UFDC Home  |  Search all Groups  |  Digital Library of the Caribbean  |  dLOC  |  Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library  

Haiti sun

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00240


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




, Weekly
Every
Sunday


Iaitli


un


10c


VOL XII SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 29th, 1959 Port-au-Prince, HAITI No. 37, Avenue Marie-Jeanne Cite DUMARSAIS ESTIME No. 4


Cancer


For


Week Opens


$10.000


State Selling Exposition

Buildings To Pay for La

Saline Shopping Center


According to a new law voted
Friday by the Legislature, presented
by Finance Minister Andre Theard,
the State has decided to sell the
pavillion and buildings in the Cite
Dumarsais Estime built for the '-19-
50 "Bicentenaire" of Port-au-Prince
with the view to amassing capital
to create the new "ShQpping Cent-
er" in La Saline.
The law, in seven sections, prov-
ides for a commission to include
a representative of the Superior
Court of Accounts, an Engineer of
Public Wo rks an Inspector of
the Tax Office, a member of the
City Council and an employee of the
Department of Commerce to eval-
uate the property.
Article 3 says their report must
be addressed to the Tax Office
which will place the property on
sale.
The Department of Finance res-
erves the right to reject any evalu-
ation they believe is not correct and
may reasssess the value of the pro-
perty.
Article 4: The sales ,\vill be made
between a party and the State and
there will also be public sales. In
case of sale between person and
. the state, the director of the Tax
Office will require an all-cash pur-
chase within, three days and depos-
it of all the money with a notary.
If not deposited after three days
WARNER DOWN
FROM D. C.
Mr. Norman E. Warner in charge
of the Haiti desk in the State Dep-
artment in Washington is here or
a routine visit.
Mr. Warner will be guest of hon-
or at 6:30 to 8:30 reception tendered
by American Ambassador and Mrs
'Gefald Drew at their Bourdon res
idence Monday night.
"MISS HAITI"
CONTESTANT


j


U -ga


the property may be sold to another.
This can be done by the Minister
of Finance with a public notary af-
ter an announcement in three daily
newspapers in the Capital and a re-
gistration of the sale. Again if the
purchase is -not paid for within the
prescribed period it will he re-sold
by auction by a simple order of
the. head of the civil court.
The sum from me sale will be
placed in a special account at the
National Bank of Haiti to be used
exclusively for the construction of
a new commercial district (shiopp-
ing center) in La Saline.


Annual


Dr Yvonne Sylvain and Madame Max Bouchereau members o
League Against Cancer explain League's progress to San
Mayoress Felicie Rincon de Gauthier.


(Haiti Gets 2 Million dollars)
Of U. S. Economic Funds


Minister of Finance Andre Theard,
BNRH President Maurice Telema-
que, and USOM Director Harry W.
Yoe signed an exchange of letters
this Wednesday in the office of the
Minister providing for the transfer
to the Haitian Government of $2
million of United States economic
development funds. The dollars
will be deposited to the account of
the BNRH in New York at such
times as they are most needed to
enable Haiti to meet its foreign ex-
change needs for essential imports.
At the same time as the dollars
are transferred, the BNRH will de-
posit an equivalent amount of Gour-
des to a special development acc-
ount in the BNRH, to be used, in
agreement with the Government of
the United States, to finance high
priority economic development ac-
tivities in Haiti.
Minister Theard and Mr. Yoe not-
ed that this grant is exclusively
for economic development purposes
and is not to be confused, with the
budget support assistance which
w as provided on an exceptional,
emergency b asi s during the last
Haitian fiscal year to enable the

T. V. VIEWERS
VIEW SELVES

Tele-Haiti on the Grand Rue oppo-
site St. Louis de Gonzague attract-
ed hundreds this week who grima-
ced or did a little soft shoe step
and saw their own images perform-
ing on the TV set. This was the first
flavor of TV in Haiti. The Americ-
an-backed television company, the
first and the only one of its kind
in the country, opened a closed-
circuit at the El Rancho Hotel or
Thursday evennig and on Frida,%
morning provided one for customers
at their store.


