- pmO .
S lat. It moins de d6lais parce que ol
Construction Grip-Seal exclusive do
Goodyear 6limine pratiquement I"
Icrevaisoas babituelles.



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PAGE 12


SUN"


SUNDAY, JAN. 17TH, 19600


"HAITI






SUNDAY, JAN. 17TH, 1T60


PAnG. 1I


POLISH MINISTER TALKS
ON CHOPIN HERE
Frederic Chopin was the subject of Chopin, 1960. The speaker stress-
of an address given before a large ed that the adaptation of the popular
audience Tuesday night at the art (L'Art Populaire) by this creat-
French Institute by Mr Aleksander ive genius, characterized the work"
Bekier, Consular of the Legation of of Chopin.
the Polish Republic in Haiti and also Mr Bekier continued that the year
Charge d'Affaires. Mr Bekier was 1960 the year of Chopin should
presented to the public by Mr Lu- not be consecrated to the memory
.cien Montas, Chief of the Cultural of this illustrious deceased, but that
Division at the Department of For- it be permitted again to inspire
reign Affairs. youth to live examples of the rand


The Palace Orchestra executed the
National Anthem of Haiti od Pol-
and. Mr Bekier oegan his address
~by exposing documents, of commem-
orative manifestations of the year


musician. He suggested the creation
in Haiti of the Society of Friends
of Frederic Chopin. Such a society
could assist in the spreading of the
work and thoughts of this great com-
poser. Mr Bekier ended his talk


DANISH MINISTER TO PRESENT
CREDENTIALS
The Minister Plenipotentiary of Denmark in Haiti, Mr Per Agger-
Denmark, '44 year old, Mr Aksel holm.
Christiansen, called on Foreign Min- Mr Christiansen, who will present
ister Raymond Moyse Thursday this his letters to the President in the
we6k and presented a copy of "Let- next few days, held posts with the
tres de Creance." Accompanying Danish legation in Paris in 1937-38,
Mr Christiansen was the Consul of was Secretary of the legatipn in Ma-


with a film in French dealing with
the youth of Chopin.
Among those who attended the
address were Foreign Minister Ray-
mond Moyse, French MiNister, Mr.
Lucien Felix and numerous diplom-
ats and personalities.


drid, 1941-47 and rose to Charge,
d'Affaires, 1949-53.
He became chief of the first sect-
ion of the Economics Division of
the Foreign Ministry in Copenhagen
and was then promoted to the po-
sition of Consul General in London
and Commercial Councillor. Mr
Christiansen ocquiied this function
when nominated to Haiti.


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Punch-bowl party.
FRIDAY: 7:30 pm to 1 am Dinner dance and
Show at 10:30 p.m.


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HAITI'S LARGEST FREE PORT )RICE
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to
HAITI SUN "


. 1







SUNDAY, JAN. 17TH, 1960


"HAITI


SUN"


200,000 LBS OF, CANADIAN GIFT MILK
ARRIVED ON CRISTOBAL


POWDER


A very timely gift from the Gov-
ernrent and people of Canada to
the Haitian people m the form of
20b,000 lbs of dried milk arrived in
Port-au-Prince Monday this week
onboard the SS. Cristobal.

A total of 4,000 bags, each mark-
Sed with a card featuring the Cana-
dian Maple leaf and the message,
"Gift from the people of Canada,"
were handed over in a ceremony
onboard ship attended by represent-
atives'of the Canadian Embassy, the
CARE Organi z a t i o n, the State
Health Department and the Haitian
Government:

