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Haiti sun

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00245

Full Text




Weekly
Every
Sunday


al G J 1Y Su n


lOc


VOL XII SUNDAY, JANUARY 10th, 1960 Port-au-Prince, HAITI No. 37, Avenue Marie-Jeanne Cite DUMARSAIS ESTIME No. 9


Queen Acclaimed


On Return


-4K -


I' -,


Sugar Cane Queen ol the World, 22-year-old Cl.a idi.:ette Fouchard photographed by/Richard Doebrich here.


LUCE TURNER
OPENS 1960 SEASON
AT CENTRE D'ART
The 1960 season at the Centre
d'Art opened brilliantly 'vith a
crowded 5,at 7 on Friday in honor
of Luce Turnier's exhibition of re-
cent drawings and paintings. Am-
ongst the paintings exhibited, none
of which are titled but only numb-
ered. numbers 6 and 9 "ere espe-
cially adnmred: number 6 was ac-
quired by Richard Kann: well-
known American journalist The
vernissage was attended by Mrs.
,Gerald Drew and other members
of the American Embassy and b.\
a number of distinguished .-laitian
intellectuals and art lovers. The ex-
hibition will remain on view through
January 23rd.


NONCE MOVING
TO JAPAN
His Excellency Monseigneur Do-
minici Enrici Nonce Apostolique in
- Haiti has been transferred to Japan
according to information published
in The Osservatore Romano.


AMERICAN FISHING
COMPANY PARTNERSHIP
SPLITS HERE

Two Americans John Elling and
Felix Spatola have ended their
partnership in the Haitian American
Processing company. A reliable
source indicates that John Ehling
has now gone into partnership with
Marco Clermont. a Haitian and tak-
en charge of the large quick-freeze
unit which was his investment in
the company. On the other hand
Felix Spatola has moved Haitiani
Processing Company from the SED-
REN building to 31 Rue Americaine
and is continuing to operate his 65
foot twin engine sports fishman ves-
sel the Gala. The Galai. the proper-
ty of Felix Spatola. with a cruising
speed of twelve knots is now buy
collecting lobster tails from Haitian
fishermen at Cayemite, around the
Southwest peninsula and the Baie
de Henne area in the Northwest.
Butch Ashton Haitian born is oper-
sting this end of the Spatola enter-
prise The lobster tails are quick-
frozen and exported to the North
American market by the Panama
Line.


SIR PIERSON J. DIXON
TO TALK HERE TUES.
Sir Pierson John Dixon. perman-
ent representative of Great Britain
on the United Nation's Securit3
Council will give a talk here at the
French Institute 8.30 Wednesday ev-
ening
Sir Dixon w~ho is due to arrive
here 9:30 Wednesday morning and
depart Thursday afternoon is giv-
ing a senes of talks in the Carib-
bean He will be '"lcomed here by
Mrr L. A. Barker Her Britannic Ma-
jesty's Charge d'Atfaires in Haiti
and a member of the Protocol
Former Ambassador to Prague
Sir Dixon a Cambridge graduate
has been with the U.N. since March
13 1954


PRISON FARM
PROJECT FOR
GONAVE
The Department of Agriculture
and Armed Forces are considering
the establishment of a Prison farm
on the Island of La Gonave 350 car-
reaux are to be set aside for the
project


LAOL


TWO DROWN AS
"SOUVENIR ST.
AUGUSTIN" SINKS
OFF LA GONAVE
-Two passengers were drowned
Monday when the Sail-boat "Souve-
nir St. Augustin" sank off La Go-
nave on a tnp to Port-au-Prince.
Nine other passengers the boat's
Captain and crew managed to swim
ashore near Dub Saline in the Rural
section of Grand Lagond.
The authorities have detained the
Captain and crew of the "Voilier"
for questioning.


SEN. G. SMATHERS
CANCELS TRIP
TO HAITI
Senator George Sinathers sudden-
ly canceled Friday the trip he had
planned to Cuba, Haiti and the Do-
minican Republic next week a Wash-
ington dispatch of David Kraslow
to the Miami Herald stated Satur-
day..
CASTRO PRESS HITS
FLORIDA LAWMAKER
As the cancellation was revealed,
Smathers was being attacked in an
article published by La' Calle, a


From
Thousands crowded Bowen Field
airport and lined the route into the
Capital Saturday afternoon to ace-
laim the return from Call, Colombia
of a triumphant Haitian beauty win-
ner of the crown of Sugar Cane
Queen of the world.
A demure, smiling, Claudinette
Fouchard dressed in a lovely beige
suit with matchtine bonnet covered
with artificial flower. holding a gold-
en septre aloft was given a rousing
welcome seldom witnessed at the
airport Ai-my Officers formed a
human wedge to escort the young
q u e e n through the clanimering
crowd to the awaiting open Ford
convertible in which she took an
hour to ride the mile to the City
HalL-
Cries of "La Rene, La Reine",.
Bewildered intransit tourist to the
point that one was heard to enquire
whether Republican Haiti had be-
cone a Monarchy.
Accompanied by her "suivante"
Mile- Mnique Cartwrght dressed in
.a blue and white suit carrying the
crown of the Miss Suear Cane Queen
of the W\\'orld., Miss Fouchard brought
out the tenants of La Saline who
snake-danced in Carnival fashion
around her open car crying "Vite
La Rimeu '
Corbeilies of roses were presented
along with congratulations by the
reception comnumittee, most of whom
were memnbes of the jury whose
decision sent Miss Fouchard to Col-
ombia to compete for the world tite
with other representatives of Sugar
producing countries -Latin Amer-
ica, the Philippines, and Hawaii-.
At the Hotel de Ville Mayor Phi-
lippe Charlier on behalf of the City
congratulated and thanked Miss
Fouchard for the distinction she had
brought her homeland. Her triumph
% as toasted in champagne and she
was -iven the key to the city.v.


Ulrick Joseph and Georges Adrien
boardering plane into exile.
POLE TO TALK ON CHOPIN
TUESDAY
Mr Aleksandre Bekier Conseiller
of the Polish legation in Port-au-
Prince and Charge d'Affaires a.i.
will give a talk on 1960 the Year
Of Chopin at the French Institute
Tuesday evening at 8.
The conference will be followed
by a Polish film in French on the
Youth of Chopin. The evening is und-
er the patronage of Foreign Minist-
er Raymond Moyse.


rY}


Call
In the evening dressed in flowing
royal red robes with $20,000 solid
gold (Colgate-Palmolive Co Gift)
crown and septre riding through the
city in an open automobile to be
presented to the public at a giant
Stadium Sylrio Cator rally the Queen
set the mood for the Carnival season
which opens today.
Following her public appearance
at Stadium Sylvio Cator the queen
was acclaimed at a reception in
her honor at the Beau Rivage and
later in Cabane Choucounne wheM
the orchestra played the National
anthemn as she made her regal
entry. (Continued on page 20)


10 Go Into

Exile
FROM EMBASSIES HERE
In a move to clear Foreign Emb-
assies of Haitian Political asylees
this week the Foreign Office grant-
ed safe conduct permitting the dep-
arture into exile of ten Haitians.
Thursday afternoon five Haitians,
former Attorney General Esman-
gart Alphone, Dr. Sylvan Jolibois,
Matuice Benoit, Dieuveuille Denis
Joseph and Engineer Seymour Go-
deh-oy ended six months in the Ve-
nezuelan Embassy in Bourdon and
flew to Caracas
Ulrick Joseph. Secretary Gen. of
the Department of Interior in the
Provisional Govt. of Daniel Fig-
nole left the Cuban Embassy with
Shis wife and Geprg-es Adrien for ex-
die in Havana.
Ex-Senator Jules Larieux left the
Mexican Embassy 'Wednesday for
Mexico City and Editor of the de-
funct Haiti Miroir Albert Occenad
left the Guatemalan Embassy for
Miami last weekend. The remain-,
ing Haitians in asylum are expected
to depart shortly according to in-
forme'd sources.


s no









"HI-AITI


SUNDAY, JAN. 10TH, 1960


SUN"


Text Of President Duvalier's January 2nd Message

To the Nation


My Dear Fellow-Citizens:-


January 2, 1804! A date overcast
with symbolism and mysticism
drawn from tlhe heart of the Infin-
ite in order to place upon it a spi-
ritual content to the service of a
race of Men dragged from their
immense and total liberty to be-
come a human herd thrown into
the "gehenne" of the old Santo Do-
mingo.
January 2, 1804! It is the date of
the exploding of a new lhfe which
split the convulsive land from
which sprang our Fathers, those
Valiant men with souls of fire!
Their pledges of January 1st to
live free or to dire find in the spi-
ritual content of January 2nd the
motives of an adhesion to life as
well the permanent basis which will
join forever these new human be-
ings and their descendants to a
free. independent and worthwhile
Life.
-.. It is fitting that on this day. sac-
red to the present and future gener-
ations of Haitians I ask them to
remember always that on this da.
of January 2nd that Dessalines the
Great inspired with the respect of
the Creator called upon all the sons
of the newly forged nation to rend-
er grace to the gods and to rise to
the Grandeur of their Victory in ord-
er to nourish, in the ardor of a
new kind of combat, the "Flame of
Action", so as to continue these per-
manent conquests which are Liberty
and Independence.
And since then...; how exalting
hymns fill the space and the time.
those cries of Faith on January 2,
1804 of all the known heroes and
the anonymous ones, and prolonged
in our souls and in my soul of res-
ponsible Chief obstinately decided
to remain for all time within the
line of action of the Man of Cor-
miers. For the life of this Giant
of History and Humanity is a light


HOTELS


His Excellency President Dr FRANCOLS DUVALIER


for the four nullion Haitians and
the li ing example for the Race on
the planet.
In the year of grace 1960. these
multiple cries of Faith of January
2. 1804 are my ounl. inspirers Taus
it is in order to tie in this date
with its symbolism and its m;,,stic-
ism with that of January 2, 1S01
that I choose to speak to 3ou the
grandsons of these heroes who con-
stitute my people to also call upon
them on this da to pursue the con-
quest of liberty and independence
in the second and consciencious
%\ork. in the fraternal love of clasp-
ed hands, in the union of hearts and
thoughts, in sacrifices freely renew-
ed. so that, like and with me they
feel all this marvelous joy of hao-


tne new and permanent Haiti worthy
:f its Founders.
'.'.y Dear Felion-Citizens:-
* I will spare you a general expose
rf the situation often fastidious. and
neither will I paint tor you in tab-
leaux and comments, the economic
perspectives of the ne"w )ear. I do
nut have the Irn-e fo that. The
daily battles o( o:gan-iinaio and re-
consiruienon do no' ofier such lux-
ury:
To whistic, stop and .-.:st a re-
trospectlne eye oier ILne oad just
crossed! No! the daily battle does
not permit us at all, and that is
much better, for the goal to be set
mnd attained is" too far away, and
bow immense are the tasks which
await to be done through obstacles


ing conscience that their hands join- w.-ithout number centered among
ed to mine each day lays a useful which lies ignorance, terrorizing
and solid rock to the edification of wcnorance


HOUSEWIVES


Li -.,ly in the course of this year
of national economic salvation it.
was possible for us to push back
the barriers of Igno-ance by one
inch of its actual position, what
immense pride we would take in it!
What a broad road we would open
for the success of oar economic and
social measures leading to progress
and general wellbeing!. With sta-e-
nating ignorance there will be no
results of oar efforts Conjugated
action must be the ba:,'.s, of unceas-
ing struggles to rcso'le the t.agic
equ..tio,.. battle of economic salvat-
ion plus forcing back the barriers
of ignorance in order to vanquish
misery. It is in this seise that Con-
gress will again be convoked for a
brief extraordinary Session.
The exceptional times which hum-
anity is living on this planet have
engendered for the uior-anazed little
peoples and for the' new States, a
disequilibrium and" an economic dis-
arroy which sustain. grimacing ainl
formidable, the frightful spector of
miser:.. The rigouros and crucial
character of the problem 'wh. c.i
confront them to the djmensio:;. o,'
dispair to f d for them a sol'-tin
But, for t:s "ho have conscience
Af an\ well egged actiupi to these
high traditions of sacrifices for the
purpose of building ever under t:k1i
impossible, there is that "-flame of
action in o r heredi't, winch anm-
mates ,is arnJ authorizes us to re-
rew the efforts and to raise all
hopes up unril victory. And it is
for the-.: fforis that I am appeal-
ing to m. people.
My Dear Fellow-Citizens:-
If the Haitian people in its pro.
found intuition and in constant asak-
ening have chosen me to guide it
towards the high destinies to wFhicth
is their birthright. it has not less
shown me during the last two .\eairs
its unaltering confidence, its ten-
fold patience in keeping silent witri
heroism about their suffenng in ord-
er to encourage me to create, to
fortify the new order in the midst
of which is exhalted the sacrifices


consented, in the midst of which it
is participating ui the great work.
of building a new humanism at the .
service of the national community.
Our Haiti, people of Haiti. strug- -
gling for political independence
came through victoriously and rose
to the digrut3 of a State and a Na- -
tion.
its f4:.::e is situated now in the-
,ve;t-b':e social and economic rev-
ol'tioon to be organized to assure
t'-e [-.e-m ..,ent co.-q.2est of the Inde-
1:ende-ce of January 1, .1804. The
personality of our dear Fatherland
e'*n:ot t'-nscend except by turning
: c;:-ln .d rtic. i -.t' a cear -
vis:on a .d canscio'.:s of economic
integratkint w independence. Must
the fa-'dation of such an action re-
pose upoi a revolutionary action? .
For witho.it doctrine, or leading, nor .
planning nor soldiers of action they
cannot and never a ll be able to -
operate the economic and social Re-, T
v'oluton necessary and accomplish
.the u're change in the structure. .N

As a simple postulate, last Octob- -
er I submitted to the Nation the
doctrine, the ideal or the mystic:
"The soul of the nation must be
saved from dispair in order to give .
,it faith and iill to work in order -
[o survive."
(Continued on page 8) .


.... -- -* ........ ..v.













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IS PLACING AN IMPORTANT STOCK
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Prices for Sack of 100tbs.

VARIETY: at P-au-P.
"BLUE-BONNET" Grade-A .. $10.2$ at the Mill: $10.50
"BUFFALO" Grade-A .. 9.20 at the Mill: 9.50
"BLUE-BONNET" Grade-B .. 9.20 at the Mill: 9.50
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chase of 20 sacks of rice or more.


-:













PresidentAtOfficialIn a ugurationOfAhbattoir


The Haitian American Meat andthe ser% ice of the people of Haiti.


GORDON DUVAL
making Inaugural speech.


The half a million dollar American
financed Meat-Packing Plant at Da-
miens that replaces the 57 year old
Municipal slaughterhouse at La Sa-
line was officially inaugurated MIon-
day morning with a dedication cere-
mony attended by the President of
the Republic and Madame Frair--is
Duvalier. -


Provision Compain an ienteipri
of Clinton T. Murchison of Dalla
Texas and two New York Inve:
ment Houses Allen and Compa
and Dancy Duval and Co. were
presented by Gordon Duval who c
lihered the inaugural speech t
text of which is reprinted here. 01
er speakers at the inauguration we
Ma.vor Philippe Charlier and Finm
ce and Agriculture Minister Gera
Philippeaux.
THE TEXT OF MR DUVAL'S
SPEECH
It is indeed an honour and a p
vilege for me to help introduce it
Haiti this new prnieet dedicated


Barbaqued imported Hot dogs, part of large reception put on for gue
attending official opening of the Meat-Packing plant. The new fact(
will make its own Hot dogs.