Government of Haiti to meet its
minimum operating expenditures.
In signing this exchange of lett-
ers both Minister Theard and Mr.
Yoe stressed the fact that dollai-
grants of this nature have the dou-
ble function of providing dollars for
essential imports and at the same
time earmarking an equivalent
amount of Gourdes for internal eco-
nomic development.
This dollar grant and the arran-
gements provided for in the exch-
ange of letters follow the pattern
established by previous United Stat-
es economic assistance to Haiti, de-
signed to assist the Government of
Haiti in its policy and program of
laying a sound foundation for eco-
nomic development.


The Bore

Incident

by Our Diplomatic Rel
The fact that Haiti sha
island with the Dominican
once again came into focus
"telediol" carrying stories i
of a border incident steeped
ance.
"There is trouble on the
the news flashed in and ai
Capital last weekend. "TI
nicans have activated there
battalions on the northern
the border, near the town
aminthe and Haiti has orde
gendarmes, formerly of I
au-Prince traffic department
them." Such rumors rang
the plausible to the ridicu
(Continued on


I


Drive:



Budget.
New Center Inaugurated
Tomorrow At 10 A.M.
This week a milestone in Haitian
medical history is finally being
passed thanks to a small group of
dedicated Haitians.
The "Ligue Contre Le Cancer"
climaxes a 3 year struggle toward
by decreeing Cancer Week and the '
inaugurating of its center for the
treatment of cancer with radium.
The League Against Cancer has
set $10,000 as its goal in a drive for
funds beginning this week and at
the same time through the radio,
i press and opening of the Cance5
center to visitors will focus public
", attention on the disease and the free.
""- modern treatment now available
.. here.
In a (letter addressed to the Pull-
lic this week the League gave a
f Haiti's brief resume of its history and made
Juan its first public appeal for assist-
ance. (See editorial page 5)
"Semaine du Cancer" opens Mon-
day with the inauguration of the
le, Center, built on the grounds of Hos-
pice Saint Francois de Sales with
an independent entrance on Rue
it Chareron. The blue facade of the
Center has "Clinique des Tumeurs"
porter painted in white.
poares this Visitors on Monday from 10 AM
resublic till Noon and *3 PM till 5 PlVwiUl
with the be able to view the large ultra
his week modern General Electric deep ra-
d in rom- diation therapy unit in its special
isolated orom with a small glass
window in a lead- door
found the (Continued on page 4)
he Domi- LAW SCHOOL STUDENT
e combat RECOVERING FROM WOUNDS
part of FROM "MACHINE INFERNALE"
of Ouan- Overt Jean-Louis, 23, of Jacmel,
*red three in hIs third year at the Law Facul-
the Port- ty here is recovering at the Gen-
nt to face eral Hospital from wounds inflicted
ged from by a "machine irfernale" that ex-
ulous. ploded before the Faculty early
page 2) (Continued on page 2)


Local Industry Strangles

Foreign Imports


A new Haitian industry, the Rose
Bags Company, has been blooming
quietly on First Avenue, Bolosse
for the past twenty months, to the
point where it now supplies nearly
all Haiti's paper bag needs. After
its first six months of operation, the
Rose Bags Company, first of its
kind in Haiti, had effectively strang-
led the import of paper bags from
the United States, Finland and Holl-
and.
This month the company put on
the market their newest product
Rose Facial Tissue, a high quality
two-ply toilet paper, the sale of
which will enable Haitian merch-
ants to obtain a profit nearly double
their earnings on the sale of impor-
ted toilet paper. A case of this toil-
et paper costs $15.00 and contains


Rose Bags Company assembly line at First Avenue, Bolosse, operating
for the past twenty month manipulates company machinery to make


(Other contestants appear on page ) (Continued on page 3) (Continued on page 3) bags of all sizes.


GIVE GENEROUSLY TO CANCER FUND


ii: -


by Our Industrial Reporter


.