SWith the gift of the precious milk


came feeling of relief, for as Mr.
Jacques Iaurial, Chief of CARE
Mission in Haiti summed it up. "The


fill the canteens' programme.
SWIFT RESPONSE


milk has come just in time to en- Two years ago CARE instituted
able us to run our canteen program- fund raising offices in Canada at
me to expectation." Toronto and Ottawa. Since these
offices opened they have received
The American Govt., previous increasing help and contribution and
large scale donators of dried milk to it was decided to approach the Cana-
charity organizations, recently an- dian Government for milk supplies.
nounced that it would be unable to The result was swift and. the Cana-
continue its contributions of milk dian Governmerit signified its wil-
for an indefinate period. With 70 lingness to help the people of Haiti.
canteens to be maintained in ndrth- Unfortunately the Canadian syst-
west, north and west provinces of em bf supplies from surplus stocks
Haiti and with milk as a basic and did. not cover freight expenses as it
most wanted item in these canteens, does with U.S. stocks. Thus, money
the organization realized that milk for'the freighting of the milk to
had to be obtained quickly to ful-Haiti had to be found.


Jacques Lauriac .of CARE, Captain Gorman of the Cristobal and Cana-
dian Charge d'Affair F.- Charpentier examine Canadian emblem on gift-
milk.


The funds in the CARE organiza-
tidn are mainly used for distribution
purposes and could not cope" with
the expensive freight charges but
once again the Canadians came to
the rescue. The big Toronto news-
paper, "The Toronto.Telegraph" ran
a story on the need for dried milk
in Haiti and issued an appeal for
funds to cover the freight charges.
Money came in fast from the public
and soon sufficient funds were on
hand to absorb the cost of ocean
freight.
These funds collected by the Can-
adian people were not only used for
Haiti but ten other countries as
well. Proceeds from the fund rais-


SLeft to right: Mr Jacques Laurlac, Director of CARE in Haiti, Mr James E. Nash of CARE, Captain F. d
. German, Master of 8S "tCRISTOBAL", Mme Fulgence (harpentier, S. E. Dr Carlo Boulos, Minister o
Public Heath, Hon. Fulgence Charpentier, Charge d'Afaires; a.i. Embassy of Canada.


ing are still continuing sucFessfully
and are being divided amongst the
10 countries.
At the handing over ceremony on-
board the Cristobal on Monday the
Minister in Haiti for Canada, Mr.
Charpentier was thanked Dr Carlos
Boulos, Secretary of State Health
and co-ordinator for CARE in Haiti,
on behalf of.the Haitian people and
also' by Mr. Laurial and Mr. James
Nash, a member of CARE in Haiti.
In Mr. Laurial's words, "This gift
helps us in a time of need and
shows us the excellent spirit of the
Canadian Government, The Toron-
to Telegraph and the CARE organi-
zation."


LIGHTS EXPECTED TO GO ON SOON
(Continued from page 1)
spent their study bour working under cases of severe eye strain.
the light from the street lamps, the Commercial enterprises are snff-
yellow circle of light is now crowd- ering also. The imposition on Hotels
ed each night as Mama Anh Papa is great and any factory overtime
join the kids with their own reading. etc. is practically made impossible.
e Of course some fortunates possess Yet another sufferer from the black-
f light per candles and gas lamps outs is refridgeration, constant "on
but it should be interesting to take and off" does not help these' mach-
note of the increasing number of ines'either.


