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Haiti sun ( December 27, 1959 )

Digital Library of the Caribbean Duke University Libraries
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: December 27, 1959

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00244

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: December 27, 1959

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00244

Full Text





K- Weekly

^. Every

n,^'u av '-


Sun


.. <" ._


lOc


New PAA


Schedule

BEGINS JANUARY Ist
To provide better Jet connections
for passengers travelling New York
-Haiti and Haiti-New York Pan
American World Airways has rear-
ranged its flight schedule.
The single weekend direct flight
to and from New York will be main-
tained Every. Tuesday and Friday
flight 429 departing Port-au-Prince
at 1:30 p.m. will connect with Jet
flight 228 leaving Ciudad Trujillo at
3:30 p.m. arriving in New York at
6:55 p.m.
Flight 227 leaving New York at
8:30 a.m. arriving in Ciudad Tru-
jillo at 11:45 connecting with flight
430 arrives in Port-au-Prince at
1:05 p.m.
This will dispense with an over-
night stop in Ciudad Trujillo. It is
possible to leave New York at 8:30
a.m. and return the same day at
6:55 p.m. spending twenty-five min-
utes in Port-au-Prince.


S HAITPS CLHAiNCED FOR T1IC Ur
SUGAR CANE QUEEN OF THE WORLD
SIGHTED AS "EXCELLENT"





I :- SIGHT
,
':



















.Miss Haiti, Claudlnette Fouchard on her departure Tuesday for the Sugar
C.Pane Queen contest in Call, Colombia. Miss Fouchard, accompanied by
er maid of lionor, Moniqae Cartwright (Ift); mother and aunty Bobo
Vieux, acting as dresser, wore a black and white checker
linen travelling suit with a straw hat and bag by Maison
Marle-Jeanne. Her, father is seen at night.



I CHRISTMAS -- Today d
"Christmas! Christas! Jesus the By An "ANCIEN HAITIEN"
: Savior I Here."
This beautiful song exalting the
Glory of the- Almighty causes one to in the middle of the street; by'the
S' meditate and recall to mind many jingling of the bells of the ambulat-
g -reat things of the past." ing vendors announcing a bargain
.CHR.ISTMAS OF YESTERYEAR sale of toys; by the "pow... pow!"
In bygone days Christmas was al- of the bursting of balloons;' by the
ways heralded around the beginning little "ralles" which the young girls
o f the month of November by the organized on the.front porches of
explosion of firecrackers; by the their homes, rafles which sometime
Slash of red and green of the "al- caused the joy and laughter of the
r..' lumettes bengales" (colored-flame "badauds" (children crowded before
I. matches); by the popping of fire- the house) when the secret of a tick-
works, each evening, the plnles d'e- et bought by a young gallant for
toUes" (sparkler) which the child- 10 cts or a gourde (20 cts) revealed
: ren took pleasure in swinging back a prize of a rol of paper marked:
and forth before throwing them out "Bopne Chance!" (Good Luck) oa
S"Faltes vot re chemin, Monsier"
CABINET NAMED (On your way, sir).
Y~ OUNG NEW YORK CONSUL Christmas of yesteryear brought a
-. GENEBAL BECOMES FOREIGN thousand joys to all the hearts. The
.* CHIEF children waited feverishly for that
.. The Government confirmed Mon- wonderful day in the year' and from
day the formation of President Fran- time to time-from mid Novet. ber-
:.'cois Duvaller's fifth Cabinet as fol- they began slipping 5 and 10 centi-
".. lows: mes coins into therl boite. secrete
Interior and National Defense: (savings bank) in. order to assure
.- mmterce and Ndl t:la" (oo e r-of "bdaus nchidren crowed coce
..AURELE JOSEP pi their share for the.;traditional idinn-
., Commerce and Industry: \ er of "durix ac pos, pbule et cock-
M RVE BOYER 'tail" ,peas and rice, stewed'chicken,
t Foreign Affairs: andrum, sugar and water, flavored
S'BAYMOND MbISE
P.FnbHoH health and Population: SAFE CONDUCT
..r AIs BO.UT ACTION SOUGHT
Edu cat raonm n CARACAS-Venezuela's ambassad
Pube rtbefors: ror to the Organization of Americat
OUNil W W HONORAT *-States has been instructed to asl
'.AMABTUIERE FORT 'that bods aid in obtaining safe
0Informairtion and Coordination:
A"' lfows a an conducts for political refugees i
tAUL BLANCHET D s asylum in Venezuelan embassies a
aor and Welfare: Port-au-Prince, Haiti. and Managua
,MIBDBRIC DESVARIEUX Nicaragua.
alee: Nicaragua.
-IG fWtANOOllS Venezuelan Ambassador Hector
hance and Agriculture:- David Castro was instructed by thi
GRAD PHIIPPEAUX foreign office to notify the OAS tha
The only surprise in the new Ca- Venezuelan efforts to obtain diploma
l lnet was the appointment of the atic safe conducts for the refugees
S33-sarold M. Molse, consul general both directly and through third part
S.aNew York, as Foreign Minister. ies. has not been successful.


p .Z. :
.....L'.)] "*ee.la.masao et


S- -SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27th, 1959 Port-au -Prince, HAITI No. 37, Avenue Marie-Jeanne Cite DUMARSAIS ESTBME No.8


S


11. 'ULITIICAL

PRISONERS BENEFIT

FROM PRESIDENTIAL

CLEMENCY

Eleven Haitian Political prisoners
benefitted from a presidential Christ-
mas and Independence day clemen-
cy measure. A comminique issued
December 22 by Interior and Natio-
nal Defense Minister Aurele Joseph
announced their liberation.

Named as benifitting trom clemen-
cy accorded personally by President
Doctor Francois Duvalier were: poet
Jean Brierre, Gustave Borno, Doc-
tor Jude Craan, Franck Landrin,
Juvigny Leroy, Benoit Depestre,
Antonio Nelson, Marc-Aurele Jean-
Louis, Joseph Pierre, Rossini Pier-
re, .Gerard Brisson.



114 Cruises

Expected
While hordes of tourists "y air
are unlikely, over 50,000 are due
on 114 winter cruises that will call
at Port-au-Prince. This will be a
record cruiseship.season for Haiti.
In 1957-58, 23,651 tourists came
to Haiti by air; 34,354 by cruise
ship. It was estimated, they spent
$6,037,725. In 1958-59, 24,264 came
by air and 42,744 -by ship. They
spent and estimated $6,820,088.

The National Office of Tourism
predicts a 12 per cent increase over
last year.

With politics stowed out. of sight
for the first time in three' years,
Haiti's Tourist Industry is dressing
up to receive the largest number of
American tourists in ten years when
an uglier monster raised .its head.
The big snag in preventing Haiti

(Continued on page 15)


I-
n
k
e

t
in

r
a,
te
t
I-

t-


'Yesterday
with lime peel) in which they par-
ticipated every year organizing the
Xmas dinner in their'respective
neighborhoods always on Christmas
Eve beginning at 11 o'clock at night,
just before they went to bed to await
the "passage du Petit Jesus." (the
visit of Santa Claus).
Christmas of yesteryear meant
December 25th a day when the
mothers, halfway out of their minds
had to rush around in search of a
bottle of "huile de ricin" (castor oil)
and "pean chadeque" (grape fruit
peel) in order to prepare a concoct-
ion which would "decongestionner"
those little delicate stomachs which
had been overloaded the night be-
fore.
(Continued on page 15)


HOSPITALS SATELLITE t,
CLINICS AND MOBILE
X-RAY UNT
Dr Edgar F. Berman, Assistant
Secretary General of Medico-Medi-
cal International Cooperation de.
cleared yesterday upon completing a
wo-week jeep tour of all the majpr.,
medical installations in Haiti that
the ground work had been laid in:
the U.S. for the voluntary, non-po-
litical organization of American phy-
sicians to begin their "Pilot Project
Haiti" and he would return here in
February to initiate the program.
Dr Berman who jeeped around
rural Haiti with Dr Auguste Denize'.
and Dr Nickolai director of the Pote
Cole. Public Health division had
talks with the new Minister of PubN
lic Health Dr Carlo Boulos and the,
personal of the Medical Sch6ol as
well as members of the medical-
profession here..
The Medico directors believe the
Haiti project will be of tremendous
international significance.
With a hundred thousand dollars..
donated by the Public Welfare Fouin
nation of Virginia and an additional
$100,000 in drugs Dr Berman said
Medico's "Pilot Project Haiti" in .
tends to make the following accom--
(Continoed on page 2).< -.

AMERICAN :
INVESTORS IN .
SEDREN HERE
STRIKERS BACK ON JOB
Three prominent Ameican busi-
nessmen, stockholders in Consolidat-
ed Halliwell of Toronto Cinada, Mau-
rice C. Hill,,William Schiller,' and
Baron Carl Vanderleck are here to
look over their investment.
Mr Hill is president of Willar
Hawen Co of New York which im-
ports Tropical Hardwoods and Co-'
coa beans from Haiti since 1843.,
His company at onetime imported
coffee from Simone Plantation and '.
Lignum Vitae.
Here to visit the copper Mines at
Terre-Neuve Mr Hill explained that
the copper output have already been .
(Continued on page 16)


2 Famous 'Lifers' Here

TO SHOOT OUT-OF-THE-WAY-PLACES FOR TOURISTS

Haiti's efforts to boost..tourism
from the U.S. and to compete on a :: -
stronger footing with the rest of the I '
Caribbean -by opening up its beach- ..
es and exploiting its natural beau- "
ty- has been noted by Ken Gould- ['
thorpe and Peter Anderson, a Life '"" .-:"':'
team here researching some of the
Island's out-of-the-way beauty spots Z.
and shorelines.
Ken, a reporter on Life's Foreign
News staff in New York, is no
stranger to the Caribbean. In addi-
tion to visiting and vacationing in
many of the Caribe's pleasure 'isl- Ij"g
ands. he was one of the Life report- .. CC, -
ers covering Fidel Castro's revolu-
tion a year ago, where he met the
Sun's editor for the first time. Edu- -
caed at the University of London An Aece Life Magazine team look longingly at l eal turkey bel re
and Washington University in SL
(Coanmed on page 3) jeeplng to the South on Christmas eve.


lfedico Opening Pilot Project
U,-C'. T A LIT 1 rO ESTABFISBn1H TENT -


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I


1








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or








"HAITI SUN"


.SUNDAY, DE TH,1
SUNDAY, DEC. 27TH, 1959 : :.