PAGE 2


PLANS OF RAILROAD COMPANY WILL
REVOLUTIONIZE THE ARTIBONITE
REGION DIRECTOR HOLDS
PRESS CONFERENCE AT SAINT MARC
The establishment of a special' elaborated upon last Thursday dur-
express train for foodstuffs and ing a press conference held by the
cattle in the Artibonite, the building Director Mr Arnoux Louis-Jeune, at
of a modern market at the Station the offices of the company in St.
in Port-au-Prince, a bathing beach Marc.
at Mont-Rouis, and the construction The conferencier was assisted by
of a colony of modern bungalows the young architect, Aurelier Jeanty,
between Matheux and St. Marc, will during the battery of questions from
all be undertaken to revolutionize the large group of journalists of
that region of the Republic. Port-au-Prince and the Artibonite
These projects are a part of the Valley, attending the press confer-
gigantic new plans of the Compa- ence. A group of ODVA officials,
gnie Nationale des Chemins de Fer from Borel were among the guests.
d'Haiti, the railroad company that A sumptuous luncheon and recept-
was established in this country over ion followed the meeting.
-half a century ago. z (Details of the plans of the Rail-
Newsmen heard the plans for the road company will appea in our
year 1959-60 carefully explained and coming edition).

THE BORDER INCIDENT
(Continued from page 1)

Six Spanish members of the D.R's has not been too happy about the
- Foreign Legion had attempted to mention of Dr Guillermo Leon An-
desert and only one had made it tich as a possible new Cuban Amb-
across the border. He was the one assador. Mexico is in charge of the
they wanted back. affairs of Cuba in Haiti, while Bra-
zil is taking care of the Haitian
Another popular version was that Embassy in Havana. The Dominican
a twenty-three year old Domnirucan Republic does not consider Dr. Fi-
second lieutenant had shown up at del Castro a good neighbor.
a Haitian outpost. Some said he The Dominican Military attache
-' "wanted asylum; others agreed with who toted a forty-five and spoke
the Dominican authorities that he fluent Creole has returned to C.T.
was drunk and had wandered too as the post is being done away for
far afield in the darkness. Opinions economic reasons, a source reveal-
about his fate varied. Some report ed.
he was -handed back. Others placed The "Telediol" was proven, com-
him in Port-au-Prince. The Govern- pletely incorrect concerning the
ment had nothing to say about the flights of Dominican Jets over Port-
border incident, and there have been au-Prince. The Sabre Jets were U.
denials that it even occurred at all. S. Navy planes on authorized flights
Those well versed in Caribbean over Haiti on a photographic man-
politics declared that our neighbor euver.


Student Hurt By
"Machine Infernale"
(Continued from page 1)

Wednesday night. Another law Stu-
dent was slightly wounded by the
blast.
Jean-Louis who has been taken
off the hospital's critical list was
operated on by Doctor Rosarion
shortly after he was hospitalized
with a pierced stomach.
Information Minister Paul Blan-
chet declared in a brief communi-
que issued Friday that an investiga-
tion to apprehend the author and ac-
complices of this act of terrorism
has been opened. He added, "de-
cided to safeguard public peace and
preserve the lives and property of
citizens the government will shows


T. V. VIEWERS
SEE SELVES


(Continued from page 1)

At a press conference held in the
operations room of the TV setup on
Friday a company spokesman ann-
ounced that 200 TV sets had already
been sold.

TV programming % ill span four
hours daily, the exact time, proba-
bly during the-evening to be esta-
blished in the near future. Haitians
within on hundred miles of Port-au-
Prince, or as far as Jeremie will
be able to pick up TV shows.

Mr Morris Rosenberg, who has
made twenty trips to Haiti investi-


its self intractable in its repression gating dithe poss of establish-
of all communist and terrorist acti- ing TV, Mr Frank, Mr Evans, the


cities.
The "Engin" according to the
Daily press was placed in a posi-
tion before the Faculty V\here tL.e
director of the Regie du Tabac Mr
Frederic Desvar.eux normally parks
his automobile.

