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Haiti sun ( December 20, 1959 )

Digital Library of the Caribbean Duke University Libraries
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: December 20, 1959

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00243

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: December 20, 1959

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00243

Full Text





Weekly
Every
Sunday


Haili


un


lOc


VOL XII SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20th, 1959 Port-au-Prince, HAITI No. 37, Avenue Marie-Jeanne Cite QUMARSAIS ESTIME No. 7


CABINET


Priest pronounces blessing at inauguration of Haitian television as Tele-
Haiti executives, Andre Apaid and Morris Rosenberg and their
wives look on.

Successful T. V. Debut
Worried onlookers, pushed their accused of being a backward peop-
-way to the middle of crowds which le, chatted, performed, and lectured
packed themselves tightly around with all the professional aplomb and
a SOMETHING this week in Petion- assurance of experienced showman.
.ville, La Saline or Bois Verna. They Now Haitians may enjoy. relaxed
were relieved and excited to find that and at home, the bands and shows
-the crowd -was not clustered about which tourists flock to see at the
the victim of an Infernal Machine, hotels and night clubs. Designed to
but were attentively hushed, watch- educate and stimulate intellectually
ing their first TV programs on Te- as well as entertain, the TV sched-
le-Haiti which opened with a serm- ule includes programs as varied as
on and blessing last Sunday. a lecture on the West Indies, a com-
. s ment on the news, a filmed speech
-On more than four hundred by Ike.
screens in the area, Haitians oft (Continued on page 2)


LARNIKS OVER FRONTIER


Dominicans Fc
Two Dominican Air Force P51's for- to the
cid an unarmed United States Air- and Ve
Force plane to return to the Domi- jor Joh
nican Republic and land for identifi- prise o
cation at the Barahona airfield ear- confron
ly Tuesday morning. P51's
The two Dominican fighters came them.
along side the American C-17 with This
-its large U.S. flag and airforce litary C
markings and fired a burst of mach- Ganthie
inegun fire before them, as a sum- sided
.mons. I Colon
The American plane carrying Col- comme
onel'Robert Foley Military attache twenty-


Baussan's




P


Miss Haiti To



Compete For



SugarQueenTitle
Miss Claudinette Fouchard was Americas, Hawaii, the Philippines
crowned Miss Haiti on Tuesday night and other sugar-producing countr-
before hundreds of excited beauty ies, in Cali for the Fiesta of Sugar
contest fans. When Interior and Na- Cane from December 24 January
tional Defense Minister Jean Ma- 24, will dress in costumes of their
gloire bestowed the crown on the (Continued on page 4),
head of the lovely creole beauty it
terminated Haiti's most spectacular
contest and one which had oversh-
adowed even politics.


To receive the honor the queen
was dressed in a stunning strapless
gown of gold satin with a sheath
tront and a bouffant bustle, the cre-
ation of her aunt, Bobo Vieux. Her
accessories: a Venetian blue cryst-
al necklace and long matching ear
rings.
The twenty-one year old beauty
will set off ne~ Tuesday with her
maid of honor, Monique Cartwvight,
to compete with sugar cane queens
from all over the world in Cali, Col-
umbia. Her mother, .Mcs Jean Fou-
chard who celebrated her silver
wedding anniversary last Sunday
with her husband a writer and form-
er newspaper man, will accompany
her to Columbia. The couple's other
daughter, Edwige, and her husband,
George Kenn run Hotel Montana.
The Sugar Cane queens .from the


Claudinette. Fouchard
BRIERRE XMAS
POEMS OUT
Christmas poems 'for seven child
ren "Images d'Or" by Jean Lrienr
was published this week by Libra
rie Indigene on Rue des Miracle!
Illustrating each poem is an or
ginal linoleum block print by Fred
and Jean-Claude, sons of the fam
ous poet.
Poet Brierre will not be able I
autograph any copies because ui
fortunately he is beyond reach
the National Penitentiary. The p
ems, on sale at the Library on Ru
des Miracles. make an ideal Chris
mas remembrance. .


Dominican Republic, Haiti
nezuela and his assistant Ma-
n G. Williams, taken by sur-
over the frontier, was next
ted by two machinegunning
which swooped in front of
exhibition gave Haitian -Mi-
Cadets on the gun range at
er their first view of a one-
"dog-fight".
el Foley who declined to
nt on the incident during a
four hour stop-over here


stated on his return to the Domini-
can Republic Wednesday that the
Army officials at the airfield where
they were forced to land could not
have been more apologetic.
By E. V. W. JONES
Miami Herald Staff Writer
trigger-happy Dominican Air For-
ce fighter pilots fired a burst of
machine gun bullets in front of an
unarmed U.S. Air Force passenger
plane Wednesday, forcing it to land
(Continued on page 4)


NEW


s.
1-
Ly
n-

to
n-
at
ao-
ie
st-


VOODOO WRITER
BACH BACK
Dr Marcus Bach, foremost Ameri-
can Religious researcher and writ-
er recently returned from a special
State Department sponsored trip to
Cambodia and Burma is here with
his wife on a two-week visit.
Dr Bach, who wrote the Strange
(Continued on page 15)


Island Beach Club Readies


Robert Baussan briefs Earlybird Tourists Mr & Mrs Frank Bachner enroute to his island resort in a Haiian "Coralin". Thir inspection tour included a new pier and landing
.stage, the beach cabanas and main building, here viewed from the middle of the island. As the group looked on with interest, workmen continued laying pipes to lead water
from a reservoir on the mainland across to the island under the sea.


-F" '


The long-rumored resignation of
President Francois Duvalier's fourth
Cabinet was announced this week.
The Cabinet, in office for eight
months, presented its collective re-
signation .n the traditional manner
Thursday morning, permitting the
President to reorganize it and ap-
point new ministers.
The new Cabinet had not beep
officially named by Saturday nighl,
but there was speculation that at
least three ministers will retain
their posts. The three are Gerard
Philippeaux, Agriculture; the Rev.
Hubert Papailler, Education; and
Lamartiniee H o n o r a t, Public
Works. Herve Boyer, Under Minist-
er of Finance, is reported to oe mov-
ing up to the post of Finance Min-
ister. Deputy Luc Francois may
jointhe new Cabinet, and Protocol
Chief Joseph Baguidy may be the
new Foreign Minister.

LIVELY NEW
COSTER SHOW
BRIGHTENS
MONDAYS
From the first drum beat the 4th
annual Coster show, which opened
at the Hotel Oloffson Monday Night,
is the liveliest, quickest-moving
show in town. When it culminates in
a fire dance after thirty minutes of
songs iand dance, the' spectatoT
feels he has just begun to whet his
appetite for more of this sort of
spectacular entertainment.
The group performs before the
rear end of a taptap camionette
which Coster has built in a corner
of his patio. This colorful little bus
is called Cherie and is the center
piece of the show.
With Ferere Laguerre conducting
and beating out rhythms on his
maracas conducting baton, the Si-
d- midor choir moves ,in time to the
re rich harmony of the haunting Haiti-
i-. (Continued on page 2)


FORMING


wrce US. Plane Down





4 . -
4- ..
~ 2*--


F'mltN-'U


.1 -


"HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY, DEC. -20TH,


Z .. -.. ,-' .COSTER SHOW... TELE-HAITI CHANNEL FIVE.
-. DU 21 AU 27 DECOMBE 1959
(Continued from page 1)
S. melodies they sing. The Sidor 8: 00-PARIS PR ECI-
o r. i ale baritone; Plagi Gouiise at one U 8:30---Bulletin Meteorsol6
point sings a h eart-rending Congo 7:.00-Club-5 EL RANCHO orch. 8:35-FLORIAN ZABACE
solo. Against-this background, Kett' 7:15-Cdmiques 9: 00-Nouvelles
- Carlo,' a beautiful young creole dan- 7:45--Nouvelles" 9:05TELECNEMA
-cdr weaves, smiling, .an innocent, 8:00- SPY
happy dance of a young girl in Jove, 8:0-Bulletin Meteorologique VENDREDI
Her sitor, Jacques Belizaire. who '
jobi, her in a dance and serenades :35--LA TAVERNE DE DUFFY 7:00-Club-5 -
-her. and the audience with his rich, 9:15-NouveRles 7:1 --Coui q ELs
deep voice. 9:-20-TELECINEMA 7:45-Nouvelles .
-In. contrast to the. gentle singing 8:00--JANET EAN
and dancing of Carlo and Belizare, 8: 30-ulletin
Nicole Muretta, Leroy,. ,one .Haiti's A .- 8:35-- S i
:oui tanding .voung dancers skillfully :0- 5-- EL RANCHO or:h. --O.B SE
-steps 4a vivid, colorful number. Her 7E15--Comques N- 5-EIoM,
counterpart fo spirit, Dancer Guy ?- om ls 9: 30-Nuvels .
-e 'ea-Louis-' 'v berates 'through a ,5-4uvesle .. C. 9:35-TELECE
an- to fgt lgt s s c boy, 9:3 Ago
muscleflexing native dance. 8: i- n eFild de .Cowbo -
he.hblfmants of Carrbeour Fenille have what they consider one of, Among the musicians, young Ti 8:3 -Dosi o nfidetie
ih ab t mo.fidentielDI
sBtma. siesesti tha have eier received.It i in the o Fritz who pounds a dru seems 9:0-NouVellqs' 7..l Ed
re a reeis a. ter the most promising cohitender for 7:0- Club5 -- E
441011[ e Ofnren oed concretecthat. now stands s a. breakwater against the title of best drummer in Haiti 0 Td E NE MA 7a1 Comiques -
r .....lou eek-,m to.te Ed.,-the title of best drummer in Haiti *\" R o-"
floeidsh thit. during the rainy season ruin their gardens, roads, Cecile in her fire dance a fitting :45-Noveles
oqjft;en taiea swi ybheir entire; homes. IThlis year though the personal climax to a show rich in contrasts 8:00--- Un Film es
... -" . .. y seemswkto have reached the voodoo 0 . ...
Sof Dr r Dvaller, President of the Republic, according to seems to have reached the voo oo 7:00-Club-5 EL RANCHO orch. 8:30-Bulletin Me.tb
.l .. state of canzowhere firecanot e theSTA PEe
harmlide her. e a 9:nd o o FPERO4
proud esidimui ts, -the Public Works department under the personal harm her. 715-7Com 9:00--Nouv& .es- .
pidrvian of P.W foreman Justin rtrand has built a giant retainin -4--ouelle Westihghous 9:05- .
"8:00---UnShow eInra.Westihg use 9:05-TE -W.
~I wleh.w tei' the i d ging "rain' waters out of their homes. Last ..et 'oloque
S.floodtore ip the malp ad.and caired -away 'six homes.. The -e i ...o '
.-cvibe completed for Christmas. above e 9:05--aTELECINElMA
i. r- 2:00--Comique ::

i3:30-CONRAD NAGI -
,E. .7:00T--Club-5.-- EL RANCHO orch. 4:00-Bulletin Mteroldf
...Isid. lt- T.. 1)t D ecb e T ---omiques -. ra
,p a" at w- o e g i- c e y o 7:45-- N ouv elles 5 : 5- N ouv elles
"lt t (Coitfimged from pages ) --.-