Medico Opening Pilot Project
(Continued from page 1)


plishments in Haiti within a two
year period.
1 Simple, but adequate medical
care to an entire nation.
2 Elevate the standards of the
existing medical profession in
this country.
3 Obviate the underlying causes
of epidemics and the ravages
, of endemic disease.
4 Gradually by teaching and
training integrate the professi-
onal peoples of this nation into
this project and ultimately have
them fake over and run the or-
ganization and facilities brought
there and progress on their own.
The reasons Haiti was chosen as
a pilot project are as follows: It's
great need -it's small size- it's
proximity to the United States, (for
supervision and low cost of trans-
portation), -it's minimal language
barrier- it's inherent friendship
to America and the existing shell
of a medical organization. Accord-
ing to Dr Berman this project will
have three concurrent facets:


I-MEDICAL SERVICE:
a) Hospitals:
This entails the establishment of
two completely equipped tent hos-
pitals in the most needy areas of
Haiti, (consisting of one hundred
beds, generators, water purification
system, two operating rooms, lab-
oratory, X-ray units, etc.) These
hospitals will be independent units
taking care of any type of medical
or surgical disease, (except those
of a special nature). It will serve
as a local dispensary for prophylac-
tic health measures, sanitary edu-
cation and minor illnesses for the
immediate surrounding area. It's
prime purpose is to treat the seri-
ous illnesses of an entire area. It
will also survey diseases in this lo-
cale and do elective rehabilitation
work. Specialized cases can be sent
back to the Universitty at Port-au-
Prince or Mellons (Albert Schweit-
er) hospital. These fully equipped
tent hospital will-aso provide a
place for young Haitian medical
graduates to work with Americans


*more pace


more space


more luxury


and a flawless sporting pedigree


Sweeping ahead with all the zip, sparkle and road-
hugging stability Inherent in Its breed, the new M.G.
Magnette wins outright on performance alone. Yet this
thrilling sports salqon has much more to offer-inspired
continental stylin... panoramic vision.. extra space
for luggage... the luxury of real leather upholstery...
flawless craftsmanship throughout. Come and see-

the -completely new




SMANETTE
MARK III

la =P


AUTO S. A. DISTRIBUTORS
360 Grand'Rue P.O. Box 147
Telephone 3134--2772
LISTED DE PRIX
MORRIS MINI-MINOR... ................. $1,500
MORRIS MINOR 1000 Convertible ......... 1.750
MORRIS MINOR 1000 4 door ................. 1,800
MORRIS MINOR 1000 Traveller ...... ... 1,900
MORRIS OXFORD STANDARD SERIES V ...... 2.250
MORRIS OXFORD DE LUXE SERIES V ....... .2,325
MORRIS OXFORD TRAVELLER .... ....... 2,525
MORRIS MINIBUS 4-2 .................. 3,275
MG "A" (equipped) 2 seater ............ ..... 2,500
MG "A" (equipped) coupe .................. 2,650
MG MAGNETTE (equipped) ................. 2,750


who will eventually administrate
them. They will be a training
ground for physicians, hospital aids,
nurses, and technicians who will ev-
entually operate this system. These
central hospitals will service, (with
the Satellite Clinics) an area of ap-
proximately one hundred miles in
diameter.
b) The Satellite Clinics:
These will be three in number at
a radius of fifty miles from each
hospital, (located in a village) to
treat the less complicated illnesses,
do mass prophylaxis, train local
people in sanitation and public
health measures and to be the local
practitioner on the job.
c) Mobile Unit Portable X-ray:
A mobile unit with portable X-
rays, (for tuberculosis surveys) to
cover the island periodically. To
check, to publicize, to probe, to sur-
vey, and to treat systematically vil-
lage by village. It will also be used
for urgent disasters.
These medical services will ini-
tially be manned by volunteer Ame-
rican physicians going for periods
of three months to a year. It will
take approximately forty physicians
and ten technicians for a one year
period. They will be dispersed as
follows: Two physicians at each
hospital, one in each satellite clin-
ic, and one in the mobile unit.
I
--RAISING THE STANDARDS OF
THE MEDICAL PROFESSION:
A depressed area takes on new
life when it feels that someone is
interested. This is also true of the
medical profession. The well trained
physicians of Haiti have little place
to work and third rate facilities to
work in. There is little stimulus for
excellence and most of the good
physicians who still reside in Haiti
give but little time to teaching. It
is the intention of this project, (and
many major University Medical
Schools are interested) to send vi-


i'.


HOTELS


%-- --- A-a, .' I


these teachings. Also to survey the knowledge of sanitation and public
nutritional status of local areas and health exposes whole communities
help alleviate malnutrition where it to devastating epidemics. There are
exists. For this it is essential that only a few examples of the condi-
the physician be constantly present tions these peoples of underdevel-
for at least a two year period to oped nations have to contend with.
work with these organizations.. We, the physicians of the United'
IV-It is intended to gradually draw States are cognizant of our good


Haitian physicians'and nurses into
this organization until they can take
over with aids and technically train-
ed people to run this operation, and
finally to leave this nation with ade-
quate resources for services, medi-
cal teachings of high caliber, and
a framework of a public health and
medical organization to build on.
The Haitian government through
its Ambassador, Mr. Ernest Bon-
homme, and its Foreign Minister,
and Health Minister, according to
Dr. Berman, has contracted to aid
Medico in this project in every con-
ceivable way. It will donate the
site of the hospitals, transportation
within the nation, guards, laborers,
and interpreters, and also sustenance
for the patients and every aid that


HOUSEWIVES


fortune in having the finest in me-
dical education, the facilities with
which to practice and!the technical
aid necessary to do a thorough job.
We also feel that due to our good
circumstances, we have benefited
economically. We are grateful for.
all of this and thus are responding
to a moral responsibility in attempt-
ing to assist both the riedical pro-
fession and ultimately the unfortu-
nate people of these nations to a
status of health whereby eventually .
they may stand on their own with
pride and dignity.
2-ECONOMICI
There is a truism that "disease
breeds poverty and .poverty breeds
disease." This cycle must first be.
(Continued on page 16)
t


RESTAURANTS


SERVE THE EXCELLENT QUALITY RICE

GROWN IN HAITI'S FERTILE VALLEY

OF THE ARTIBONITE



O.D VA



IS PLACING AN IMPORTANT STOCK
OF HIGHGRADE RICE ON THE LOCAL MARKET.
Prices for Sack of 100lbs.


VARIETY:


at P-au-P.


"BLUE-BONNET" Grade-A .. $10.2$at the Mill: $10.50


"BUFFALO"


Grade-A .. 9.20 at the Mil:


"BLUE-BONNET" Grade-B .. 9.20 at the Mill:


"BUFFALO"


Grade-B .. 8.20 at the Mill:


RICE FLOUR .............. 5.00 at the Mi1:


9.50
9.50
8.50
5.30


A Discount of 4 per cent at the Mill at Deseaux (Artio-
nite Valley) or at our warehouse in Port-au-Piince, (corner
Rue- du Centre and Rue des Cesam) wil be allowed on pur-
chase of 20 sacks of rice or more.


raA"' m CA


rlAun a 2 &


siting professors from either Johns
Hopkins Hospital or Harvard for
eight periods, (in various speciali-
ties) during the year to work and
teach in the medical school. It will
also be arranged that they work in
the tent hospitals. An exchange will
also be arranged to extend fellow-
ships at these Universities in the
United States to promising students
so that they may eventually return
to teach their own.
II-CONTROL OF EPIDEMIC AND
INDIGENOUS DISEASE:
In cooperation with the World
Health Organization and the Inter-
national Cooperation Administration
and Care, an attempt will be made
to wipe out at a local level some of
the indigenous diseases and to train
Haitians to expunge the contributing
causes of epidemics. It will be ne-
cessary to teach public health and
sanitation methods and to check


it is possible to give to make this
project a success.
The basic idea of the program pre--
sented here, (Pilot Project Haiti) is
essentially a part of a general'plan.
of medical aid to underdeveloped
nations by the American NMedal'
Profession though the organization, :
Medico. There are three important'
facets in this concept:
I-IIMANITARIAN: ,
Of the two and one half billion-
population of the world, almost one
billion are almost totally without-
medical care. This means that there
are peoples all over the globe hav-'
ing neither the service nor the se-
curity of alleviation of pain and Ill-
ness within practical distance from
their habitat. Children die' from
simple infections, (usually cured by
a simple pill here in the- United
States) or a simple fracture means
crippling for life. Lack of basic








"HAITI SUN"


raUG 3


4'




- i.iiPalnting number three, one of eleven numbered oils and fifteen draw-
-'ig- which will be exhibited by Luce Turnier, Haiti's outstanding woman
IJInter, at an exhibition opening at the Centre d'Art Friday, January 8th,
I nis. Interested persons are invited to attend the vernissage on that
*' te from 5 to 7 p.m.
'.:'.


Build your own Stereo Tape library
.with these&?,t High
Fidelity Components
The ll Tape Transport re.
o: *da stereo broadcasts, copies
Stereo records and tapes. New
modelss now available for %-
track or'" -track stereo re- pMW mO SOM -
-eording. Match it with the Add nth Ilro manr ts
SBell 3030 Stereo Amplifier or Bell tere Ampier,.
and new Model 3070 Bell FM. asM nd AM d &
AM Stereo Tuner to record s mIr pa~or m a id
0 your favorite stereo broad-' O t a
-b ___


LUCE TURNER EXHIBITING
AT CENTRE D'ART JAN. 8th.
ent a painter who is exhib- sage of the artist, a message pro-
ithing other than a formal foundly human, never vulgar, some-
t is specially futile when times bitter, always moving; con-
ns an artist who has a veyed by a pure and accomplished
I his means of expression, technique.
Luce Turnier respects her art. In
bile whom these lines a period where facility without tal-
ssed will not be annoyed ent and a low order of commercial-
I-trust, if I avid here a ism menace the living sources of
iticism of the works Luce Haitian art, this is certainly not A
resents today. It is her slight merit.
and her paintings and not The purpose of these lines is to
literary "translation" of pay her exceptional homage.
sing which carry the mes- Albert Mangones.


DUTCH SAILOR
WINS EL RANCHO
T.V. SET

Wuiner of the beautiful Westing-
house Television set valued at 5299
which was given away as a door
prize last Saturday evening, Dec-
ember 19, at El Rancho's "La Ron-
de" club was Mr Piet Van Kammen
of Harlingen, Holland, a member of
the crew of the motor vessel "Lifa-
na" visiting in port over the week-
end. Mr Van Kammen attended El
Rancho Hotel with three companions
as guests of the Royal Netherlands
Steamship Company here. Mr Van
Kammen was thrilled with his prize
and was very concerned with the
fact that he, as a visitor, had won
this beautiful set. The Management
of El Rancho assured him that ever-
yone present was pleased with his
good fortune. Fortunately, Mr Van
Kammen was able to take the large
set with him on his ship. As Mr Van
Kammen does not speak Ehglish,
the prize was accepted orr his be-
half by the representative of the
Royal Netherlands Steamship Com-
pany who expressed appropriate
thanks for the winner.


BEACH
- *. ,' V ,:''' Y.: -"
"'&


QUEEN


"LIFE" TEAM HERE...
(Continued from page 1)

Louis, he has been a newspaper
man for 11 years. His assignments
as a staffer on Joseph Pulitzer's St.
Louis Post-Dispatch ranged from
covering Presidential campaigns to
the coronation of Queen Elizabeth
II in London in 1953.

In 1956, he was aboard the French
Line's Ie de France when the Swed-
ish Liner Stockholm collided with
the Andrea Doria His eye-witness
accounts and photographs of the res-
cue operation earned him a Pulit-
zer Prize nomination, and were car-
ried world-wide under his byline.
More recently, he reported on the
record influx of American tourists
to Europe in a lead story which ran
in an August issue of Life, and just
prior to leaving New York, he was
one of the team handling Eisenhow-
ers visit to Europe and Asia.

Photographer Peter Anderson was,
in prewar days, a racing mechanic
with Alfa Romeo in London, and
wound up the war as a sergeant in
an Army Film Photographic Unit.
As a cameraman with then British
Government, he travelled Central
America and the Middle East. Re-
turning to London in 1950, he was
retained by Life as a freelance pho-
tographer, and had worked for the
magazine in all parts of the world.
Pete, who has worked in Jamaica
and other British West Indian isl-
ands, loves the area and looks for-
ward to his stay in Haiti, and is
particularly impressed with the
kindness of Haitians. The pair are
staying at what Pete calls the Head-
quarters for Caribbean Correspond-
ents, the Oloffson Hotel, where they
more than enjoy the legendary stor-
ies of their colorful host, Roger
Coster.


HAITI'S U.S. SUGAR
QUOTA BRINGS
DOLLARS
The New York Times of December
18th (A.P.) states that the U.S. Gov-
ernment has granted a sugar import-
quota to Haiti of 7014 short tons.
Since sugar is selling in the United
States for close to 5% cents per
pound or $115.00 per short ton as
against about 3 cents per pound on
the World market or 60 dollars per
ton this amounts to an annual Ame-
rican subsidy to Haiti of about $385,-
000. A large part of this subsidy
goes to cane planters and labor.
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At Kyona Beach recently Mlle Michelle Fouchard was unan]
elected Beach Queen by the Sea-worshipping Set. She is wearing a
outfit made by her aunt fashion head of Sassine Couture House.