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se We have endeavored to make this
as, abattoir the most efficient, the most
st- modern and the most sanitary in
ny the whole Caribbean area The ori-
re- ginal plans were approved b.v offi-
le- cials of the United States Depart.
he ment of Agriculture. Its construction
th- is as fine as that of any plant of
ire its size in the United States. We
in- hope it will be a show place of
rd its kind in the Caribbean.
In addition to producing the best
meat ever processed in Haiti. we
expect to supply the market with
ri- such products as ham, bacon, frank-
nto furters. bologna. liver sausage. cor-
to ned beef. lard and other specialty
meats. These will be in every way
as good or better than the imported
products and. I am sure you will
be pleased to know, available at
lower prices.
We have been asked by Americ-
ans in Haiti and by Americans in
ie United States, "Why do you risk
vour money in Haiti? Surely you
can find a better place than Hairt
in vh. tch to invest your money and
time." You cai see before you our
reply to the question. Aft.:r careful
consideration we were agreed that
Haiti is the best place for our in-
vestment and we are fully confid-
ent that time and you fine people
are going to prove the correctness
of our decision.
First, let me say that most of the
i credit for the establishment of this
plant in Haiti belongs to .vour great
President, the Honourable Francois
.,ts, Duvalier. He gave us encourage-
ment from the beginning and it was
at His suggestion that Damien was
chosen as the site for the plant, tc
be near to the Agricultural College
Ht- has given generously of His val
able time to smooth our path t(
completion of the plant at the earth
est possible date. To President Du
valier I wish to express our grea
appreciation and to give Him ful
credit for making this plant poss
ible.
Next. I should like to give credit
to an outstanding group of Haitial
gentlemen who contributed their
skills to the completion of this tini
structure:
To Mr Felix Bayard, who so
successfully completed the con-
tracts for the foundation, the
land fill, the steel erection, the
root, the plastering, and the hot
water and steam systems.
a To Mr Rene Moravia for his
fine electrical work.
To Mr. Claude Romain for the
v.ater well.
To Mr. Charles Fequiere for
our beautiful water tank.
To Mr. Henri Dominique for
the plumbing.,installation.
Also deserving much credit ar
Mr. Charles Campbell and Mr Geoi
ge Satterlee, of our organization
S .vho have given so mjch of therr
.elves to make this project a sue(
ess.
Our thanks go also to the fin
job of construction engineering pei
formed by Mr. Lloyd Ponder. Hi
good humor, great engineering knom
ledge and untiring encouragement


were invaluable in the creation of
this plant.
The Precision Block Compainy und-
er the able management of Mr Vic-
tor Lampson supplied the blocks for
the walls and partitions.
I want also to take this opportu-
nity to express our appreciation for
the very friendly cooperation we
have received front Ambassador
Drew and his associates at the Unit-
ed States Embassy.
And last, though b.3 no means
least, much credit belongs to the
tine, lo.al workmen whose devotion
to their lobs. some of which htac
to be quickly learned. contributed
so importantly to the excellence of
our structure. The quality of their
labors is a tribute to the people of
Haiti.

There is one thing about this pro-
ject of which we are verve, proud.
The idea was conceived, plans
drawn, concession negotiated, cont-
racts let and the plant completed
without the payment of one solira.rv.
cent to anyone in the torn of pay-
nent for special fav-r- EV :-i, ,.id-i
lar spent on this plant %was irin mat-
erials and services rendered
Wlule there has beer, no pa.,-off
to any individual, there will lie a
pa.1-off to all the people of Haiti.
We expect to pa:, to all Haitians.
for the favors received, in the foitm
of:
1. A better mai ket in which the
farmers may sell their ainmi-
als. In time we expect tor
purchase every healthy anim.
mal offered for sale to us.
2. This better market which


should increase the cash in-
come of the farmers of Haiti.
3. Making available to the people
of Haiti a sanitary supply of
meat products from only. the
healthy .animals.
-1. Processed meats at lower
than present prices.
5. Increased taxes and foreign
exchange for the Government.
6. A gradually improved quality
of the meat. This will take
-some time as we must start
with the animals now avail-
able to us. As our feeding
program gets under way we
expect to improve the quality
of the meat.
We will introduce new ideas of
marketing and packaging and will
expand the ones which prove to be
acceptable and wdll discontinue the
ones not liked by the public.
We tull.\ recognize our obligation
to the people ot Haiti and will make
eery ,c effort to give the finest qual-
ity and service at lowest possible
prices consistent with the highest
p,..hle prices we can pay the farm-
er for lus alumals.
This plant was built at a cost of
L' eln $5o0(,0C0 and the aiuual purch-
ase of animals will exceed $2,000,000.
Upon my return to the United
States I Qhall take great pleasure
il teillin- my many b lesss friends
about Haiti as a place for American
investment. I shall tell them of the
opp.rtinities, .f (t'it pleasure of do-
ing bhi-.irne;s in Hain, of the friend.
unless of its people and of the co-
operatie attitude of your fine stable
l:)ertircnt urdef His Excellence
President Francois Duvalier.


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ISUNM "


PAGE 3


SUNDAY, JAN. 10TIH, 1960


H -I A TITT







SUNDAY, JAN. 10TH, 1960


Popularity of Haitian Art Growing in United States


In the last few years more and
more North Americans have been
decorating their homes or their mus-
eums with Haitian art pieces. Haiti-
an painting, as well as sculpture.
has gained great appeal in the Unit-
ed States and is growing more pop-
ular daily with the increase of tour-
ism to this Caribbean island.
Haitian painting has a long hist-
ory antidating its discovery by art
lovers abroad. This is evidenced in


the decoration of drums, the stip-
pling of center posts and the de-
piction of religious life over altars.
But the painters had to be brought
into the open, and a demand had to
be created for their works. This
demand was realized when the Cen-
tre d'Art in Port-au-Prince opened
its doors and began to offer primit-
ives for sale.
Haitian art gained recognition in
1943 under the director of the Cen-


At the opening of the recent showing in Washington, D.C. of 40 primit-
Ives by Haitian artists are (left to right): Mrs. Jason Seley; DeWitt
Peters, Director of the Centre d'Art, Port-au-Prince; and Jason Seley,
a student of Haitian Art. They are admiring the painting "Composition"
by Hector Hyppolite.

I I


tre d'Art, DeWitt Peters, who had
studied art in Europe and had taken
an English-teaching assignment in
Port-au-Prince. Seeing the need for
formal art instruction and deciding
that the filling of this need was
more important than his language
assignment, he took steps to establ-
ish an art center and resigned his
position as teacher of English in
order to search the country-side for
talent. He soon learned that the
Haitian hills were dotted with po-
tential untaught artists. Within a
few years he had discovered 'and
attracted to the Center Hector Hyp-
polite, Philome Obin, Rigaud Be-
noit, and others now well-known.
In their canvases, Peters detected
a rare freshness of vision and an
intensity of feeling that later attract-
ed international recognition.
At about'the same time the Cen-
ltre opened in Haiti, the Museum of
Modern Art in New York City ac-
quired its first Haitian primitive
painting when it began its Latin
American collection.
The success of the Centre's paint-
ers led to a suggestion that they
paint the murals for the Episcopal
Church in Port-au-Prince, then' und-
er the direction of Bishop Alfred
Voegeli, who had just left the Unit-
ed States for his new missionary
post. The Bishop consented inmme-
diately, urging the artists to paint
the religious subjects in terms
meaningful to themselves. He be-
lieved undeviatingly in their ability
ahd talent.
Nine artists were assigned to the
project. Seven of them were primit-
ive painters, self-taught. When the
murals, were finished, they were
very original very Haitian, and
none, of them vaguely resembled
religious paintings of the past. It
wvas a revival of Christian art that
made fellow Haitians feel a natural
kinship with the Bible scenes paint-
ed in familiar, everyday terms.
In contrast to the followers of the
primitive painting movement in
Haiti is the group of non-primitives
who separated themselves in 1950
from the Centre in an effort to go
beyond the movement of popular
painting, or primitivism. These art-
ists referring to themselves as "the
advanced, or modern painters." for-
med the Foyer des Arts Plastiques
and now have a gallery on the out-
skirts of Port-au-Prince. Many
American tourists purch-
ase works of such modern
artists as Roland Dorcely, Lu-
ce Turnier, Luckner Lazard, Max
Pinchinat, Lucien Price and others.
Some of these artists have been to
Europe to study and show Europe-
an influence in their works.
The two artistic movements in
Haiti -the primitive, working with
traditional and folklore themes ex-
pressed in religious and festive
terms, and the modern, employing
progressive techniques- are equally
popular in the United States.
Haitian art as a national cultural
phenomenon was first shown in .the
United States in 1947 at the Whyte
Book Shop in Washington, D.C. The
following year Selden Rodman. art-
its and authority on Haiti. wrote a
book, Renaissance in Haiti, calling
attention to artistic movements in
the island. In the same year, the
San Francisco Art Museum exhibit-
ed a large collection of Haitian pri-
mitives, while the Pan American
Union in Washington. D.C. present-
ed a group of Haitian modern paint-
ngs.
Among the promoters of Haitian
art in the United States are Selden
Rodman, James Whyte, Jason Se-
ey, the Reverend William Chase,
and Mr. and Mrs. Vergniaud Pierre-
Noel.
Mr Rodman, author, and art crit-


ic, initiated the mural painting mov-
ement in Haiti, and directed the
great series of paintings in the Cath-
edral of St. T.rinite in Port-au-Prin-
ce. He also inatigurated the Haitian
Art Center of New York.in 1948.
James Whyte, art collector, has
one of the finest collections of Hai-
tian art in the United States. He
resides in Washington, D.C.

Jason Seley, American represent-
ative for Haitian primitive paintings
in the United States, has a large
private collection of Haitian art pie-
ces in his home in New York.
The Reverend William Chase of
the Episcopal Church in New York
Assisted in the project of bringing
together an exhibition of Haitian
primitive painting in New York in
1957. At this showing, hundreds of
paintings were sold.
In Washington, D.C.. Mr and Mrs
Vergniaud Pierre-Noel. both artists,
have accumulated a large number
of paintings and sculptural pieces.
Mr Pierre-Noel himself is a former
Haitian artist. Mrs Pierre-Noel did
a series of paintings on colorful
Haitian scenes and panoramas,
which she exhibited five years ago
at the Pan American Union in Wash-


ington, D.C. She was awarded the
"Decoration and Diplome de l'Or-
dre National, Honneur et Merite"
by the Haitian Government.
I i addition to the private collect-
ions of Haitian art in the United
States, many art galleries and art
'museums are expanding their Haiti-
an collections of paintings Thd sculp.
tures. Only recently the Janet Ness-
ler Gallery in New York City ex-
hibited a large selection of both
Haitian primitives and modern
paintings and sculptures. The Mu-
seum of Modem Art in New York
owns a painting by Roland Dorcely;
the Museum of Primitive Art in
New York City also possesses sever-
al 'works by Haitian artists. Fam-
ous Galleries like the Corcoran and
the Phillips b6th in Washington, D.
C.. have featured the works of
Haitians.
U.S. magazines including Life,
Vogue, Time, Newsweek, Holiday,
Harper's Bazaar, have contributed
to the popularity of Haitian art with
interesting articles by art critics.
Haiti, today, is in a "ferment of
art." A talent unexplored two dec-
ades ago now promises to become
one, of the leading exports of this
Caribbean country.


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"
t I A I T I SUN "


PAGE 4t







SUNDAY, JAN. 10TH, 1960


"
HAITI SUN "


CARNIVAL IS BUSINESS AS WELL
AS PLEASURE
Next month will be given over to the pageantry, color
and revelry that transform Port-au-iPrince and attract thous-
ands of visitors to Haiti every year at Carnival time.

The original individual costumes, genuine joyousness and
spontaneous participation of the eighty-odd Mardi Gras
bands and the population in general will ensure the unique
quality that distinguishes the Haitian 'Carnival.

People from asil walks of life will meet on equal footing
during the three days preceding Ash Wednesday, dancing,
masked and 'painted, through the streets in the wake of
throbbing drums, vaxines and other traditional instruments.
But the Carnival -will fall flat if there is no more than
this. Floats 'are needed to set the scene for the dancers, to
add the pageantry and grandeur that will offset 'the aban-
doned gaiety of the dancers.

Commercial firms, every year, find these floats are among
the most effective advertising media.

Besides the tourists who flock to 'see the !Carnival from all
over the world, there will be local sightseers rodm the mount-
ains and the suburbs upon whose memories the vivid floats
and the giant letters inscribed on 'them will be indelibly im-
printed.

Moving picture photographers, professional still-photogra-
phers, as well as thousands of amateurs will be recording
the three days of fantasy to show them far and near long1
after the floats are dismantled.