First Factory And
Investment Firm
Opens Here

OMNIUM. S.A. is the first factor-
ing and investment corporation to
open in Haiti.
The firm that existed in another
form was transferred by govern-
mental decree in the official gazet-
te "Le Moniteur" November 26 into
a corporation.
Daniel Eug. Roy is the Secretary
Treasurer while Earl C. Ruddell is
President. Lawyer Andre Villejoint
is a member of the Corporation
board.


dynamic Manager-Director Andre
Apaid and the Haitian engineer Ed-
ouird Gentil were present at the
press conference. Gentil ,who exp-
lained the tecliical workings of the
TV to the press, reported that Haiti
has a substantial supply of young
enthusiastic technicians versed in
electronics.

Asked if he was confident in the
success of TV in Haiti, the Americ-
an director said that TV means
progress and that American money
couldn't be safer TV has never
gone bankrupt anywhere. As for TV
ethics, a spokesman quipped that
no quiz programs have been sche-
duled.

MIeanwhile, on the mountain near
Le Perchoir, gangs worked into the
night, hastening the construction of
the sturdy, cinder block transmiss-


ion station and tower. The sta
is already bedecked with local p
settas.


1960 Miss Haiti Contestants


Miss Volande Toussaint
V


Evelyn Guignard
Miss SNAD
*


Miss Moninque Poilevien Ee'iine Dreyfuss
Miss Hotel Riiiera


"HAITI SUN"


ton LES PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUES-

HAITIENNES

SHBC'WTI...

F PLACE GEFFRARD "- "

---_"Y. : -.





















...

Mile Viviane Boucherean -
Miss Hotel. Montana ..

* *I*--


Marie-Florence Rov
Miss Bacoulon


Monique Carthright
Miss Beau Rivage Hotel


Naje Hakime Marie-Ninon Sajous
Miss Ford


SUNDAY, NOV. 29thi, 1 98


Ambassador Simmonds
Departs .
This week British Ambassadw-or
Sydney Simmonds ended a four year
assignment in Haiti and sailed home .:
to England via New York. A friend- "
ly and knowledgable diplomat, Sim.
monds spoke fluent French as wel."j
as Russian and Arabic. He express-
ed a lively interest in Haitia aff-~
airs showed an attentive .concg -
with the problems and activities :of *
his fellow countrymen who lived.-
here in Haiti. :
The absence of Ambassador and
Mrs Simmonds will be deeply -felt'--'"
by their many friends in the diplof-,,;:
matic social set and mahy'-a
bridge playing couple will have"-tt.:-
search for another skillful thirdanad
fourth. -
During a faithful career vith t ,
British Foreign Office the Simmol.
es served posts as distant from
Haiti as Russia where they an-ri-r'.
xiously watched the purges duin
the 1930's. Soon after their return "'
to England, the Simmondes wi.re-r"
tire, having completed a faithful.-
and varied career.



..



lt-- -J :T C 4

'-I

R. -' ia -
\4


.I













A Local Industry Strangles,


Foreign Imports


*A rr'-


The I


100 rolls, whereas im
paper of the same c
$18,00 a case of 96 roll
Charles Plaisimond, (
ager of the Rose Ba
estimates that within s
more toilet paper will
imported to Haiti, Sup
Hudson Paper Compan.
the toilet paper which
in Jumbo rolls 81" a
is unwound perforated,
wound in the Bolosse
exacting specifications
the U.S., The roll app
than imported brands,
is deceiving. Each roll
actly the same amou
counted automatically I
y's machinery, but h
subjected to an "air
cess. This operation do
improve the quality
paper, but merely ma
seem'bigger by blowing
the sheets and require
machinery which The
Company cannot afford
due to the size of its po
et

Starting as an indus
seven workers in 1 9 5
Bags Company has tri
now employs 22 wor
monthly payroll of $9
machinery worth $28.0
It manufactures a