,' :


nAAN-10 0


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P A G 4IH m s rS N A D C 7 H 1 5


It is with pleasure that we re-
produce the Preface in English
of the new book "Les Laboureurs
Sde la Mer", by Reverend Father
SHubert Papailler, actually Minister
of National Education.

The Preface signed by His Ex-
cellency, Doctor Francois Duvalier,
President of the Republic, gives a
keen insight Into this chef-d'oeuvre
where the heart of the.talented auth-
or goes out to his suffering brothers
whose problems are etched in what
might be called a 3-dimension tech-
nique. There is no stopping [he read-
er from the moment he begins the
Preface until he reaches the final
scene where Father Papailler's mes-
sage terminates: "this couple, stran-
gers to each other by language, race,
religion, turning to the harmony of
the waltz, appeared to be writing,
on two notes, the symphony of the
Classes, reconciled."'

PREFACE
By His Excellency,


By FATHER PAPAILLER-


in Derac a living chronicle of the
every-day life of the "sisal cutters"
and the foreign contractors. It des-
cribes, without subterfuge, just as
it is seen, the grievous tragedy of
our Haitian brothers. And as if to
reinforce cruelty of this tragedy,
mundane episodes come to exhibit
their insolent luxury. Alcibiade, the
drudge is someone you know and
despite the hundred and fifty years
and over that he has fecundated the
Haitian soil with his sweat, his con-
dition as a human being has not
changed. He personifies, in our opi-
nion, a class despised, but also the
effort which raises the oppressed
towards a destiny of grandeur. Ar-
ound and about him. toss the phan-
loms, the colonists amuse themselv-
es and practise negrophobia. He,
obscure hero of a cause which he
knows to be invincible, he advances,
he marches on. It matters little to
nim that at the end of the road, he
is to be the victim or the martyr.
The essential thing, for him, is to
advance, to march on.


Dr. FRANOIS DUUVIALIEji
President of the Republic And he advances and he marches
I call this tableau of peasant life on.


CHOPPING DOWN OF
CHRISTMAS TREES PROHIBITED
The General Direction of Agricult- ing a special writer authorization
ure, Natural Resources and Rural delivered by the Agricultural Agent.
Development brings to the notice The transport of boughs and bran-
of proprietors and occupants of lands ches can be made after obtaining
on which pine trees grow that it a free permit of deliver by the Ag-
is prohibited to cut down trees of ent.
this species for Christmas trees. The contravenor will be punished
The General Direction points out in conformity with the law of 17
that only the secondary branches August 1955.
and boughs can be cut for this use. Louis BLANCHET -
This can only be done after obtain- General Director
rIf


He is not understood, he who wishes
to bring happiness to the commun-
ity of Derac. He is even combatted.
All he knows is that he has a right
to this happiness, that his brothers
have the right to this happiness and
that for them, as for himself, as
for all others, life is one, beautiful
and rosy.

I acknowledge that the play of
contrasts to which Father Papailler
resorts places a new light on the
explanation of certain attitudes.
Without side-stepping religiQus orth-
odoxy, he composes a human land-
scape which is not made only of
lights. It is indeed the way of life:
shadows and lights. Father Papail-
ler knows the country, and he knows
above all the peasant, the humble
outcast and he understands' him and
he understands his song, heavy with
bitterness where, on moonlight
nights, there also circulates a whole-
some optimism and where, before
the promising harvest is equally
fused an engaging laughter.

SThe chronicle of Father Papailler
with such an evoking title -"The
Laborers of the Sea"- has all the
allure of a diary where the writer
allows his heart to speak. It is not
false lyricism nor the conventional
lyricism of the snobs of literature.

The sincerity, the spontaneity of
Father Papailler please, move you.
Art has no other purpose, for the
writer must above all remember
his quality of man. Father Papailler
offers a chronicle filled with the
bounty of the man of the fields, of
the sweetness of the Antilean night
and of the servitudes of a cruel bit-


ter existence and which at the same
time denounces the present society.
(s) Dr. Francois DUVALIER.

The publication of the English
translation of "Les Laboureurs de
la Mer" which will follow shortly


/
S


is being anticipated by an intrigued -:
public. "Une petite indiscretion" has
permitted us to learn that the Pre-
face and the rest of this magistral
book by Father Papailler was trans
lated by our consoeur Madame
Christian Laporte.


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PAGE 4


I


"HAITI SUN'


I


SUNDAY, DEC. 27TH, 1959"







- SUNDAY DEC. 27H 1959 H=m sine PACU


HAITI SUN
T HAIIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
Responsible MAUCLAIR LABISSIER
MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1950 SHOPPING CENTER NOT
E AB PRACTICAL LET PRIVATE
ENTERPRISE TAKE IT OVER
THE NEW DECADE
:, Haiti Sun
Ave MNrie-Jeanne
SA New Year the time for new Hopes, new Dreams and the promise Ae ar EditJea
Dear Editor:
=o new Aehievements. In Haiti the New Year is also the traditional eel-
.t" of Independence. I noted a letter published by your
Halitians and their friends will join in wishing each other a Happy and interesting newspaper last week con-
Prosperous New Year. This is the beginning of a new decade. cerning the La Saline shopping cent-
tiu er, and would like to add my sugg-
IT IS a fitting time also to pause and remember and pay tribute to estion.
those who gave to Haiti a New Day and a New Year.
Our New Year promises are contained in our tenth anniversary editor- As a businessman with also the
interests of the community at heart
i1. I endorse a plan for the conversion
We want the people of Port-au-Prince and the Republic of Haiti of L Saline from a rankin wusease
to khow once again that The Sun has only one cardinal aim. That is to breeding tourist eye-sore slum into
encourage, help and publish the news of the march of the Haitian people a commercial district a credit to
this Capital City.
towards a better, more prosperous and happy life.
The Sun has been -and always will be- a newspaper reflecting the It is simply this. In place of the
:. hitdests of the Haitian community. It never has -and'never will- serve state building an expensive shopp-
ing Center at La Saline the land
the Interests of any power-seeking "clique". Every Haitian has a rightful could be sold to private interests
Space in The Sun. under rigid ruling of a planification
,' Our guidepost is the motto of the American press: "To give the news Bureau that would permit only build-
impartially, without fear or favor, regardless of any party, sect or inter- ings of certain specification to be
et involved." constructed there. That is to say no
shanties.
SThere will, of course, always be some who will accuse us of veering
'trom that clearly defined road. The answer to these is that the news col- There is no reason why the State
should have to assume the respon-
umns of the Sun, which cannot be bought, are open to those who choose to sibity building up La Sane
*: disagree. when a growing town like Port-au-
'The Sun never has, and never will, accept subsidies or money from the Prince is in search of space to ex-
ligovernment of Haiti, any other state, organization, group, or individual. pand onto.
'Jt'the newspaper of the Haitian people. I am sure private business could
:build up La Saline withinn 1960 at
i~t ll never fear honest competition, for that is a condition that fosters build up LaSaline within 1960 at
a profit to the State and community
to y .jIitiative and enterprise, and enhances the sacred trust the people not at a loss
Jd always have in their press. The Sun will vigorously fight against
publication that violates that trust. ts) Private Enterprise.
Sun .has -an unshakeable faith in the future of Haiti and its people. *
It hopes eventually to publish an edition in Creole. D F O
PLEASE NO DDD FILMS ON T.V.
For the nine'years that have passed and the tenth and the'other years
ahead, The Sun gratefully acknowledges the support of its advertisers HAITI SUN
and readers. It pledges Itself to strive in every way to be a bigger and En Ville
SIbetter newspaper.
Dear Diederich:
..Nothing could please The Sun more than to have nothing to publish
.but "good news". But there always must be the bad along with the good. The Television is great, the gent-
Whichever category into which the news falls, it belongs to the people of lemen who are pioneering this in-
;H.alti. They will always find it in the columns of this newspaper. stitution here are to be congradul-
. ated, but after viewing several pro-
They will always find, too, that The Sun, as in the past, will whole- grams on the set at the Rer Care
heartedly support every move designed to strengthen the bloodstream I would like to recommend that
Sof- the nation's economy, they go easy on the "True Life Edu-
That includes everything from boosting Haiti's tourist attractions, the national Problems of the U.S." type
S products she wants to sell to the rest of the world, to obtaining substanti-ilms. They are characteristically
l loans -particularly from the United States- aimed at achieving
j einanal and economic stability which in turn strengthens the govern- MODERN COr
'nent and the nation's administrative machinery.
SThs Is your newspaper. Every community gets the newspaper it H I
deserves. "
SI
tThe Sun confidently believes that you -the people of Haiti- want
IN TURC
i It to be the best of newspapers. IN
'" It is here to serve you. It will never falter in that duty.
; For the news --all of the news- belongs to the people. A Distinguisl
: The Sun will always publish it knowing that a happy and prosperous Convenientl
.ifu tare Is assured in the hands of an enlightened people.
AUll Air Conditione
L.I "'
f.itorial MIAMI HERALD Dec. 6th. New Pool Terrn
HAITI SEEKS BETTER LIFE Air Conditionned J

SiAffairs in Haiti, much troubled lately with political and economic un- ' H
have been improving markedly in recent weeks. One big reason
the quiet work of the United States International Cooperation Agency F M T
FROM 5:30 AT
help overhaul the nation's entire administrative machinery.
from the ICA were called in by President Francois Duvalier
assist in cleaning up a situation he described as "a mess". ICA is S U N DA Y
some $4 million in technical aid into a program designed to FROM 12:00 p.m
op an atmosphere inviting to private capital, both Haitian and for- Fro

'ae big job is the reorganization of government finances. Heading the DINNI
Sis Nolle Smith, a 70-year-old American Negro who has held
posts in Ecuador and the Virgin Islands. ICA brought the well TO THE RYTH
SPublic Administration Services of Chicago into the picture to MAKE RESER1
(Continued on page I)


American rather than Haitian. Del-
inquency, use of dope, divorce
which may appeal to the morbid
set in the U.S. cannot appeal to the
unsophisticated Haitian audience.
This type of film of negative en-
lightment gives a bad impression
of the U.S.

We know they have just started
and promise to develop Haitian pro-
grams educational as well as en-
tertaining but we would all like to


~I~Aw u


see T.V. succeed. The DDD films
(Delinquency, dope and divorce) are
not for us.
I for one want to commend the
T.V. people for a fine start and sug-
gest too that they begin discussions
of public interest. Have the Minist-
er of Education tell us about the
anti-illiteracy program the Minister
of Agriculture about Erosion etc.
Good Luck
Haitian Integral.


*>


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__ il ~ _ i I__ _ _~_ ____


II


*J^ *


'SUNDAY, DEC. 27TH, 1959


T



i r


1


"HAITI SUN"


PAGEfl.