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1


PAGE 14


CPAOLMN





I: N AY, AN. 17TH, 1960 "tHAITI SUN" PAGE 15


E 0.L C PANYI DECEMBER 19 IN THE EXECU- been the victims of dispossession, I
report NEW TROPIGAS SPECAL MEETING HEW ON to be respected, for their having
t u p p t COMPANY TIVE MANSION IMPORTANT have just been informed that simil-
S DIRECTOR STATEMENTS OF THE CHIEF ar eviction acts are being performed
EXECUTIVE TO THE HONOR- at Arcahaie".
S liABLE MEMBERS OF THE LOWER "Under my Administration such
I HOUSE MANY PRONGED acts can not be perpetrated".
EFFORT AND COOPERATION "That is the reason why I urge
PRAISED you to pay a careful attention to
During an important interview such questions, for, I for one, noth-
..'' between His Excellency the Presid- ing can prevent the achievement of
Dali-aralson PAA chief mechanic at Bowen Field is over in Miami ent of he Republic and the Honor- the program of Social Justice, I am
dyig up on DCTBs... Guest to cocktails and buffet at the Jules Tomars able Members of the Lower House determined to attain".
roMorne have been singing the praise of the Kosher food. The occa- at the Presidential Palace on Dec- In me the Chief of Stae is over-
r.4.;. 'ember 19, the Chief Executive un- powered by the Revolutionist and
was Jules birthday... Dr Pape has recovered from his delicate oper- emberc 9 the Chef Ex tive un- were by the Revolutionist and
m oper- derscored the following parts: I theDoctrinarian".
r.made difficult by the hospital lights going out... dit-on popular made it a point of expressing my "RecenUty there was a debate in
'Baussan PR for La Belle Creole and Rhum Barbancourt will manage satisfaction for the close coopera- the Parliament about a would -be
wCacique Island Beach Club... Jessie Dejoie's husband is newman tion you brought the.Executive. I alienation of the. land- of the Na-
am of the New York Post and Saturday Evening Post anchored am a hundred per cent satisfied tional Heritage Let me recall to
j61James of the New York Post and Saturday Evening Post anchored with the behavior
-..., ..-*-~ ,Marr~ *y u- with the behavior of the Chamber of your mind that I would rather'pass
'=Mexico City. Married formerly to the sister of Duke Ellington Mt- James Deputes. out of sight together with my own
i ras.lHaiti for ten' days during the 31-man Cuban invasion... The ill- Tropigas Company, Inc., has an- "I am aware of the annoyance family than commit such sacrilege".
s 'of the famous Haitian artist Wilson Blgaud has seemingly ended nounced the arrival of a new Man- caused to many of you by this meet- SID
ager, Mr. Donald C. Brooks, in re- ing since many of you who are in-
i.":i painting career... Moussa and Bill Talamas are back in town this week. placement bf Mr. Walter M. Pierce dustrialists have been compelled to
: ...'ort-au-Prince Prefecture is established on Ave. Marie Jeanne in the old Jr transferred to Venezuela, who ac- leave off such activities to answer HAITIAN FARMERS
KLM local... The son of Colonel and Mrs Jacques Etienne flew back to companies by his wife and. two sons, the call of the Executive. FLOWN TO NASSAU
,;San Juan this week'to resume his studies at the University of San Juan... arrived here on December 30. "~Ve promised, ydu and I, during
rm graduate from Indiana Unmver- the electoral campaign to protect 154 Haitian farmers were flown
IelorJ" er Jacqueline Godefroy married to a French Naval officer has sity', Mr. Brooks is backed with 10 the peasant's land. to Nassau to work under contract
-:named her second boy Christian... Frantz Brandt the Textile engineer years experience in L.P. Gas busin- "After a committee has been re- Wednesday morning. The Farmers
f-is back from spending Christmas with his daughters in Canada... ess, working 3 years in Venezuela solved whose duty it was to cause left by chartered planes of the Ba-
'The Chanifeor-Guides building on the Hairy S. Truman Boulevard is and 7 years in Columbia on Costs the rights of the Artibonite farmers hamas Airways.
-. and Operation
e to be completed in February. They will have their headquarters and Oeros at ed that hs
and classrooms for their children... Lance #bbott is recovering ive in coming to Haiti is to create
kro a broken arm and crown sustained when he took a swan dive into goodwill services for Tpigas. His DISCOVER THE FASCINATION
S i empty pool from a roof... Colonel Henry Relchner of the Navy Mission office is open to any\ visitor Who T
is holding a bamboche for his mother-in-law Tuesday... American writer w lke to ome and see him OF HAITI
nJi Kobler spent three days in Cap-Haitien this week researching Haiti-
.an history for his upcoming book... Phil Schoenberg thel Sweepstake boss DR. R. R. MADISON Through Its Postage Stamps
eeere has recovered from his Yule tide illness.... TO DELIVER
The lovely Arinand sisters Jeannette and Michele are both engaged LECTURES IN For complete information 'm Haiti
-to be married. Jeannette is fiance to a Frenchman who is serving in the PORT-AU-PRINCE
*Colonial service in Algeria and Michele is engaged to a fellow student Stamps and other details which will be
-atthe Science Po at the Sorbonne... The Ricot Relhers have their fifth Dr. Ryland Rr. Madison will arr-
baby, a lovely baby boy... five little boxers were born into the George .ie in Port-au-Prince on January 19 fur ished you free of charge, write to
and Edwige Keen family Friday night while they were at the Palace in order todeiver an su of ec
ures on the following subjecs:
reception. This is Pookie Kenn's second litter... Carl M. Hanman of the I-Comparative Historical evolut- P.O. Box 723 PORT-AU-PRINCE
SBridgeport Post is loving his vacation at the Villa Creole... Lady Pierson ion of the United States and
Dixon purchased a Frederic Pierre and a Georges Hectbr painting... De- Latin America.
puty Jseph.Jn-Baptiste attending the inauguration of Liberia's Tubman 2-Utilization of human Resources
3-Consumer Education.
has been invited to visit Guinea... 4-Understanding the United States
..Mrs Henri Deschamps returned from the States Saturday... Mrs Clifford 5-The effects of Industrialization SEE THE SENSATIONAL
Brandt accompanied by her children flew back from from abroad yester- upon a society.
day... Ti Barbe Morrison and Ed Marshall flew to Jamaica on business Dr. Madison had his university N E W 1 9 6 0
r training at Stanford University, Ca- JOHNSON OUTBOARD MOTORS
Saturday... Ernst Casseus organizer of the Miss Haiti contest went to ifornia where he got his degrees: AT
.the States yesterday... Mrs Frtz Leon is over from Jamaica... Arthur A.B, M.A and Ph. D.
Duroseau went to New York Thursday... Although specialized in Bacterio- R PA
logy and Chemistry, Dr Madison has
a good knowledge and experience of
Latin America affairs with particul-
ar attention to cultural patterns and t Af
behavior. He has traveled a lot in
Sin the area delivering lectures.
SDr Reyland is Associate-Professor .. -
TH E BEST EGGS of Social Sciences at 'Long Beach '
State College, Long Beach, Calif.