aose Bags Company min Boosse
(Continued from page 1)
ported toilet glassine white bag to cover Fruti
quality costs Bars, and supplies bags for Polar
ls. Bear Ice Cream Company and Hak-
General Man- time's Usine A Glace Nationale. Rose
gs Company Bags are snapped open to receive
ix months no groceries. shoes, pills, laundry, and
need to be department store purchases. The
applied by the Canadian Caribbean Chemical Com-
y of the U.S., pany has ordered some special
is received translucent bags to hold sugar for
nd 72" wide cake icing, and even small bakeries
slit and re- -able to purchase smaller quano-
e factory to ties of Rose Bags than they could
just as in of imported bags- are beginning
ears smaller to slip their products into bags.
but the size Not only are Haitians finding more
contains ex- and more uses for the bags, but a
nt of paper, Puerto Rican firm ordered a quan-
by the factor- tity of white bread bags. It was im
as not been possible to fill the request, because
puffing" pro- there is no economical way to ship
es nothing to the bags from Haiti to Puerto Rico.
of the toilet Negotiations are now in process for
kes the rolls an order of 500,000 bags from Pana-
g air between ma.
es expensive To fill these orders, Rose Bags
Rose Bags Company employees, working in
d at present what was bulit to be a paint factory
tential mark- convert paper supplied by United
States and Swedish companies to
bags ranging in size from one third
trial bud of pound to 20 pounds two inches and
8. the Rose in type of paper from the finest
ipled in size, "glassine"-a translucent paper- to
kers, has a heavy duty "kralt" paper. The vaa-
00 and uses riety and quality of the bags have
100. boosted their saleability to the point
translucent where the Rose Bags Company is


PHILCO TROPIC 103
INTERNATIONAL 6-BAND RADIO
Listen to the High-Fidelity brilliance of this Philco master model and
7 YlU thing you're in the studio, so keen and dear is every programme.
But that's only one of this model's many fine features; others include:
Complete short wave and standard broadcast reception on 6 Bands.
Pescinating 'long-low' styling-fully 2ft in width-with rich walnut
ftdt cabinet.
. Iligh-Fidelity sound from speaker network of duo-cone front speaker
and dynamic side speaker.
Bilt-in antenna.
8epmrate bass and treble audio controls.







FIRESTONE INTERAMERICA Co.

Radio Pleasure

NOW ENJOY HI-FI


a $40,000 home industry. Un d e r
the new industries Law the com-
pany has been given the right to
import its raw materials duty free
for ten years, arid has already paid
back the purchase loan for their
machinery.
General Manager Charles Plaisi-
mond plans diversification of prod-
ucts -paper carons are first on his
list of possibihtles- and expansion
of -market. depending on the deve-
lopment of trade routes. Right now
he is searching for additional cap-
ital for expansion, the Bankers
Trust Company in the U.S. having
loaned to capacity under their reg-
ulations, according to Plaisimond's
N. Y. purchasing dgent, and part-
ner Samuel Gallin. Plaisimond and
Gallin are long-time friends from
Plaisimond's days as a procurement
officer for the Haitian Army in the
U.S. and the company's name, Rose,
is the same as Gallin's mother.
The covering for Rose Bags' new-
est product -name- is in English
because, as Plaisimond puts it "As
soon as someone sees that a product
is made in Haiti they begin to look
for the defects." But Rose Bags
products' are made to exacting spe-
cifications and any irregulars are
sold at a special low price or given
away in some cases to schools and
hospitals. The day should soon arr-
ive when the Haitian will search
for "made in Haiti" on a product's
label as a guarantee of quality and
assurance of the best price for the
product as such home industries as
the Rose Bags Company continue
to develop.

Ed. McGurk Elected
President Of ICC.
American Edward Me Gurk who
heads the "L'Agence Fronlif" firm
here was elected to the presidency
of the Club International de Com-
merce for the year 1959-1960 by an
unanimous vote Wednesday night at
the Sans Souci.
. Mr McGurk replaces Mr Fortune
L. Bogat. The Club president holds
office for one year and cannot succ-
eed himself.
Engineer Charles Feqiuere and
M.r Elias Noustas were elected res-
pectively Premier and Second Vice-
President. Mr Louis Noisy was
chosen treasurer and Jean Claude
Nadal Secretary of the Club. The
three new Club concellors are. Mr
Maurice Telemaque President of the
Administrative Council of the Na-
tional Bank, Engineer Harry Tipp-
enhauer and Serge Gaillard.
The new committee will be in-
stall at a gala dinner on December
5th.