Puerto Rico University Establishes New


Research And Teaching


"Institute Of Caribbean Studies" Of Vital


Interest To HAITI


In July 1958, the University of
Puerto Rico established a new re-
search and teaching organization
named the Institute of Caribbean
Studies. This Article Indicates the
pressing need for an Institute of
this sort within the Caribbean area,
defines the scope of Interest of the
organization, and sets forth its aims
and functions.
THE CARIBBEAN AREA
One of the most admirable labor-
atories in the world for the study
of human history, institutions, and
culture" is that string of islands
which curves into the Atlantic to
define the northern and eastern li-
mits of the Caribbean Sea. The West
Indies, or the Antilles, were orgin-
ally occupied by American Indians,
and they have since become a home
for peoples from every part of the
world: Europe, Africa, the Middle
East, Ipdia, Indonesia, and China.
If the Caribbean be taken to include
the mainland territories of British
Honduras and the Guianas, the cult-
ural spectrum is widened even more,
notably with the addition of the
ndians of the mainland of Central
and South America, the "Black Car-
ibs" of the coast of the Gulf of
Honduras, and the "Bush Negroes"
of Dutch Guiana.
Defined in these terms, the Carib-
Sbean area consists of more than
forty populated units, most of them
islands, ranging in size from the
tiny Grenadines -each several squ-
are miles in area- to Cuba (44,000
sq. mi.), and British Guiana (83,000
: sq. mi.). Population varies from a
few hundreds on the smallest Dutch,
'.. English, and French islands, to Cu-
ba's six millions. Barbados, with
-166 square miles, supports over 200,-
000 people; British Guiana, with 83,-
000 square miles, supports 500,000.
In its ethnic composition as well,
the Caribbean is an area of remark-
able contrasts. The people of Hail
arp nearly all of African ancestry;
the European strain predominates in
Cuba and Puerto Rico; while the
people of Dutch Guiana (Surinam)
are of African, European, American
Indian, East Indian, Javanese, and
Chinese ancestry. The economies
are also surprisingly diverse. With-
in the Caribbean area, one finds
units which are predominantly dir-
ected to subsistence agriculture
(such as Haiti and the Grenadines),


and others which are predominantly
based on plantation agriculture
(such as Cuba). Oil refineries are
important in Aruba and Curacao,
mining in Jamaica, British Guiana,
Surinam and Cuba, oil and asphalt
production in Trinidad -while small
industries are growing rapidly in
Puerto Rico. There are islands
where population density is almost
unbelievably high, as in Barbados
(1.400 per square mile), and other
units, such as the Guianas,'which
have among the lowest population
densities in the Western world. In
their variegated cultures, histories,
and economies, and in their recur-
rent similarities, the societies of
the Caribbean area provide a fas-
cinating mosaic for the economic
planner, the social and political
scientist, and the informed observer.
CARIBBEAN RETROSPECT
At the time of Columbus, historic
landfall in the Bahamas, the press-
ure of the Carib Indians from the
south upon the Arawaks of the


Greater Antilles had already made
the West Indies a scene of human
tensions. After 1492 the islands, and
particularly Hispaniola, became a
staging area for the Spanish con-
quest and colonization of immense
regions of the New World. Spain's
interest in the Caribbean declined
in the 17th and .18th centuries, ow-
ing to the great importance of the
Mexican and Andean highlands with
their vast populations and mineral
wealth. These were centuries of
trade, smuggling, and piracy in the
Caribbean -a "focus of en\y"--
as Spain's rivals fought her for the
islands. Under Britain, France, and
the Netherlands, the Antilles became
among the richest colonies in re-
corded history. The plantation syst-
em, erected upon the backs of mil-
lions of Negro slaves, provided bas-
ic commodities for the growing urb-
an populations of Western Europe,
and for its looms as well, stimulat-
ing the growth of European capit-
alism.


During the half century after 1776,
however, when the nations of North
and South America were winning
their independence, the arc of Car-
ibbean possessions played a marg-
inal role. In the'island chain only
Haiti won independence in this peri-
od, the second nation in the New
World and the first of the southern
Americas to do so. Meanwhile, in
the other Caribbean islands colonial
domination persisted. Thus, the Car-
ibbean was and Canada remained
as the two principal European foot-
holds in the Americas.
In spite of the industrialization of
sugar in the larger islands, 'the Car-
ibbean lost importance in world
affairs in the 19th century. Exch-
ange and communication among the
various islands slackened, so that
each one became even more exclu-
sively oriented to an overseas "me-
tropolitan" power. The heritage of
centuries of exploitation and the
control of the colonial powers had
created an area in which each com-
ponent unit saw itself more firmly
attached by bonds of language, cult-


For Christmas Cakes
Or "Buches de Noel"
Bakings and Dinners
For the NEW YEAR
MAKE your ORDERS
to Specialists
ANNA BARTHEIEMY
and FIFIE CELCIS
Ave Charles Sumner after
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WI.'I


ure, economy, and sentiment to an
European "mother country" than
to any immediate neighbor. The pos-
sibilites for pan-Caribbean feder-
ation, for regional awareness and
integration, were not realized. At
the very end of the century, the
Caribbean rose to strategic
importance again with the Spanish
American War, the changing strat-
egies of naval power, and the pros-
pect of interoceanic communication,
It was in this period that United
States colonial ambitions in the Car-
ibbean area were revealed most

(Continued on page 1)


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"HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY, DEC. 27TH,


~-~slr


PAGE 6





'S-BUNDAY, DEC. 27TH, 1959


SD T 9sA


D Your
b '-9- $'r --

Shopping

in Haiti

It is getting so that people are
'-. taking vacations as much to
shop as to play golf, lounge in.
S the sun or just relax. And, no
S -won'der when you consider the
savings to be had through Free
Port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they can
b:uy the same gifts, in free-port
shops, at savings up to. 60% of
U. S. prices. So, for the $250
or-so they save, they enjoy a
wonderful vacation in Haiti.
perhaps the most famous free-
port shop in the world is La
Belle Creole. located in the
S heart of fascinating Port-au-
prince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable wonderland.
full of the world's most de-
S sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
'-'.ches, Cashmeres, Handmade
bags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
r.;*.- meras, Liquours and a seem-
inigly endless array of native
handicraft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
I : ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
'". sider that one can b.uy the
world's most famous Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin,-Tissot,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
S:' Borel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
-.: guet-at discounts of 50% of
the U. S. advertised prices,
-and it is no wonder that La
i elle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
'is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be well worth your time to
consider a trip to Haiti.

Al Noustas, .President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhaps -another reason for
the Surge in popularity of
free-port shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
,leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
S icy bt cooperating with tra-
S l agents in their various
S pirbmotion to increase tou-
rlist. Atnong the most popular
-Inotations he has created is
the practice-of sending a bot-
: 1 of free champagne to any
41.il toi tb Haiti who happens
S to be celebrating a wedding
iailversary or to be on a
S.oneymoon.
:' This year La Belle Creole is
5,- itself celebrating a 10th an-
: niversay and Al Noustas has
Doubled, his efforts to make
the world conscious of the
advantages of, traveling-to-
': shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
nmous brand merchandise.
i everyday exclusive items will
te selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
/tt6ud them. No doubt thou-
s'" nds of tourists this year will
come home from vacations in
aiti, richer, in a way, than
when they went away.
1* ; '


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PAGE 7


, .-'


r~n


At .






PAGE 8m


FRENCH AND CREOLE: Some
SBy Sidney W. MINTZ & Vern C


Let is e assumed. at least for has to notice the difference between 33 signs m all, most.of them ordn- meant plot to seduce Haiuans into German in German scipt. anhe
sake of aruimemt. that the idea o[ ho', a word may be presently pm-o. ar Roman letters, such as "a lea'ngr Eongish A phoes no ortho- French in Round; bt ell onm ho
teaching neracy in Creole were ae- nounced, and bow it is written. The Ipronounced "ah", ad "ah Id a r graphy for Creole does not move the l a no one around to tel i
cepted The net question is logical- pronunciation of words changes over nounced "oh"i Ony ee ns are lea nger awy om French and o.- thev language be speaks at ro
ly, how it could be written? And time, and one can no more halt used soshe letters the o ccent ward ngsh. t. I s quite not even a language
hereby hangs a long and pretty un- this process than .top the tides, signs ued in French. ardpossble th p at a phoneuc ortho-grapnen
nY tale. The brst attempts to wrie When a language' s wrtlen down cumarlex All three signs have strd cwll prepare the students to learn ian e PaXeothetai. 'the contentir ma"L
role were of course made by Hau- for the first nme, the conventions vdue in Lhis orthograpfn but e'. oer language frater than d be is a phonepet othography for lre.rnle
tians literate m French. Naturally. for wanting a gi en word are always never change The acute accent t aught m an ortnography g e.sembl- Wril prepare rthe child f5r ie- rnlc
they wrote Creole using French loose, because the hrst riers are used over -e," and the sound I ng son other In uag's orthogra- Englicah rather than Frble The l.cnr,
spellingg" for the rounds the form really epWnmentrng With nime. the represents ia alay3- ay -. The gra- phi The ar-gunment that a phone- ticlmo .
of waiting ued to put dozen a lan- con\entions become standardcizd IUi e accent is used over ", and o- orthography wrtl cut the student of Creole, we have seen. is-hamonr pu,;
guage is called its onahography") a dictionary i compiled. new i er o' and the sounds t represent m ench may be laudable, bu l derived fom French mosThe n .
But the difficulty with French ornh ers %no accept it mten hace a guide are ehn" and "aw. The creumflex it has no werigt The way a laiagu netoes of Crehole are almost -nal.,
ography. is so happens, is that it to .correct' spelling The spoken s.as stands for nasaization, and age is 7irten is a tughly arbitrary closer to French than to b.
is pret lousy phoneueal. lust as words, however, continue to change is used over .....e" .'" matter e ,take our language oe re.e'blance to Ei.EE a
is Enghsh. Tne same letters can be in prununcation. The Engl.sh lan- and 'u." Li one has understood this it s g'en to es, and if me written some -ree blane to
pronounced ,n different ways m guage is a ine ase m point. The paragraph so lar. ne has lre.ad or the L.sounds .tha.e t notm e up htory served There
English; n French. more common. cord *Ihoughl" is no longer pron.- sunmated ,cri or Creole 3 or- the to "mpugn" are writtenI r not rhitorc ass deri edm Theren
ly, the same sounds can be wnrten bounced as 11 once as., but i,[ ai rgraphic si-,,: ithe re~ are La str angel w a, c lear thm o ur no be assert thatd m E.n rlyr
c-th many rdiferent comonaons of still wr(iten more or less- t, stnd consornants. or r,;i-ccnronant combl- u unk i p un b' When-t we earn could be assimilated more -~tyini
than-French by children literate Ist4
letters Hoe does one write tne ens for the cay it cac prnoniiced long na'n. trom our ou.n alphasbe. Germanic scnpr. And ib te art, e Creoe Eaerli rents w teould e ta
for that cambmaron c-i found : ap- apr Bobth French and Engbi.h arc. G.rman-c script. And "e leam R wen, be ,rtaseri o ewltablsh or s.-
promunatne g hat -' 's hen we taden with "ords n e .peings of But tois ysiem .iil not o for e fr.i. Surely. i e learn Ru sian, e ont on. ay
say (Engush *mar.e' .Well. in urleh must be carefully mmonmzed. rmet e H.lmn nLellectual, e en lr EE ar n its alphabet st. r n ded, is that the t.,rterly.
French. i, depends on .n~ah er you since one cannot possible. tell tn*c those who are cdhnI) io o fI.r a the phne rce talue- for l hih earned feeling o rs that nr. t,,t
mean to aTre 'ma.r rrm,)hr.' to .i trite them by iteningothm o ,ad i tht isdt m tl i he a should e Hainan country chod ha-s o,,, -
or "sea Such hum,r, .m l;tlr Ttrus Ths s the problem that laced good dea t.eah p,t-:pk le i ,. i t- be difer lt [or OJDian ll ey s lOT]ilangusa.Creoleh a-I blat,
both French and Engi-rn Tney ar he ta Lrs -s ers of Creole There w3s rate in their cn langugua Eecn tle read and rt Cret e conviction that French is tue l
part of the pnce a l.nr-uacee pay.. no dcronai 'and .hamefu lla ,e-re lei- ...-1 ,r .,tista Lne Ferencnman u'i p nti age o the phy e nchn, anord thep
for emerging from ,u mother orn- sril is none', no guide. Each r nier iho is -p sris L.te parasnod ""I"ii s.he mh ce learn g s th terms l, may redispose lm to.'
gue if the mouher i.:,.iue uaj writ ued the convenntons he ti-ought ber notion that a pnr-.nelit ortho.-rrph Frenhb. the c-al learn French o- larn English more eailp l tan't
en. Thus such a i.,.und as nasauzed Acruall.y. d enough people rere able for Creole i a LS State. Depart.thor A S-. chd ite his French. Th i, hbowevrl, a pych
"eh" m Creole u:a' rTiten as in to rite CrelE for enough urnm. te oloical and-a pobical problem., noL
or, en. or em or ar,. --.r tin, or em, consent;ians could m act errmrge In-. a speaCeally iclpgustc l iEr. T-he
or aim. Ho- did L-e unicrs know and become standardized. But it ;o ac0ra nor attemptig r.u foist'e
in which of ihese mrnilldJ ways to happen' inat there Ii a simple or F I S H E R S ART & CURIO SHOP Englih on the Haitian pE-icple rF.
write a nasalued "*eh"' Oh. 'trl tinograph .for Creole, and it ran i e Rue du Quai all the. care, the official linruge
was ea.v the% just w ent back Icarned quickly, e\en Dy, a Creole of Haiti could be Ger-man or Spa:'.
to the French wond Irmm which the\ speaker cho is totally illterate SOLE REPRESENTATIVE OF ih. The problem remaairo- in ha.t-
thought Lme Creole ,onl came, ianr1 This nrthographi i base on tie languageO should the Haitian icherl,
used its combinmatin lenders for Iniemnauonal Phonetic Alphabet ltne GUERLAIN'S BEAUTY PRODUCTS child be taught irsl? Once Hitai'
the sound of nasdiized eh" development ol v.hcln i- oced lirge- hardworking and ambibrous peiOpl.e
The difficulries v.nn n thi pn ced is I,.: e nork oi a BEtani n Lnsuis in BAIMI is proud to announce the arrival of Mrs. Claire SZANTO are literate in something, the, ill
ure are man To bein ith. one oi French ancicstr It conis oi peciahsi of GUERLMN PARIS. .have no difficult. in acq-u-irng 1aY.
second language. In 151) y.r' theay
_Mrs 8zanlo speaking fluently English Is al your disposal have remained illiterate in tw. lin.
guages. When will the coilrr- Fia .
for Treatment and Make Uip from ports honestly lay aside r..jr We.,
( >\ l K/ k e9 i.a.m. io h.a.m. 1:30 h.p.m. to 5h.p.m. appro d the queton lci r
or special appointment i and find an'answer that i; r.op.:me:s;'.