The businessmen who would affairee 'pas bon" should be
reminded that the Carnival is big business as we'll as a time
for meri"ment.
Not only is there great publicity involved for shrewd
"conmmercants" tbut there is also the increased sales to be
considered. The purchasing popuIaJtion in Port-au-Prince is


Dear Mr Editor:
Writer Selden Rodman suggestion
for a Haitian Art Museum is sani
and sensible. I believe after reading
an article in 3our paper about E
visit to his private home 'in th(
States that he has perhaps one o
the finest of all Haitian Art collect
ions. Nobody has probably sense
it but I feel that Mr Rodman ma,
want to begin this Museum by don
eating some of the priceless work
he has in his collection. Rodma
has done much for Haiti and
think he should be contact
through the right channels and give
the chance to lay the first stone o
a museum that may become on
of our most famous shrines.
Another suggestion is for wha
it is worth in the event such a mus
eum does become a reality the
proper legislation should insure tha
no official as in the past pillage
it for his own private collection.
With the hope you will give spac
to these points
I remain Is) Art Minded.


swelled during Mardi Gras 'by 'thousands of foreign visitors r A f -
and the inhabitants of our own distant villages, who, sa'tur- LES PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUES
a'ted 'by the atmosphere of care-free abandon, will part with HAI TI ENNES
their money a lot more willingly than ordinarily. H IC OUlnPa

Tourists interests. too, must accept this Carnival as their PLAGE GEFFRARID _
responsibility. 'We hope that we shall 'see the 24 hotels each
represented this year as weUll as the gift shops and tour MODERN CC
agents.
They will be acting only in their own interest if they help jH i El t I
the 'holiday to becomfie a big, booming success. | I t

_______ IIN TUR

IDIOTIC ACT SEEN BY THOUSANDS A Distingu
DRINKING CHICKENS BLOOD .AT Convenien
TOURIST VOODOO DISGUSTS VISITORS
-- "All Air Condition
Louis Clifford City Editor of the Cleverland Press published Mto enter- New Pool T
training full page illustrated articles on Haiti this past week as a result
of a vacation here at the Montana. Both articles carry a Powerful tourist Air Conditionned
plug for Haiti and on (Reprinted, on page 12). points up a distasteful
very unvoodoo like practise that has been going on ever night -In
the week for many months: wringlIng the head off a chicken and drinking
its blood straight from the neck. FROM 5:30' Al
Sympathetic writer Clifford trying not to offend Haiti or upset his
readers placed the brief description of the man drinking blood obscurely S U N DA Y
* stating "IT isn't pretty" and- to spare those who do not wish to read FROM 12:00
the description it is written so that only those who really want to know F1 0
can read. ,

This ridiculous part of an otherwise passable voodoo show put on for F
tourist at Coq d'Or in the Palmiste section of the Exposition and other
similar tourist-voodoo shows around the city should be visited by an TO THE RYTI
Inspector of the Tourist Office who could advise the showmen on the MAKE RESEj
unfitness of such acts for tourist consumption. ,1


In Cap-Haitien
By Our Correspondent
After a three-month training course, nany matrons -some men among
them!- received a certificate of qualification plus an obstetrician case
at ceremonies performed, on December 21, at Trou-du-Nord. Limonade
and Quartier-Morin.
The trading course of midwives is part of Pote-Cole's program to
improve rural life and specially birth conditions in the North.
At Trou-du-Nord, the ceremony took place at health Center "Ambroise
Holly" where Major Robert Bazile. Coordinator of HADO, delivered a
n speech. He underlined the meaning of the courses and the important
e cooperation of Miss Annie Louishomme, in charge of the program, ass-
g isted by Misses Paulette Debrosse, Claire Martineau and Mrs Louis
a T. Etienne. Drs Georges Nicolas and Perard received also their part
e
f of praises for their perfect collaboration.
Beside the diploma, special gift packages were offered to the laure-
ates for their conscious work and assidwuty during the three months.
n- These rewards went to: Mrs Sylvia Dorsainvil and Dorcella Aristide,
s of Trou-du-Nord, Mrs Mericette Dieudonne and Clercine Felix, of Lmno-
n nade, and Mrs Antoine Simon, Quartier-Morin.
I Cap-Haitien has a new town Council since Wednesday Dec. 23rd. Mr
n Ludovic (Dodo) Vincent replaces Mr Hermann (Loulou) Leveille as Pre-
)f sident. The assessors are MM Edouard Bastien and Leon Jean.
e At Customs Office, assistant-director Morton Dietz has been dismissed.
"Telediol" said that Marc Chauvel, former Haytian Consul in Dajabon
it (R.D.) will be named.
s- Accompanied by wealthy businessman Jean Luciani, U.S. Navy Rear
n Admiral John Henry Shultz (retired) paid a short visit to Cap-Haitien.
it
He enjoyed his two-days stay in the North, visited Sans-Souci at Milot,
many tourist sites and the hotels; he had also interesting talks with
important people. Rear Admiral Shuitz who stayed at Mont-Joli Hotel
,e is reported a staff member of an American airline corporation.
Albert C. Slaughter, head of Pote-Cole flew to the States last week
on business cum pleasure trip. He %will come back soon with his new wife.
wife.
John MNacNamara, Business Manager of the same Organization will
fly to-morrow just on vacation.
Pote-Cole ended the year ,ith two big receperions. One at Haut-du-Cap,
on Friday 18th and the other at Milot, Tuesday 22nd.
Bosses. employees, friends and guests attended the parties.
NM Theodore S. Arthur, Attache Citrurel of American Embassy, gave
a cocktail-party at Hostellerie du Roy Christophe on Tuesday Dec. 29th.
From 12:30 to 2:00 p.m. Mr Arthur played host to his guests.
Writer Selden Rodman stayed m Cap-Haitien, at Hostellerie du Roy
Chuistophe. looking for another "renaissance" in Haiti.
Four cruiseships called at Cap into six days; it's a valuable record.
From Dec. 26 to 31, STELLA POLARIS. ITALIA, and BERLIN were re-
ceived by .Chnstophe's Citadel Tours of Raymond Jean-Pierre and ARI-
ADNE by Cap Haitien Travel Service of Leopold Sanchez.
Z Police cleaned the streets and no beggars could be seen in town. Vi-
sitors were quite satisfied.
Businessmen, industrials, exporters and individuals are still complain-
ing about irregularity of post-office. Letters and packages arrived after
perceptible delay: ten days from "la Capitale" to Cap-Haitien... by air
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PAGE 5


-I-
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a A Z-x A X x Qp 1%.j I









PAUL A _I_"SNAY A.19- -6-


CanaC
By FULGENCE CHARPENTIER
Charge d'Affaires, a.i.,
Port-au-Prince.
Haiti, in the middle of the Carib-
bean, occupies half of an important
island discovered by Columbus dur-
ing his first voyage to America.
Under French rule until 1804 and
later destined to become the first
Negro republic in the New World,
it soon acquired a deserved reput-
ation in Europe as a producer of
sugar and coffee. Its economy still
depends greatly on these two pro-
ducts, and agriculture, contributing
97 per cent of the total exports,
plays a preponderant part in the
daily life of Haiti's four million in-
habitants. Industrialization is still
arely ten years old but in certain
spheres it shows healthy signs of
maturity.
Haiti's industry can be divided
roughly into two categories: one,
goods used in production (for ex-
ample, Ciment d'Haiti producing ce-
ment, plaster, etc.) and two, com-
modities (for example. Madsen Tex-
tiles,that turns out cotton goods, ed-
Sible oils, lard, soap: Caribbean
1Mills: flour (from imported wheat):
Haiti Metals: kitchenware, tools;
Canadian Caribbean Chemicals Com-
. pany: pharmaceutical products; In-
dustries Nationales: plastic goods).
Handicraft, mainly mahogany wood-
carvings, bowls and ironwork, is ex-
ported extensively by 710 handicraft
.workshops in Port-au-Prince and 507
in the provinces.
One of the big developments in
progress in Haiti is the Artibonite
S p Valley project. Through the Deve-
lopment \Loan Fund the U.S. Gov-
eminent recently granted a loan of
$4.3 million for the irrigation of some
83,000 acres of land in the Artibon-
ite Valley. To date, $31 million has
been spent on this undertaking. ini-
nIated in 1953. It is a project of
multiple aspects iTigation, drain-
age, flood control and power deve-
lopment. Among the works already
completed is Peligre Dam. 63 met-
.* res high and 322 metres long, built
-. to accommodate three generators of
40,000 kw. capacity, 12 irrigation
outlets, and irrigation ducts.

With the $1.3 million loan. the
agricultural aspect of the Artibonite
Valley project enters its final phase.
Some 30,000 .additional acres of atr-
able land will be opened for the
planting of rice, bananas, sugar
cane, cotton, corn, millet, etc. The
rice harvest, which now totals 150
million pounds a year, will be doub-
led, as will output of other food
crops.
The project includes the harness-
ing of the Peligre Dam, including
transmission lines and distribution
centres, but this part of the project
(tobcost about $20 million) is still
awaiting financing.


LE CENTRE D'ART
Founded 1944
Exclusive agents:
Alix, Amiama, Armand, Bazile,
Benoit, Bigaud, Blanchard, Desro-
siers, Domond, Duffaut, Hyppolite,
Joseph, Leontus, Leveque, Liaulaud,
Mootas, Normil, Obin, Pierre, St.
Brice, Stephane, Turnier, Vital,
many others.
17 Rue de la Revolution
From Pan American
hi town one block toward
bay, half block to left.
Open Monday through
Saturday
9-1 3-6 Phone 2055


ia Looks A f Haiti's


FOREIGN TRADE
Haiti's foreign trade depends very
largely on coffee, which provides
usually 70 per cent of her exports
and brings in 14 per cent of the na-
tional income. Coffee plantations co-
ver more than 120 thousand hectares
1300 thousand acres and production
averages 600 pounds per hectare.
The annual crop thus totals about
72 millions pounds, of which Haiti-
ans themselves consume about 18
million. Last year 547,059 bags Q120
pounds each were exported, partly
from the previous crop, and earned
$29.1 milhon. The coming coffee
crop is estimated at 650 thousand
bags.
Haiti has ratified the Latin Amer-
ican Coffee Agreement already ap-
proved by 15 Latin American coffee-
producing countries. Under this,
each member country must reduce
its export quota by 10 per cent, tak-
ing as the basis the best year of the
last ten. It is expected that this
agreement will even up offer and
demand at about -10 million bags
for the crop season starting October
1. Coffee is piling up in the coffee-
producing countries and world pric-
es have sagged. The variety prod-
uced in Haiti a non-bitter type -I
has commanded rather stable prices.
Sisal ranks second in Haiti's ex-
port trade, and production reaches
72 million pounds a year. The Pha-
eton and Derac organization annu-
I


ally produces 800 thousand tous of
machine-worked sisal taken from
the 7,500 hectares of Plantation Dau-
phin, and supplies more tran 80 per
cent of Haitian sisal exports. Other
plantations of lesser importance are
managed by the Farm and Indus-
trial Loan Institute. The increase
Ui the number of tourists who want
things to buy has popularized the
matting and weaving of fibres into
hats, baskets, purses, shoes and
cai pets.
Total production of sugar ranges
between 60 and 65.000 tons, 50 per
cent of which h is consumed locally.
Plantations cover 25 per cent of the
land area and more than one-third
of the population gets its living from
the cane. Hasco. a U.S. Haitian com-
pany. processes from 500 to 600
thousand tons of -cane every year.
producing from 50 to 60,000 tons oif
sugar. There are two other sugar
mills one in the north producing
1,600 tons per year and the other.
in Les Cayes, with a capacity of
10.000 tons but an average output of
3.200 tons or under. Another sugar
mill was under construction at Welch
near Cape Haitien but money ran
out before it was completed. The
Development Loan Fund announced
in Washington on September 23 that
it was willing to supply $3 million
for this undertaking. There is cer-
tainly room for expansion in this
field; as Haiti has never supplied


its quota under the
ent and internal c
risen materially wi
pulation.
Cocoa, cotton and
constitute only 3 pe
trade. Cocoa plant
4,700 hectares but cc
acreage could be u
chocolate-making pl
The average crop
$1.3 million a year.
MINING PROGRESS
A 'U.S. company
have found oil in t
tricts of Ganthier, F
Sac, and Marfranc
Anse. El Nacional
cently stated that
oil in St Marc Can
at Maracaibo. Two
riles, Reynolds (U.S
IHalliwell of Toron
ing bauxite and coi

TRADE WITH CAN
Haiti buys about


Economy.
Sugar Agreem- her imports from the United States; -
consumption has Canada comes second as a source,
th increasing po- but furnishes only 5.53 per cent. Last
year, Canadian exports to Haiti tot-
bananas together alled $2,197,000 compared with -$2,-
er cent of export 241,000 in 1957. Figuring largely in
itions cover only these exports were wheat flour
considerably more t$653,000), salt cod, ($252,000), her-
ised especially if ring bloaters ($300,000) pickled ale-
ants were set up. wives (210,0001 and tires ($110,000).
value is about A fairly wide variety of other prod-
ucts is sold, some in small amounts.
SSES These include ply-wood and plastic"
is reported to raw materials.
the farming dis- Canada's purchases from Haiti
Plaine du Cul-de- fell to $1,080,000 in 1958 from the
in the Grande $1,494,000 of 1957. Coffee and. sisal
of Caracas re- fibre continue to be our main im-
there was more ports, though we also buy essential
ial than there is oils and handicrafts.
foreign compa- There is no doubt that with the
.) and SEDREN good coffee crop expected this year,
itoi are extract- and given political stability and out-
pper. side financial help, Haiti constitutes
a promising market for competitive-
ADA ly-priced manufactured goods.
62.2 per cent of FOREIGN TRADE


Caribbean Construction Co. S A.

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SUNDAY, JAN. 10TH, 1960


"'HAITI SUN"


HERTZ CAR RENTAL NOW UNDER MA NAGEMENT C


By Our Tourist Writer
Proprietor of the Hertz car agen-
cies in Venezuela, Panama and
Haiti Arthur Borden announced this
week that he and his wife Donita
had appointed Auto S.A. their agents
in Haiti.
The Borden's in making the ann-
-ouncement that henceforth Hertz
Rent-a-Car will be under the ebull-
ient management of Jean Bolte pro-
gressive director of Auto S.A. point-
.ed out highlights of the 1960 Herz
Rental program.

One of the appealing idea Mr.
Bolte has, according to the Bord-
.ens is that the deliver of cars to
hotel or pension the tourist is visit-
ing. On departure the tourist has
only to drive to pier or airport,
leave the car and board his ship
or plane. No time wasted, no last
minute nuisance of stowing the lug-
gage, driving into Grand Rue's mid-
day traffic to the Hertz office at
Auto S.A. next to All-America Cab-


les, unstowing the luggage, restoring
it in another vehicle and dnming in
a last minute frenzy of perspiration
and dust to one's ship or plane.
Mr Bolte is also planning to work
out tnps for his customers, supply-
ing them with marked maps as they
set forth. This should be a particul-
ar blessing to first time visitors,
bowled over as they so often are
by the hub-bub, uproar and confu-
sion of Port-au-Prince. With his as-
sistance, they will learn, for ex-
ample, that a trip to Robert Baus-
san's new Cacique Island resort, can
also include a visit to the Agricul-
tural Center at Damiens. to the Bar-
bancourt distillery, to the workshop
of Haiti's famous iron sculptor,
Liautaud or to all three. Or he
will plan a Cap Haitian trip to in-
clude a comfortable night's stop ov-
er at Kyona.

In appointing Jean Bolte and Au-
to S.A. to the managership of Hertz,
Arthur Borden has again demonst-


rated his business acumen. Auto S.
A. with its garage. not to mention
its dealership of Morrises and MGs,
is in a perfect position to keep the
Hertz fleet beautifully serviced and
up to snuff at all times. Cars will
be replaced the minute they show
the slightest sign of wear and tear.
Hertz clients will have their choice
of more than one type of car.
Hertz world wide services will be
available to any one renting Hertz
cars in Port-au-Prince. This will of
course include credit faciites as
well as making advance Hertz res-
ervations for the visitor's next port
of call wherever it may be.
Jean Bolte, McGill University gra-
duate, speaks a perfect English. His
Hertz staff also speaks English.
American tourists will have no
trouble making their wishes under-
stood. Jean also speaks .panish
which should greatly simplify life
for many Latin American friends
who visit here.
Arthur and Donita Borden who are


..-or,,AGE
-" ~ ~ ~ ~ w.- .f p ,., ----


n O S aro oou have range tOO

'ly this year. Do re' usually plenty
--t short on water sup ation or shing? t it where it belongsI
Are you caug Want a pond for e probe is to Tractor.
Srom water?- r -bo,,l Trea t -|od
foa hr Calls ereab1 if you have a Cat a ter i and PTanc .
of watace te really t c. e ate. Clear Out for water control
That's where Co -es to control the w.a. ds, ditches, for
udoze n r scrub. Build stockU p e when ou own Diesel Trac-
stealng brush tnac r that e ti3me when You nd in dry falls, you
and storage. your spa sy all year earond- backed groud-
ca p ow all this i w t r Cta it on the hardypackedrou
tou caIs the tractor th e e tractors spin o in winter. .. uYou to
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an plow or su low where w tors refuse to go. -tore. We'll gladly
in we springs rads where wheel at our s
the feed lots. an or s best in eve
see the tractor that wor btijn e
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SCity State -


Your. CAE LAA*Dealer


I
I
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)F JEAN BOLTE SERIES OF LECTURES ON


3F JEAN BOLTE SERIES OF LECTURES ON
MARXISM AND COMMUNISM
BEGIN AT LAW SCHOOL TOD.
well remembered from the several Professor Leon Dion of the Soc
years they spent here aboard their Science Faculty of the Catholic U
Yacht, FULL SWING fI. The Bord- versity Quebec, Canada opens a s
ens, can be counted on, to send us ies of twelve lectures on Marxi
a steady stream of tourists They and Communism ten today in
ought to be able to what with Ar- Salle Des Pas Perdus of the L
thur's many years as President of Faculty under the University rec
Borden Mills, one of the biggest tex- Dr Clovis Kernisan.
tile mills in the U.S., Donita's con-
nections as a writer and photograph- Professor Dion Mill continue
er and both of their acquaintance series Wednesday. Saturday
with the yachting set throughout the Friday at 8pm in the Cercle d
world. Etudiants 7 Ruelle Roy.