t to et th litside sore cbi po ed of both Haitians and Ame- VOOD OO WRITER... EP
i -stling maesd i be shown, ricans: working together jn perfect. n(Continued from page 1)
I- Haiti h na personal ap- a rnony, a i deal example of how s Rual Educat io
arancef" :and there _is a.~smili both groups can benefit from sod- Altars; bed on the author's person- topFi st U
Woman, hosenggns reflect ly based cooperation. Ralph Evans al investigation and. built around .T wth
'sZl v aried-.suiny skies: His and his three American Engineers, the life of thq late Stanlvy "Doc" wfaei ir endine'a
"dbuthisweek mbch -to the Ed. ,Geritil and his.- on, 'our Haitian - Reser a voodoo authority. en C iiba Emb
,: a : ete of ,s ...o u Tel n as a .a . a .t *oit;tCban
aiamusemient .TVtewer._-- EngineerS, Andre Apaid ourlocal 's -. at he. Cuban as
option of. a clear itghr in managerand Boris Frank, Americ- LLE Joseph .. ...
'Gds .-on aU A O in '. 9. 0 '
tauPrincewhich hit.the chani- an TV expert pnd the restcitizens Dr Bach and his wife were el- ated in terrorist
Sboth.countriesha disregardedcorned to Port by Sonny Reser Doc's authorities too k his
st, a r id sho wer b t isawkdtisregdeds OU- so who is- Also vacationng here; ido. The Cuban
o ansed a -I P es- ea itd ys a in of tireals A Two Ame religious writers being tAken care
.t-og. oa or..tmzed ls 666d. tes iti.- disregardo-bfhealth.. egi i teso.
n o: .i..orU. -citi gi itohake.tonight possible PLAE. GEFFRARD a joined them here Saturday. embassy. -
egan to face-the same prbbl- We tuthfully say that without them,
i week -. hd-' to persuade and here we include .all our coll- .
i children to. cow ientrate on their leagues and co-workers too numerous
.4_ .gthe brie ,
som$ 10g ':-the Mie- 0 a. yto name, both ourselves -and the re- -
dt ofs10t esP.t s right ih the public would be the poorer.
t-.- i' bst, study hours. It's We- niust also-express our grati- HOTELS HOUSEWIVES RESTAURANTS "...
e .that the kids will.hae a tude to two other groups whose ',
i'l -vide6 feast once their Christ- .faith in our venture has.- been most SERVE THE EXCELLENT QUALITY RICE
vacations start. reassuring. The sponsors, who by
comi. fo ard when the station b GROWN IN HAITI'S FERTILE VALLEY .
-oickoff Haiti's first TV,'Mor- was barely above ground level, and -i
-,isRosaenierg, president of Teleiait wh6.. to.show their faith in Haiti O T.ER B N E
d .. and its Government. made ,commit- OF T ARTIBONI -.
A- ments to sponsor programs made
evening ladies and .geditle- our task appreciably easier. The
...o. ly .,the fat .that we other group, is of course you oir a-wr.
,. e tg thisi evening -is the customers who came, looked, listen-' -
.s. excitinig event of our lives. ed, asked questions and then- show- ..-"V
Sthd day the idea of bringing ed your belief in us and your count- -
olm rto your country was first ry by buying our merchandise with .
Sse6&.t.by'.biyself a-nda.group your hard earned dollars..
b". ih'ia" in 0ei friefdds ov- .You will find as your Government IS PLACING AN IMPORTANT, STOCK
gP. -Until tonight has already discovered that we are
M.;.-'.efft o nd ,a., stibst- reliable men of our word. We are .. -"A
M Snt -mo4ney have been engaged' in a commercial activity Prices for Sack of 1001bs.
ntI.t- ,bercoming the problems it is -true. But we are determined, .
in. any venture of this type. to use- Television as. a beneficial '
.- -... ... force- in your beautiful land, to its VARIETY: a. P-au-P.
the-6bstacles -aepeared utmost capacity. This Mneditim is "BLUE-BONNET" Grade-A $10.25at the Mill: $10.50-
Alle.At tale, -but With coopera- the most powerful- man has yet a" 9
!your Government. the Presid. created; in its ability to impart "BUFFALO" Grade-A .. .9.20at the Mll: .9.0"
ea-t ofHailti; Hit Ministers and all ideas, to further education, to raise "BLUE-BONNET" Grade-B .. 9.20 at the Mill: 9.50
.6Govpnmexit- officials with whom we standards of culture. We intend to G.. .
$.ai1Mtiout, whose. whole- extend our complete cooperation to "BUFFALOG de-B 8.20 at the Mill: 8.
weaid Weould not be appear- your officials, and further to- take RICE FLOUR ........... 5.00 at the Mi: 530
S i reg. befe you tir channePl- five to-, active measures of oun own to make .
411ti all o. 4t6.. nid' dificulties certain that the country receives
"conquered. We- riust. also ex'- the full benefit of this potential. A Di nt of 4 per cent at the Mill at Deaux (Artibo-
s.ress our thanks and appreciation Please bear with us if from time
the people of -your wonderful to time things are not exactly as niute Valley) or at our warehouse in Port-au-Prince, (corner -
Zuotfry who, responding to the call you want them. High quality com-
w.-ihait. they instinctively realized, mercial Telecasting is a tremendous- Rue du Centre and Rue des Cesars) will be avowed on pur-
a project that will prove of vast ly complicated procedure. It will chase of 20 sacks of rice or more.
efit to-. the nation, have aided take time for our work to become
(15 d assisted us intevery way poss- as polisher as we would lice. But
we confidently belive that each -day
will bring both change and improve- > L
.W _e ust also acknowledge the ment. Good night and our heartfelt ._ ,
efforts of our own staff, thanks to you all. "___'____


w


RI '-'*~~-


* it"








.>: SUNDAY, DEC. 20TH, 1959

JACO SASSINE RECEIVES HONOR FOR HAITI


..The dynamic Haitian businesswoman Jaco Sassine received last month
a 'distinction on behalf of her homeland -along with twenty-seyen other
nations throughout the world- of honorable membership to the Interpa-
tional Hotel at the Miami Airport. Above Miss Sassine is receiving for
Haiti, a diploma trom Metro Commissioner Ben 'McGee.
er"


Above Jaco Sassine along with the Miami rMetro Commissioner McGee
and Members of the Consular corps accredited to Miami Florida.


5 HAITIAN ASYLEES END
7-DAY HUNGER-STRIKE
F- ive Haitians in asylum at the Ve-
nezuelan Embassy in Bourdon ended
their seven-day hunger strike follow-
-. ing a conference with the Nonce
'. .Apostolique dean of the Diplomatic
corps Captain Russian Smitter, Char-
ge d'Affairs of the Venezuelan Em-
bassy declared Friday.
Captain Russian Smitter explain-
ed that the asylees had a doctor at
their service.
The reason the five went on a
hunger strike is believed an effort
S on their part to obtain safe conduct
out of Haiti.
2- i_ _^

-DISCOVER THI

OF


Through Its P

For complete inf

Stamps and other d

-furnished you free

P.O. Box 723 Po


"HAM SUN"

LE PERCHOIR GETS NEW CHEF FRO!


Albert Barcilon, a remarkable:
Egyptian born Spanish National
graduate of the Ecole Hoteliere de
la Societe Suisse des Hoteliers has
been selected as chef of the Le
Perchoir restaurant.
Barcilon who speaks over a half
a dozen languages arrives Saturday
with wife Elizabeth a German na-
tional from Zurich.
Born into the hotel restaurant bus-
iness -his father has a hotel in
Egypt,- Barcilon has held positions
at the Continental Savoy, Schweiz-
erhof, and the Hotel Baur Au Lac
in Switzerland.
His languages include French, En-
glish, Spanish, Germany, Arabia,
Italian.
Albert Barcilon DOMINICAN DIDIEZ
TRANSFERRED TO
TOURISM UNDER SALVADORWANE
WING OF DECADE HERE
Dr Federico- A. Dldiez Burgos,
INFORMATION AND inistre Conseiller" at the Domi-
COORDINATION nican embassy here is being tran-
sferred to Salvador after more than
DEPARTMENT A decade in Port and Cap-Haitien.
The law attaching the Commissa- First Secretar Luis Hernandez Diaz
riat National du Tourisme to the is beingpromoted to Consul General.
Department of Information and Co-
ordination was published in the of-
ficial gazette "Le Moniteur" Dec-
ember 14th. "PRIVATE
The four articles in this law are
as follows: 1) TheCNT henceforth LESS THAN 1
is attached to the Department of
Information and, Coordination; 2)
The prerogatives conferred on the
National Touristn council will now
be fulfilled by a director depending
hierachically and administratively
to the Department of Information
and Coordination; 3) The consultive
council is to be maintained; 4) The
money set aside in the budget for .
the CNT is transferred to the Dep-
ailment of Intormation and Coor-
dination.


U. S. RAISES
ON SUGAR
IMPORTS .


QUOTA


HAITI GETS 411 TONS MORE
CUBA 60,000.
The U.S Department of Agriculture
set 1960 sugar requirements for that
nation at 9,400.000 short tons, raw
value, and apportioned this amount
among eligible supplying areas to-


TURKISH AMBASSADOR aay.
CALLS Cuba got the largest single quota
Mr Tal'a Carim, Ambassador of 3,119,655 tons.
Turkey accredited to Haiti and res- The estimate of requirements is
ident in Caracas Venezuela spent 200,000 tons more than the original
three days here at the Montana this estimate for 1959.
week enroute to New York for his
frst vacation in two years and a The Department eantrols domest-
check-up at the Walter Reed Hos- ic markets and imports under a
pital. sugar control prgoram designed to
Ambassador Carim who travelled help stabilize prices and supplies.
to Port with Haiti's envoy to Vene- Legislation providing for the pro-
zuela Senator Ulrick St Louis had gram expires at the end of 1960,
talks with Foreign Minister Dr Louis unless extended by Congress.
Mars and Secretary General of the The 1960 quotas by supplying are-
Foreign Office PRne Chalmers pin- as are: Domestic beet sugar. 2,043,-
or to his departure for Washington. 480 tons: mainland cane sugar, 628,-
799; Hawaii, 1,140,462; Puerto Rico,
1,192,498: Virgin Islands, 16,261; the
Philippines. 980,000; Cuba, 3,119,655;
I FASCINATION Peru, 95,527; Dominican Republic,
S81.457; Mexico, 64,809: Nicaragua,
AITI 14027; Haiti, 7,014: the Netherlands,
3.731; China, 3,624; Panama, 3,624;
,ota psa Costa Rica, 3,316; Canada, 631; Uni-
ostage Stamps ted Kingdom. 516; Belgium. 182:
British Guiana, 84; and Hong Kong.
-- i^ S- iJ iti 3.


details which will be

of charge, write to

rt-au-Port-au-Prince


For comparison, the 1959 initial
quotas by major supplying areas
included: Domestic beet sugar,
1,998.717; mainland cane sugar, 615,-
024:; Hawaii, 1.115.479; Puerto Rico.
1.166,375: Philippines, 980,000: Cuba,
3,060.475; Peru, 86.867; Dominican
Republic. 71,557; Mexico. 54,609, and
Nicaragua, 12.879.


A condensed compk
along wherever you ml
ion, 7 transitors pu'l in
away, highly sensitive
than I cent battery-po
ic. Smamt 'Maick-and-c
it the perfect gift!










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a





PlPHI




CURACA(
DUTY FREE PRICES F


0


!












i


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}


-. . .4
-4


PAGE 8 -.

M SWITZERLAND I


















and wife Eilzabeth '
PRESIDENT OF HAMOC IN TO .:;

Mr pordon Duval of New Ybrk .
Investment Bankers Dancy &' Quval, -,
President of the Haitian American.
Meat and Provision Company arriv-
ed here Monday to oversee the com-'.- -'-
pletion of the new Meat-Paking.,
plant at Damiens. .
Mr Duval said the company wa'
striving towards a "January 4th op-,A
ening date.



MUSIC FOR
Cent PER HOUR!























eight go. Sensitive recept-
stations up to 400 miles
e loudspeaker, use les
wer for an hour of- mus-
hromium styling makes











onal RADIO

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ILIPS




O TRADING CO
OR DIPLOMATIC PERSONNEL


I








rAGE 4, "HAITI SUN"


)MINICAN LARKNIKS OVER FRONTIER
(Continued from page 1)


hin''the Dominican Republic for in-
wetion.
e..in cident was reported to have
th_.emost recent of several by
f.on-wary Dominicans, one of
wi.c..h.le9d to a protest by the U.S.
S State IDepartment to the Dominican
Government.
Dominicans are fearful that Fidel
Catro's ,Cuban Revolutionary Gov-
de-i enet-will car-out threats to in-
SiV4. the island. The Dominican
RepubiUc shares with Haiti.
:-^he T Wednesday incident was dra-
Ia call broadcast from the invol-
v4ed. US.- Air Force plane to the
rprt tower at Port-au-Prince,
taiti, and overheard by a number
'of pilots flying in the area.
Pilots reporting it said the U.S.
C47; flown, by Lt. Col. Robert Foley,
.ir attache in the U.S. embassy at
Caracas, Venezuela, was flying the
International airway from Ramie
A .' Force Base, Puerto Rico, to
ort -au-Prince. (Actually they were
fdlyiing from Cipdad Trujillo.)
His route led in from the Carib-
;,bei-an..Sea ovei a portion of the Do-
"'-mucan Republic, and then over
,4Haitian territory.
':f.-The jittery Dominicans recently
built a fighter base. directly on the
airway and within rock-throwing
.Aditance of the Haitian border. As
Coil. -Foley passed the fighter base
;dnflew alorig the south shore bof
,i*e.- Saumatre in Haiti, two Domi-
inian.i F51's roared aloft and inter-
:'cepter him._
"aTbs is. Foley," the officer was
quotedd as telling the Port-au-Prince
: by radio. "A. couple of F51's


are making passes. at me. Here
comes the fifth pass and they're
firing."
He turned the plane back toward
Dominican territory.
A similar incident occurred June
23 when a C-47 from Patrick. Air
Force Base at Melbourne, Fla., was
en route from San Juan, Puerto Ri-
co, to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
This plane, piloted by Major
George A. Williams Jr., avoided
flying over Dominican territory, but
when it reaches the Windward Pas-
sage between Cuba and Haiti it was
Major Williams said the Domini-
can pilot "flew formation with my
C47 just off the right-wing, lowered
his wheels and pointed down. Then
he fired a machine, gun burst
straight ahead." I
The officer radioed Ramle Air
Force Base in Puerto Rico for in-
structions and was advised to obey
the fighter pilot's command. Escort-
ed by the Dominican, he flew across
Haiti to. the Dominican Republic
and landed at Ciudad Trujillo, where
his plane was inspected and re-
leased.
With Major Williams on the flight
were Capt. Frederick I. Hafer, co-
pilot; Staff. Sgt. James E. Thomp-
son, crew chief Airman 2c Charles
R. Staler radio operator, and three
passengers, Majpr Maynard J. Mc-
Guran, Lucian J. Sibbisey, 1 civ-


ilian employee, and Harold L. Jury,
a Pan American World Airways
employee assigned to the guided mis-
sile range.