at FISHER'S ART & CURIO SHOP
Rue du Qai across Customshouse .

N.B.-The consultations are entirely free of charge.


WHICH LANGOU&OE FOR IHE
NEWCOMER? -
Be that as it may, h i lihscu-siao
rnay suggest some of the prol.teiA',
Haiti has- wth i s larIguagee- N.id
ai is necessary to speak o.-.re prnpr


^ .

.: -:.%.l
;,,,^ '- .s 4 . ...... se

s --.k -,.


S REF.fiERATOR STOVE
ee A peMONTRoATrioN AT.- TROP 1AL, CO., INC.AU alI
S OR TROPICAL DALEa. IN..Tit ROVINC.


PAGE U


ts On the Languages of Haiti
ILOBLEM OF WRITING CREOLE

m hater languagThee should themore can be esaid n perhaddon bit asked Tne' -d eten De udlighted student who wants to learn this or Ha"an nationalsm. It is, rath-
,,ie cor e t a nm er i o that the diaec d In addfon to at one's wean tng to learn it Down language, these two books and hard er, an mtelectual. an educational,
T* ton ,f e back r rre answer to that the i at the Port-eole Preems deep. they know it is a language, work ;with any Haitian friend wi- a psychological and a linguisne pro-
it O n It oes back to asking lng v certain that i the Port-aPrtnce da- and mew own. and the hy ke it. oon produce pleasing results. One blem. In what language should the
o 1,ne larrun another language at lect is spreading and replacing the Th. rio major tex ts on Creole. not- of the discoveries il be that the Haitian child first become literate?
u .,r,e .iill be worlong much of others. Creole seems to hsae an- ed beloc, deal almost exclsivc-ely sinrax of Haitan Creole is econo- The answer to thss queson can
th rre a -iti Haitian country peop other sor of dJnision The Hajdan with Big Creole i "n a n. case. the mcal and logeal: it is soopeak. be discovered wth moderate appll-
le. ij !an onae torememer s Creole- peasants and domestic workers rei choice is between Creole and an "easy" language ror an En. caton oa the scienntc method, and
I, i:, c one remembers to apo- speak of ens Creole and C're- French nolt between \'arietli of glsh speaker without recourse to sermons on pa-
lae ':'t oe's Haitaan social equ- ole frhancste The hi-t L s country ether
al iL, roit kioouing French' If one speech, pure and simple, the sec- Tn trofm geolais or S he ee rat-e
i,, ti: .orrlang with documentarn ond is Creole cith a boeral sprin.i One other minor side-issue There the oluteorgett la man n m rd: ma- o Rn bel ais eor Shakespeare.
ai riinapmerittena t notir et Rimeare or Shakeobpeare. Is
miatrii anid i' the c it y, and Ling-o French. Ths may sound races n endless atraent bou of the deal of the hnguisic for pumng the needs of the Haian
iLh .pp,,-:,cinal people, the langu- confus-ng. because Creole ,LseIf is whether pror ilnowleodge of French approach to language and language people hirst"
a. ,-,.,;rni French. So that what largely French to oe n with But i. an adsanage or disadvantage in learning have been delberael cm-
,,r ai,;l 1- do is a basic condition in Gallicized Creole rrany cords learning Creole. [t is probably a ,ted or stmphuied But to the best Sidney W Ml'TZ
,r lL,~i rg. and each person pro- and pronunciations are ued which ioolish ar urent. Knowing French of the w 'riers' k owled e, there are
ti ,l r 'i.decide for himself what are not used in Big Creole ELen means one bhs a \ ry valuable no serious omm sons, and surely CARROLL
e ,,~i,,ld learn There is one self- some of the construchons are more leicral ,:re %ocabular-- for Cre- no distortions of (ct herein The
d, ls,... t,rtn noting, though That Galhe than in Big Cre ,le. If you ole But French verb forms can be paper has sought to discuss a numb-
,.- r,. ia,,, Iotr. regardless ot one's have a maid or a hou4.se Sriaan, cunieneritily forgotten when letrne er of araed questions, winch ace CE ENTJRE D'ART.
)o ,r pitPaJle,. the .language to chances are thde. ip.:ak G.ilbiczed inc Creale Creole serh_ hae on- aunts In part for its dcsecur E .Fnn e d
I. rr ,a French. because It is an Creole. Tue. U-ll know- cfhat Big y one oirm. Tre wrers have been Bit it is hoped that interested read. Founded 1944
la,..,.: I~anguage. Of course Creole is. d the house et -ant I told with equal 3surancer that rhe ers so chaete r poIEi of s iew W il Excusive agents: -
Irrrsi Ir' eco is valuable under ori'inall. from the ctirr-, and ie eere antle Lto ean Cre:,ole because beuese that the ppoilion taken here &rman ,
at, ,.r..:u dances But rnLht n ow. goes home to Hantrti, n onr Erinefo,, Lh.knen no French. nd that if is taken m all sncen. Water many Bo Bmlgmaud. B and, Bale
v ii.. ,n Haio. If French is the m the tuird rural second of St Ml. they had nowr, French. t ns would ieaars of debate. some of bn Bealt1' Blgaud Blanrhard, Deerbt
Iar -,,. need here, then by all chel de IAttala e to .e lt.: Moem hai-e LiTerr Creole mucr faster. the ipe-ple o Hl still lack a c uri siers, Domond, Dutfaut, Byppotlie,
tir. i us learn French. But iI ne is going Io speak Big Creole to b. : dtifferenra e'Opi. ft (:,,Lt.e. ed educational program cluch tack- Joseph, Leontus, Leteq e, Llsutaod,
: r L-"nore Creole because her But he has to keep up a htrn les irrrdl the problem -f to lan Montas, Normil, Ohio, Pierre, Bt.
I ,,,i .r-.. ken n Paris No one's in the cr,.. and part ,,i that fnr: For the begnnir. rudent of Cre- guges and hadly unly hleracy MBlce, Neplne, Tbraier, Vital
m-i-d trs our iemm learning a new is spealaos Grallic-;zed Cre-ole. He aie the inepitensrve and useful little Toe facts abo-t language cited here
l- ..- -any new language. In has. so to .peaR. nooughti" -nat the rext b.y M- Conrnei and S tar, You aren eiaolahhed Creole is a lanrgu man others.
facir r can be an exhilarating ex-- fancier folk hase been telling him Can Learn Creole tobiacrable in ae; it ha a ramar, its oca- 17 Rue de la Revolution
.n tr,.: and h-arung one's first that Creole n't really a lanu.- P-rt-au-Prine ab-krcIre is e.xtre ulari is actual \ r larg.v andion
i.r,,rn lingjage can prove how in- age Patheticall., he uiinks he can r-el. useful F.:r more adi anced can be readidy enlarg d t ser e Frol Pan American
r..at i ea:. I, S once it steps sound rather more French d ne st udentr. there p Prife-or Haills an pupose. It has no uterature, town one block toward
tl:,,r; .slcdul. speaks Gallitczed Creole. But pro- nork. Haitian Creole iAmerican An- people wtho are riot taug o l e to wariw
ii ,i .- t i be French, then, the bably everyone, peasants included, rinrp'iopp eal Assiocanon Memoir don't create literature.. But the ex bay, half block to left.
,,i.l- i n s.op here Id ne has borne rill understand Gallicizeda Creole. No i. costing iour dollars, and istence of a iterarure is not what Opetn Monday through
e- rht. I,.rF:.re this fare There For Lfe foreign Creole learner, eith. obtained to. -rm.inng I,:. me Stcre--ary, makes a language a language. The
.u. [.ir, .:.( Frencn books, records. er of these Creoles n-iJ do Any dom. .-Nrenir;icn Arithnpiocal ,ssocianon. problem then. is not one of French Saturday
ai-ir:. t ,ener.s, and whatnot. Il estic sernant r dl speak Big Creole if Washinn on D.C. To, th- senois cuirure or American imperiasm. 9-1 3-6 Phone 2055


CCEE SUNDAY, DEC. 27T,19 SUNDAY, DIC. 2I, 1959
ONCER WEE" 'HAITI SUN"




"HAITI SUN" SUNDAY, DEC. 27TH, 1959


The Compliments of the
a .


Season


and best


wishes


for a


prosperous


New


Year.


From


The Manager And Staf

Of

The SHELL Company


'West Indies' Limited


..

i.A
1V

- :


_ __


i


PAGE 10







;'UNDAY, DEC. 27TH, 1959


"HArTI SUN"


DA-f1F 11


Puerto Rico University Establishes New Research...
(Continued from page e)


clearly. World War II and its after-
math brought a generally salutary
reorientation in United States policy
yith regard to the Caribbean, and
the European powers active in the
area also came to acknowledge that
tie needs of these peoples could not
continue to be ignored.
THE INSTITUTE OF CARIBBEAN
.. In the mid-20th century it is clear
S'.at the dependencies and nations
' the Caribbean arc, far from hav-
iig drifted into economic exhaust-
ion and colonial insignificance, are
entering an era of political auton-
omy and cultural self-awareness
under the impetus of vigorous local
leadership. Not every situation kind-
les the highest expectations, to be
-sure, but examples such as the new
West Indian Federation and the
sw if t economic development of
Puerto Rico, to name only two, are
clear indices of growing regional
Maturity,
As the leaders and creators in
'-each Caribbean society -the states-
.;men, economists, social workers,
''technicians, scholars, writers, and
'rtists- take stock of their home-
.land, it is natural that they become
c.curious about their neighbors. The
economic planner and the poet have
both found that the long-venerated
-:models of the European mother
.countries have but partial relevance
Vto present needs., It is apparent, too,
,that in spite of great differences
: within the Caribbean area, the sim-
Siarities of environment, economy.