SCHEDULE OF NIGHT CLUB SHOWS
IN AND AROUND PORT-AU-PRINCE
AND PETIONVILLE


MONDAY.-
Oloffson Hotel
Casino

TUESDAY.-
Beau-Rivage Hotel (Pipistrello
Night Club)
Ibo Lele Hotel IShango room)
Casino
Riviera Hotel

WEDNESDAY.-
Bacoulou Night Club
Casino

THURSDAY.-
Beau-Rivage Hotel tPipistrello
Casino
Riviera Hotel

FRIDAY.-
Montana Hotel
fbo Lele Hotel 1Shango room
Casino

SATURDAY.-
El Rancho iLa Ronde night club
Cabane Choucoune
International Country Club
(Guede Niboi
Casino
Riviera Hotel
SUNDAY.-
Bacoulou Night Club
Casino


AY
cial
Jni-
er-
sm
the
aw
tor


his
and
des


- 10:00 p.m. Show
- 12:00 p.m. -


- 11:00 p.m. -

- 11:00 p.m. -
- 12:00 p.m. -
- 12:00 p.m. -


- 11:00 p.m -
- 12:00 p.m. -


- 11:00 p.m. -
- 12:00 p.m. -
- 12:00 p.m. -


- 10:00 p.m. -
- 11:00 p.m. -
- 12:00 p.m. -


- 11:00 p.m. -
- 11:30 p.m. -

- 11:30 p.m. -
- 12 00 p.m. -
- 12:00 p.m. -

- 11:00 pr. -
- 12:00 p.m. -


MARIE-JEANNE

AIR-CONDITIONED

.- STRAW-GOODS FACTORY

134, Rue du Centre
PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

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JOHNNIE WALKER
Born J P20 -Stil going strong
PREZANAGROLDSTIUO


PAGE 7


K ..


PREETZMAN-AGGERI-fOLM, DISTRIBUTOR


rh









.H T S"ADYJ .0,U


PAGE 8


CHANT D'APOTHEOSE
POUR LA REINE MONDIALE DU SUCRE
By ULYSSE PIERRE-LOUIS
Dans nos coeurs resonne come des grelots
Ton nom de clair-de-lune, de fievre, de bonheur iTre
Ton nom de caimitte, de pomme-cannelle, de piment
Ton nom de Tam-tam, de lambi
Ton nom d'ombre el de soleil
STon nom de canne-a-sucre
Ton nbm a I'allure d'une danse Pethro
Ton nom de mer, ton nom d'ile
Ton nom de cyclone, de tremblement de terre
Ton nom d'epopee, ton nom d'idylle
Ton nom petri de tout le mystere, de tous les sortileges
(des miles,
Olaudinette Fouchard
Beaute vegetable couronnee a -Cali,
Les pulsations trepidantes de ton sang
Sont a la measure des rythmes omnipresents, indomptes,
Totalitaires des tambourss empiles sous ta peau",
Ta peau de cafe au lait pure, si pure sous les projecteurs
(de Cali,
Claudinette Fouchard
Notre Reine, beaute vegetable couronnee a Cali,
Tes yeux au magnetisme de reptile acclimatent
La langueur et la nostalgic de nos nuits,
Nous t'intronisons et imprimons dans nos coueurs en
(lettres capitals
Ton nom, Claudinette Fouchard,
Reine Mondiale du Sucre,
Ton nom de meringue, de danse Pethro
Qui eclata le 2 Janvier a Cali
Et annonca an monde une nouvelle measure de la Beaute.
Vraiment, Haiti n'aura pas fini de les etonner
Par sa plasticite! Et, grace a toi,
Claudinette Fouchard,
A tes hanches chaloupantes,
A ton sourire de Terre Promise.,
Dams toutes les langues sera change
Le nom de sucre
Le nom de solely
Le nom de cafe
Le nom de rythmes
d'Haiti.
Nos coeurs ouverts a deux battants
T'aceueillent, Claudinette Fouchard,
Beaute vegetable, notre Totem, Notre Gloire, Notre Ouonga.


I


The Government of September 22
must be able to secrete an economic
system capable of offering and of
giving generalized well-being. -"We
have chosen the national effort in
patient action and the sacrifices to
be made in order for us to save our-
selves."
Setting out with this doctrine, my
faith inspired from the sublime ac-
tions of the Ancestor, each day dict-
ates to mie that My People can
from "every dark night" make. "ra-
diant mornings of sunshine." Con-
vinced of meeting, in this manner.
with the thought of the Alan of Cor-
miers, I will hold on to it until I
shall have integrally accomplished
the historic mission which God and
destiny have conferred upon me.

And my faith sustained by my
People convinced me before and
convinces me still that the new de-
mocratic society must offer to the
people all the possibilities of fully
edifying and 'of controlling its des-
tiny; if it convinces me of the per-
tinent reasons for pursuing in peace
and discipline for it, under authority
founded upon the respect and dignity
due to the human person for me as
moral policy; if it convinces me of
pursuing the social and economic
depths which will redefine the fut-
ure relations of the Haitian Man andq
with all men, brothers on the earth:?
if finally it convinces me of polar-
izing the general action of My Gov-
ernment with the informed sense of
responsibility, of efforts and sacri-
fices towards an amplification of
the Faith of the Nation itself in
the grand lines of life in common:
it means that the time has come
where Together, we must hold our
hands with all our being, with all
our minds towards the altitudes of
courage quivering on the knees of
the tutlary gods of the Fatherland.
I would like to greet 1960, .the


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DANCING IN A REAL EXCITING ATMOSPHERE
THE GREATEST SHOW ON THE ISLAND!


year of national economic salvation, in the profound peace and dynamic
the year of great duties to fulfil in security for a social resurrection.
common in the order which makes Dr. FRANCOIS DUVALIERT
the strength and dignity of peoples. PRESIDENT OF THE ,REPUBLIC


"A rmande



PARIS ..-PORT.RU.PRjNCE




a

S.rue de's CaOiPnos
PHONE.


Text Of President..
(Continued from page 2)


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"
HAITI SUN "






- SUNDAY,


JAN. 10TH, 1960


"HAITI


Do Your

SA .4- *L. r "

Shopping
-in Haiti


It is getting so that people are
taking vacations as much to
shop as to play golf, lounge in
the sun or just relax. And, no
wonder when you consider the
savings to be had through Free
Port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they can
bluy the same gifts, in free-port
shops, at savings up to 60% of
U. S. prices. So, for the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
wonderful vacation in Haiti;
Perhaps the most famous free-
port shop in the world is La
Belle Creole, located in the
heart of fascinating Port-au-
Prince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable wonderland
full of the world's most de-
sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
ches, Cashmeres, Handmade
bags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
meras, Liquours and a seem-
ingly endless array of native
handicraft make- La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
sider that one can buy the
world's most famous Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
guet-at discounts of 50% of
the U. S. advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
Belle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be" well worth your time to
consider a trip to Haiti.

Al Noustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhaps another reason for
the surge in popularity of
free-port shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
licy of cooperating with tra-
vel agents in their various
promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tle of free champagne to any
visitor to Haiti who happens
to be celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niversary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts to make
the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
mous brand merchandise.
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
sands of tourists this year will
come home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
when they went away.


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SUN"


PAGE 9


MW ldr,


joz. ^9 do.


A -A Al -8


rm





"HAITI SUN" : SUNDAY, JAN. 10TH, 1960


PAGEi10 10


UNDAY; JAN. 10TJ,- 1960


"HAITI .SUN" PAGE


By CHESTER BOWLES
In The New York Times.
Most of Latin America is in a per
iod of -profound social, political and
economic change. In the present de-
cade this ferment has led to rev-
olutions in Bolivia, Argentina, Col.
ombia, Haiti, Venezuela and Cuba,
while rumblings elsewhere suggest
* more changes to come.
Nationalist leaders, most of them
strongly anti-Commpnist, are out to
end the poverty, illiteracy, perpetual
indebtedness and fear which for gen-
erations have prevented all but a
small minority from participating in
the sound growth of their countries.
Inevitably, one of their principal
weapons will be land reform to en-
able most farm families to own their
own land.
Inevitably, too, L a t i n-American
Communists will increase their'eff-
orts to associate themselves with
the movement. The Communist ver-
sion of land reform is only a first
step toward a system of collectiviz-
ation that makes every peasant a
captive of the state. Yet it has a
powerful appeal for naive, landless
peasants who see in it only the pro-
mise of freedom.

Whether history will record Cub-
a's Fidel Castro as an earnest pat-
riot or as a fellow-traveling adven-
turer is anyone's guess. But one
fact is already clear. His land re-
form program -limiting all hold-
ings to 1,000 acres and all purch-
ases to Cuban citizens- is indubit-
ably in line with Latin-American
sentiment.
Many North American political


and business leaders, appr
about their investments in
under attack, have rushe
I nounce all land confiscati
Communist technique. Thb
. look the powerful underlyin
- The sharp conflict between
actions and those of Latin
t anstreflects a gap of under
which may lead to new cr
our vitally important neig
the south. What are the ii
evolved? And what is the
of solving them by de
means?
The social structures of n
in-American countries and
justices which grow out of
back to the original conqu
settlements. The Spaniards
tuguese who seized control
sixteenth to eighteenth
brought with them their fe
stitutions. When colonial dt
broken in the early nine-teer
ury, the dominant role of t
landholders was left most]
alleged.
Today 1.5 per cent of the
those with 15,000 or mor
each, own half of all agr
land in Latin America. In V
3 per cent own nine-teenths
heavy proportion of all Lat
ricans are impoverished ten
mers, deeply in debit to the
lords.
If this antiquated rural
produced- an adequate su
food and fiber at reasonable
the social and economic., i
would be less apparent. I
cause much of the land is s
for cash crops such as cof


people,
re acres
bicultural
enezuela
of it. A
in Ame-
nant far-
eir land-

system
pply of
prices,
justices
Yet, be-
et aside
fee and


Life Problems was held in Santiago, Each country presents its .own type
Chile. The conference concluded of challenge. In. many of the rep-
that the.establishment of small, in- ublics, millions of acres of land
dependently owned farms was the are owned by state or federal gov-
key to the freedom, stability and ernments and, by and large, lie
progress of Latin America and of idle. To distribute some of this land
most of the underdeveloped world. to peasants -and, at the same time,
,All men have a right to live lives provide such fundamental aiq as
worthy of human beings," the chart- rural credit, seeds, tools and ad-
er adopted by the congress said. vice- may be the best method of
"God does not will that some shall land reform.
enjoy extravagant riches while oth-
ers n lack even the barest ne- There is no doubt, though,' that
cessities." sweeping changes in Latin-American
The charter wisely observed that land-tenure systems are inevitable.


ican staples as corn and beans.
Since then, the Mexican Govern- .
ment, with American private and
public assistance, has taken steps
to correct these weaknesses, and
production is now mounting steadily.
In" Venezuela, President Roriulo
Betancourt last July submitted to
his Congress a bill vigorously tack-
ling the problem of. the country's
out-moded agrarian structure. Pro-
fiting from such experiences as
Mexico's, the Venezuelan program
provides for liberal Government cre-
dit for equipment, seeds and Jertil-


a tin Am erica


PAGI 10 "


Cry For Land

The redistribution of Land to those who till it is essential-to' stability t
rehensive sugar, which benefit only the few, the necessary changes-in -the .old Only one question remains to be j,
a system and because farming methods,are pattern of society cannot be ach- answered:. How will these changes j
d to de- largely outdated, most Latin,Amer- ielved merely by exhortation. "A come? *By bloody revolution or by -
on as a icans continue to suffer diet defi- certain measure of intervention by, long-range democratic planning? Let.
e y over- ciencies. Meanwhile, a 2 and one a the state j~ necessary." us look at the lessons of some past .
ig forces half per cent annual population -Throughout Latin -America, -gen- experience:. "
their re- growth rate --among the highest uinely liberal, democratic elements In Mexico, Wbdtween 1916 and 1934, J
Americ- in the world- exerts increasing recognize that a change in the land- approximately- 25;,000,000:a c r e s of -
rstanding pressure on the lagging food sup- tenure system is indispensable for feudal landd were-expropriated and
crisis with ply. the peace and' stability of the reg-. assigned-, to peasants. More than..
hbors to ion. Yet the land-bwning classes ali 900,000 -peons received their own V.
issues in- With the strong winds of social, pear uriable to understand their own small farms in'this opening phase
prospect political and economic reform blow- profound stake in helping the peas- of the systeri. Uiler President Car,.
mocratic ing across every continent, and with ants work out peaceful transitions denas,- who took office in 1934, an:
the Communists advertising their by democratic means. additional 50,000,000 acres were ex-
nost Lat- special short-cuts to an economic Since land is traditionally a- symB propriated and reassigned to 8,000,-
the in- millennium, the -situation in Latin ol of -power and prestige, the land- 000 landless..
them go America is explosive and likely to owner clings to it stubbornly. The Some of the weaknesses in the -J
ests and become more so. excesses of the Mexican revolution early phases of Mexico's agrarian
and Por- Fortunately, anti-Communist voic- a generation or two ago, and the reform subsequently became appar- '
I in the es are increasingly speaking out in even more terrifying lessons of the ent. The new landholding Indian, for..
centuries favor of democratic land reform Russian and Chinese revolutions ap- all his will to -work, found himself
eudal in- that assures full, permanent owner- pear to have "been lost on them. '- without good seeds, farm animals
jes were ship of the land to those who till it. Latin-American lan d specialists' and tools. He had nowhere to turn -
nth cent- Among the .most important is the emphasize that confiscation or na- for credit. He was unfamiliar with
he large Roman Catholic Church. tionalization of estates, no matter planning -techniques and the profit-
ly unch- how equitably conducted, is not the ably marketing of his'rops. The res- :.
u In April, 1957, the Fourth Intern- only avenue for solving the probl- ult was a drop in agricultural prod-.
..l a ntinnal Catholic Congress on Rural em. auction and a shortage of such Mex- I


chaotic. But one thing.is certain:
the Bolivian farm laborer will nev-
-er again endure feudal servitude in
silence.
- Responsible Latin-American lead-
ers are anxious to legislate careful-
ly planned land distribution progr-
ams before the restiveness of their