(Continued on page 16)


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Prior to her departure, Claudin-
ette was honored at a dinner Friday
evening at the Hotel Montana along
with her Maid' of Honor, Monique
Cartwright, Queen of Tourism Eve-
linne Guignard -and her Maid of
Honor Monique Benjamin, as the
guests of Mrs George Kenn. Satur-
day she opened a ball in her honor
at the Camaraderie Club and app-
eared on Tele-Haiti-Channel five.
Today she will be received along
with the other winners by the Col-
ombian Charge d'Affaires and Mrs
Lopez Mosquera. Flowers and tele-
grams of congratulations have been
showering, on Miss Haiti as well.
Eveline Guignard, Miss Tourism,
and her Maid of Honor, Monique
Benjamin, will head for Call, Colum-
bia on January 20th to compete for
Miss Tourism of Americas title.


SUNDAY, DEC. 13TH, 19.!



HO TEL MONTANA-


ANNOUNCES


MISS FOUCHARD TO
GO TO COLOMBIA
(Continued from page 1)
respective coun t r. e s and ride
through Cali on oxen-drawn sugar
carts.
When Miss Haiti goes before the
jury, composed of Miss Akiko Ka-
jima, who is this year's Miss Uni-
verse, Governor and Mrs Nelson
Rockefeller, Galo Plaza Lasso, ex-
president of Ecuador, some Republ-
ican Presidential aspirants from the
U.S and novelist Ernest Hemingway,
she will be dressed as an affranch-
is.
The festival is expected to sur-
pass anything ever seen in the Am-
ericas. There will be bull fights
featuring the famous Spanish mata-
dors Luis Miguel Dominguin and
Antonio Ordonez who have been
waging a bull fighting duel in Spain
this past. season.
The streets will be decorated in
sugar cane and there will be danc-
ing and other events including an
international horse race. Special
folklore groups 'and bands from all
over the world will participate.
Haiti is sending its twelve-member
National Folklore troupe led by An-
dre Narcisse.
Miss Haiti will have no trouble
conversing with her hosts in Call,
Mr and Mrs Luis Palacios who have
the most sumptuous residence in
the delightful Columuian City as
she speaks Spanish fluently, as well
as English, German, Italian and
Dutch.
Miss Fouchard commenced her
studies in Port-au.Prince, went on
to Havana where her father held
a diplomatic post, spend six years
in Paris, one year at the University
of Washington, one year at the Uni-
versity of Hamburg, Germany. Re-
cently, she has been doing social
work in the villages around the fa-
mily's rum and alcohol refinery at
Prince.


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HAITI SUN In Cap-Haitien This Week


E HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPERS
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICHI
Gerant-Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIEREI
MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
_D ESTABLISHED IN 1950

THREE SUGGESTIONS FORM EQUESTRIAN CLUB:
SELL BUILDINGS IN TOWN OF BELLADERE;
ESTABLISH A MODERN PRISON FARM

Three members of this community made off-handed sug-
gestions to.-the Haiti Sun this week. We feel they are worth-
while passing on. A- hotel owner, a coffee exporter and an
army officer came forth with these thoughts.
To reduce the expense of maintaining the large Army stab-
les Rlbert Baussan of 'Ibo Lele thought it would be a good
idea if civilian horse-lovers were permitted to form an Equ-
estrian Club 'paying monthly dues that would help defrayI
the Army's horse feeding bills. The club would renew inter-
est in Polo and other equestrian sports, exercising the fine
breed of anglo-aralbian stock and add a new tourist diversion
to the list.
It would be in the interest of the 'State and the model
* border town of Belladere, built 'by the 'late President Du-
m'arsais 'Egtime. Coffee Exporter George Reinbold, mused
this week, if .the Government were to sell the state-owndd
town 'buildings. [Mr Reinbold feels that the selling of the
Buildings 'as h'as 'been suggested for the Exposition city in
Port-au-Prince, would relieve the Government of the chore
of maintaining the Belladere buildings 'and in some way may
trigger private interests to push the town as a resort for
local and foreign tourists. The Government could use the
money for some wofhwhile project 'and the pleasant pictur-
esque promenade to the border town over a newly repaired
road could be advertised.
An Army officer has mentioned 'as a profitable idea to
the ,country, the setting up once again of a prison farm
that would change the convict's environment and provision
the army with fresh vegetables.
A prison farm on modern lines ,would not only save 'the
Quartermaster food supply money 'but make jail less inviting
for the habitual vice-ridden conrvi'ts 'who infests the common
criminal block at the National Penitentiary.

APPEAL FOR CLEMENCY FOR JEAN 'BRIERRE
AND GUSTAVE BORNO

An appeal for Presidential clemency this Christmas in
favor of 'Poet Jean Brierre and reporter Gustave Borno was
made Tuesday by Le Matin in a front page article.
Charges have not been pressed against Jean Brierre in
his fourth month at the National Penitentiary but his case
is said to be under investigation.


HAITI'S PEASANTS DO NOT
USE CHARCOAL
HAITI SUN
Mr Diederich
Dear Sir:
I hope you have space to publish
Mme Fritz Brierre's reply to Loys
Savain of Esso published in Le
Nouvelliste Tuesday. Mme Brierre
by .he way is a remarkable writer
on matters concerning Haiti's econ-
omy. Tax free kerosene is not the
answer to stopping the use of char-
coal and curbing deforestation as
NMr Savain pointed out in his speech
to the International Club de Com-
merce. The reasoning most people
are overlooking is that the greater
part of Haiti's population, the peas-
antry, do not use charcoal. They
cannot afford charcoal they use
plain wood. I suggest that they en-
courage tree planting to keep ab-
reast of the demand and encourage
charcoal farming on saline waste
lands like they did in China several
years ago.
(s) DAILY ARBOR DAY AVOCAT

SECOND THOUGHTS ON
LA SALINE SHOPPING CENTER
Editor The Haiti Sun ,
En Ville.
Dear Mr Editor:
I have noted your editorial on the
selling of the buildings in the Cite
Dumarsais Estime constructed to
mark the Bicentenaire of Port-au-
Prince. I have also noted the "pen-
see" of the out-spoken Senator Vic-
tor Nevers Constant before the Sen-
ate. My agreement is whole-heart-
edly on the side of the Senator. The
Exposition city should definitely not
be sold for the sake of La Saline.
Senator'Constant pointed out too that
the La Saline Shopping Center
should be built with money found
by selling space in the center be-
fore it is built or let an Investor
float a loan. Voila! I see no reason
why a shopping center should be
built at La Saline. This will probably
fellow the old traditional ways of
pushing the poor marchand aside
and allow the Petit bourgeois take
over the shopping business under
a modern edifice. Let us complete
the Croix des Bossales market for
the marchands and rid the water-


By Our Reporter
Two trucks belonging to Maison Novella Freres, loaded with bags of
Coffee and Cocoa clashed at 8th street in Cap-Haitien Monday afternoon.
The two camion drivers, it is reported, were racing to the company's
store to win a dollar wager. One truck capsized and two school girls
returning home- from school were injured, one seriously. The accident
will cost the drivers both more than the dollar wager.

Thomas Moon and Daniel Stewart of Pote Cole left yesterday (Saturday)
on Christmas vacation in the States. They will be back in January 1960.

The West India Fruit Company received new machinery for the Sugar
Factory of Lame, in the North this week. The company is remodeling
the very old plant and the cane planters of Quartier-Morin area are re-
joicing.

Great damages was reported in the Northern plain from heavy rains
which brought on an important flood, especially where SCTRH built a
small dam at La Grande-Riviere du Nord for irrigation.

Monday and Tuesday of this week, the Cohata plane landed at Cap-
Haitien without any mail. No letters, no newspapers for the Capots.
What is going wrong?

December 19th, at 6:00 pm., handsome Lt Louis Vilfenay married
charming Ghlslaine (Gigi) Coutard at the Cap-Haitien Cathedral. Many
relatives and friends attended the ceremony.
4 *
A housing project for Haitian Employees of Pote Cole will begin next
month. The chosen site is 5el-Alr, on Government land. \

The greatest problem in the North today is the state of the roads. Cap-
Ouanaminthe is reporetd in very bad conditions; Bayeux and Le Borgne
can't be reached, even by jeep; Dondon and Saint-Raphael are unapp-
roachable.

Newsman Eric Etienne, former Director of Cap-Haitien Tourist Bureau
for the past twelve years, is now teaching French to Pote Cole's Ameri-
can staff. Among his students, are Miss Patricia Hertert and Joe Thomp-
son, in charge of Rural Education Program of HADO.

The Becks are now adding three more rooms to their lovely Hotel in
Cap.


front sky-hne of a homble skeleton.
Then we can either sell the La Sa-
line area for warehouse or private
shopping space. But let us keep our
conscience clear of harming the
brave "marchand" of Haiti.

(s) HAITIAN INTEGRAL.


MACHINE INFERNALE
NEAR CATHEDRAL

A loud detonation close to the Ca-
thedral Notre-Dame was identified
as a "Machine mfernale." Shortly
before o'clock Wednesday evening.
The noisy "engine" did no damage.


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SUNDAY, DEC. 20TH, 1959


"HAITI SUN"


PAGE. 5


p





-' ., '.' ''., ,_

PAGE "HAITI SUN"

"3E QUESTION OF WHEN A SENATOR IS ON A SPECIAL MISSION


'-esator Bonhomm


7 1Ofeo A U4 S. Naval
*It.t..9. Arthur Bonhoi=nme, with verb high, said: "I am not return- ericanism. We were the first to aid ts
paage newspapers in his ing 'from Warsaw. I did not receive other nations to win their independ- so
-.. ;-.elpombered up ot the rost- $5,000 from the Government for my ence. We were the first to take the M
rIu- the Senate. "Tomorrow," travelling expenses. I did not. makq land and to separate it among the cc
athe -qratr, "I .hall saI mit a jump to Moscow. have no .been siall ones. It is this which constit- hi
... write to. the senate on supported by money from any Gov- utes the basis of our nationalism. A hi
occasion of my latest trip to ernment, American or Russian. I do basis has nothing to do with the in- ec
toe United States. It is the rule, "he not own two trucks working in the dependence of a country. The Rep- at
i.2 "when a Senator or a Valley of the Artibonite, benefiting public of Cuba has had all the liberty .
eut goes abroad, in any demo- from a loan from the American Gov- to expulse American interests, to h<
y...4ic. country lie. is, on mission. His erngnent." re-enter repossess properties. They ec
*.pitibn of representative of the Senator A. Bonhomme was inter- have even arrested American citiz- q
;.People makes him. an official per- rupted here by Senator V. N. Cons- ens. They "have allowed invasions D
-'.sonage. It is in this way that the tant: "I believe," he said, "that to depart from their land, thus
merican Senator -or,, Congressman these matters are irrelevant to the threatening the system of American'
-.. 6 goes abroad is expected to oh- debate." defence. From Cuba. invasions have. ni
4 rve, tp speak a:d to 'report. These "It is sufficient," equally declar- departed which threatened the int- C
At.ep.trts with declarations and recom- ed the orator.",A question of a nav- erior security of the United States." S
jendations are always found in the al base in Haiti," he added, "can "Now," added Mr Bonhomme, I ir
', Aives of Parliaameit. The present be envisaged from four different shall point out one thing: "Copmu- c,
Hi'"'poi. c is no longer a regional pol- points of view: (1st) the national nist Russia is opposed to the system ,a
tie view point, (2nd) from the view of the nations of the free world. She rM
Soliciting permission to. speak, Se-- point of ideology, (3rd-from a poll- is not hiding her intentions. She fo
i. nator Victor Nevers Constant repi- tical point of view, (4th) from an must upset the world. However," in
'."It appears that my colleague international point of view -" think- said the orator warming up, "we oI
in rroF. The Senator or Congress- ing on further Senator Bonhomme know well that the Capitalism which
an .who goes abroad is not neces- resumed,-"and from an economic- Karl Marx attacked is nolonger the er
".. ly on a special mission. One al view point." same."
S: ay tr t'el for reasons .of health. Coming back at him, Senator Con- Returning to the question of In- h
_..'. ~ Qie may travel on a confidential stant told his colleague: "You pro- ter-American defense, the orator
mission. And then one is not expect- 'mised us a report, but now we are .pursued "One of the points which vc
-; 4to make a report: waiting on you." is serving as a cible is the Panama
ev
l. igaemnent. ith the pintt, of. "I am responding to -Deputy A. Canal which forms a part of the ev
'..i dressed by Seeator COnstant, Lahens," declared Mr Bonhomme. defense system not only of the" Unit- ao
%-orator. pursued "For today,' he "You must respond through the ed States but even of the American a
'i,'`T e anir-i obliged-to discuss in newspapers," replied "Mr. Constant. Continent. If we do-not wish to besh
--detail-.a question which the- news- "The Deputy spoke from the rost- taken in this assault, we must prot-
r-'V"r-s lias been tossing about since rum of the Chamber, I am respond- evt ourselves, for all these attacks
At Chicago, I waA invited. ing from the rostrum of the Senate. tend to' overthrow the Government.
-at a.banquet organized by I am defending the Goverhment." Then saying that the naval base
".'businessmen who -wanted to Mr Constant had it be known that has nothing to do with the indepen-
l ed. on what-was happening everybody is disposed to defend the dence of a country, Mr Bonhomme
R. aiti, oon the opportunity for them Government. declared :
t invest .their capital. I was invited M" Bonhomme went on anyway "Among the measures of military
to speak officially. Now it happen- his expose: "From the national cooperation the great powers have
e t.-l that during the same afternoon, point of view," he said, "we all turned over the United States bases
.lJ "lthe American newspapers begpn know, actually, that the: President on their territory." The orator cited
.-'-ubhishing headlines that the'Cuban of the Republic is a Dessalinlan England, France, Greece, Turkey,
-Government no longer wishes to lea- down to the marrow of his bones. Morocco, Lybia,
"'e the, 'base of Guantanamo ,at .the We others, our nationality is itself "Does Deputy Lahens think he is
t ispqz isa .of the United States. All an ideology. We were the first Ne- speaking to imbeciles in Haiti", Mr
,-; '-. it, was explained, was the first gro -slaves to win our liberty. We Bonhomme is wondering.
r Qintof. a vast communist program. were the first to establish Pan Am- Once again, Senator V. N. Cons-
S '.. .i Was therefore the most magnifi- '
cent opportunity to gain sympathy --
if 'from the American public opinion.
h.i".'c en made the following declara-
I tion which was printed apd which
.wbi. tobr us, at one time, the syin-
.'- atps of-.the American public dpin,'
-,ion, I believe I was intelligent. B
bleve I was wise." .
S-At..this point, Senator A. Bonhom-
-me': selet_. ed a- newspaper clipping
.,"f from which be read his declaration.
It was in connection with Mole
-,-S.Nicolas, concluded the orator.
.a '-"'Returning to Haiti," he "added,
read in 'Le Matin" that Deputy
bad risen up in the Chamb-
.... Deputies with indignation ag-
i the declaration of Senator