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i^^ z


history, and developmental need sug- and integration, and perilously re-
gest possibilities for comparative tarded by continued isolation. At
study and diagnosis. Surprisingly, present, communication among Car-
Caribbean research has rarely been ibbean peoples is not keeping pace
of a comparative nature, and suc- with political and economic evolut-
cessful solutions achieved by the ion; research, like the area itself,
people of one island or political is dispersed and decentralized; the
unit are rarely heeded by others, political, economic, and cultural
achievements of any given Caribb-
Along with comparison, genuine ean society are often neglected by
attempts toward cooperation are yet the others because of the prevailing
to be taken. The island economies, orientation toward outside powers.
although they have by no means There is therefore an urgent need
become independent ,are being di- to discover, means which can help
versified and thus offer new vistas to awaken the peoples and nations
for regional integration. The increas- of the Caribbean to each other, in
ing tempo of travel, trade, and corn- new and creative ways.
munication among the islands is but Puerto Rico unites certain import-
one index of new regional ties. It ant qualifications to make it a na-
is necessary that a growing segm- tural home for Caribbean studies.
ent of public servants and private The island is centrally located with-
citizens of the Caribbean become in the Antilles. Its inhabitants, part-
aware of the cultures, institutions, icularly those of its University com-
and achievements of their island munity, are to a large degree bilin-
neighbors. In such fields as politic- gual in two of the four principal
al and economic development, so- languages of the Caribbean. The is-
cial change and social welfare, or land itself, which has achieved Corn-
liberal and vocational education, lie monwealth status, has the vitality
possibilities for fruitful schemes of and growing resources of a country
pan-Caribbean corporation. Nor can in rapid process of social and eco-
these possibilities be lightly ignored. nomic change. The University of
Nascent nationalism promises to be- Puerto Rico offers an established
come an important political force. university structure, a variety of
Economic and political development research centers ,an international
will be accelerated by any positive faculty that includes a group of
moves toward regional cooperation trained Caribbeanists, and a library


HOTEL


MONTANA
PETION-VILLE



The SoEst &LANAM AocaUoo

ofewig r0w I paaNe Vimgws

&o4kui^ l te ay ,tt6 ent6Me G4.,

theValle of CnapeVet and the


61nkf sen Mnutes Amn PORTR4IkCFS^
Wi ASM4AeMENT AS Hwr OTEL CHOUCOlgth


-M 56<4 m&M SigOL Is"l.
Ml. -tAIt d Uoft cJ# c3tbes in-& U.S. PHOdAE: 2a


of 200,000 volumes containing a val-
uable Puerto Rican collection' as
well as a growing collection of
Caribbeana.
THE INSTITUTE OF CARIBBEAN
STUDIES
It is in the light of the consider-
ations just set forth that the Uni-
versity of Puerto Rico has establish-
ed the Institute of Caribbean Stud-
jes. The Institute will serve as a
center for study, teaching, and dis-
semination of research and research
aids in the humanities and social
studies. Its principal aims will be:
1), to encourage, support, and serve
as a center for scholarly research
in the Caribbean; 2), to give disci-
plinary training to Caribbean spe-
cialists; 3), to awaken interest in
the Caribbean among university un-
dergraduates (both Puerto Ricans


HAITI SEEKS


and students from the rest of the
area and from abroad), offering
them preliminary training and
where possible, supporting them i
advanced studies.
The Institute of Caribbean Studies
will thus have a scope and funct-
ions not easily to be found in oth"
university centers. Although tbe4.
are Latin American area programs
in United States universities, and
several excellent research and teach&
ing centers in the Caribbean area
itself, the former seldom concent-
rate solely on the Caribbean nations
and dependencies as here defined,
while the latter tend to be princip-
ally concerned with their respective
countries, territories, or federations.
The Institute will of course endeav-'
or to build up a maximum of c6-'
(Continued on page 12)


BETTER LIFE


study Haiti's finance and public works departments. Other experts assist
the Haitian officials in the agricultural and publiclhealth ministries.
The two governments, in one notable example of cooperation, are con-
ducting experimental operations in an area of 350 square miles where
550,000 farmers till the soil. Spectacular results have been achieved with
hybrid corn, pointing the way to increased food supplies and higher
incomes. Youth centers, schools and sanitation projects grow out of the
central endeavor.
This is a practical demonstration of neighborly assistance that attracts ..
little attention but steadily improves conditions throughout rural Haitji.
It is the largest program of its kind in Latin America after those in; ,"
Bolivia and Guatemala.
Best test of its usefulness is a noticeable easing of tensions among the
people. When they are busy with productive work that means more' food.
on the table and more money in the pocket, politics recedes into there
background.


NOfOVWAU UT
OlAN -- NT



*ANB CHAFBRE
owewmt-^an


Le oauimfla i do I a66 i4
JiM donee we traction at
jrfi(entair66. U
apositif do silence .r6dut l.s
"a |ruits drsajaybbA IeSa d
beai 0 :1 6o nstructMon tl9qimI'
i.p-CGashlb $Sans Chambtw
per.A ls Carb. d
.oe GYous. r mao p d-a pa PA
Sa~l moms do d dlak pere* WOn ye GrpSme -ataive
yyear Mamine pratiaem


I..ijoiam a Soft
(eOD1VYIEM
^^*- -^ ^ _ ^^*lf ^


(Continued from page 5)


rcrurrrr
- --_







PAGE 12


"HAITI SUN"


PUERTO RICO UNIVERSITY ESTABLISHES NEW RESEARCH...

(Continued on page 1I)


* operation and exchange with simil-
ar institutions and, in areas of spe-
Scialization, it will explore possibili-
ties for a "division of labor".
THE PROGRAM OF THE INSTI-
TUTE
The functions and activities of the
Institute of Caribbean Studies that
have so far been planned are the
following:
1) Meeting-place; center of ex-
change and dissemination.-
In its attempt to stimulate the
comparative study of the Caribbean
and to serve as a point of liaison,
the Institute will develop contact
with the largest possible number of
persons and institutions, both in the
Caribbean and elsewhere, whose
concern with the region lies in the
humanities or social studies. A rost-
er of Caribbeanists is being built
up and will eventually bI published.




Caribbean Censtr


Builders Of Th

Gen. Manager: G

Phone: 3955. P


Visiting scholars, researchers, and and research trips to other part of
public servants will find the facilities the Caribbean.
of the Institute and its faculty sem- 3) Teaching.-
inars at their disposal. Each year Starting in the academic year 19-
specialists will be invited to come 59-1960, the departments in the Hu-
to Puerto Rico to participate form- inanities and Social Science facult-
ally in the Caribbean program. ies of the University will cooperate
with the Institute in offering a var-
2) Research.- iety of courses and seminars on the
Both permanent and visiting fac- Caribbean area. These will be given
ulty members will be given oppor- in the fields of geography, sociology,
tunities to do part and full-time political science, economics, history,
research, and-they will be encourag- pre-history, and literature. It is hop-
ed to share the fruits of such rese- ed eventually to make scholarships
arch in lectures or informal semin- available for students coming from
ars. Insofar as possible, the Univer- outside Puerto R i c o, particularly
sity Library will accommodate its from the Caribbean area and from
growing Caribbean collection to the the United States. Each student will
needs of specific research projects be assisted in planning his program
and new courses by acquisitions, by a faculty advisor in the depart-
photo and micro-reproduction, ment of his specialization.
and interlibrary loan. In the future 4) Folklore, music and the plastic
the Institute expects to support field arts--
In cooperation with the Universi-
ty's department of fine arts and
organizations outside the University,
the Institute will, as resources per-
uction Co. SA. mit. sponsor exhibits, performances,
research, and lectures designed to
bring the arts and folklore of the
e Military City Caribbean to public attention.
5) Future plans.-


.erard THEARD

'. O. BO.. 284


DISCOVER THE FASCINATION

OF HAITI


Through Its Postage Stamps

For complete information in Haiti

Stamps and other details which will be

furnished you free of charge, write to

E.O. Box 723 Port-au-Port-au-Prince


These include: a), publication of
articles, monographs, books, transl-
ations, research aids, and new edi-
tions of Caribbean "classics", in
addition to a periodic news-letter;
b). a certificate to undergraduates
who successfully complete their
course work in the Caribbean pro-
gram and write a thesis; c), sum-
mer travel fellowships for under-
graduates to do research in all parts
of the Caribbean; d), creation of
advanced seminars and courses in
anticipation of an eventual program
of graduate study.
Inquiries about the program of the
Institute should be addressed to:
The Director, Institute of Caribbean
Studies, University of Puerto Rico,
Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico. In the
spring of 1959 a bulletin will be is-
sued describing the courses relating
to the Caribbean that will be offer-
ed at the University of Puerto Rico
in 1959-1960.


POLICY SWITCH SEEN IN LATIN


SUNDAY, DEC. 27TH, 1959 0

AMERICA


U. S. Eves Latins In New Ligh t


The most searching review in the
history of U.S. relations with Latin
America will come to completion
next year according to an Associat-
ed Press dispatch from Washington.
Just what will emerge from it is
uncertain, but major policy changes
are possible. One thing that seems
sure is that Latin America will oc-
cupy an even greater place in U.S.
thinldng.
The review was begun in early
1958. It was accelerated after the
May 1958 attacks on Vice President
Richard M. Nixon in South America.
Since then it has been building up.
The developments in 1960 will in-
clude:
1-A possible visit to Latin Ameri-
ca by President Eisenhower. Alth-
ough officials stress that nothing is
yet in the works, Eisenhower has
said he has such a tour very much
in mind.
2-A January-February tour of the
Caribbean and South America by
Sen. George Smathers (D., Fla.), as
chairman of a Senate trade group.
Other congressional leaders may ac-
company him.
3-A full-scale investigation by the
Senate Foreign Relations Commit-
tee, which already is receiving re-
ports on U.S. policies. Public hear-
ings are expected. Sen. Wayne L.
Morse (D., Ore.) now is on a long
tour of Latin America. Two Republ-
ican committee members, Senators
George D. Aiken of Vermont and
Homer E. Capehart of Indiana, also
have just visited the area.
4--The eleventh inter-American
conference, to be held in Quito, Ecu-
ador, beginning in February. The
State Department, in preparing for
the conference, is certain to re-
view its past and planned programs.
in the expectation of Latin Ameri-
can complaints.
5-The U.S. presidential election
campaign in which policy toward
Latin America now appears sure to
be a topic for foreign policy discus-
sion. The candidates may bring the
issues to the people in a way that
official studies or reports cannot.
1 -


So far, the review would appear
to be in the fluid stage, as far as.
actual decisions affecting U.S. pol-
icy are concerned. Some changes
-notably U.S. participation in an in-
ter-American development bank--
already have occurred. But others.
logically could result.
The continuing discussions may
center on economic matters.

DON FEIJCIANO, A NATIVE,
REPLACES SANTA IN G0B
The Cuban revolution has produce
ed a new figure to replace the unde-
sirable foreigner Santa Claus i'a
Cuba's Christmas. He is Don Feli-
ciano, or Mr. Happiness according
to the New York Times.
Don Feliciano is a typical Cuban_
countryman of the colonial days. He-
has a long drooping mustache and
a beard divided into 2 thin strands.
He wears a guayabera _(coat-like
shirt), a typical Cuban straw hat
turned up in front, baggy trousers
and leggings.
Cuba's children regard Don Feli-
ciano with little enthusiasm. He is
just another countryman to them:
and not at all like cheery, red-faced.
Santa Claus.
The official stamp of approval was
put on Don Feliciano by. Premier
Fidel Castro. In a recent television
interview he said: "Now we have
Don Feliciano in place of Santa
Claus and this shows that the Cub-
an Christmas will be really Cuban."