New! Sensational!




38 JEWELS


." ANb JEWEL ROLLER BEARINGS

S12 On Sale At: Canap6 Vert

1r- Aux Cent Mille Articles


Dadlani's Maison Orientale




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SEA-HORSE 40, SEA-HORSE 18, SEA-HORSE 10
SEA-'HORSE 5 and a.half, SEA-HORSE 3.
1






"HAITI


SUNDAY, JA..


SUN"


NEW DOMINICAN AMBASSADOR
ARRIVES HERE

It has been announced that Dr Pe- career as a second secretary in the
dro Pureel Pena has replaced Amb- Embassy in Port-au-Prince in 193.,
assador Sanchez Rubirosa as Anlb- The new Ambassador speaks fluent
assador of the Dominican Republic French having been in the Dominl-
in Haiti. Dr Rubirosa has oeen ap- can protocol service for the past 23
pointed to the position of under Min- years. His wife is Haitian by birth
ister of Interior and Cults. and will arrive here on Monday.
Dr Pena began his diplomatic






A'









The new Dominican Republic Ambassador, Dr Pedro Pureel Pena, seen
here on arrival this week. Dr Pena speaks fluent French and has been
in the Donunioan Protocol Service for the past 23 years. His Haitian
born wife will join him tomorrow.


TAXES SOAR...
S(Continued from page 1)


It is expected that the new tax
rises on locally made cigarettes, La
Splendid, will be ain additioria five
cents making the new price 1 gour-
de 25 centimes. On cigarettes man-
ufactured in the U.S. the rise will
be 10 cents making the new price,
ordinary, 2 goutdes and filtered, 2
gourdes 50 centimes. A rise is fore-
cast for French cigarettes too. These


.4'-.






r Wl






tH
RSI

a3
mg


are expected to rise to 1 gourde 60
centimes for Gitanes and 1 gourde
50 centimes for Gauloises.
All imported ears are to have a
6 per cent increase in taxes placed
on them and alcohol is expected to
have an inclusive tax of 20 centimes
on three-star Barbancourt and 2
dollars on imported liquors.