.said, taking up a number of
-- ttriay's edition of the journal "Le
.W an," he read ..Deputy Alphonse
Lahenq' declaration. .
1t .' i While reading, Mr Bonhomie sta-
Sted: "I shall say that this is false.
L, Ldid not invite the United States.
I .paid that Haiti would be the first
.country to offer, and that I was go-
ing. to propose this to the President
of the Republic."
"Now," continued Senator A. Bon-
home, "I wish to treat this ques-
Stio"n fully, with the logic of history,
with the logic of the actual political
..-situation of the Government, with
the logic of the under-development
of the country and of the misery
o te Haitian masses."
. Here, Senator .Arthur Bonhomme
'- did not stop a minute, and with the *


SUNDAY, DEC. 2"




SAnd The


Base In Haiti

ant intervened in the debates. "Per- "I am not giving "Jrou' f
nally," he said, "I refuse to corn- que", declared Mr 'iV,
lent on the words spoken by my "I am not answering .?
colleague while abroad and which hens. You have not the
e has just given confirmation." He answer Ieputy Lahes "
ad however noticed the painful promised us a report for i
cho that these declarations had had we are waiting. We kIio
t the Chamber. are not yet prepared
"These words," replied Mr Bon- that I- have .been accr....
omme, "did not have a painful bassador p Japan. io
cho at the Chamber. It is there a is a Japanese Eqon"n,'^
question of the "vitUperations" of riving here this aftelnao
eputy Lahens." ing you to shorten yow
I am a member ofith
"It is easy to see that you are' committee. If you don'.
ot a Statesman", affirmed Mr even have the timetop.g
constant. "There are reason 'of the members of the i
Late which prevents us from mak- always -disposed to
ig such-exposes. Furthemore, if my colleague whosoever.'4'4"
colleague believes that he is the those who cause obstruc
author of these declarations, he is. -er to alienate the liberty
mistaken. AUl he is doing is to "en- For me, -they have..
rncer une porte ouverte" (break- "crippled." the quorqram.
ng in where the door is already speaking arid I was oblige
pen." speaking. So- far, we
The bell (with the Senate Presid- with a close major.ity '
it's finger. pressing down on it) "' --,s."
ad been ringing already for sever- After tese coPseaVioi
minutes. Senator Bonhomme's by Senator V. N Co st.
ice could, hardly be heard as he league, .Bonhomme,-'p" i
ied to continue his expose. How- ptaway his papers):-'
'er, Senator Constant whose intbr- sion was adjourned...-
cutor contests the right to raise .
prejudicial question continued to (Extracted f--ro-?tlI
out "I haven't finished yet." Phalange" .f


r~ we wkniC uke


La
A


~jr


a'


tipill -.1 Pmmp - .





Do Your



Shopping

in Haiti

It is getting so that people are
taking vacations as much to
shop as to play golf, lounge in
the sun or just relax. And, no
wonder when you consider the
savings to be had through Free
Port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they can
buy the same gifts, in free-port
shops, at savings -up to. 60% of
U. S. prices. So, for the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
..wonderful vacation in Haiti.
Perhaps the most famous free-
port shop in the world is La
Belle Creole; located in the
heart of fascinating Port-au-
1P'rince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable wonderland
full of the world's most de-
sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
.,ches, Cashmeres, Handmade
bags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
meras, Liquours and a seem-
ingly endless array of native
-handicraft make La Belle
Creole more- a shopping cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
sider that one can buy the
world's most famous Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
Niv.ada Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borel, Juvenil, Audemars Pi-
guet--a discounts of 50% of
the U. S. advertised prices,
and it is no' wonder that La
Belle Creole is famous. The
same applies'in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be well worth your time to
consider a trip to Haiti.

Al Noustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhaps another reason for
the surge in popularity of
free-port shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-.
shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
licy of cooperating with tra-
vel agents in their various
promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tle of free champagne to any
visitor to Haiti who happens
to- be celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niversary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts 'to make
the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
mous brand merchandise.
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
sands of tourists this year will
come home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
when they went away.


. A-a .


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER


P. 0. Box 676,


PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI


AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS


MINTON, WEDGWOOD,
ROYAL CROWN DARBY,
ROYAL COPENHAGEN,
ROYAL WORCESTER,
ROYAL DOULTON,
ROSENTHALE, SPODE,
AYNSLEE, COALPORT,
GUSTAUBERG.


IL


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HANS HANSEN, GERO,
DRAGSTER, GENSE.



The Finest of FRANCE.
ITALY, AUSTRIA,


LALIQUE, BACCARRAT;
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VAL SOLAMBERT,
STUART, LEERMAN.


=_
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OMEGA, PATEK PHILIPPE
JUVENIA TISSOT, BOREL,
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JAEGER LE COULTRE,
ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO,
ATLANTA, STUDIO,
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KISLAV,
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ITALIAN ANTELOPE.



PRINGLE, BALLANTYNE.
BERN HARD ALTMAN,
LUISA SPAGNOLI.




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and BRAZILAN GEMS.


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SUNDAY, DEC. 20TH, 1959


'"HATI SUN"


113 A 9110 py


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It was pointed out that Haiti has
an official language, French, and
a "national" language., CreoIe.
Rather more must be said about
this. By "official language" is
meant simply that French is the
language of government, of educa-
tion and of the press. It is spoken
by perhaps 15 per cent of the peop-
le of Haiti, though the figure may
be higher, and more likely is lower.
It depends on where one wants to-
draw the line. Is the French of ru-
ral lower-class Canada o e a I1 y
French? Also, it depends on wheth-
er one means "speak," "compreh-
end," or both, or something more.
Surely more Haitian people under-
stand than speak French, and more
understand and speak French than
can read and or write it. Even
the question of literacy is an open
one read and understand what?
- political posters? the local news-
paper? Voltaire? In any case, Cre-
ole, and not French, is the language
of all the people of Haiti, and the
Haitian who neither understands
nor speaks Creole is a very rare
bird indeed.
Now as for Creole. It is referred
to in this paper over and over again
as a "language". But almost all
Haitians, and most foreigners, say
it is not a language. They call it a
"dialect," a "polyglot," a "patois,"
"degenerate French," and everyth-
ing else, but not a language. What
is a language? It is a system of





r <3


SUWAYDO 20TH 1959


FRENCH AND CREOLE: SoAme (
"IS OR l&A LAN-UJAGE?" ,
** -' ~ /(


communication used by a society or is nonsense, too. What happens us- cause Hilarity, particularly because comes originally from the. Latin
a community of speakers. It has a ally is that one dialect, spoken by it reveals the marvelous stupidity.' ord meaing"f tig eand," Plain-
collection of sounds, pktterns for a regional group, becomes enshrin- of those who use it. Aln languages ;l,. ...t a-log en -a word
building words out of those limited ed as "proper" or "pure" because are pol.y glots, and Bglish. and liked by -city' folk the "hicks
sounds, a grammar, and a vocabul- its speakers at one time-"ran"-the French-art among the leaders, Ean spoke :itois-..Taie- difference was
ay. On every count, Creole quail- society thus "Castillan" Spanish, 'glish is so riddled with French vo- Betwe.encountry- and itcity; city-peop-
lies. It is a language. The terms "Back Bay" American, and "Pa-bcabfilary, for instance, that phoney le felt they knew how to" tak :"prop-
given above to describe it, such as.risiar' French. The speakers of the upper-class speech would practical- er -ly'q-un intry fol didn Is city
"polyglot", m e a n something. But "dominant" dialect-use their-spech ly be French, if the phonetics-and speech "better" than cqurtry spee-
when applied to Creole, they are habits to separate the sheep from .syntax' changed 'with the lexconch?i aT e.hteranT "better! is actually
nonsense, pure and simple. Yet it is the goats, in countries, where such (which, however; they don't : no- onebtsed bon. taste, not objectivity.
well worthwhile examining this non- a group has dominance But dial. blessed oblige; hours d'oeuvres; sang Really to appreciate the delicious
sense, because unlike nice nonsense, eels are objectively not better than froid; tete-a-tete; rendezvous; in- nonsese whfich/is iniplied 'here, one
this kind serves certain not-so-nice each other.' Such a notion Is made me; entire nous; derriere; decolle- would. hve to have witnessed a
purposes. up by somebody, and f hen other tage; coiffure; epater le bourgeois, Brooklynite and a -Mississippi' farm
A dialect is a division of a langu- people are persuaded to believe it. risque; ennui; naivete; etc. etc., boy 'holding a. barracks discussion
age, usually defined geographically, Creole is not a dialect. But it has not to mention the unmentionables in the. United Sta'es Army. The fact
and the differences between dialects dialectal divisions. Hall, probably such'as lingerie, brassiere, bandeau, is, the word "patois,"as it is care-
can be in their sounds, in their vo- the world's leading authority on and chemise. One can do the same lessly used in. describing Creole, has
abulary, sometimes in their gram- Creole languages, believes there are with Army talk: reconnaissance;. no meaning at all, .except toserve
mar, or in all three. Normally, three, corresponding roughly to the barrage; lieutenant; enfilade; born- as an eplithe lThe write .ave pro-
speakers of different dialects of the Departments of the Republic: South; bardment;p fuselage; nacelle; para- ved this- by.taski. g those wvho use
same language can understand each West (including the speech of Port- chute. ; fouragere; and so on. (It the'word to:Cefine rt-. Cohsistently,
other (which is why such dialects au-Prince); and North, Northwest, is hard to imagine the. United Stat- it is.defined.-by using othfer-term,
are not considered separate langu- and Center. The differences between es fighting a war without its French also-'mfeat -as 'ai e-pithet,- such as
ages). It's fairly arbitrary which these dialects are partly lexical (vo- vocabulary; everything would have "jargon 'bo "polyglot;" -In sum,
criteria one uses to separate out c a u a r y), partly phonological to 'e "interdicted" in "massive sa-. though the *ord "patoise' has par-
dialects. Vienna German, for inst- (sounds), partly syntactical (gram- turation"; thank Heaven for Lat)in, ticulai'meaird.hgs, when used to des-
ance, can be considered a dialect mar). No such differences prevent -anyway. The men wouldn't even be cribe Creole;- it really means no
of German Sicilian is a dialect of Haitians from any part of the count- able to deploy.) These loan-words more than' tl t the speaker thinks
Italian, The speech of the Ameri- ry from understanding each -other from French are recent acquisitions, poorly :gf Creole, and seeks terms
can south could be considered to be A "polyglot" really means very much like such words as :le jazz to- cover. an .unscientific prejudice
a dialect of English, though usually little. The word comes from the hot," borrowed into French. But En- he is not equipped -to;defend scien-
it is broken down into sub-dialects Greek Words for "many" and "ton- glish has many older words of tifically .
People generally are being snide gue". When used to refer to Creole, French origin within it, now consi- hat aboucalling-Creole "dege-
when they speak of d i a I e c t s the implication is that Creole is no dered "real English, and dating back t Frenchi' Here is a differ-
"midwestern twang" and "Brook- language because it is made up of to an earlier period, when the French er mat er Ater allch Creoise asoundiffer
lynese" are epithet terms. From the words from many languages. This dominated th English in other ways nt mattliker. After all, Creolbut the peopleunds
point of view of communication, this argument is so foolish it should besides linguistically. Such terms as w l e bt t ea
chair, table, couch, beef, veal, mut- who spek it mostly- cannot read
--. rom ton' chief and hundreds more have pie"t o arwhil-ncould be taken
long been embedded in English, and gramean whtclscouldobe taken
are now commonplaces of daily s more primitive"
are c omuEnplash ofrdallanguage. If it came from French,
speeh. But Englisho is not proud andsif ifi s somehow inia re rudiment-
it happily took hammock, wampum, ary than French; could-it not be
tobacco, maiz, maize, tomahawk, quinine, considered generate? The answer
coca, avocado, ipecac, 'potato, and is, it could. But the person who so
tomato from the Redskin:-flak, s tu- considers it has very'peciuiar, not
| |ka, blitzkrieg, kindergarten,' hamb- to mention very- unstiifid, notions
urger, frankfurter, and weltschmaerz about the nature o-laniiguage, in ad-
from the Germans; cadenza, pizza dition iton-w esul ighorasice of histo-
and fresco from the Italians; and ry. Almost.-tAl-ietiianguages of Eu-
w so on, and on, and on. Hence En- rope, with so r hblunsual exceptions-
gUsh has borrowed and continues to (such 'as Hung garn, -Finnish and
S .Bborrow, as new -items, new ideas, BAsque), togetfir .ith many of
and new thoughts arise or enter the those of Ibidia, -canft m traced back
culture of its speakers. In itis s pro- to. a common ticestor. This great
cessv it is identical with all other group of languages, including such
IS languages. If this makes English dissimilar' tongues as:'Russian, Old
a polyglot, 'it is no more and no Churcl Slavonic, -,Cataloiian, Swed-
S less so than any other language, ish and English,:is caid "Indo-Eu-
s Iand it shares this quality as much ropean." All-of the."languages in it
with Creole as it does with French arose out of other languages, and
Sor any other tongue. all of -the languages in it can be
traced back to 'sort of mother ton-
M A "patois," in its original mean- gue.- One sub-group within Indo-Eu-
ing, is a "jargon" or "dialect." In ropean is called,Slavic, another Teu-