HAITIAN-GERMAN NIGHT AT
CERCLE PORT-AU-PRINCIEN
The "Haitiano-Allemande" society
presented a cultural evening at the
Cercle Port-au-Princien Friday night
with films of the Rhine, the great
painter Conrad Soss and Christmas
in Germany with the music of Jean
Sebastien Bach.
German Minister and Mrs Ludec-
ke Neurath were present along with
Madame M. Ludecke and Sambale
and Society President Max Bouche-
reau former Haitian Consul in Ham-
burg Germany.


0mcle


1

s
i
o







SIIJNDAY, DEC. 27TH, 1959 "HAm su~ PAGE 13


p.ANE FORCED DOWN HAD


CLEARANCE


US Is Concerned Over

Dominican Air Incident


The United States asked the Do-
minican Republic Friday why a U.S
aircraft was forced down by a Do-
minican fighter plane near the Do-
minican-Haitian frontier last week.
The/Embassy at Ciudad Trujillo
was instructed by the State Depart-
* nent to express U.S. concern over
""616 J__MJ_ t TI____&--ant Ff> I-C


when it was on a routine flight for
which prior clearance had been ob-
tained from the Dominican capital
to Port-au-Prince.
Col. Robert P. Foley, U.S. air at-
tache to Venezuela, who is also ac-
credited to the Dominican Republic,
was on board the plane.


h e nmclien, DepaLrtmen press of-
icer Lincoln White told a news con- The C47 was intercepted by a Do-
ference. minican Air Force F51 aircraft east
He said the C47 aircraft of the of the Dominican-Haitian border,
U.S. Air Force was intercepted at White said.
10:10 A.M. local time yesterday The interceptor made four passes


near the C47 and fired warning
bursts on the two final passes, White
explained.


He said that then the C47 turned
around and was escorted to Bara-
hona in the Dominican Republic.
The Dominican Air Force comm-
ander at Barahona immediately ap-
ologized and said the intercepting
aircraft made a mistake. Then the
C47 was allowed to depart and it
arrived at Port-au-Prince at 11:55
AM.


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(UJNDAY, DEC. 27TH, 1959


"HAIT SUN"


PAGE 1S



~
i:C






PAGE 14 "HAITI SUN" SUNDAY, DEC. 27TH, 1959:


ti Joseph report


Strange coincidence in the local press this week was that the cliche
,cut) of the Peligre Dam that accompanied the popular article "Le Bar-
rage de Peligre et ses chutes" appeared up-side-down in Haiti Journal
and also La Phalange... 15 members tourists came to Port this week
with Cartan Travel Service Tour... John Means, not unlike his cousin
Harry Belafonle in size and looks is here for a two week vacation with
the Timothee Parets. Mr Means works as a senate assistant in Washing-
ton and also teaches.International Law and Political science at George-
town and Howard Universities.... Ex-Senator Thomas Deulnme and his
wife Juliette arrived from eight months in Europe 21st and were asked
to keep moving. They took the first available fight PAA's Miami 434.
Mr Desulme's father passed away that night at Croix des Bouquets after
a few weeks illness... Hate is the name of the new Rue Pavee Novelties
shop... The new son of Mr and Mrs Fritz Mevs is out of danger after be
was stricken with a suddenillness this past week...
Mrs Helen Williams is down from Rockland County for the Winter with
her daughter Mrs Rony Chenet... John and Jean Mason of Long Island
are in town fresh from the the riots in Martinique... Mrs Mance of Food
Fair and Hotel Splendid spent hours at Police Headquarters on Christmas
eve minus one after a shirmish with a client that led to a furor... Henry
Bermlngham, Haiti's Tommy Manville, was wed to Mile Marie Therese
Stark of the National Bank Christmas Day. Mrs John Cusick was matron
of Honor and Mr George Wiener Sr was best man. Henry's lifth marriage
'was performed by civil officer Oriol in Port au Prince... Lovely Mireille
Merovee Pierre is down from College in Nlew York for Christmas... Writer
Selden Rodman is visiting Cap Haitien .. The Roger Jeanry clan of Tor-
onto are doing Cap Haitien by Auto... BB Brigitte Bardot is coming
to Haiti this winter in the course of a world tour that will also take her
to Tahiti a Pans informant disclosed this week. BB \will bring Husband
Jacques Charrier along for the ride...
The beautiful Choucoune Roof-garden was afire with the Christmas
spirit in a "reveillon" that continued into the Dawn... Blonde Stockholm
Panam hostess tlla Fahre spent a week at K.lona with her mother. The
fishing was excellent... Montana Hotel has won the praise of the Tourist
Industry by entertaining Travel Agents and their travelling staff memb-
- ers to luncheon and dinners during their visits here. Manager George and
Edwidge Kenn are excellent hosts... Editor Mac Lindahi of the American
Swedish Monthly, published in New York was here for the day on the
88 Gripsholm with his wife and daughter's Maire and Anna. They met
with writer Donita Borden at the Oloffson.. Jean and Jerome Leitner of
New York are spending their honeymoon here. Mrs Leitner is the former
Miss Jean Hagin Public Relations director for the French Nahonal Rail-
ways... Dr and Mrs Edgar Berman are returning to New York after their
second busman's holiday here. The John Hopkins doctor and his lovely
wife Phoebe were here last February for the opening of the Psychiatric
Clinic.... Relaxing from special missions to the Far East for the U.S. In.
formation Service of which he is a prominent member is Arthur Gunder-
son. Mr Gunderson is here with his wife lodged at the Oloffson... Noted
New York fashion designer Adda Canasata and her business partner Sid-
ney Smilove joined Dr Erica Solaric and Yasha Armarnic here as house-
guests of Haiti's Consul General in Israel Mr Natan Abramovits and his
artist wife Mirtza at their MNusseau Villa... SS Nassau is bringing Mr and
Mrs Malcolm Rosenblatt to town next week. The visitors have been re-
commended to PR man Aubelin Joticoeur by Marcia Schlather a PR
for Haiti in Boston... Ballet dancers as well as teachers back in Pitts-
burgh Pa sisters Shella and Marla Jean Cohen are vacationing at the
Montana and perfecting their meringue...
Broadway star of Redhead, Gwenyth (Gwven) Verdon and wellknown
choreographer Robert Fosse returned to New York and work Christmas
day. They enjoyed a quiet leisurely vacation at the Oloffson and travelled
about the Capital in a U-drive auto. The famous dancer said she added
several pounds with the good cooking.... Mrs Maillard and her three child-
ren are due down from work with the U.N in New York... Fritz Cineas
flew to San Juan Xmas day... Rev. Father Papailler left Canape Vert
hospital Christmas eve and flew to New York for a medical checkup...
Union School Teacher Marie de Lonzo went to New York for a white
Christmas with the family.



BEACH COMBER

Leslie Bogat flew off to New York da to spend Christmas with his
via Miami on Sedren copper Mine children attending school there.
business Tuesday. Leslie expects to * *
be gone for twenty-two days. Mr and Mrs Claude Martin re-
turned Tuesday morning from a
Frantz Brandt clippered to Cana- trip abroad.


ARTIBONITE VALLEY OFFERS "NIAGARA
FALLS" SPECTACLE WITH WATER
CASCADING FROM 3 "CHUTES"


Reservoir Reaches Capacity For phalted highway as far as Mireba-


First Time Since 1956
The gigantic reservoir of Haiti's
most remarkable example of mod-
ern technique, at Peligre, is func-
tioning to full capacity for the first
time in more than three years and
the second time since its construc-
tion.
For the past few weeks the "ma-
jestic isle in the middle of the lake"
has been flowing over the dam in
three huge waterfalls, presenting a
rare and fascinating spectacle in
Haiti's Artiboiute Valley.

Practically unique.in its type, the
Peligre Dam is certainly the most
impressive woik ever accomplished
in Haiti, after the famous Citadel
built by King Christophe.
The Peligre Falls last only a few
weeks and when they cease, Heav-
en knows how many years it will
be before there will be another op-
portunity to admire this grandiose
spectacle.

The Christmas holiday season this
year-will afford the occasion for
excursions by teachers, students,
Scouts, sports-loving groups and fa-
milies, to visit Peligre. ft takes only
half-a-day to travel, picnic, and
contemplate, the colossal success
due to the technique of American
"know-how" and Haitian techruci-
ans.

ODVA operates a modern camp at
the site, and tourists and residents
find full commodities ,including a
well-stocked bar and restaurant.
There is easy access to Peligre,
via NMorne-a-Cabiit over a pictures-
que hour-and-a-half of entirely as-


lais. From there to Peligre is only
a matter of ten minutes, and voila!
The Peligre Dam in Haiti's Arti-
bonite Valley is a must on every-
body's Yuletide calendar this seas-
on.


IMPORTANT. VISITORS TO
UNION SCHOOL
On Friday, December 11th, forty-
two students of the Ecole Normale-
Rurale visited our school to observe
classes. From 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 o'.:
clock the group visited the kinder-
garten to sixth grade classrooms.
They then met with Mrs Shaw for
a discussion of Union's methods,
aims and standards of teaching.
This project was planned by Mr.
Reeves and his associates with,
SCHAER of the USOM program.. -,
We were honored by the great in-
terest shown by thesp prospective.-
Haitian teachers in our work here
at Union and hope they will visit".
us again. Among the distinguished' '
visitors were: Leonce Guerrier, Sec-
tion' d'Entrainment de Eleves Mai-
tres; Marcel Desroches, Directeur.
de l'Ecole Normale Rurale, and,
Gabriel Fontain, Professeur de Te-
chnique et Pratique d'Ens. E.N.R.
(Extracted from the School publ-
ication Tambour.)




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* --:- c;-~- .7.- --~~ '


SUNDAY, DEC. 27TH, 1959


"HAITI SUN"


Christmas of bygone days was the
morning of December 25th when the
children consulting over what
Santa Claus had brought for each
one of them felt no jealousy. Each
was content with his own.toy. The
"Petit Jesus" knew how to satisfy
all the kiddies.
Christmas of bygone days meant
the "reveillons intimes dans les fa-
milies port-au-princiennes"- where
one ate and drank in intimacy,
% here having attended the Mid-
night lass, one danced to the mer-
ry music of the violin, piano, cello
and saxophone the languorous Hai-
tian Meringue, the foxtrot, the tan-
go, fast waltzes and slow ones, in
the homes of the neighborhood, with-
out excessive spending a simple
contribution not exceeding ten gour-
des ($2) from the young people of
the neighborhood covered everyth-
ing

In the old days, Christmas meant
the perfumed little-sacks of "Bon-
bon Pharmacie" (drugstore candies)
or the luxurious boxes of chocolates
which the young swains exhionted
and distributed, respectfully to the
.oung demoiselless" who being shy
made a thousand diaLculties before
finally accepting the gift.
Long ago, Christmas was "la tran-
ehe camaraderie et I'entente la plus
parlaite" (open and above-board
fraternizing and the most perfect-un-
derstanding).

In the good, old days Christmas
drew forth even the "octogenaires
perclus" (the aged who had retired
fion circulation) who would brave
the cool night dew on that night in
order to see witl their own eyes
the "Petit-Jesus de la Creche," (the
cluid in the mangerl.
Christmas of yesterday was the
time when the sons of Ti Joseph"
and of "Ti Do" swaggered through
the streets of the Capital, "saouls
ennime macaque" (drunk as a mon-
ke, bottle of white rum in one


hand, "bout de baton" (a stick) in
the other and shouting their heads
off: "Vive Noel! Vive Noel!" (Long
live Xmas)
Everyone celebrated Christmas to
suit his own taste. And everybody
was joyous.
That was the Christmhs of the
Little Jesus of Nazareth.
"Noel! Noel! Voici le Redempt-
eur." This joyous chant exalting the
Glory of the Almighty, causes one
to meditate:

THE CHRISTMAS OF TODAY
Christmas of today sad Christ-
mas, monotone, awaited with too
littleenthusiasm on the part of the
children.
Christmas of today Christmas
in the streets deserted from 10 o'
clock at night. No more joyous child-
reni exhiuting their pretty little "fa-
nal" (cardboard lanterns), a verit-
able masterpiece, well lighted up
beahng the words "Vive Noel" writ-
ten in red letters, a sign of joy,
sign of victory.