President and Mrs Francois Duvalier with American Ambassador
Gerald A. Drew before the Episcopal St. Trinity Cathedral Thursday after
attending special Thanksgiving service.
Ambassador Drew who recently returned from his vacation in the U.S.
read President Eisenhower's Thanksgiving Day message.


AGENTS: TIPCO, Place Geffrard
TIPCO Bldg Phone: 3216, 3929


IN HAITI SHOP
AT


FISHER'S

HAITI'S LARGEST FREE PORT PRICE

SHOPS AND MAHOGANY FACTORY

1) GALLERIES FISHER ACROSS FROM NEW U.S. EMBASSY

2) ART & CURIO SHOP FISHERS ACROSS FROM CUSTOMS HOUSE


SAVE UP TO 60 Per Cent ON IMPORTS
AND BUY HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS
STRAIGHT FROM THE FACTORY
ON THE RUE DU QUAI
(AM. EXPR. AND DINERS CLUB ACCEPTED)


q' l. D ^_ Ilm_ __ 1 ........ !-- n--I ....


SUNDAY, NOV. 29th, 1959


"HAITI SUN"


PAGE R




'. -- --".


*1 ~ j
a


"HAITI SUN"


PAGE 4


SUNDAY, NOV. 29th, 1969


Cancer Week Opens With $10.000 Drive


which permits the doctor to control will be a fashionable garden party
the machine in complete isolation Iat the Vil.a .Creole, a ball, floor-
from the patient. The mac'iine which show and beauty contest.
cost $18,000 is only partially paid for. Saturday a "Matinee Scolaire"
The hundred milligrams of radium will be held at the Institut Fran-
purchased as a donation for the cais.
League by Hati's Honorary Consul Sunday a day long Christmas Ba-
in Hamburg Germany, Mr. Wesner zaar will be held at the Haitian
Linberg at a cost of a million francs American Institute beginning at 9
is expected to arrive this coming a.m. At 4pm there will be a parade
month from Pans. of children in National Costumes.
December I the League will make Dr YIonne Syl'ain ,ice-President
special radio broadcast and a spe- of the League and her sister Mada-
cial cancer campaign stamp will be me Max Bouchereau who heads the
issued. I committee of organization of the
Wednesday a literary and artistic Cancer Week visited the Puerto Ri-
festival will begin at 8 P.M. at the can League now in its twentyfith
Institute Francais. year last week.
Thursday will be devoted to ra- The Puerto Rican League which
dio broadcasts on Cancer. possesses one of the most up-to-date
Friday the highlight of the week Cancer treatment centers in the


FIRST CLASS PASSENGER SERVICE


P4


ORTTAU -Pwr u"
To

NEW YORK
WEST 24th STREET

Only 3% Days direct to the center of New York
,City modern American Flag Cruise Ships.
y A CON CRISTOBAL
Sailings Mondays and Fridays