giving the term a special meaning Romance sub-gr6ui ,includes such
SERIES G) 31 8 SERIES G) I N which doesn't concern us here. But la-iguage "as Spaisl, Catalonian,
ERIE E)G- (SEIE )I ES it is of interest that the Ftrench Romapnsch, Rumanian, Italian, and
verb "Epatoiser" means "to speak -French. French is in a sub-group
with a provincial accent." The word called' Gallo-Rbmance. Its so happens


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AY, Di :.2...1959 .


-'4


"HAITI SUN"


. .. .. ..- .. PAGE 9


,nts On the Languages of Haiti
V MINTZ and Vern CARROLL)


(CA


that Creole in thesamecateg es ctd themselves Th same of unwritten languages a it is of politics and recent history, is hard
chat Creoles br iisectds recentf e his tu -evory, i
st as Creole bereadi tr- is, ourse, ue C reole. witten gs. It is as true of enough to define to please everyone,
S h.:ed to French, soaFrencu can be tnmc- But ifs C role is not degenerate h French as it is of Creole. While but when applied to language, it
ed to Latin. latin, of cersb, toas, iLf, in fact, the wQrd degenerate" Creole nwas taking its shape here makes no sense at all. Any language
a wtten language when the people as applied to language reveals no in aiti, the French dialects of is just as civilized as any other -
o oFrance were not yet Frenchmeas more than the ignorance-and person- Franc were continuing to change or better, no language can be de-
.*ii u trbal groups, living in many ale bias 6L the user- wat'ofthe themselv es. and the French of the fined as being more or less ci iliz-
b' u separate regions, offen.at war with terms "simple," "primitive," and salons and of literature was chang- ed.
each other. Needless on e to-emphasize, "complex"? Can these words be ap- ing as we l. It is not possible, there-
these tribal groul spoke rluueroun plied to fang ages, tq distinguish fore, to establish a starting-point or Defining simplicity is also very
different langua, e, and were total them from each other? The answer base-line in comparing uch related difficult in the case of languages.
y illiterate. TheyLatiwere conquered to this question appears to be "no" languages as French and Creole. Though the Frenchman learns all
by a great Roman general who'has -- at present, it is notscientifically Looked at from the point of view 57 verb classes as he grows up, with-a
tolf d us all abgut his campaigns possiolen to rate languages along a of their mother, Latin, Creole ande ut too much pain, the French verbs
amsthere a great detai. An ri.at-ale o simple to complex. or along French are of the same age, even frighten and dismay most foreign-
ther in great de L'ati tim too mucg as p th ua ,ll tihe areno c vb s-
i things, and after Iosi durable n e, a scale from primitive to civilized, though the community of speakers ers. English verbs are no snap, eith
S the people whbeao we one da tohe h us look and to equate "odin reverse or of the language called Creole dider, but they surely seem easier (ev- i
come Frenchmen lBefored how.to er..fim t considering the terms "primi- not begin speaking it until the sev- en to other foreigners) than French
read and, writeould The laguv e ee n mtive of these three l ul es is enteenth century. This argument verbs. But in other ways, French
Which they became iterate was La- terms "simple" and "complex." may seem very abstract. It is not. imporan features which simplify learn-
tin naturally, th"degenerate" un they he saokme as primitive. In fact, it is distinguishes between a language ing, when compared to the samI
S differedconsiderab from the a- Pritice" has numerous mean- and the social group whichmakes uses that features in English. Langlly impoages are
i tin e of ctiRoman' thnqteror. Whehas beco is, of course, but usually it is used language for communication. n the systems; each language is spoken
Sthe newly terate first began writ- tomesean: older; or less and o French as changed case of Haitian Creole, the biased not piece by piece, but as a whole;
ting Latin. they followed the rules than something else or just simptise. critic of the Creole language seems the sounds; the words and the
--.>" as the., had learned them. But at From one point of view. a particular incapable of seeing' the difference g r a m m a r a r e a II be i n g
one pot these Latin readers be- is now establising thought of all langu-. between the language itself and the u s e d amplerI t m e in o thanm-
writers began writing shaped by d a kind of Laing older than another. Thus one society which employs it. Hence, municating meaning. Depending up-
f the purposes to which was no longer the Latin might think of Latin as older than the "age of Creole -of nuclhether on ould what language is one's native
of Rome: in fact,, it was Frenchb It Fuench, and of 1rmneh p. older thinks of it as starting only a few tongue, each foreign language will
was much later that this new writ- thai C reol. If one were to db this, centuries ago, or as being as old have some features that make it
ten language became' known as the however, and to equate "older" with as French-,- cannot be used to deter- seem easy, and others that make it
French language. efore. it did, hoy- more primitve, then the least primi- mine whether it is a "primitive" seem hard. The "hardest" languag-
ever.t t would not -have been qor- tive of these three languages is Cre-'-language or 'not. In fact, the word es, of course, are those which share
reef to call it degeneratee Latin." ole. I-However, older does not mean "primitive", as applied to language, no important features with the nat-
The term "degenerate"u s-trai l y the same as primitive. In fact, it is is as inappropriate as the word "de- ive language of the learner. It is
means that something, has lost some linguistically questibnable to think generate." and makes just as little hence scientifically impossible at
of its functions, that it has become of Latin as being older than French, sense, present to speak of one language
less perfect, that it operates less and of French as being older than Just as there is no such thing as as simpler than another. One may
efhcientlb. But the French language, Creole. The science of linguisitics' a "primitive" language, there is contend that Creole -verbs are sim-
as it emerged from Latin, was be- is now establishing that all langu- neither any such thing as a "civi- pier, or simpler to learn, than
ing shaped by daily use to serve all ages change at approximately the lized" language. The word "civiliz- French verbs. Even if this content-
of the purposes to which -its speak- same rate over time. This is as true ed" itself, in this world of nuclear ion could be proved correct in the


* A.


rAGE 8a ,


"HATI SUNi"


CATERPILLAR*,
VAURICE BONNEFIL, Manager, The Haytian Tractor Co. Chancerelles.


-
-


Afflbl 0


A - -


abstract, it emphatically would not
mean that Creole as a whole was
simpler than French. Thus the sim-
ple-complex notion also fails to ap-
ply to language, just as did the
primitive-civilized notion. (It hardly
seems worth adding that, if one day
it proves possible to call one lan-
guage simpler than another, this
will mean nothi-.5 about the com-
parative value of tiese languages. If
anything, simplicity in sounds and
in grammar can be regarded as a
virtue. It is exceedingly difficult to
see how the confusing orthography
of English, the many verb classes
of French, or the tone-classes of
omrne American Indian and African
languages make them "better" than
other languages).

Beyond these points, there is the
matter of a literature. It may be
that one will not grant the name
"language" to a system of commu-
nication until it is accompanied by
a literature. Such a position, while
liiguistically indefensible tw hat
were people speaking, if not lan-
guages, before the invention of writ-
ing?), needs at least to be acknow-
ledged. Having a written language
is a tremendous advantage to a
people. They can communicate
much more with each other. They
can record information of all sorts,
rather thsai having to commit it
to memory (or just forgetting it).
Their history seems to begin with
writi.r-: r.nd in fact "history" takes
over from "prehistory" when writ-
ing is in onmcd. Yet the word "lan-
(-'ostinued on page 10)








PAGE 10



SFrench And Creole


guage" can not justifiably be with- municate what they perceive. Any-
' held from Creole because it has no thing can be said in any language.
literature. And, as a matter of fact It is quite true, of course, that no
Creole can be written, and there language.has all of the words which
are 6 few things written in it. It would be needed to communicate
y win be necessary to say more of everything. Eskimos would have
this, because we have not yet con- trouble discussing atomic theory.
sidered why people want to deny to But Americans would have
Creole the status of being a langu- just as much trouble dis-
age. But ilrst, a few more words cussing the very many degrees
on languages in general. Linguists of hardness of snow, which the Es-
say that a language provides a fra- kimos must be able to describe, and
S mework for perceiving reality. This which their languages enable them
is a very expressive idea. Until we to do. When a people needs. a new
speak, we cap only communicate word, a word is borrowed or invent-
. in very rudimentary ways. Human ed. In English, "jeep" was invented
babies do it by grunting, crying, (and then borrowed from a comic
waving their little limbs, and so strip), along with "goon," "Sput-
on. Animals also. fail to commUni- nik" was borrowed. Was English
cate very effectively. This is not more primitive than Russian at the
- the' place to go into an even longer moment we borrowed it? We have
S / discussion of language, but the fol- added thousands of words to our
lowing has to be said. Only man language since Shakespeare. Was
S has the power of speech, and that our language more primitive at the
holds for all men. Before man had time he wrote his immortal prose?
s -ech, it is an open question wheth- Is "Them what has, gits" more pri-
er' he could have been considered mitive than "The wealthy .have a
human, other than anatomically, greater advantage in the accumula-
Speech takes the form of languages. ton of yet more wealth than the im-
AllU peoples have language. No lan- poverished"?
guage is any more primitive than If is therefore laughably irrele-
any other, All languages enable the vant that Bossuet cannot be read-
. men who speak them to communi- ily translated into Creole. It hap-
cate symbolically with each other, pens that it is exceedingly difficult
and they use their language to com- to describe the belief system of


i:';:.' -. :,- -

.. *" .
t -


. .- '-

"it
. *. *.



- I.

'i . ..


4
V

.1
*6'
I
'F.

~1'


"HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY,


: Some Comments on the...
(Continued from page 9)


vodou in French, but that does not
mean that French is not language.
Since each language is to some ex-
tent the product of the needs and
experiences of a people, not every-
thing can be said immediately and
equally well in every language. But
any language can readily be used
to say everything. No one considers
Hebrew degenerate Aramic, or con-
siders it a jargon because it has
no Word for "atom bomb." Words
are 'readily added to languages as
they are needed, not. before. One
is led to wonder whether the Rus-
sians have had to borrow as many
terms from the French for their
language of diplomacy 'as the
French will have to borrow for their
language of the atom.

In sum, then, Creole is a lan-
guage. It is, Hall tells us, a creoliz-
ed- language. It is based on a reduc-'
ed variety of French first spoken,
he believes, when the masters and
slaves of Saint Domingue came into
protracted and continuous contact
during the 17th and 18th centuries.
Probably many of the structural and
grammatical features of Creole ori-
ginated in the West African langua-
ges spoken' by the slaves themselv-
es. It is interesting and this, too,
Hall points out- that the basic
features of grammar in Creole are
common to both French and West
African languages, with some feat-
ures peculiar to noe or the oth-
er. The vocabulary of Creole is al-
most entirely French, long argu-
ments to the contrary notwithstand-
ing. The terms used in vodou are
usually from African languages.
Many foods are known by African
names. Many mechanical parts, as
in cars, are known by English nam-
es. A few words are derived from
American Indian words, some more
from Spanish. When more words are
needed -and they always are- they
are most likely to be borrowed from
French, secondarily from Spanish
and English. Hall says this is much
like the relationship between mod-
em Italian and Latin.
A long look is needed now at the


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motivation of those who call Creole
everything but a language. We have
seen that French is almost the ex-
clusive property of a small group
of Haitians (there are debates about
how much French a Haitian peasant
can understand, let alone speak; no
one really knows). The use of
French is a prime way for establish-
ing status in Haiti. Two Haitians
who hJave not known each other pre-
viously, and who meet for the first
time abroad, always speak French
to be gin with, if they can. When
do they start speaking Creole, an
to begin with, if the3 can. When
they take off their coats and sit
down to a drink," she said. There
is nothing wrong with Creole, then,
if you can speak Fre'nch. But if
one can speak only Creole -! Cre-
ole, then, is subjected to constant
downgrading at the hands of most
(not all) Haitians. And at this point,
the 'picture becomes quite confus-


ing. Many educated.1
fiercely that all dad
should be done in' F*
for their argumeinit
one point of view.,>I
if Haiti were to bec
Creole, it would be'j
off from the rest f;
fact, if Haitians weui
in Creole, the effect
isolating one. But.;4
need to be raised. *:
sary that Haitians"
only in Creole? ".A
Haitians becomtlt`
more rapidly or m4*
become literate in -
are beginning to"'
These are important
the future of Haiti/
the first is easy; inr-
of the world, peope
or even trilingual.'Th.