Christmas of today means the de-
serting of the family group for the
night club where they dance the
"tcha-tcha-tcha", the "rumba", the
*Guaracha" to the crazy rhythm of
noisy jazz.

Christmas today is the child say-
ing to his father: "Papa, Santa
Claus didn't bring anything for me
However. I am always a good boy.
and I have done well in school."
And the father answering as his eyes
fills with water and tears course
down his cheeks: "Cheri, Pere Noel
est raseur; il n'a plus le sou" (Dear,
Santa Claus is dead broke, he hasn't
got a cent).
Then, the child, sad, affected
deeply, adds: "Ne pleure pas papa
cheri," (Do not cry, papa dear,) fhe
Little Jesus will take pity on us
and will send down His blessing up-
on us..
In order to keep faith with this


ENJOY



NEW YEAR'S EVE



AT 1BO ILELE



Galq


Dinner



TILL


Danee



DAWN


SIX DOLLARS PER PERSON
Dance To IBO LELE Orchestra till the Sun rises below
cool refreshing IBO LELE. 1
-I h


CHRISTMAS -TODAY AND
(Continned from page 1)


114 CRUISES
EXPECTED
(Continued from page 1)
from getting its share of North
American tourists according to the
moaning hotel and travel people
here is that Haiti has been caught
without an airport large eDough to
land a jet and Pan American World
Airways, the principal air link to
Haiti has reduced its direct flights
to Port-au-Prince from New York,
where -17 percent of Haiti's tourists
originate.
Haitians believe the entire winter
season is in jeapordy because 1) the
New York tourist has only one week-
ly direct flight to Haiti. 2) The jets
to Ciudad Trujillo also serve Mon-
tego Bay and Nassau are reported
to be booked solid. 3) If a tourist
takes a jet to Ciudad Trujillo he
must overnight there, before pro-
ceeding to Haiti, and the newly-op-
ened Dominican Republic airport is
some thirty-five miles outside the
capital.
Eviendence of panic at being left
jetless was evidenced recently in
Haitian newspapers, one of which
went as far to say that Columbus
found it easier to reach Haiti than
will the American tourist.
The Sun commented that haiti has
been placed on the "milk run", lack-
ing an express ser-ice from the most
important tourist breeding grounds
in the- world. Any hotel keeper or
tour agent in town this week could
woefully display a flood of corres-
pondence that indicated Tibet is
closer to the U.S. than Haiti as far
as 'American travel agencies are
concerned... if work on a new jet
some of the constructions are more
airport does not commence next
month, by the end of 1960 Haiti may
possibly be left without air service
as the airlines move rapidly to con-
vert their entire fleet to jets."
The Haiti Herald we n t further
and noted that lack of transporta-
tion will be the reason for the maiiy
hotel rooms which will remain emp-
ty during the same period.

TI JOSEPH Continued...
Bob Laughlin and wife Evelyne
the daughter of Mr and Mrs Ray-
mond D'Adeskey arrived yesterday
for their visit to Haiti since their
marriage last Summer in New York.

Mrs Emile St Lot was welcomed
home Saturday. The wife of Haiti's
Envoy to the Kingdom of the Emp-
eror of Ethiopie is in New York
having a medical checkup.
* *
Maurice Duchatelier, Assistant P-
AA station manager is in Miami on
his annual vacation.


PRICES OF COFFEE SHOW STEADINESS

OUTPUT RISE, INTERNATIONAL flow of supplies through an inter-
PACT AND SOVIET DEAL national agreement and news early


BOLSTER THE MARKET


YESTERDAY

noble.though of the little child, Xmas
in Hait, today must mean a determi-
nation on the part of each and every
one of us to work together for the
glory of our dear Fatherland. Our
New Year's Resolution must be to
contribute to the best of our indivi-
dual ability toward's building our
country's shaking economy back up
to a standard where our children
and our children's children may en-
joy all of their Christmas as did
those of yesteryear. Here is the
chance for "tous les homes de
bonne volonte." Goodwill to All Men.


JOHNSON


At Anton


Kneer


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SEA-HORSE 40, SEA-HORSE 18, SEA-HORSE 10
SEA-HORSE 5 and a half, SEA-HORSE 3.


this month that Russia would take
a sizable amount of Brazilan coffee
in a barter deal.

The 1958-59 exportable production
was 51,050,000 bags (132 pounds to
a bag), a record amount. The esti-
mated exportable production for the
present crop year is 61,100,000 bags.
Normally, two large crops in a row
would force prices below present
levels.


MOTORS


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Coffee prices have held relatively
steady the last six months despite
large harvests in the 1958-59 crop
year and prospects "of even greater
production during the present seas-
on.
The chief reasons for the steady
tone in the coffee market are the
rise in world consumption, some suc-
cess in limiting and regulating the


PAGE 15


You know
It's a realy fine

Scotch when it's

JOHNNIE
WALKER




JOHNNIE WALKER
Born JfPo-lU tligoing strong

PREETZMAN-AGGERHOLM Dislrlbu:or For HAITI



SEE THE SENSATIONAL
NEW 1960


OUTBOARD
AT
RUE PAJVEE





PAGE 15.







"HAITI SUN"


- ~ - : -
.. ......
v ,
-'13
SUNDAY, DE.C. 27%~,


broken in those underdeveloped
tions if these people are eventua
to control their own economic de
nies without continuing econor
aid. The financial burden of
more fortunate nations cannot go
indefinitely, and by the same tol
aid given over a lengthy period
time is non conducive to the mor.
of the recipient peoples.
3-FRIENDSHIP FOREIGN I
LICY:
In the international picture, Ai
rica desperately needs friends.


MEDICO PILOT PROJECT
na- (Continued from page 1)
illy
sti- underdeveloped nations .especially
mic those that have been exposed to co-
the lonial control, are particularly vul-
onerable to the insidious influence
ken of systems and governments which
of forcefully propagandize and .which
ale e think inimical to both their and
our welfare. If these influences pre-
vail, (in the uncommitted, under-
PO- developed nations) there is little
question that America's prestige and
ne- position on the international scene
The will suffer unmeasurably. We of Me-


AIL%~~


;0






='






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For all kinds of French perfumes
visit Haiti's Smartest Indian store
Select your favourite perfume
from our large collection

JEAN PATOU
CHRISTIAN DIOR

We offer you the world's famous
brands at free port prices

LE GALLON

CARVEN

LANVIN NINA RICCI

CARON

CHANEL

RAPHAEL

etc... etc...
MILOT
~. ,


dico, feel that the physicians of
America, with no overt effort to
propagandize for a political system,
but who are willing to go anywhere
in the world and treat the and
crippled, uncompensated' without
government aid, can create more
good will and make more good fri-
ends for our country than any other
type of military or economic aid
openly designed to influence opinion.
When an American doctor treats a
patient, he has made a friend for
America. At the rate Medico is pro-
gressing at this date, there is no
question that within the next few
years millions of people will be
treated by American physicians all
over the world asking nothing in
return said Dr. Berman.

Medico, IMedical International Co-
operation) is a voluntary, non-poli-
tical organization of American phy-
sicians, designed to aid the ill of
the underdeveloped nations of the
world. At present it has hospital
projects manned by American phy-
sicians in Asia, India, Africa and
South America.


PANAMA LINE PANAMA
CANAL CO.

The SS "ANCON" of the Panama
Line will arrive from New York at
7:00 A.M.
On board are a total of 15 pass-
engers of which the following will
disembark at Port-au-Prince:
Mrs Jeanne Clesca, Colonel and
Mrme Oliver P. J. Corwin, Mrs Gor-
don B. Dival. Miss Carol E. Duval,
David B. Duval, Mr Beauvais Felix,
Mr and Mrs Wilfred Gulick. Mr and
Mrs Samuel Gurvitz and Mrs., Miss
Inez Malvoisin, Miss Angela Martin,
Mr and Mrs Jack Nathan.


IE1


I'


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"Oi


EVERY M(

We recommend

DI
Dinner wil
Entrance for s


THE WORLD


FAMOUS


BACOULOU TROUPE
SCORES SUCCESS
IN PUERTO RICO
The Bacoulou dance troupe that
recently won mention in the show
the business Magazine "Variety" is
back from scoring a success in
Puerto Rico.
This season's show which opens
Wednesday night at the Bacoulou
night Club is called the ..,arabou
Show" according to Mrs Gerard
Wiener who directs the troupe. Mrs
Wiener informed that a group of
famous Puerto Rican artists are ex-
pected to come to Haiti next week.

AMERICAN
INVESTORS
(Continued from page 1)
sold for the next three years at


THE EDITOR
HAITI SUN:
The story in your issue of Dec-
ember 13th by esteemed Fortune
Bogat concerning a committee of
business men to aid foreign invest-
ors in Haiti was interesting.
But first why do not visiting pros-
pective visitors use existing agenc-
ies? There are the Deportment of
Commerce of the Haitian Govern-
ment, and the Commercial Attache
of the American Embassy, in addi-
tion to some well informed person-
nel in the ICA, both Haitian and
American.
Of course in not-too-distant mem-
ory there was a Minister of Com-
merce who did not speak or read
foreign languages and his value to
prospective investors was limited.
But the new cabinet seems younger
and more active. More power to
them.
PRO BONO PUBLIC.


EIC4lEuA,


current prices at the time .f
ery. The company is still at
on -the installations and exloai'
phase of the copper mine. ,

Asked to comment on the reeiR
strike of owrkers at the Sedreni
site near Gonaives, Mr Hill de
ed to reporters that "there is-,"
doubt about the success of the'a i
pany and that the workers hadl
er been paid as well as by thel.2
dren". Their wages, he said'.i,
normally be raised after-the con
ny commences the actial miiAl
operations. Mining will begin tli4-
calculated in about a year. -

The American businessmen we '
welcomed here by Sedren local d .i
ector Fortune Bogat. They are-lodg'..
ed at the Montana. ?-


FRENCH SHIPPING -

FYCOON -AND GREEKI

WIFE VISIT -

Jean Mayer gerant of the French-
shipping line Panocean was here on.,
his second visit this past week with
his lovely Greek wife.
Calling in Haiti after stops in-
Cuba, Guadeloupe and St Kiits Mr e
Mayer was interested in. checking:.:
the possibility of his company's -
ships calling here as well as other "
Caribbean Ports, Texas and Florida,
His ships sail regularly from Ant-..
werp Belgium.
Mrs Mayer who has a ten year old
son in New York and a ten month
old one in Paris volunteered a hint
for women for a happy and full life-
A woman should have a child once
she is married, every ten years.


|IWAUW -




i21 Cher'ie "


3NDAY AT 10 P.M. SHARP

That you reserve for

NNER and SHOW.........$5.00
1 be served from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m.
how only: ....$2.00 Limited space




SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCASION
4orii~alO


* PAGE 16


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PORT.AU.PRUINC
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WIST 24th STREET
Only 3 Days direct to'he center eo New YorI
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Saltings Mondays and Friday
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Complete accurate informationn only rom

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Rue Abrahamli t ,lphoe 3062


The SATURDAY EVENING POST said:

"One of the highlights of Port-au-Prince night life
is the Oloffson's uninhibited Monday night floor
show..."


the


Hotel Oloffson


I _