This makes it likely that every
attempt -however democratic or
reasonable- to overhaul the out-
moded agrarian systems of Latin
America will be misinterpreted as
"Communist confiscation." The re-
suiting pressures on Congress and
the Department of State are likely


trol his own destiny on his own land.
Since World War- l, our historic
American belief that widespread pri-
vate ownership of the land is essen-
tial to stable democratic societies
has been consistently reflected in
American foreign policy. Indeed, the
most radical land reform in modern
history was launched under Ameri-
can auspices by Gen. Douglas Mac-
Arthur in Japan immediately follow-
ing the war. Before Pearl Harbor,
two-thirds of all Japanese farmers
were tenants. Today, 92 per cent of
all Japanese rural families own their


Thus the record shows that the
United States has been deeply com-
mitted not only to land reform but
to the drastic means often necessary
to achieve it. Developments in Lat-
in America may profoundly chall-
enge this tradition of ours in the
months and years ahead.
Can democracy create a workable
alternative to communism's appeal
for simple confiscation? Can United
States diplomacy summon the tact,
adaptability and persuasiveness to
work with struggling new Latin-Am-


e question 'is: Is it to- be achieved democratically or through violence?...
er, and for an agricultural exten- people- takes. a similar ugly turn. to be increasingly great. Soner or own land and are producing re
ion serice-to-advise ie- landown- Th'e main obstacle, apart from the later these Pressures may back us cord output per acre.
s what, where andi how to plan. resistance of the landlords, is lack into a position of endorsing the very Americanord output per pressure, too, forced
. is Betancourt's second, try. In of money to pay for the expropriat- interests which are stifling the dev- Chiang Kai-shek to put into effect
:y his Accion Democratica party, ed land.. Only four times in our elopment of a region on which our on Taiwan a democratic system of
n power for the first time as the century have large-scale land re-- own secfiiity depends. land ownership which, if it had been
potof the first free elections in forms-been adopted by democratic on ty ded land ownership which, if it had been
ezuelan history, passed an agra- governments with reasonable tic Ironically this will be a far cry enacted on the mainland ten years
reform law history, passled an agrar-governments with reasonable coz- from the American tradition of wid- earlier, almost certainly would have
l reform oaw which called for pensation for the landlords: in Cze- spread land ownership. One of our swung the peasants in his favor.
expropriation of t land With compen- choslovakiaex in 1926 post-revo- first acts after winning our inde- Under the ^Generalissimo's progr-
ation and redistributix da on' to the land- tionary partexico, in parts of India pendence was to repeal the British am, no farmer is allowed to own
e. Thirty-hrewix days later, the milrn foloing partition, and in Puerto colonial laws that had protected more than ten acres of land, nor
,it-r overthrew the reform Govern- Pico, for which Congress in 1900 large estates. Royalists-owned lands is anyone allowed to own land which
pass ership by corporslationlimiting land wn were confiscated. The Homestead he does not till himself. Govern-
:-In Bolia, land" reform wasamog oday,- in rporatin Ame500rica, only of 1862 provided 160 acres free ment officials in Taipei credit these
-In 3oU'ia, land're~form was-among.-16day,- in Latin America, only of charge for every family head reforms with much of the extraor-
the first acts of the revolutionary oil-rich Venezuela has the capital killing to farm them. By 1880, three diary increase in Taiwan's output
regime in 1952. Bolivian landlords necessary to handle the transition out of four American farmers were of rice per acre.
,had'been notorious for the system without unfairly squeezing the form- owners or pAm-owner s were o u r ic e per acre.
;:0 serfdom which allowed them to er owners of the land. But will his- the worked. gram is now goingorwetn a rd a successor pro-
demand personal services from pe-- tory.wait? ot gram is now going forward success-
ions and their wives. -pe- fully under the guidance of United
s and their wives. This situation challenges United In the depression-ridden Nineteen States representatives.
The revolutionary over n.m ent States diplomacy throughout Latin Thirties, our deep belief in farmer- Such was the strength of the op-
planned to give each farmer bet- America. United States citizens' pri- owned familysized farms led Con- position that these post-war reforms
,een twenty-five and 2,000 acres, vate investments in the area amount gress to enact laws to provide long- could be effected only by decree.
'depending upon estimated soil prod- to more than $9,000,000,000. This 'is term loans at very low interest to General Mac-Arthur's military gov-
uctivity. But no soil survey of Bol- more than in any other region of intercept foreclosures and otherwise eminent, in particular, rode rough-
'via ever had been made, and there the world, and not all of it is based protect the farmer's ability to con- shod over Japanese landlords.


1/ WAC


Is happy to announce to the public i


of the new modern slaughterhou


on JANUARY 4th. 19


THIS MANAGEMENT WISHES T- EXPRESS AT T-IS

ADMIRATION AND SINCERE THANKS TO

I THE PRESIDENT -..OF THE -REPUBI

- .'


the inauguration:


ise at Damien .

.-. -
-Vc
60- .




OCCASION ITS GREAT : ..

HIS EXCELLENCY,.

LIC. .


k.


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Should be happy to be

honored byg oup

SOisit at ,



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WRLLY


04iti mostexciting FREE PORT STORE




JEIiti$ mostfamous MAR oqR lI FFCTORI


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* Swiss Wa.fcheb Images


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SPORT-AU-PRIN
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The Management .



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The Haitian American Meat '-..


& Provision Co. S.AN
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- ~ ~ ~ Th~~4i' -- ~ Th-~ ~4I~i LWk~w -


erican governments toward these ob-
jectives?
Although our Government cannot
direct the course of events, it can
often exert a constructive influence.
For example:
.(1) We can reaffirm our tradition-
al support for reasonable measures
to assure the widespread ownership
of land.
(2) We can draw on our world-
wide experience to assist Latin-Am-
erican Governments in working out
compensation plans which will pro-
vide fair payment to the landlords
without unreasonably burdening the
new owners.
(3) We can adjust ourselves in ad-
vance to the certainties that reason
will not always prevail, that injust-
ices will almost surely occur, and
that the short-term price paid for
long-term stability will often appear
exorbitant.
Above all,, let us not lose sight ot
the essential issue. The real choice
in Latin America, as in Asia and
Africa, is citizenship or serfdom,
hope -or despair, orderly political
growth or bloody upheaval. Our fail-
ure to understand this choice, or to
support the vital new elements
which are striving to assert lead-
ership, would be catastrophic.


were not even adequate maps of the-on strictly legal arrangements. Al-
farm lands available, though only part of this investment
S-. is in land, some American financial
Ifmipatuent, machine-gun-carrying interests are certain to be seriously
peasants ultimately took over. _To- hurt by any legislation breaking up
day, Bolivia's-land. reform remains big estates.


. o1p rl qjl S,








"
HAITI SU N,,


PAGE' 19


SUNDAY, JAN. 10TH, 1960


Voodoo


By LOUIS CLIFFORD
City Editor of The Cleverland Press
Anis Cazeau didn't want us to go
to a voodoo dance. "It's rather
primitive," he said. "Why don't you
go to the folk dance?"
But George Kenn, .suave propriet-
or of Hotel Montana in Pernonville
a mountain suburb of Port-au-Prin-
ce, shrugged and said: "While .\ou'
re heie you ought to see voodoo."
So we compromised. We went to
the folk dance with Anis at the op-
en-air Theater de Verdure and en-
joyed it very much. The, next night
we sneaked off with Jens Jenson.
of Chicago, and his wile and went
to see voodoo.
Anis Cazeau is the chauffeur-guide
who took us under his wing %%hen
- we landed at Port-au-Pnnce on the
fourth step of our island hopping
through the Caribbean. Second and
.third steps were to St Thomas in
the.Virgin Islands and San Juan in
Puerto Rico. In this account of our
island hopping we'd like to pass
over St Thomas and San Juan tem-
porarily and stay a while in Haiti.
Haiti shares the island of Hispa-
niola, with the Dominican Republic
occupying the eastern tno thirds


Is Only


It was a French colony until the
early 1800's then the ranks of the
African slaves produced such her-
oes as Toussaint I'Ouverture. Henri
Chrisiophe and Alexandre Petion,
and Haiti became the first Negro
republic in the world.
It still is a republic and in the
past several years its once. turbul-
ent politics have reached an even
keel and George Kenn and other
resort operators in the Petionville
area report a big increase both in
off season and season iDec. 15 to
April 151 visitors.
KEEP HEADS BUSY
You don't have to compare voodoo
with folk dancing to get the con-
trast which is such a big part of
Haiti's charm and excitement.
As soon as you clear customs at
the Port-au-Prince Airport and walk
outside you see the straight-backed
Haitian %,omen and girls walking
briskly along with huge baskets on
their heads.
What's in the baskets? It rnugkt
be 50 pounds of vegetables being
taken to a side-walk market. Or
pots and pans for the Iron Market
Or bolts of cotton, for sale to who-
eter will buy.


Part


Along with the feminine basket
carriers you see other Haitian wo-
men riding donkeys, both side sad-
dle (but with no saddle) and West-
ern style The donkeys are loaded
Vwith bags of merchandise as varied
as the contents of the head baskets.
The streets of Port-au-Prince are
narrow and are crowded, mostly
with the head basket wearers and
the donkey riders. But zipping in
and out, miraculously hitting neither
beast nor human, are 1960 American
made cars and darting European
small cars.

HOUSING VARIES
The city itself is filled with con-
tradictions. Harry Truman Blvd. is
a wide modern highway that skirts
the shore. Side streets are narrow,
rough, lined with gutters down which
flows muddy waters into holes chop-
ped in the roadway.
Many of the 300,000 residents live
in housing that would be considered
sub-standard almost anywhere in the
world. In other sections housing is
new, modern, colorful, an indica-
tion of the new future that may be
in store for these people of Haiti
who have had to lift themselves
from slavery by their own bootsraps.
But how about voodoo?
Well, you find voodoo by the
sound of the drums. We arrived late
but the dance went on for a full
hour longer and not once -not ev-
en for 10 seconds- was there a
pause in the throb of the drums
beaten by the bare palms and fing-
ers of kneeling youths
AFRICAN IMPORT
Voodoo was brought fr-am the Afr-
ican jungles by the first slaves im-
ported by the French to work the
plantations. It is combination dance,
chant and religious ceremonial.
In parts of it the participants
walk barefoot over -flaming candles,
whirl and prance to the -frenzied
beat of the drums, and roll on the
ground. The climax involves the
leader and a chicken. It isn't pret-
ty To spare those who do not wish
to know. the following description
is written so that onl. those who
really want to know can read:
-tuaql
3uruamq pus saaoqieal i ai &upanld
si dais lputA -I*\oj aq1 jo poojq
alli suJuup at uaqJ.. .aeu s.ua3jaroa
OLIi SauLiL,1 Jiapval oopoo,. ajll


w. '-
1fleze1~a >owu < n "



r l 1960 o a


lit


L


a


Of


Haiti's


"WHAT'S CIVILIZED?"
Reaction of viewers is varied. On
the way out some-one said: "That's
not very civilized." But, how civil-
ized is a strip tease in Chicago or
a wrestling "'match" in Cleveland?

The Republic of Haiti is working
hard on.one of its big problems, il-
literacy, which runs about 90 per
cent. Government and Catholic
schools have high standards. We
ivent to a children's mass at the
Catholic church in Petionville and
learned nothing from the instruction
given in French (the official lan-
guage of Haiti) to the children.

But from the children themselves


Story


we learned a lot. The boys were
dressed in short white' pants and
white shirts.. The girls %ore blue
skirts and white blouses and straw
hats. Each blouse, each shirt was
fresh and spotlessly clean.
There was no rustle of restless-
ness from the youngsters during
mass. All received holy communion
and walked back from the comrmu-
nion railing with eyes down and
arms folded in front. After church.
they marched in a. body to a school
building for class.

That completes the image of- the
contrasts of Haiti. From the drums
of the voodoo to the "Hail Mary's"
of a new generation.

S-





~- -="


. .---- ... -'-

SHOTEL


MONTANA
PETION-VILLE



I-
The t" lclAotxxe -oco



OOooku stheI a ,3affie e /eej,




VE t5eidEn MAEMIteTs iom POlTRCUPouINCo
iMnfTliE5SAME MANAGEMENT AS HOTEL CHoucotft4


00E A DEMONSTRATION AT TROPICAL GAS CO., INC.-Rue PAVA0E .P-AU.P
OR TROPtCqAS DEALER IN ITHE FIROV.NCe Phone. 3853.


I JLLRJIJ = 4k I A A A %J iL


... .. liI I I II[I I I I II ii I









Therese Noustas And Ivan Kovacs Bethothed


The engagement of Miss Therese Noustas to Fordham student Iban
Aurel Kovacs was announced December 29 at an "inlime" family dinner
at Le Perchoir. A fall wedding is being planned for New York.
Miss Therese Noustas is the eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs Elias
Noustas of Port-au-Prince and New York. A graduate of the Academy
of St Joseph, Brentwood Long Island and the College of New Rochelle,
New Rochelle New York Therese has been working with her father in
the vast La Belle Creole enterprises.
Ivan Kovacs is the son of Mr.and Mrs. Antal Ivan Kovaes of Budapest
Hungary. He studied commerce and economics in Paris and Budapest
and is currently attending the Fordham University business school. Mr.


CAPOIS GRAVELY
INJURED IN
AUTO SMASH
HIT BRIDGE NEAR CABARET
The lives of Henry Dejoie and
Guy Andre who were badly injured
when their automobile crashed into
a bridge parapet on the main higie -
way near Cabaret have been in bal-
ance all week at the Canape Vert
hospital. Both received the sacra-
ments of Extreme-Onction.
Henry Dejoie the son of Cap Hai-
tien met.hant Louis Dejole was
driving home to Au Cap early Sun-
day morning after spending the New
Year festivities in Port when he
struck a bridge parapet on the main-
high North near the village of Ca-
baret.
At the family engagement party (left to right) Uncle Issa El Saleh, Both of Henry's legs were broken
Aunty Mrs Jamil Handal. father Mr Elias Noustas, brother Mr Joseph and his front seat companion Guy
Noustas, grandmother Mrs Vve Joseph El Saieb, the bethothed couple, -Andre who crashed through the win-
Uncle Jamil Handal, mother Mrs Elias Noustas. sister Elizabeth Noustas. dow shield received multi lacerat-
ions about the head. In the back-
seat MIr Franck Lareur had his
NEW DOMINICAN NEW GENERAL left leg and right arm factured
AMBASSADOR BRING DIRECTOR OF wKile his wife received facial injur-
COMPLETE CHANGE PUBLIC HEALTH ies.