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\








Sr-SUNDAY, DEC. 20TH, 1959


"HAITI SUN"


(FRENCH AND CREOLE
(Continued fr

and surely no justification for Hai-
E-ia s becoming literate only in Cre-
1 Q.lp. The second question is harder
'.'q answer,.. if it can be answered
th;at all. One must think a little about
Pr'the psychological side of it. The
peasant-knows his child needs to
''pba.-French to get anywhere in
"hig society. Usually, he wants him
to eam French. But the child
ki Creole, is taught Creol e,
the time it utters its first
2r4-like babbling. Creole is, in ev-
sene, his' mother language.
M ver the teachers who teach
fhin child are often not wholly com-
-etentin French. They may speak,
.-ad and write some; a few are
probablyy fluent in French. It app-
'.ears that-the majority do not speak
. -gbd grammatical. French. They are
ntlberefore in the position, often, of
Ptechng bad French to children
whose mother tongue is Creole. The
chool- has very little connection
with the rest of hie in the Haitian























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: SOME COMMENTS... "folk" or "national" languages, as
om page 10) well as an "official" language, as
in British West African, Russia, or
countryside. French. then, is learn- Paraguay, the procedure is usually
ed painfully. It is. furthermore, to educate children through the low-
learned in a situation where the er grades in their language, and to
national language is derogated, ri- teach them the official language
diculed. and called no language at gradually, and starting a little later.
all. We do not know, really, what In the Philippines, careful experi-
goes on in the Haitian school child's meeting over several years has de-
head so far as this problem is con- monstrated conclusively that the
cerned. But surely one can suggest children who were taught in their
that the circumstances are not the mother tongues and then went on
best for the rapid assimilation of to learn English in their third year
French. And yet, how would the of school did better work in all sub-
formal teaching of literacy in Cre- jects, including English, than child-
ole improve the rate and quality ren who had been taught exclusive-
of French learning? It does seem ly in English for the full three
like a foolish way round. Here,, ag- years.
ain, the answer may be psycholo-
gical in nature. The Haitian people Again, in Puerto Rico, nearly fif-
must learn to be secure with their ty years of teaching exclusively in
own language to know that it is Englisb in the lower school had pro-
a language, and that it is as "good" duced a situation where people were
a language as any other. It is just "illiterate in two languages." There
possible that, once this was truly is evidence now accumulating that
,,nderstood French would lose its Puerto Rican students who begin


awesomeness. In most parts of the
world where there are one or more


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their education in Spanish acquire
English more rapidly than those who
begin their education in English. In
Haiti, the situation is somewhat dif-
ferent, but just as bad as what
Puerto Rico was: here, most of the


PANAMA LINE PANAMA
CANAL CO.
The SS 'Cristobal" of the Panama
Line will arrive from New York at
7:00 Am., December 19th, 1959.
On board are a total of 116 pass-
engers of %which the following 40
will disembark at Port-au-Prince.
Mr & 'Mrs Syney S. Aier, Miss
Fernande Apolon, Miss Mathilde A-
zor. Mr Raymond Balmir, Mr Jo-
seph Barron, Mrs Olga Bouzi.. Miss
Emmeline Cadet, Mrs Raoul C. Col-
cou, Mrs Louisina E. Delva, Miss
Adulca M. Desir, Mr & Mrs Gerard
D Haiti, Miss Zirphile Dorismond,
Mis Florestan Marguerite. Mr Wil-
lans Garcia, Mrs Frances B. Gar-
vey & 2 children, 6-1 Yrs., Miss Ro-
se Gateau, Miss Elizabeth Hardy,
Mrs Marie Hue. Mrs Ghysele Hus-
band, Mrs Rosita Hyppolite, Miss
Edith Joseph, Mrs Raymonde Jo-
seph, Col. & Mrs Kent C. Lambert,
Mr & Mrs Joseph Mainville & Son
2 months, Miss Marie-Therese Nar-
cisse. Miss Violette Nicolas, Miss
Simone Petrus. Mr Llrich Prudent.
Mr Felix St Jean, Miss Lunie St.
Louis, Mr Charles P. an Amburg,
Miss Juliette Westerband, Miss Sa-
rah Yoder


- - A - ".4


p4 TROPICAL (.e W-RUs pvE
Ltki M* rI fu PU VTh*C E Phe. 38B3..


H.'..


.<* ." -

L'-l = *
'*f t^


people are illiterate in two langua-
ges, and are 'constantly told that
the one they speak is degenerate.
In view of this evidence, one wond-
ers seriously why Haiti has never
had a comparable experiment. It
would be neither expensive nor dif-
ficult to carry out, and it would pro-
vide answers to a basic educational
problem. At present the sound and
fury continues unabated. The gaili-
cized Haitian says Creole is no lan-
guage, and the nervous Frenchman
may agree. (One must feel some
sympathy for the French, of course:
their readiness to assume that any
proponent of Creole teaching is an
unscientific Anglo-Saxon has its
roots in political events remote from
little Haiti.) The Haitian nationalist
may go too far, and seek to make
Creole Haiti's only language. The
brash American may want Haitians
to learn English, to save him the
trouble of learning any foreign lan-
guage.
But the problem remains: how to


educate the Haitian people what
language will provide the best be-
ginning? The question is a practi-
cal one, and a scientific experiment
might provide an impartial answer.
The argument here is emphatical-
ly not to make Creole the language
of Haiti. But it may be worth re-
flecting on what might happen in
this country if its nearly four mil-
lion inhabitants could express them-.
selves on paper in their language,
and be subject to all sorts of out-
side (that. is, city) influences they
are now cruelly and hopelessly cut
off from, as well as being able to
write to and for each other. Creole
does not need a literature to win
for itself the name of language; but
all over the world, people whose
languages were never written be-
fore are now creating national spir-
it and literature in their own ton-
gues. This need not happen in Haiti;
but there is no necessity to rule out
this possibility either.
(Continued in next edition)


You know

it's a really fine

Scotch when it's
JOHNNIE

WALKER




JOHNNIE VWALKEgR
Born 1 20-still Dh'li/ strong


PREETZMAN-AGGERHOLM Distri butor For HAITI


MQ7VUAU KT
DIFFIRIENt


SANS CHAMBRE


L Breft airMiitor de Is b'a
soulement done one traction m .
scurit6 supnplmentai res. U b gu
dispositif do silence .r6duit *is .
rents bruits d6sagr6ables d p
tandis que .la construction 169grs M
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Construction Grip-Seail 'exusivo do
;eoodyear h6imine pratiqewF1--
te"vaisons habituelles.


-eODAIUEAUI


PAGE 11


* I'








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'I.


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. '1*'4


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-


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Selde

RodmanPoet, writer, anthology
art critic has returned to Ha
San absence of five years. He
:.. or'three weeks with daughter Or
,.a. Rodman is doing an article 1
the-New York Times on the de'
lopnient of the Haitian Arts, expli
ing. the possibilities of produce
a film in color on all phases of H
,I; .tiap -art -next .winter .and check
Sqn.'the revision of his book "Hait
The Black Republic"; still the -mi
accurate and-up-to-date boQk\bn tI
tk -.:: :; - "
While .Rdman advocates the imn
diate creation"of a Museum of
here which would keep some Haiti
art treasures from disappe
-.ing into private collections through
ut the world, and-at the same ti
: praises the-collections of -foger Co
er~of the Oloffson -and Bishop Vi
Ll.gel_. of the Episcopal Church as p
-;, -the .finest -in the world, he a
S ap :an .inpressive- collection at I
o,.l.-me in Oakland New Jersey.

".cr- e Cleaver ori a visit to R<
m n'a home recently published
Wickoff News under -the ti
-i J 'ak~d Art Collection hints
'''.' d.of abstractionism" her expe
epce .


.-.ot .unlike the primitive Haitians
and 'Mexicans pictured, in his large
-collection, Selden Rodman has
Sffth:his own hands, carved out a
red-acre Paradise here in Oakland.

It'is easy to pass by the simple
ilBox. marked "Rodman" at 659
amapo Valley Road. without guess-
ng-at the treasures which lie .be--
Elid te screen of trees.


n Redman Re turns After 5 Yea


SAYS HAITI SHOULD
ist I turned into the*long drive on a
iti warm, sunny day to see a man in
ere the fields shearing grass and furth-
ia- er along, above and behind two
for lily-padded pools, the house, set
re- high.on a prow of land. As the car.
or- swept around the curve of the drive
ng and.' stopped, everything was very
al- still.
an Rodman's small bulldog, Pudgy'
ost greeted.,me at the door, and with-
his out barking or biting, simply went
to find her master.'"She's not much
of a watchdog" said Mr Rodman
me- coming around the house, barefoot-
Art ed, to admit me to his collection.
an I suppose there must be furniture
ar- in the Rodman house, but it is com-
ghp pletely unnoticeable because every
me wall is teaming with pictures. "You
ist- really believe in living with art,
oe-. don't you?" I said at one point as
er- I discovered the picture [ had been
iso staring at was beside a re.fpigerat-
hie or.


Aubrey Sbhwartz's "Crying Vend-
or," just one of many fresh sketch'
es casually grouped on a kitchen
wall '(among them Lebrun's carica-
ture of Stravinsky) is a delightful
prelude to his powerful
"Edgar Allen Poe" in -the Rodman
gallery-- Also hanging inconspicu-
ously in the group is a head by
Roualt which Mr Rodman bought
for $5 in 1931. The picture was' the
first purchased, has increased in
value many, many times. "Paint-
ings are actually better investments
than stocks," said Mr. Rodman.', Al-
though every picture and bit'of scul-
pture. in his collection was bought
solely because he happened to like
it, nearly every work is worth a


CREATE IMMEDIATELY A MUSEUM FOR ITS ART
great deal more than its .original of 'intense emotion or. illumination, resting in con
price. Whether or not their work is corn- More irony
I suggested that it Would take prehensible is immaterial. Perhaps b% Lebrun ca
much knowledge'and training to pick they do not understand [he paintings It shows Ma
the right paintings. "Only taste," themselves. It is this attitude, which at the death
.said Mr Rodmari. Mr Rodman once defended, that he one of many
An avowed "insider" so much so has now turned away from. None ones) in who
he is now writing a book with that of the works in his main gallery es, was amc
title, Mr Rodman has kept "outsid- are the somewhat mechanized des- a show which
er" paintings, outside his main gal- igns of the "moderns." All are con- um of Moder
lery. In an adjacent room hang such cerned with humanity, showing the of the first si
currently fashionable moderns. as human figure with pity, understand- is turning a'
Jackson Pollock, Willem DeKooning, ing, and compassion. ism.
Kline Tobey, and Kandinsky. A strik-
ing exotic abstract, painted here on "The gallery, created by Mr Rod- Also shown
Rodman's wall by Georges Mathieu man to display works of art, is a Shahn, of wh
brings to mind another Mathieu work of art, itself. As the door op- in his book
painting in the-Museum of Modern ens, one stares into a long white ARTIST AS
Art, N.Y. C. Mr. Rodman Was quick room where at the far end a black ard Baskin, w
to point out the Japanese influence mobile swings impressively, but not book, CONV
in the design1 which was painted without a certain humor. Beside it ARTISTS, M
the week after Mathieu returned hangs a large oil by Rico Lebrun, Orozco, Geor
from the Orient, and to show anoth- entitled "Study for Buchenwald and Javies
er picture hanging nearby which Cart" showing man's suffering und- remarkably in Dove
the artist did especially for Mr er Nazi torture. The delicate mob- remark
Rodman's daughter. ie, created by Alexander Calder portrait of M
if-"To-


A Joan Miro painting previously
in the' collection was sold recently
because Mr Rodman no longer en-
joyed it. "However," he said some-
what wryly, "the artist could hard-
ly object to that since most outsid-
ders paint neither to be liked, nor
understood, nor even viewed." They
work solely from a spontaneous urge
to express themselves in a moment


balances the heavy painting both in
feeling and size.
Four sets or indirect lighting, cre-
ate varying effects, illuminating
now oneside of the room, .now an-
other, shifting emphasis from' a
rich oil by Jonah Kinigstein, "Three
Cardinals," to a' large canvas by
the young Belgian, Octave Laqduyt,
called ironically "Reclining Figur-
es" figures which could easily be


7~- - -. -..-. .\.
ST0 TEL


JMONTANA

PETION-,VLLE


The AMobt EKCb ~)e occIlo



Aook tie ay fe entee 41,

he 4.lle Can Vegt and t6


ncentratdt
is otf.A
lled t
ry g
,of her.
artt
im Mr.IB
)ng tli
ih opened
n Ait.l
igns"a
way."ia

in theg
om

ANs
ho

!ktta,-3;
ges. Ri
Kearns.
er,
exact
-* -1S


, - ,
I..-.. . ,
'4-4'- - I -, .
v ,.--- ,. .'-.' '


Iot o 1 U Je InsiderLU
currently at work off
Mr: Rodman's groa
to have a New '"Yo
soon. -
The living rooih'
home -is somewh
overwhelming- are t
ent colors of the.ge4
ive Haitian pain-m
cover walls,\ Din
World .War whilee ;|
production -of hisi^
lutionists," Mr
intrigued with. lh.