For all kinds of French perfumes
visit Haiti's Smartest Indian store
Select your favourite perfume
ftom our large collection

JEAN PATOU
CikSitIA i DIOR
We qf tr you the world's famous
btadhds at free port prices
LE GALLON
CARVEN
LANVIN NINA RICCI
CARON
CHANEL
RAPHAEL
etc... etc...
MILOT




!THE LOuST, PRIBC, t THE ORLPR IF


THE WORLD


FAMOUS


RADIUM MACHINE
LYING IDLE AFTER
NINE MONTHS
Lawyer Ron %s voided his sur-
prise after a visit to the Cancer
Centie this week, that the General
Electric machine fot Radium ther-
apy had not worked since it arrived
here some nih4 moriths ago.
How come? Apdarently G.E. had
overlooked sending a specialist down
to calibrate the ihchine. Mr. Moss
is here on his fourth visit and dUr-
ing his stay has visited Dr. Larimer
,Mellon at his kchwetttef Hs6pital
and had a lenfhy talk with the
Adirilstrator, Mr


When I
in Port
States a
pecting
drums' a
ochred .
pavement
Before
ends gav
and trini
But he
cause pa
Now, a
nard fin


LePerc
THE RESTAURANT OF

'THE HA]

[S OPENED DAILY EXCE

A SPECIAL LUNCH IS

I OFFERED

FOR $1.75

AND $2.00 A LA

The menue is prepared by P

Of Switzerland
I


rRUY rV



The SATURDAY EVENING POST said:

"One of the highlights of Port-au-Prince night life
is the Oloffson's uninhibited Monday night floor
show..."


the



HOTEL Oloffson



Show



"Oui Cherine"

EVERY MONDAY AT .10 P.M. SHARP

We recommend that you reserve for


DINNER and SHOW.........$5.00
Dinner wil 'be served from 7:30 to 9:00 l.m.i
Entrance for show only: .... $2.00 Limit1 Ijiace

S^


ItJ
2'-


SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCASION


*'iaf -1t


AMERICAN COMES TO LIVE .IN'
UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA: -,

Mr Tom BERNARD arrived different place from the onp lhe'in-.'
Elizabeth from the United agin"cd.
fortnight ago he was ex- But he likes ei6nfiomusuly., -
to wake to the sodnd of iLOVATh1i : .,A
t night and to see beaded A 32-year-old bdchelor1ii
Africans walking down the led into an executive job i t ]li1
t. al Motors and has rented: kal i:
house in Humewood.
he left New York his fri- Now he is waiting for
ve him a tropical helmet plus air-conditioning--.
kets for barter! from America before mo .
e could's bring them. be- Already he has explored ali
kingg space was limited, by beaches.
after a short stay, Mr Ber- He loves the sea and has
ds Port Elizabeth a very luxurious beach house 6n..L
S land built partly'by
After attending an all-mert."
S. where he took a degree. i"f
Sciences, Mr Bernard joined
Ih o 2 He has travelled in Euroop-4
trial and South America hiLiiE
West Indies. -,.
But the best country' in. a '.r
[TIAN FAMILY world? .. -;'
Without a doubt Haii. Heha
visited it ten times and loves it1
PT MONDAYS exotic beauty.
Whenever he went there he sta
ed with a well-known journalist, w'i.
started the first English newspae
in the country.
) AT MIDDAY Now in South AfricaMr mo.
is determined not to miss any of
sights. :
His first trip will probably, be.to
the Transkei, where he hopes to see
African tribal life.
CARTE "I want to travel all over .the.
country," he says.
Ubert Barcilon "I want to meet every lknd of.
person and really get the feel of.
the place."
S(Reprinted .From The Port Eliza--
beth News _-
.#`


--




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