TOP-LEVEL
IN EMBASSY STAFF
HERE
The appointment of Dr Pedro Pu-
reel Pena as ambassador of the
Dominican Republic in Haiti repla-
cing Ambassador Sanchez Rubirosa
who is being appointed under miW-
ister of Interior and Cults was an-
nounced this week.
Dr Pena began his diplomatic


Kovacs who returned to his studies at Fordham January 3 is graduating career as a second secretary m the
In June.embass in Port-au-Prince in 1930.
nThe new ambassador speaks flu-


dF


DR. JEANNOT CADET
Dr Jeannot Cadet was installed
this week as General Du'ector of
Public Health. He replaces Dr Ro-
ger Rousseau.
Dr Edmond Loubeau became ad-
ministrator of the General Hospital
replacing Dr Lovinsky Faucher who
has been promoted to the post of
Inspector General of Hospitals.
ent French having been in the Do-
mnunican protocol service for the past
23 years. His wife is Haitian by
birth.


,Major Robert Bazile returning to
Pote Cole project in the North at
4 am rushed the accident victims
to Canape Vert hospital.




;,C-,W S ATC
sria,~r


HIRTZ




World- Wid4


Is HERE Lz




e HERTZ


HAITI!


Bent-a-Car


JEAN


BOLTE
MANAGER


WE DELIVER


TO YOUR HOTEL AND


PICK UP CAR AT YOUR DEPARTURE


POINT BE IT BY SHIP


OR BY PLANE


Reservations:


THROUGH YOUR HOTEL
360 GRAND RUE NEXT
ALL-AMERICA CABLES
BY PHONE-2772, 3134


AT AUTO S. A.,
DOOR


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Here In HAITI!


Kt,
_. ,


SUNDAY, JAN. 10TH, 1960


"
HAITI SUN "


PAGE 13









P iE4H T JN ,


NEW TEXACO DIRECTOR JOHN 0. SHELDON
H. CALVIN MINOR TRANSFERRED TO AFRICA
AWARDED HONOR AND MERIT BY PRESIDENT


New Texaco manager John 0. Sheldon flanked by tho assistants LeRol
L. Eliot (left) and Captain George (Ti Pouce) Elie Fils. Mr Elliot
in Haiti for eighteen months spent tNto years in Ghana and three years
in French Cameroorms.




OD VA
January 6. 1960.
Announces the competitive bidding for a rice drying and
storing plant at Deseaux, Valley of the Artibonite.
For complete descriptions and specifications secure mi-
meographed specifications from the ODVA office, either in
French or English, at Rue des Cesars and Rue du Centre
in Port-au-Prince or from the ODVA office in Borel, in the
Artibonite Valley.
'Bids must be submitted in a sealed envelope on or before
11.00 A.M. February 17, 1960, Such envelopes must be clear-
ly marked on the out side.
"BID FOR RICE MILL"


DISCOVER THE FASCINATION

OF HMTI

Through Its Postage Stamps

For complete information in Haiti

Stamps and other details which will be

furnished you free of charge, write to

P.O. Box 723 Port-au-Port-au-Prince


American trade sub-committee, an-
nounced more than two months ago
that he would take off in January
on a tour of 12 Latin countries and
Puerto Rico.


John 0. Sheldon a veteran of Cen- Cuba was tentatively scheduled as
tral, South America and the Carib- the first stop. He said at the time
bean has taken over as manager that, because of touchy relations be-
of the TEXACO Caribbean in Haiti. teen Prenmler Fidel Castro and
Mr Sheldon who was in Haiti on the United States, he would seek
brief assignments in 19-19 and 1950 State Department advice on wheth-
replaces H. Calvin Minor who has er to stop in Cuba.
been transferred to Abidjan Ivory
Coast as manager of Texas Petrol- Smathers' office announced Fri-
eum Company. Wednesday prior to day he would leave on Jan. 19 in-
his departure Mr Minor was receiv- stead of Jan. 14, canceling schedul-
ed at the National Palace by Pres- ed stops in Cuba, Haiti and the Do-
ident Doctor Francois Duvalier and minican Republic.
personally decorated with the Natio- A spokesman for Smathers insist-
nal order of Honor and Merit rank ed the start of the trip was delayed
of Officer for his contribution to the due to "press of Senate business."
economy of the nation. He said Bonsel's visit had nothing
to do with the change.
A native of Woodsville New


Hampshire, Mr Sheldon has taken
up residence at 21 Place Boyer Pe-
tionville with wife Ethel and their
two children Jack and Linda Prior
to coming to Haiti he was manager
of Texas Petroleum Company in
Honduras.


SEN. GEORGES
SMATHERS CANCELS
TRIP TO HAITI
(Continued from page 1)
Havana newspaper.
"Everything that is rotten is not
in Denmark. Some of it is in Flor-
ida and the senator is smothered
with it. In other words, he smells!"
the newspaper said Friday3.
"Sen. Smathers is nothing but a
publicity seeker... he has the mak-
ings of a Florida-produced Huey
Long."
The paper said Smathers' propos-
ed visit .to Cuba would "be to no
purpose other than to satisfy his
ego by seeing personally the man
who is the symbol of liberty all over
the world, Fidel Castro."
Announcement of the cancellation
of Smathers' trip was made Friday,
but Smathers informed his office of
he decision Thursday afternoon fol-
owing a visit from Philip Bonsai,
U.S. ambassador to Cuba.
The switch in plans also comes
et a time when the State Depart-
nent is in the rrudst of formulating
tougher policy towards Cuba.
The new policy is expected to be
made public this month. Skittish of-
icials refused to comment on this
Friday .
Smathers, chairman of the Latin


I


2






F
I'


JOHA


However, between the Ijt,
19th, there are four days ..
Saturday, Sunday, and 'Morjstda
which the Senate rarely does'
business, particularly this _ea
the session. .
As it is. Smathers will Ie
three weeks. He is not du'
until Feb. 8. He will visit ')
Rico, Venezuela, Brazil, UJ
Argentina, Chile, Peru, ]a;
Colombia and Panama.
It is known that'there has
top level discussion for wpeks
whether Smatlhers -should Yisif
and try to meet with Cast"r'
time.
Smathers and Castro havW"
severely critical of each dth
the past. There was a fear:.1b
quarters that Smathers' predi
Cuba might ignite another antl
rican blast by Castro'and oth


SEE THE SENSATIONAL
NEW 1960
VSON OUTBOARD MOTO


AT
RUE PAVEE



At Anion


Sneer


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SEA-HORSE 40, SEA-HORSE 18, SEA-HORSE 10
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Fly to Miami in the wonderful world of Pan American


SUNDAY, JAN. 10TH,'i


PAGE 14


"
HAITI SUN "


PAiLr








'SUNDAY, J


AN. 10TH, 1960


"HAITI SUN"


-A




U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon showed how truly democratic a
Republican can be on the way back from a tour of Damien and the
Fish Farming Center during his three-day \-isit last week iMaich
.3-5th, 1955i5
In the five-mile journey, he stopped at least sL\ times to accost passing
.peasants to cross examine them on the daily events and vital statistics
-of their life. ,-
On one occasion. Mr Nixon stopped the official car. breazily waved
the secret servicemen back out of the way of bedraggled and worn-look-
-ing -cameramen, then halting a couple of "marchandes" tried to launch
a conversation.
The younger, more attractive vendor, who was driving a patient "bour-
rique" laden with two nulk containers, attracted- the larger share of
-questions. Finally, the Vice President asked, through an interpreter, her
marital status.
In disinterested Creole, the girl said she was unmarried, and added
that she had, nevertheless, given birth to three offspring.
The interpreter was brought up short, but managed shyly to admit
:she was "fiancee".
"What's the donkey's name?" asked Mr Nixon placing an unsure
-hand on its rump. The interpreter relayed the question.
"Fou?" countered the milkmaid "Li relle bourrique Oh! Oh!" iare
you crazy he is called bourriquel.
SThis had the interpreter in a tight spot and the Haitians accompanying
: the visiting statesman leapt in the breach urging the woman td call
him "Malice. Jean, Jacques, even Richard", as they had to meet their
schedule.
With an expressive little toss of her head, she demanded:
Ca blanc besoin, m'besoin fai route moin."
l. What does the American want, I've got to go.)
"What does she say?" asked Mr Nixon with bively interest.
"Oh,'it appears she hasn't got around to naming her donkey yet,
and it's getting late so she must ask to be excused.", th interpreter
obliged. Her parting sally was: "A la bande de cocoye papa.'
(Reprinted from Haiti Sun edition oi March 1955 on the request of
[, the Dems Party Committee In Haiti.)



.
Lunch Dine Have

By The SEA-SIDI

-00-

KYONA BE

-00-
DEEP-SEA FISHING EXCURSIONS

I Swim, Spearfish, Snorkle,

And Sail In Safe Co
Waters From Kyon
-00-

HAVE YOUR PARTY A7


EIGHT HAITIAN NON-COMMIS-
SIONED OFFICERS IN TRAINING
IN USA.
Eight non-corrmissioned officers
of the Haitian Army left for train-
ing in the U.S. on December 2S,
they are:
Sgt. Luc Boursicault, Rodrigue
Dorvil, Caporal Vital Duperval, Set.
Luc Nelson, Caporal Jacques Pier-
re, Sgt. Emmanuel Gochelin, Sgt.
Wilfiid St-Preu\. Sgt Roland De-
castro.
This trip is in accordance with
the provisions of the Military Ass-
istance Agreement between United
Slates and Haiti.
The training will include:
a) Recruit training at San Diego,
Calif. for 13 weeks
b) Advance Infantry training in
Camp Pendleton, Calif. for 4
weeks
c) OJT at Rifle Range, Cam Mat-
thews, Calif. 3 weeks.
Travel expenses and li\-ing allow-
ance of the group are provided by
the U.S. government. LUSISi

NEW AMERICAN TECHNICIAN
Mr Laurence F. Wiler recently
arrived in Haiti for assignment as
Hydraulics Engineer with the Publ-
ic Works Division USOM.---Haiti.
where he will be working with Mr
Roger Miliort, Co-Director of SCT-
RH, and will be primarily concern-
ed with potable water supplies.
Haiti is his first assignment with
Point I'. He has previously worked
as a Civil Engineer for the Depart-
ment of the Army in Vienna, Aus-
tria; Mannheim, Harlsruhe. and
Heidelberg, Germany: and in Nan-
cy and Paris. France. He is a gra-
duate of Drexel Institute in Phila-
delphia and of the Pennsylvania
State University. He is a member
of the Uhion Francaise des Ine-
nieurs Professionels. IUSIS)

NEW JET FLIGHTS BEING
ADDED TO MEET INCREASING
TRAFFIC TO HAITI
The addition of flights ,429 and 430
each Tuesday and Friday will round
out PAN AMERICAN AIRWAYS Jet
Flights 227 and 228 between New
York and Ciudad Trujillo into Port-
au-Prince Haiti, effective January
1st 1960.
The Jet 227 leaving New York
at S:30 a.m. EST reaches Ciudad
Trujillo at 11:45 a.m. connecting
with P.A.A. flight 430, departing CT
at 12:15 p.m. and arriving at Port-
au-Prince at 1.05 p.m. This is even
faster than the DC 6B flight direct
from New York each Saturday which
leave at 9:15 a.m. and reach Port-
au-Prince at 3:10 p.m.
Returning passengers take PAA
flight 429 to Ciudad Trujillo to con-
nect with Jet 228 leaving at 3:30
p.m. and arriving at New York at
6:55 p.m.
In anticipation of increasing traf-
fic to Haiti P.A.A.-is planning four



Cocktails

E




EACH





Water-Ski

astal

la


r KYONA


Roy Tasco Davis who proceeded Ambassador Gerald Drew as U.S.
Envoy to Haiti has been called out of retirement by the State Department
and American Council on Education to direct the Latin American Orien-
tation Program of the Washington International Center. "Tasco Davis
is a veteran of twenty-seven years in Diplomacy and Education' in Latin
America." Above Mr Davis with his niece on a donkey he kept on the
grounds of Ambassador's residence in Bourdon.

Jet flights a week in February sup- ing" flights 431 and 432 between
ported by the New fast-connecting Miami and San Juan and regular
"SHUTTLE SERVICE". This is daily direct flights from Miami and
in addition to daily "Island-Hopp- return. tTourist Office).


DIFFERENT




SANS CHAMURB


roement donna une tracticb tA
socurt ,upple...etaires.Un ing6nie
duspositif do silence ."6lui6t i.*
rents bruits d6sagr6able du p-.1
tasdh que la constructione16.1eg .
Super-.Cushion Sans Chambre l
p.rm.t d'absorber les cahos de ol
'ut. Vous aurez molns de ps p s
1atl moans de delays pare quo il
Cowsftuction Gip-Seal excsive
Goodyear 61imine pratiquemelF-IA
lrvaso habituelles.




,.4OD^-EA-t
N M Rom so' -


PAGE 15









"HAITI


PAGE 16i


SUNDAY, JAN. 10TH,


SUN"


PRESENT WITH VESTMENTS MADE IN HAITI DR. NATHAN KLINE VISIT PSYCHIATRIC

REV. HENRY BURROWS OF LONG ISLAND AFTER RUSSIA TOUR
ORDflATNED AT ST. TRINITE HERE


The Rev. Henry C. Burrows of
Garden City, L.I., was ordained on
Epiphany, January 6, in impressive
ceremonies at Sainte TrTnite Cathe-
dral, Port-au-Prince. The Mission-
ary Bishop of Haiti, the Rt. Rev.
C. Alfred Voegeli ordained Fr. Bur-
rows on behalf of the Bishop of
Long Island.

The Haitian Cathedral, with its
celebrated folk murals of Biblical
themes, was a colorful setting for
the two-hour service that climaxed
when Bishop Voegeli, after leading
the congregation in the chanting of
an ancient hymn, "Come, Holy Spir-
it," read from the Book of Common
Prayer: "Take thou authority to
execute the Office of a Priest in the
Church of Christ, now committed to
there by the imposition of our


ice then laid their hands on the
kneeling ordinate, after which the
Service of Holy Communion was
celebrated.
The Very Rev. Harold Le Moine,
dean of the Cathedral Church of the
Incarnation, Garden City, represent-
ed Bishop DeWolfe of Long Island.
Preaching the sermon, Dean Le-
Moine called the priest's primary
task that of reconciliation between
God and man. This, he said, must
he carried out with love and total
devotion.
The Rev. Fr. Jean G. Michel,
canon of St Trinite Cathedral, pre-
sented the candidate to the Bishop.
The Rev. Fr. Raoul Moreau read
the litany for ordinations.
The Very Rev..Roger Desir, dean
of the Cathedral, celebrated the


Dr Nathan Kline visited his Psy-
chiatric Center here this week in
the company of fellow Psychiatrist
Dr Alfred Stanley head of Rockland
County Hospital.
Dr Kline recently visited Russia.
This is what Time had to say about
his trip and findings.