'.. .,

.
'.Se~


WITH
NEWA .CO

or Hw

[t. Easy,


AMP
BELL is h

For HIGH El


Agents f!
Pulae GefaisA
irP-Oad


o- 1


.. t1tIttmI IIepo"
iti"" "Me l tousmf t o
*ur I s gau 5arbr O*DO '
5. PortmcnprfncdO"mo









Served mewsmvay at Hiti's Leading
HOTELS & RSTAURAS &, Y CONNOISSEURS
THROUGHOUT THI WORLD


SUNDAY, DEC.


"HAMEJ SUN"


I


Lo.A




~*~'~t---


- SUNDAY, DEC.-13TI, 1959


j'ater returned to participate in the
.discovery of a school of self-taught
-native artists in 1949-50 he initiated
Sand directed the painting of the
.-celebrated murals in the Cathedral
t.St Tri ite. RENAISSANCE IN HAl-
L T. and HAITI, THE BLACK REP-
k BLIC contain the fruits of this ex-
perience. He then came to Oakland.
Wh "a.ny Oakland?" I asked. We had
left the house and were wandering
Li.'beside the two -lovely pools. The
'answer was almost self-evident....
'the country was so oeautiful and
'-.tdl, yet wild. "Sometimes a deer
t comes down from the mountain
right up to the house," he said. I
Thought somewhat nostalgically that
.soon this would-no longer be true.
.Progress has its price.
"i But Mr Rodman does not fear en-
.eroaching civilization. His five acres



SF]



HAITI'S

SHOPS

1) GALLERIES FISH
S2) ART & CURIO SHO

SAVE U1
AND. B
STRAi

(AM.



r 'ri


"HAITI SUN"


SELDEN RODMAN RETURNS...
(Continued from page 12)


adjoin thelarge property of his fri-
end, the playwright Sydney Kings-
ley, guaranteeing a wide area of
undeveloped land.
I congratulated him on the. two
natural pools. "They're not natur-
al," he said. "I dug- them out
myself and they're filled with rain
water, but they're really quite deep.
Would you like to go for a swim?"
A car had turned into the drive,
bearing an elderly couple from New
tork state. They said that they had
read of the collection in THE NEW
YORK TIMES and driven here to
see the Orozco painting (shown at
the left.) We laughed because my
car was apparently blocking the en-


IN HAITI SHOP


IN HAITI SHOP
AT

L S H ER


trance. So many people come to
see the collection that Mr Rodman
has had to construct an extra gravel
driveway. There was a parking pro-
blem. He doesn't mind. Everyone
is welcome and is made to. feel so,
although Mr Rodman does appre-
ciate being phoned in advance of
a 'isit so that he will be at home.
We ambled down to the guest cot-
tage reconstructed from an ancient
barn. Within are housed souvenirs
and art work found on six months'
trip to Mexico two years ago and
brought back in a jeep. Mr Rod-
man's personal account of the trip,
MEXICAN JOURNAL, was publish
ed recently, with an opening quote


'S


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AND MAHOGANY FACTORY

R ACROSS FROM NEW U.S. EMBASSY
P FISHERS ACROSS FROM CUSTOMS HOUSE

P TO 60 Per Cent ON IMPORTS
UY HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS
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EXPR. AND DINERS CLUB ACCEPTED)


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FOR RESERVATIONS, ROAD MAPS AND SUGGESTED

AVIS CAR RENT
P.O. Box 602
PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI


by Nehru, "In Mexico artists are would ha
more important than politicians." three year


indeed it would seem from the at least a month to view all of Mr
souvenirs that every Mexican is an Rodman's collection. Few of us can
artist from the pre-Columoians live abroad for a long period of
to the modern peasants who carve time, bue the Oakland collection is-
toys, figures, and whistles from na- fore ever available for a second or .
tive clay and sell them to tourists third visit. 'that is the closet most
for a few pennies. of us can come to the pleasure of
A really ingernous shelf, built on living as Mr Rodman does in the
a Mondrian design, has been creat- midst of it.
ed by Rodman to show the Mexican
sculpture. A window swings out be- GESNER ARMAND'S
hind the figures exposing them to WORK SNAPPED P '
the air and the light of the world. BY COLLECTORS
As we were all getting ready to The Gesner Armand exhibition at
leave, Mr Rodman's daughter, Ori- the Centre d'Art has done a great
ana, arrived home from school, to deal to bring this very young artist
pick mint leaves and zinnias for the rapidly up into the forefront of Hai-
guests and show her own paintings tian non-primitive painters. The jud-
which may be used to illustrate a gement of such an expert as Roger
children's book. It was after Orian- Coster of Hotel Oloffson fame has
a's birth eight years ago that Mr been amply substantiated by collect-
Rodman leased his home, sight un- ors of discernment who have a-
seen, on the recommendation of quired examples since the opening
Freeholder Arthur Vervaet, a friend of the exhibition, the latest of these
and terinis partner. After moving on being Selden Rodman, whose coil- '
to the property Mr Rodrdan loved section of American. French and Hai-
it, bought it, and has since been tian art is well known. Another is
redecorating and redesigning the the eminent Dr Eric Ponder, cur.-
lovely old farmhouse that was own- ently in Haiti giving special courses
ed for many years by the Robert and lectures at the Ecole de Mede.
Sheldons. Having spent three years cine. Dr. Ponder's personal collect-
in Europe following graduation for ion contains ten works by the late,
Yale in addition to his other trips great Paul Klee, considered by
to Haiti and Mexico, he has no im- many experts to be one of the fin-
mediate plans for future trips. est artists of modern times.
Armand flew off to Mexico last ".
Oriana, or "BeeBe" as she is af- week with plans for intensive work :
fectionately called by her father, in painting, ceramics and theatre
eyed the company with delight and designing and ligthing. It is his in-
asked us to come again before tention to return to Haiti next Fall "
being whisked off to attend to her and to continue to work here in.
piano lessons. Waving a fond fare- these various fields, especially in .
well both drivers turned up the that of the theatre, certain aspects '
peaceful country drive toward the of which have long been neglected
traffic of 202. in Haiti. It can be confidently pr :,
'dicted that Armand will make an
It is said that to see all the treas- important contribution to the artist- i
ures housed in the Louvre, one ic evol':on of his country. ...;






UIHAL111F11 of
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.:

PAGE 13

ve to stay in Paris for .
rs. Certainly it would take





...,--- .... -' .. ..- ;"-. -.** .
-a ., *, " '-
t '.F- ..


A; tiJoseph report









" -toe Perchoir restaurant this week instituted a better cuisine at much
:'. more reasonable prices. The restaurant with the hundred mile view
Serves a chicken chasseur for t3:25 in place of $4:75. The Poulet Flambe
c.-o. oognao $2:75 instead of 3:75. Drink prices have also been slashed'..
.N';,Dadlani clippered to Kirigston Wednesday... Sydney Cawley star VIP
S .the ,PBA association is thinking of turning over a new tree and
N man ,ii g an English model-incredible... The Bayard's with the sad pass-
"R .agot former Coast Guard. Commander Franck Bayard, have closed down
;'t~Sir Sputnik bazaar... Franck Fouche the playwright, poet is back from
.',;,-. tour of Europe and the Far East. He visited Russia and China in his
t iitavels.,. 'General -Louis (Tonten) Alerte 70 graduated this past week
.,-''.'.fkpm the summerie at the Sandstone college. He speht his last 'days at
military hospital... Ambassador Ulrick St Louis is up 'from his Ca-
pqst... The Chiouconne Roof Garden opened Thursday night. A
a- Chrisitmas.&Ev. party.is being organized by a group "jeunes gens"
.',the roof garden... Miss "Belle BagallUe" Audry Brakie of Jamaica
t .'- friend Enid M. Rhoden of Brooklyn are enjoying Haiti on a long
:.i .t.er holiday... Dr Tom Rees, Plastic surgeon is down from New York
again to give some time to patients at the Schweltzer Hospital... Mr,
-tmynmuci a -VIP of Durbdm Associates, one of the largest Investment
es in the world is vacationing'here at the Ibo Lete...
-e: n ,i., Saks was welcomed to town Thursday by Richard L. Davies, exe-
director of Klein & Saks on a routine visit... Cap-Haitien Merchant
coffee planter Otto Schutt was in town this week at the 'Montana
Sedt with his family on business,.. Carpenters are working on a .Free
ffbee Bar at the airport... Three month old Marie .MiheLt Laguerre. has
i:- overed her illness thanks to Dr Bright... Mrichel' Bredy, Haiti's Consul i
C.? .. ainaguay Cuba flew to New York Thursday he explained to have an
ration....,Frauck .Magloire of Le Matin which ran into technical
cities' with their Wednesday edition flew to San Juan Thursday..'.
epty Alphonse Lahens of Arcahaie spoke his mind to the Chambpr c
c-r e i tlhe',sesgion was closed about Senator Bonhomlne. He later hit the
aesover radio. Caribe wth his reply to Senator Bonhomme. The
iniBe difference' had th1 ear 6rarks-of becorning a "cause
but -fisseled. out Thursday when Lahens get permission for a
t v-a c a t i o n from his colleagues a n d went North... French
uamessman Felix "Gorce' left fpr San Juan Thursday after looking over
spil Vnestabhlied wall board: factory here...- Ti Bo-Po the comedian
S --'.ner has passport in readiness for his trip to Colombia with Missr
STi Ro-Ro says he has a student drummer on the way. His wife
i.ela Ae_'arals is pregnant he reports... Charlie Willis, Washington
t.'.A vpcate'came 16 town Saturday...
;ilday Hotel Sans Souel's "White Christmnas Balr' from pm to 2am
it '-"') ipet rson" includes midnight snack... 'Popular Birdman .Henri
,er-received-an avialnche of friends at his Petionville duplex roost
-!;*--.4-inet Sa dyA .i ;.. Senator. Victor Nevers Constant is expected
to leave for Toko. to take up his -Am ibassadorial post the first week of
tJtgjanuary.... Haseb..has placed a special fellow and white rail crossing
-'5 barirler on the Damien-road where Bob Roy narrowly escape death in
Sa'collision with a Hasco train early this year... Mr Dancy is down froth
i- ew York to see- his investment in the new meat-packing plant... The
.1eath of "TI Pi~W" ji46builts) caught stealing gasoline frim a plane at
.:4' he end'of Bo en -Fi'eil has not been in vain. A pew block fence is being
i."' 0bJt..to keep others out..- Beau Rivage opened their season Thursday nite
with Orlando Kavas of1caragua the Ceha-Cha-Chitas' with darling Mar-

'Head-miller at the Minoterie Bill'Wobkittel flew home to Yule in Dall-
as Texas... Bill ras er. also.f the-Minoterie went home.to a white Christ-
-."bs i in Denver... Colonel lIddie. Roy former Haitian Airforce Chief is
;0'over from Miami with wife Ginette for the holidays... Dave Anderson
,.b ullder of the new American Embassy has purchased Peruvian Ambassa-
r' dor Alberto Perez Saez's yacht and rumored preparing'to sail it home
ds," .to T.ilindad... Travelers .from the D.R. report that all the telediol is
S, ayng in' C.T. is.abqut a rupture in Dominican Haitian relation. Its news
i 'to ati.'.... Mr and Mrs Billy Ray Stqed are expecting for February... Mrs
S-oward Scherm'erhorn. is back in Haiti to arrange. Christmas for
:'. o400 -childreit in Caes-Jaamel... Forest E. Abbuhl second secretary- and
.' Political offider at the American Embassy is playing host to his parents
'ovi the holidays....

Caribbean Construction Co. S A.

Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD


Phone: 3955. P. O. BO.. 284


SUNDAY, D. 2


"UNAm UY'


Art Exhibit
AT H.A. INSTITUTE.
The Haitian-American Insti t u t e
has called its art show "Tendenc-
ies" in Haitian art today.
One is impressed first of all by
the! dynamism and activity of the
canvasses shown.
Every aspect of the Haitian lands-
cape and village life have leht them-
selves as subject matter. Charles
Obas has caught the village in a
sombre mood inl his "Orage" What
contrast are the exciting figures in
Leon Jn-Pierre's "Ra-Ra" or Max
Arnoux's "Gagure". In his "Ti-Ti"
and "Homme Vieux" .Rene Exume
has given us insights into the- crafty'
paysan. .
Likewise, one is impressed by the
departures from Folk .themes, the
examples of artists who have dev-
eloped their own images and colors,
who seek to enter the lovely world
of form and color. In this respect,
there are work by Lazard, Cedor,
Duval, Depas and Gabriel.
The Centre de Ceramique is well
represented in the works of Jean-
Claude Garoute and several of his
students. The variety of their sub-
jects and, their skill in execution
-reflects real credit on Haiti's dev-
eloping -ceramic arts.
Miss Barbara Aubin, who is visit-
ing Haiti as an Inter-American Con-
vention grant, is represented by
ive works. Her style is intimate,
and deply personal, reflecting a
person who has given her serious
and most sincere attention toward
working out her own personal art-
stic statement.
No mention of the show would be
complete without citing the scuIp-
ural work of Andre Dimanche. His
six works in 'wood are skillfully
carriedd out.

-**0


Pisributpr
JOS3MPH NJ b4 R?.


U.S. IMMIGRATION PLANE 1
TWO DEPORTEES TO--HA


A United States Immigration DC3
brought two Haitian girls home to
Port-au-Prince Thursday afternoon.
The two girls had been in State
Mental Institutions in Long Island
New York. Well dressed they app-
eared quite normal and relieved to
be back in Haiti.
The two Haitians were part of a
strange cargo on the U.S. Immigra-
tion PlAne. The aircraft was deliv-
ering mentally disturbed aliens tq
their homeland with all the comforts
of a hospital. As no airline will car-
ry such persons and no hotel will
open their doors even for overnight
the plane carried three pilots who
took turns at the controls during ten
hours air travel.
Under the command of Captain
John Landry and Deportation-Offic-


CAROLS AT UNION
SCHOOL DEC. 23
The Union School has sent out in-
vitations to parents and friends of
"Ye Olde Union School" to a Christ-
mas program and old-fashioned Car-
ol sing fori Wednesday evening Dec-
ember 23 at 5pm.


. .^
cer Joseph BcHuCH
nurse and three a
craft was. maki
Haiti, Jamaica, C1
ama. They spent
here.


LE ,CENTIt
O

Exclusive:
Alix, Amlama, i .
Benoit, Biga:d,
siers, Domo.d,
Joseph, ILpntwg;
Montas, Npraal.
Brice, Stephiane, M
many others.
17 Rue de.'l
From Pafn
In town one-.$
bay, half
Open Monct
$Satu
9-1 3-6 P


PHILCO TROPIC 103
INTERNATIONAL 6-BAND RADIO
Listen to the High-Fidelity brilliance of this Phi
you'll thing you're in the studio, so keen and cleai
But that's only one of this model's many ine-.fea
Complete short 'wave and standard broadcast 'e
Fascinating long-low' styling-fully 2ft. ind.s
inist cabinet.
High-Fidelity sound from speaker network'
and dynamic side speaker.'....
Built-in antenna. .
Separate bass and treble audio controls. :'
-. "U


FIRESTONE INTERAMI
Radio Pleasu
NOW ENJOY I-i


*. I..^ -' -' New! SensaiiotU



JEWELS



A AND JEWEL ROLLER R

': On Sale At: Canasi


Aux Cent Mille Ad


Dadlani's Maiso
*- ,9-c .


I-


::*.:








1 SUNDAY, DEC. 20TH, 1959













,_ ,,, ,


;Ed. Salmon who perfectly mast-
,ered the French and Creole langu-
ages during sixteen years here as
Firestone Manager returned to town
last week for a business visit after
Sainost a decade, Ed is now sales
-n ,.a-n ager for Westrade Inc. in
..Coral Gables Florida. He departed
this week but intends to return in
r- .January.

SMr Raymond D'Adeskey returned
"this week from visiting his eldest son
I "Ddctor Raymond Junior in Markette
S.Michigan.

.' Old time Point Four hand Wigg-
Sins, now technical adviser to ODVA
e. came to town Thursday to pick up
.his son dowvn -from the States for
Christmas in the Artibonite.

Mr -and M[rs Edouard Peloux are
-leaving today to spend their first
-. Christmas -away from home in
k-*'years. They will enjoy the holidays
wFith -son Robert who is studying
:plumbing engineering in New York.

Mrs Jackie Auguste, former Mo-
%.zugte Dreyfuss is returning from
y16,.ern Canada for New Years
f.ere with her three children. Her
',fJwsband is engineering a railway
N.n the frozen north.
-..-', *
,Sonny Reser is down lor the first
ial look at his old country in thir-
feen years. The son of the late Doc
..' ieser is with PAA and is spending
i''two weeks at Hotel Choucoune with
hi'ls wife.
. .. ,

Mrs Helen Curtis of Brooklyn N.
Y. is the guest of her in laws,
Dr and Mrs U. G. Dailey at Mar-
S"ssant. She is the widow of the
late Honorable James Logan Curtis
Si.inister in the U.S. Foreign Serv-
Ic, e in Liberia. Mrs Dailey was the
.sister of 'Minister Curtis.

.-Lawyer Francois and Iva Lator-
tue welcomed a baby girl this week.
"- *


,:Mr and Mrs Rolf Wallach, Haiti
rans, from Wingdale, New York
.-ve been dividing their time bet-
en Kyona, Chatelet des Fleurs
d "the Dloffson on their annual
locationn.

a.r and Mrs Jack Babotn are ov-
m Mexico city with their son
for the Christmas holidays with
Noustas clan. Joe Noustas flew
from school in New York Fri-


6 Fritz Mevs consider that they
H received their Christmas pre-
with the arrival (slightly
,endue) of a fine heavy-weight
pion. Their fourth son.

P tit Four Chief and Mrs Harry
.-elco ed junior home from
academy for the yule holi-
ThtUrsday.

O~. Brandt flew to Kingston


IIey Tecon engineer in
I t'. building Jacmel wharf
t.'his family for holidays in
a English his assistant
on the construction


which is progressing per schedule.
Sara Lee Shapiro of Golden Beach
Miami Florida enjoyed last week-
end at the Hotel Montana.
S *
Arriving today for the holidays in
La Boule-with the family is Clare
Cochowski who is attending Florida
State University at .Tallahassee.
* *
World traveller, sculptor, painter
and decorator Jeane Owens is here
at the Oloffson. -The tanned skin-
diving enthusiast worked Les Area-
dins from Kyona this week. Friday
she was joined here by her brother
John Nicholson proprietor of the
Chic Cafe Nicholson 146 East 57th
Street New York City.

Tall beautiful Pathologist Enca
Solaric is a house-guest at Musseau
villa of Natan and Mirtza Abramo-
vits. Dr Solaric is the wife of Bran-
co Solaiic Vice-President of Fran-
cesco Parisi Inc a large Export-
Import Shipping Company. Mr Am-
arric of Switzerland is also a house-
guest of the Abramovits.
* *
U.S. Ambassador to Venezuela,
Edward Sparks who was here for
r several years with the Embass.
spent twentyfour hours in Port last
week meeting his old friends.

Dan Allen is back from his fish-
ing trip and the Rendez-Vous opens
its portals this weekend. Dan was
i in New York on his first vacation
in five years.

Long time resident and Mahogany
manufacturer David E. James has
flown away to the U.S: The Presid-
* ent of Carib Craft in Bois Verna


"HAITI SUN"


PAGE 15


MISS HAITI CONTESTANTS PARADE IN BATHING SUITS
AT THE BEAU RIVAGE HOTEL SUNDAY


was followed to the States this past
week by his wife and daughter.
* *
Marek Burgers returned Friday
from Georgetown University wit h
the title of Campus Queen. The
lovely daughter of Dutch Consul and
Mrs Toni Burgers is in her first
year there.

D. C. Lawyer Charlie Willis came
to town Friday.


Joe and Elizabeth Noustas are
home from studies in New York for
the Christmas holidays.


Honorary Haitian citizens who
have once again forsaken the White
Christmas of Toronto Canada for
thd Haitian variety are down at
the Oloffson Inn. They are Roger
and Francoise Jeanty and their
clan Roger Junior and lovely
blonde Nadene.
*
Gwen Verdun Broadway actress
whose dancing would even make
the Roi du Rara sit up, is down for
a restful vacation at the Oloffson.
Her present show is Redhead. She
is also starred in Pajama Game.



sialis


Mine Antoniv Geoffroy, Haitian representative of the famous French
beauty product firm, Stendahi, beginning Monday will offer facial exam-
ination and beauty counselling to feminine customers at La Belle Creole.


I.


ENJOY



Christmas And



NEW YEAR'S EVE



AT IBO LELE




Gala


Dinner Danee



TILL DAWN


SIX DOLLARS PER PERSON
Dance To IBO LELE Orchestra till the Sun rises below
cool refreshing IBO LELE.


t4F i".


WITH A










v9 C A M E RA S AT FI'l." P11ir 'll::T.S'


,^jCmV u Ce191^


RUE BONNE FoI
manager, :S.KAHN Phone: 2390
AIR-CONDITIONED


-M







niA EI A


Baussan's island Beach Club Readies


The tourist who seeks --and finds
,- i Haiti a hathie 'life rich n color
and tradition is often a versatile
one who likes to round out his
days of.absorbing the local life and
taking advantage of the shopping
with 'some beach loafing.
He has often been heard rather


wistfully inquiring if there a
beach dose to Port-au-Prince.
He may soon find the answer lies
in a mile-square little island a few
hundred yards off the mainland,
half an hour's drive from Port-au-
Prince or an hour by boat across


i'

)





'A
-s









































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...




























































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El;'
".. - .' i.
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.. '.. .
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: ,.' ,.-
b^", -
I: .%
N: *. "
'K *, *
. ..


THE WORLD


FAMOUS


the bay from the capital. Here, und-
er gentle wind and sun, is an island,
Ile A Cabrit, that the Arawak Indi-
ans used as their last refuge against
approaching civilization. Buccane-
ers careened their vessels on the
sandy beaches, while lookouts kept
watch on grassy hills in'the middle
of the island. '
The turtles and Iguanas who saw |g
only an occasional archeologist have
vacated their paradise, giving way
to an energetic Haitian citizen. Ro-
bert Baussan, one of the leading
pioneers of The Haitian Tourist in- ."
dustry, is coming close to realizing
his fifteen-year-old dream by com-
pleting the first phase of his island
resort, the Cacique Island Beach'
Club, a project which will give Port
tourism a needed boost.


Dance


/


Christmas Eve





At




cqkane




choucoune
.- ,,


Former lagoon now fille dwith sand is backed by landing p.
foreground evidently are an open Invitation to would.be.

pointed out how in five weeks he
had built a dam and pipe line from DOMINICAN
the mainland, bulldozed in a lagoon, FORCES U.S. ,
imported tons of sand to cover it,
cleaned the sea of seaweeds and DOWN WITE
troublesome sea urchins, and (Continued' fron'i
constructed ten cabanas and a large jumped by a Dominic
main building for the restaurant and The jittery Domirnca
bar. halted two U.S. -merni
the high seas. This I
protest by the State li
Looking ahead, Baussan's plans, the Dominican Governi
taking shape for Cacique Island Pilots who overheard
Beach Club, include bungalows sus- incident commented:''
ended over the cliff, a swimming "This sort of thiUg*
pool in the sea, a golf course, a ten- on for six months, ev,
nis club a yacht basin and even a built the new fighterbi
cockfight arena and a miniature somebody going to-j
village-style market. Working at his bad. It may not be'th
present dynamic place Baussan has intention to hurt an("
scheduled all these dreams for real- are taking chances
ity in 1960. ely dangerous."


The SATURDAY EVENING POST said:

"One of the highlights of Port-au-Prince night life
is the Oloffson's uninhibited Monday night floor


..J 'vS
I
. .".
.-


show..."


The New


Hotel oflOson



Show


"Oui Cherie"


MONDAY, DECEMBER 14th, AT 10PM SI

We recommend that you reserve for
DINNER and SHOW.........$5.00
Dinner will ,be served from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m.


LRP
..:..


-!i


Limited space -


I.: S


r
1(~o


. SHOES.


FOR EVERY (


Baussan, who was the first min-
ister of Tourism in Haiti ,this week
supervised the finishing touches on
ten cabanas compact beach
homes with showers, toilets and liv-
ing room and a large restaurant
with bar, dining facilities and out-
door dancing.

Beginning in January launches will
run from Port-au-Prince, delivering
tourists to a new landing pier
which Baussan has constructed on
the Island. Tourists wishing to pre-
view the new development may
drive up the main road to the cem-
ent factory and contact the watch-
man at landing stage who will ar-
range transportation to the island.
On a visit to the island this week
with Frank Bachner of J. E. Matches
Inc. of New York and wife Dorothy.
Baussan, a Paris-Beaux Arts train-
ed architect, with unconcealed pride


Entrance for show only: .... $2.00


SUNDAY, DEC... ;


as


.'*- -*


H-A


"
HAI'II SUNn