American physicians who believe
that U:S. medicine is the world's
best in all departments got a jolting
report last November, from a
research psychiatrist who spent five
weeks in Russia last summer, con-
cluded: "The care of mental pati-
ents in the Soviet Union is superior
to our own in a number of import-
ant respects."
Dr Nathan S. Kline, 43, research
director at New York's Rockland
State Hospital, told the New York
A-- -F QM.- L. .L_-


hands. And be thou a faithful dis- Communion Service. The Very Rev. Academy ofx sciences taut .w'ere:as
penser of the word of God, and of N. Caryle Spitz, dean of the semin-
his holy Sacraments...." ary, was deacon, and the Rev. Fr.
All the priests attending the serv- Dickens Celestm, canon of the Ca- at Evensong, at which Fr. Burrows
thedral and rector of the Church assisetd. The choir and church
3 HAITIANS ORDAINED of Our Lady, was sub-deacon. Scout Troops carried lighted candles
AMERICAN WESLEYAN in procession for the service, after
METHODIST PASTORS TODAY An honorary canon of the Cathe- which all lights were extinguished.
AT PETIT GOAVE dral, the Rev. William Chase. assist- Later a master candle was lit and
A week long convention of the ant at St. James' Church, New York smaller candles given to the over
American Wesleyan Met h o d i s t City, took part in the ceremony. '500 people that filled the Cathedral.
Church in Haiti terminates today During the service Bishop Voege- The entire congregation then carri-
in Petit Goave with the ordination li presented Fr. Burrows with a ed their candles lighted from the
of the first three Haitians pastors Bible, part of the ordination rite, I main Altar into the Church court-
Into this church. and a set of vestments made by yard for the final blessing.
Dr John Edlir.g in charge of the churchwomen in Haiti. Fr. Burrows is canon organist at
American Wesleyan Methodist mis- Epiphany at the Cathedral was the Cathedral and teaches English
sion in Port Margot near Cap Hai- climaxed by a Ceremony of Carols at the College St. Pierre.
tien said Monday during a stopover
in Port-au-Prince on his way to the ,
convention, that over forty-three
missionaries and their children al-
ong with a minister and delegate PORT-AU-PRINE
from twenty-two organized church- PANTAL Bdg
es wl be in attendance. -
In Port Margot the mission has .
A clinic with a T.B. ward as well r.. -
as a school. Under the remarkable OF EXQUISITE ag
leadership of Pastor Le\i Trmyer DSesi ns
the American Methodists have es- D sC f I
tablished a model mjssioh on sleepy AND SUPERB '
La Gonave island at the coastal Ulita a
village of Aise a Galet. The main- R Ji as u i ow
stay of their Gonave mission is the GRAND RUE itAcL e &tr
island's first real hospital.


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I


the U.S. is woefully short of doctors
for the mentally W, the Soviet Union
comes close to meeting ideal U. S.
standards. In proportion to popula-
tion, it has 50 per cent more physi-
cians for mental illness than the
United States.

Equally significant is the ratio of
psychiatrists to hospitalized patients.
Against one for 200 patients in the
U.S., it is one for every 25 in iRus-
sia. And whereas many U.S. psych-
iatrists are engaged in intensive the-
rapy, often of the analytic type, so
that they have time for.-only a small
number of patients, intensive and
prolonged treatment is rare in Rus-
sia, where there is no waiting for
psychiatric care.
Paid to Stay Home. Most striking.
to Dr Kline, was the basic differ-
ence in handling psychotic patients.
In the U.S. most are promptly ad-
mitted to big (usually state I hospit-
als, and many spend the rest of
their lives there, slowly deteriorat-
ing. Outpatient treatment at clin-
ics or in day hospitals is still rare.
In Russia the reverse is true. "Hos-
pitalization is for extremely brief
periods by our standards, with very
early discharge and follow-up in the
dispensaries," said Dr Klne. The
relatively fewu psychiatric hospitals
are almost entirely for acute cases.
The many dispensaries (eleven in
Leningrad alone) care for the vast
majority of cases.
Some long-term (so-called chron-


a A A-& A


5 1


I


CENTER HERE


ic', psychotic patients are Keptii"
work \villages (kolonil) out ih the..
country. "This," reported Dr Ilift,'
"was the one type of facility with -
I could not obtain permission to
visit." But a great majority ot bioig-
term patients are kept at -.ae6,6
treated by their families under Ji
pital supervision. A mentally ..
worker draws a disability peni-on
for as long as he is unable to troa
His family can get up to 400 r-ffis.
($40) a month to care for hil .'.fli
it still costs the state only ab qt
hall as much as keeping him- 4a.f:a
hospital, said Dr Kline and, iioei
important, it helps the average bpa..
dent get better faster. -

Wbrk to Get Well. The Soviets f-
ject. Freud and hi and his analytic pti
les. In his place they have elev1eha
Ivan P. Pavlov, apostle of coib
tioned reflex psychology. One resin
is that neurotics are hospitalitd&A
far more often than in the j.
since environment is blamed
neurotic disturbances. But these pa)L i
tents rarely stay longer than two.u
months. .

Prominent at both inpatient and
out-treatment units is the emphasis
on work as one of the most impor-t,
ant and constructive factors in.
treatment. (In U.S. hospitals, occu-s
national therapy is usually make
work and little better than leaf rak-h-
ing.) Workshops, Dr Kline found,4
constitute complete industrial pro-
ducuon units, e.g., one in Leningrad'.
has six full-size looms and manufact."
ures snowsuits. Patients not only'.i
get training, but receive full indus-L
tr'-scale pay for their work. Not-'
only do they get better faster, but. -.;
often they emerge from- the hospital ."
better able to support themsevles-:."
and their families than when they.
entered. .
.. .







SUNDAY, JAN. 10TH, 1960


"
HAITI SUN "


ANTHROPOLOGIST WITH POII


Dr Richard P. Schaedel recently
.arrived in Haiti as community anal-
yst assigned to work with the pro-
gram division of Point IV in Port-
au-Prince.

Dr. Schaedel's services are to be
.directed toward resolving obstacles
in the orientation or implementation
.of the various action programs of
Point IV. As such he will act as a
,insultant and advisor to the vari-
. ou 'thnicians presently working
in Haiti. He will undertake special
studies of various aspects of Haiti-
ani society both urban and rural in
order to gain a full appreciation of


Fl


Haitian values and attitudes espe-
cially as they relate to measures
designed to raise living standards
and productivity.
In this capacity it is expected
that Dr. Schaedel will be working
with Haitian professional ethnolog-
ists and sociologists.
Dr. Schaedel's previous experience
has been in the Andean area. He
recently left Peru where he con-
ducted a comprehensive sociologic-
al survey of the human resources
of the heavily populated southern
highlands as part of the Southern
Peru Regional Development Plan


IN HAITI SHOP


IN HAITI SHOP
AT

SHER


'4T FOUR
for Point IV in that country. Dr.
Schaedel who received his doctor-
ate in anthropology at Yale, has

OPC PRESIDENT TO VISIT
HAITI ON CARIB BOOK TRIP
John Wilhelm, President of the
Overseas Press Club in New York
is planning an extensive trip through
the Caribbean commencing January
2nd. Travelling with wife Peggy, Mr
Wilhelm is beginning a manuscript
for a new book, GUIDE TO THE
CARIBBEAN, and will gather mat-
erial for this forthcoming volume.
He is expected to visit Haiti thus
month.


' S


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carried out anthropological research versity of Chile in Santiago, Chile.
in Peru and Chile before joining He has expressed his satisfaction
Point IV and has taught at New at having the opportunity to be able
York University in the United Stat- to carry out work in the congenial
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and Trujillo in Peru and the Uni- ti provides.


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PAGE 17


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SUNDAY, JAN. O1TH, 196(f'


CAPEHART EXPERT ROUSE CALLS


Bearded Englishman Maurice H. Harskin of the Spain Travel. London
England was in town at the Splendid Hotel for a week long visit... Jay
H. Auslander of Pittsburg Pa French teacher at Kiski Prepretor3 school
visited former school pal Andre Khawley over the holidays.. Sabine
Gova Phd, lecturer at Fordam University who wrote a series on fle de
la Torune back in 1956 revisited the Island for Christmas.... The Tropp
family ended a week vacation at the Villa Creole and returned to West-
port Conn. Papa Jack Tropp ip director of Purchasing for Peter J.
Schweitzer Division and was taken on a tour of a sisal factory by the
Joseph Nadals... Ralph and Betty Kilb of Schenecteady, New York are
honeymooning at the Oloffson. Ralph is in Chemical research... Anne
McAloon is vacationing in French-Creole speaking Port-au-Prince from
her English teaching in Venezuela... Carol and Josephine Pia of Califor-
nia,are relaxing here from their I'nvestments and Property business with
their law student daughter Charlotte... Dr Abner Notkins of John Hopkins
Hospital in Baltimore is vacationing here...
The Casino operators Cliff Jones and Jack Kahoff came to town this
week... The now famous New Year's eve fight apparently has been de-
clared a non-decision bout. The police nor the two Harry S. Truman
Blvd title contestants had any comment which leads us to believe the
book has been closed... Builder David Anderson danced the New Year
in at Petionville Club with good spirit despite two head stitches and body
bruises. Mr Bradley spent the first few days of 1960 confined to bed...
Johnny Charles is on road to recovery after proclaiming himself king
of Delmas... Writer Michel Buckmaster is down from Bermuda for a
second visit... Mrs Francis Gagneron is recovering trom a broken arm...
Gary Scrimgeour youthful New Zealander who is professor of Humanities
at Florida University in Gainsville came to Port after a five day visit
to Cuba. Gary's father missed becoming Prime Minister of New Zealand
by a couple of votes a decade ago... Roger Bermingham the "Clear Voice"
Ham of Detroit W8CVD is down for his first visit in three years .. Min-
ister of Education Rev. Father Hubert Papailler was hospitalized at New
York Medical Center and then proceeded to Paris for health reasons...
Money has been found in a New York Bank for the completion of the
Grand Rue says the Telediol...
Roger Jarman first president of the International Club de Commerce
here during his years as Sales Director of Panam was back in town
this past week to see the Hertz Agency get underwva. Mr Jarman runs
Venezuelan Hertz agency for the Bordens... Lt. John T. Peavey USMC
returned from visiting the In-laws at West Palm Beach with wife and
young son Thursday.... With the beginning of the Hasco Sugar grinding
season the Electric company can hitch a power line to the sugar mill
generators and end the nightly cocktail hour "Black-out"....

Exposition vagabond named "May 25" because of the stra3 bullet he
received during the day of civil war was apprehended by a plain clothes
police agent Saturday morning and pistol whipped down Harry Truman
Blvd. enroute to La Police... Son of the Panam Sales Director Dick Abb-
att broke his arm this past week.... Mrs Burton Williams is moving into
her Gros Morne Villa with the departure of the FAO Martin Routh for
Rome... Miss Tourism Evelyn Guignard leaves for the Cali, Colombia
contest Jan 20 with her "suivante" Mile Monique Benjamin....
contest Jan 20 with her "suivante" Mile Monique Benjamin... Little Eur-
rope is the flashy new store of Mrs Dadlani on the corner of Tourist Ave.









HOTEL


SPetionville
featuring
The Smart Saturday Night Club
LA RONDE
9p.m. Until Late Closing
The El Rancho Duroseau
Orchestra
Dancing Nightliy Except Sunday From 7pm
THOSE WHO APPRECIATE
THE BEST DINE
AT EL RANCHO HOTEL
And always superb cuisine


5-
-4,
'4


Dr. Maria Bourgeois who is stu-
dying the modern technics of can-
cer treatment in Germany on a
fellowship made available by Ger-
man Businessman Wesner Linberg.
Honorary Consul in Hamburg. Mr.
Linberg donated a hundred milli-
grams of radium for the new Can-
cer Center which opened in Nov-
ember.

PANAMA LINE PANAMA
CANAL CO.
The SS "ANCON" of the Panama
Line will arrive from new York at
7:00 A M.. January 12th, 1960.
On board are a total of 89 pass-
engers of which the following 19
will disembark at Port-au-Prince:
Mrs. Noptany Barthelemy, Sister
Yvonne Boivin. Mrs. Albert Breton.
Sister Laurette Dion, Mrs Clara Fe-
lix, Sister Gagne. Mrs. Marne-The-
rese Kemrisan & daughter -lYrs.,
Mr. William Kuhns. s William
Kuhns. Mrs. Therese Lherisson. Dr.
Harold L May, Sister Mary Alice
Soucy, Miss Cecile Stines, Miss El-
eanor Tarshis, Col. & Mrs. Dean
T. Vanderhoef. Mr & Mrs. Arnold
Wolf.

INSPECTOR DIES SUDDENLY
Jacques Lamour. twenty-five year
old immigration inspector collapsed
and died in his room at home in
Carrefour-Feuille 11 am on Decemb-
er 31st.
His sudden death bewildered his
family and friends An autopse in-
dicated he died of natural causes.
Funeral services were sung at St.
Anne's Church Tuesday afternoon.

BONE SPECIALIST HAM FIERE
Dr Arthur Young, a bone speci-
alist from Long Island has been
induced to spend part of his vaca-
tion in Haiti by fellow Ham of the
airwaves Juies Tomar. Dr and Mlrs
Young (K2VQQ) arrived yesterday
for a stay at El Rancho.


is


ti Joseph report


au Prince Mr Rouse will leave for
meetings in South America and re-
turn to Washington in late February.


5 40


Seeking additional facts as a res-
ult of his recent visit here with Sen-
ator Homer E. Capehart Mr. Wall-
ace G. Rouse, Executive Vice Pres-
ident of Berlanti Overseas Corpor-
ation arrived on the SS. Cristobal
for conferences here. January 4.

Mr Rouse who served as speciall
Assistant on Latin American Affairs
to Senator Capehart on his recent
tour of the area is no stranger to
flaiti having visited here about 30
times since 1948.

Senator Capehart's team of ex-
perts are all recognized Specialists
with years of experience in their
respective fields.
Following his conferences in Port




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HAITI SUN ,,


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-SUNDAY, JAN. 10TH, 1960


-.. J--J r,' *- "tIjA U i.i.1


m Ir in


.r _


-aa

"4 1 "* "
'Carbl Malval and Jean-Claude
Iblland became engaged December
4.' 30 at a party held at the NMalval
,,i...Chauvet home in Babiole. The young
V- couple are planning a February
wedding upon Jean-Claude's gradu-
ALtion for Hotel School management
at Cornell University in New Jer-
sey.
."'_.-.
Jacques Lataillade was over from
Jamaica for the New Years festivit-
es.

Dr Michel Stephen who has been
-practising his dental art at 157 57th
-'-St West New York City for the past
A two years is down visiting his family
in Lalue.

:-'. Hasco manager Albert Hill visit-
: ed Miami this week.

Papa Obed Laurent accompanied
-. by hits wife and three grandsons
clippered to Venezuela December 26
"to visit with his two engineer sons
in Caracas. Mr Laurent father of
Garvey Laurent the agronomist in
charge of ODVA will be on hand Ui
Caracas for the christening of an-
other grandson.

Jessie Dejoie the second daughter
of the former Presidential Candid-
ate Louis Dejoie %was married in
Mexico City last week.

Pierre Richard Villedrouin the
dashing young student of Architect-
ure in Mexico City is \isiitng with
his family and friends here.


Hundreds of friends converged on
the home of Roland and Micheline
Rigaud Friday when the tragic un-
timely death of their little two and
a half year old daughter Martine
became known. With offer our deep
regrets to the young couple.


The Rev. John Turnbull is return-
ing to Haiti next week after eight
years. Rev. Trunbull who did mis-
sionary work here will visit with
his son Pastor Wally Turnbull.
*
Jan Hartog the long haired Dutch
Historian was up from Aruba for
a look at Port-au-Prince.

The engagement of Micheline Mal-
. branch to Jean Claude Appollon
-. (de Paris) was announced at a party
held Saturday night in the Ruelle
"; St Cyr home of Micheline's parents
-Mr and Mrs Fatty Malbranche.

Mrs Jackie Deschamps flew to


Mau r i e ce Duchatelier assistant
Panam Station manager is back
from a 22-day island hopping tour
of the Caribbean and Mianmi.

Leslie Bogat is back from three
%week Sedren business in the States.
'"
Margaret Rose Fouchard daughter
of Mr and Mrs Emmanuel Fouchard
is back from hive years in German
where she studied piano. The tal-
ented young Miss Fouchard will
teach piano here.

Guy Scott son of Captain and Mrs
Lucien Scott is returning on the SS
Flandre from four years at the Par-
is Conservatory of Music where he
studied piano.

Jack Kaufman a historical writer
-Military Institutions- is vacation-
ing here at the Oloffson.
*a *

Roger and Francois Jeanty and
their children Nadene and Roger
Jr have returned to Montreal cam-
pleting their third annual vacation
in Haiti. The Belgiunm Rio Tinto
Mining executive and his wife left
with a tan worthy of the tropics -
from K.ona and Goat Island.


Jean Kobler the imminent writer
who recently described Haiti the
Oloffson and Coster to Saturday Ev-
ening Post readers -a timely plug
for the Winter season- is back do-
ing research for a book and several
articles.
a 4 *
Ibert Noustas returned to Manhat-
tanville College Sunday while her
brother Joe flew to Georgetown U.
in Washington D.C. to continue his
study of business.

Mrs Jackie Auguste has returned
home from North Canada where her
Engineer husband is building a rail-
way. She returned with son Regin-
ald, daughters Genevieve and Clau-
dette. They are expecting a fourth
next month.

H E. Harold Juell presented his
credentials to President Dr Fran-
cois Duvalier Friday morning at 10
as Minister of Norway to Haiti.

Mr Juell a graduate of the faculty
of law of the Sorbonne is author-
of the book Ethiopie, Three years
in the Empire of Emperor Haile
Selassie.
*


Jamaica to join her husband with Frank Jordan news director ot
son Jackie Junior and Claude. Mrs NBC in Chicago, a former UP man
Vve Henri Deschamps is on a health in the Far East is honeymooning
trip to the States. here.


Mr Richard Beckard and his wife
traveling along with Misses Rose
Randell, Ida May Born, Florence
Anderson from New York are at
the Ibo Lele. Mr Beckard is the
Executive of Richard Beckard Ass-
ociates, Consultant in Sales Confer-
ences.

On board of the SS Oslofjord of
the Norvegian American Line Wed-
nesday, arrived among 400 Tourists
were Lawyer Jerry Deutsch and his
beautiful Brasilian wife Thelma, En-
gineer Leonard Weiss and his char-
ming wile Erica. Jerry and Thelma.
They got married on Deceniber 20
in New York were greeted here
with champagne by La Belle Cre-
ole.

The SS Nassau arrived here with
Dr Malcolm Rosenblatt Boston, a
Psychiatrist and his "seduisante
femme" Ruth. They were traveling
along with the happy honeymooners
Charles and Sandra La Monica from
Westchester County, N.Y. The party
was greeted by the Public Relations
of the Tourist Bureau, Aubelin Jo-
licoeur.

The SS Berlin brought -100 tourists
and Kurt Conle a copy writer for
TV and Radio, lovely Sue Mosel of
the Norman Craig & Kummel Ad-
vertising Agency, New York. They
have made plan to come here for
a longer visit for Carnival.


The John Masons are back in
Port. Presently stopping at the In-
ternational club at Thor they are
expecting their boat from Martini-
que shortly.
*
A. J. Cutler brother of"Mrs Jules
Tomar of City Shoes revisited Port
after almost a decade. A leading
light in Haddonfield New Jersey
Mr Cutler spent a fortnight %with
the Tomars on Gros Morne.

Nagela Hakime the lovely Miss
Haiti contestant left with the big
brown envelope of an resident to
the U.S. Friday.
6
Jessie Merceron the lovely daught-
er of Ambassador and Madame Ar-
naud Merceron %was married to En-1
gineer Frantz Jerome at the Sacre
Coeur of Turgeau Thursday even-
ing. President and Madame Francois
Duvalier the bride's uncle Army
Chief of Staff and Mrs Pierre Mer-
ceron were witnesses. The church
was crowded with frIends of the po-
pular young couple.
8. *
Etzer Racine recently recovered
from his auto accident wed Mlle
Marie Buteau of Aux Cayes, a well
travelled member of the Haitian-
American Institute staff. Etzer Ra-
cine is the former Mayor of Croix
des Bouquets.

Priscilla Winslow Wood, artist and
graduate engineer was down from
Washington with her mother for the
Yule holidays with her sister Mrs
Leroi Elliot of Texaco and Petion-
viile.

Dr Ronald Hilton director of His-
panic American Studies and Profes-
sor of Romantic languages at Stan-


SACHA THEBAUD who was bell- I
eved to be studying architecture on
a scholarship in Paris arrived home
Christmas da with his childhood
sweetheart on his arm wearing a
golden wedding ring Nineteen %ear
old Rona Roy was thought to be
working in New York when her ast-
ounded father saw her comingE i,n


married in a religious service in St
Gerard's church on New Year's Eve.
Sacha's father Dr Jules Thebaud
was bestman and the bride's Aunty
Mrs Jean Vorbe matron of honor.
Colonel Edouard Roy, Rona's fath-
er attended the ceremony as did
other close members of the families
,n Haiti i


the drive way with Sacha.
The romance that began when
According to the radiant youngg 'they were neighboring children in
bride. Sacha told ner to tell her St Gerard exchanging notes over
boss goodbye and they flew off that j the fence has deeply touch the many
night to Miami but had to fly North friends the youngg couples have here.
to Alarama a State that does not Sacha and Rona leave today for
require parental consent for young a long honeymoon on the Island of
people to marry. After the Christ- Dominica where Sacha's sister Gil-
mas eve civil ceremony in Alabann da is bring up a family.
they flew home to Hain and were P


DEPARTURE OF A PROMISING ADMIRAL--The Bill Ellis family of
the American Embassy bidding "Bon voyage" alter the holidays at
home inl Bourdon to Junior Ellis who is attending Florida Naval Academy.


ford Unijversity. California spent
twelve hours here last week on a
swing through the Canruoean. Pro
lessor Hilton came to Haiti alle
travelled Llu'ough rural Culba.
i. i *
Wdliam Attaway handsome TV
and Radio writer is down for a
vacation at the Oloffson Mr Atta-
wa.\ writes songs for Harry Bela-
fonte.
l K
Former Army Colonel Max Lau-
renceau has opened a cale bar res-
taurant on the Grand Rue next to
the Boulangerie St. Marc.


House-guests of the Joes Cichowisk
in La Boule over the holidays were
Mirs Cichowisk's sister and husband
Jewel and Robert Ossenbeck and
Betty Hugey of Cincinnati. Clara
Cichowisk returned to her studies at
Florida State- U in Tallahasse Mon-
day.
j. '
Pretty Eva Meinberg daughter of
the Mahogany Tycoon returned to
her studies in Fort Lauderdale this
week.

Jacques Habert editor of the New
York French language newspaper
"France-Amerique" a council re-
presentative in the U.S. of French-


men Overseas is li here for a fortnight
visit.

A recent visit to the art institu-
tions in this city were the famous
American sculpture Louise Nevels-
on and Matha Jackson of the Jack-
son Art Gallery in Mlanhattan.
*
C a ) a n e Choucounue broke its
1NS8 record New Year's Eve with
I ore than a thousand persons crowd-
ed under its thatched roof to see
1959 out and 60 in.

A foreign bossy night-spot oper-
alor is reported to have pulled his
gun on his foreign female star danc-
er during an argument. The Teled-
lol comment that if he had pulled
th trigger he would have been con-
sidered a brilliant critic.
Donita Borden flew in from New
-York last Wednesday to join her
husband, Arthur, min working out fin-
al details for the 1960 Hertz Car
rental program. She is still wond-
ering how many people in addition
to herself decided there was no point
in taking National's jet airplane to
Miami and spending all night and
next morning waiting for the' Port-
au-Pnrince plane. She went the slow,
old fashioned way -thus avoiding
last week's dreadful e r a s b- but
she's shaky from the near miss.


SPORTSCAR


RENT AND DRIVE -A VOLKSWAGEN OR


"14ATTT -qT7NI99


SACHA THEBAUD AND RONA ROY
ELOPE: ARE WED IN ALABAMA
TO HONEYMOON IN DOMINICA


From Southerland Tours


FREE HOTEL, PIER AND AIRPORT DELIVERY AND PICKUP


TEL: 3591--OFFICE: EXPOSITION NEAR ROND POINT




.1 *.M~ -


iPAGEl 920


- ATTI


SUN"


A. A A6


SUNDAY, JAN. 10TH


Tele-Haiti



PROGRAMME DE LA SEMAINE


MONDAY

7:00 7:20 Club 5
7:20 7:45 Comiques
7:45 8:00 -' Nouvelles
8:00 8:30 I Spy (L'Espionne)
8:30 8:35 Bulletin Meteorolo-
gique
8:35 9:00 Taverne de Duffy
9:00 9:05 Nouvelles
9:05 -10:30 Telecinema

TUESDAY
S 7-00 7:20 Club 5
7 20 7:45 Comiques
7:45 8:00 Nouvelles
S 8:00 8:30 Mon Hero
8:30 8:35 Bulletin Meteorolo- ,
gique
8:35 9:00 Intrigue Etrangere
S.9:00 9:05 Nouvelles
9:05 -10:30 Telecinema

WEDNESDAY

S 7:00 7:20 Club 5
7:20 7:45 Comiques
7:45 8:00 Nouvelles
8:00 -- 9:00 Show de la Westing-
S housee (Cow-Boys)
S .9:00 9:05 Nouvelles
S-9:05 9:10 Bulletin Meteorolo-
gique
9:10 -10:40 Teleeinema

*''.' THURSDAY
7:00 7:20 Club 5
7:20 7:45 Comiques
I. 7:45 8:00 Nouvelles
8:00 8:30 Paris Precinct
lip:


I


d


8:30 8:35 Bulletih Mereorolo-
gique
8:35 9:00 Florian' Zabach
(Musique)
9:00 9:05 NouveUes
9:05 -10:30 Telecinema

FRIDAY

7:00 7:20 Club 5
7:20 7:45 Comiques
7:45 8:00 Nouvelles
8.00 8:30 Janet Dean
.:30 9:30 Show de la Ford
(Robin des Boisi
(Franlke Laine)
9:30 9:35 Nouvelles
9:35 -1): 30 Telecinema

SATURDAY

7:00 7:20 Club 5
7:20 7:45 Comiques
7:45 8:00 Nouvelles
8:00 8:30 westernn Theater
8.30 8:35 Buit- --.. eteorolo-
gique
8:35 9:00 Star Performance
9:00 9:05 Nouvelles
9:05 -10:30 Telecinema

SUNDAY

2:00 2:30 Comiques
2:30 3:u0 Cow-Boys
3:00 3:30 Documentaires
3-30 1:00 Conrad Nagle
4:00 4:05 Bulletin Meteorolo-
gique
4:05 5:45 Telecinema
5:45 6:00 Nouvelles


For all kinds of French perfumes
visit Haiti's Smartest Indian store
Select your favourite perfume
from -our large collection

JEAN PATOU
CHRISTIAN DIOR

We offer you the world's famous
brands at free port prices

LE GALLON

CARVEN

LANVIN NINA RICCI

CARON

CHANEL

RAPHAEL

etc... etc...
MILOT


WHERE. THE LOWEST ,PRICE, IS THE OnLVYPRICF


AFRICAN RESEARCH FOUNDA-
TION LAWYER HERE TO SEE
DR MELLON AND NEW
CANCER CENTER
Ronald Moss, attorney for the Af-
rican Research' Foundation is here
to invite Dr Larimer Mellon of the
Schweitzer Hospital to become a
member of the ARF board.
Mr Moss who is on his third visit
to Haiti said he would be interested
in seeing the new Cancer center
and finding out what their needs
are. He explained that the African
Research Foundation is preparing
to build a Cancer Research Founda-
tion in Kenya the first of its kind
on the African Continent.
LEE OF KENSCOFF MOVING
TO JAMAICA
Atherton Lee of Chatelet des
Fleurs in Kenscoff flew to Kingston
Thursday he explained to complete
negotiations 'for the purchase of land
in Jamaica's Blue Mountain region
to begin a new corporation "Flow-
ers of Jamaica", '
To deal in artichokes flowers as
well as pineapples for export from
Jamaica to the rest of the Caribbean
and Florida Winter market. Mr Lee
had land trouble here last year pand
it appears he is moving stakes to
our competitive neighbor.
QUEEN ACCLAIMED...
(Continued from page 1)
The reception committee for the
queen included Madame la Gene-
rale Pierre Merceron, Mrs Fortuna
Guery, Leonie Coicou Madiou, Ray-
mond Roy, Mile Marie Lacombe,
Mrs J. B. Cantave, Jn-Jacques Ho-
norat director of the Tourist Office,
Ernst Casseus Miss Haiti contest
organizer, Salomon Baboun, Major
Kesler Blain, Edouard Craan of
Club Camaraderie where Miss Fou-
chard made her debut. Andre Pier-
re, Victor Assali, Lucien Thebaud,
Carl Berhman, S. Lassegue and
Philippe Charlier.
IlI


The

"One of
is the Olol
show..."


Gerard Bartell President of Tele-Haiti leaves today for Curacaq, t .
visit two other stations of his budding Caribbean Television net-WiorlL'_
The dynamic young progressist spent four days here with his wifq cheek- i
ing over the new T.V. station, Haiti's first..
During his tour of the Tele-Haiti installation he paid' tribute-to thel'
work of Haitian manager Andre S. Apaid and youthful team of Haitians. .
The proprietor of the Bartell Group, a large chain of Radio and T.V.
Stations throughout the U.S., stated that he was satisfied with the pro- -
gress Tele-Haiti had made and said he believed that television in Haiti
will rival any country within the year. Lodged at the El Rancho Mr and
Mrs Bartell were accompanied by Mrs Rose Evans( wife of Television
engineer Ralph Evans. .... ....




SATURDAY EVENING POST said:

the highlights of Port-au-Prince night life
ffson's uninhibited Monday night floor




the


Hotel Oloffson



Show




Oui Cherie "

EVERY MONDAY AT 10 P.M. SHARP

We -recommend that you reserve for

DINNER and SHOW.........$5.00
Dinner will be served from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m.
Entrance for show only: ... .$2.00 Limited space


THE WORLD


FAMOUS


SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCASION


i




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