EVERY CABIN oUTSIDE WiT ING SATElON
&M-CO.NDl .NE DIN [G sPLON
ouTDOOR TILED SwlMi1m 0
250 LBS. BAGGAGE C LLOWANCE


Ask about round-trip sea-air tickets.
Complete accurate injorSlatiLonoly from

PAR.AMA STbErAMSm.i LU
Rue Abraham Llocol Telep


(Continued from page 1)
world drawing patients from all ov- Haiti with the intention of contri-
er the Caribbean. also initiated a buting his knowledge of cancer the-
campaign this week. Their goal is rapy in a program to aid victims
$200,000. of the disease here. 4
The Sylvain sisters spoke with Dr Gross who intends to return
San Juann's well known lady Mayor here next month and help the Lea-
i\Tne Felicie Rincon de Gauthier gue in a consultation capacity also
about the Haitian Cancer League. hopes to set up a lecture and train-
Th6 Hait League Against Cancer ing course in the use of radiation
has Dr Charles Chevalier as Presi- therapy for physicians, medical
dent of the Council of Administra- school students and technicians.
tion, Dr Yvonne Sylvain as Vice Dr Gross, who is als6 director of
President, Dr Pean, Secretary. Mr radiology at Crippled Children's
Maurice Telemaque as Treasurer, Hospital and assistant clinical pro-
Mile Gina Celestin, assistant-treas- fessor of radiology at New York
urer, Mrs Max Bouchereau, Mile University College of medicine came
Carmen Nicolas, Madame Garvey to Haiti earlier this year with the
Laurent, Dr Colon, Dr Paul Boney intention of establishing a tumor cli-
and Dr Verrettes. members. Dr Ver- nic at the General Hospital and
rettes operates the radiation ther- donating a radiation therapy unit
apy unit. Dr Lesperance is present- to fit. On his second trip he disco'v-
ly studying radiation therapy at th? ered the existence of the League
Institute Gustave Roussy in Paris, and immediately planned to collab-
reputed to be the world's finest in orate with them.
methods of fighting cancer.
The League plans to send Dr.
Maria Bourgeois abroad to study ,
the modern technics of cancer treat-
ment, on a scholarship made avail-
able by Mr Wesner Linberg who
made a gift of the radium.


IVNeanwhile a specialist from the
Schweitzer Hospital in the Artibon-
ite Valley has contacted the League
and visited the center to offer any
assistance needed.
IMPORTANT CONTRIBUTIONS
The most important donations to
the League Against Cancer to date
include a cheque of three thousand
dollars sent by Mrs Claudia Haynes
in March 1956 through The Public
Welfare Foundation in the States
along with an other of two hundred
dollars monthly.
This gilt was the incentive for
the reorganization of the Fight Ag-
ainst Cancer started by Dr. Che-
valier in 1952 and the beginning of
an initial drive to set up the center.
A prominent Haitian businessman
who asked that his name not be
revealed along with the help of a
fe\ friends raised enough idnds to
defray expenses for the remodeling
of the old building into the Cancet
treatment center. This amounted to
a little more than three thousand
dollars.
Dr Robert J. Gross, president of
the medical staff of the Newark.
New Jersey hospital for Crippled
Children has made two visits to


Up until the opening of the Cent-
er this month, with a population
of four million persons, Haiti has
possessed only one radiation ther-
apy machine -- and it is privately
owned, unavailable to the average
patient.
Dr Rindal Assad who pioneered
Cancer treatment in Haiti with the
establishment of his private clinic
over a decade ago presented to the
Center this week a document on ra-
dium dosage signed by Madame
Curie herself. This document which
now hangs in the center was given
to Dr Assad by a Catholic Priest
at Terre Rouge. Dr Assad is coop-
erating with the new center.
The twin purposes of Cancer Week
are to make the public conscious that
treatment of Cancer is now availab-
le and to collect funds to defray ex-
penses for the operation of the cen-
ter during a year.


ALLYS


SCOTCH WHISKY







Celebration
SScotch


Agent Distributor: LA BELLE CREOLE


Aiinaie


WITH A









RS
V9 CAMERA S AT FIIlT PfIRT I'RICPR.'






RUE BONNE FOI
Phone:'23P90
Manager :S.KRHN
AIR-CONDITIONED

.\,'


JM-LXA -3L







SUNiDAY, NOV. 29th, 1959


o ..... =, ...;,.-- - - -. -- -'. 5':. ''.'-2..'--,- -....: .


=L- '.jp iij;


P A V.l' P.A


HAITI SUN
THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
Gerant-Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
MEMBER OF THE INTER.-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1950


CANCER WEEK

Dear Public,
The League Against Cancer, founded here in Octoaber 1956,
in spite of difficulties of every kind has succeeded in build-
ing a Center on the grounds of 'Hospital Saint Francois de
- Sales and ihas installed an ultra modern deep radiation
therapy 'unit for 'the treatment of cancer with radium.
The radium necessary for the -treatment of 'certain cases
was donated by the Honorary Consul of 'Haiti in Hamburg,
Mr Wesner Linberg.
At the beginning of 'November the League opened its doors
to the public.
It has on a small scale commenced its operation thanks
- to the help of members and friends.
At this moment it is necessary to address the public so
that the League may develop to the point when it can resp-
ond tb. the. numerous and continuous demands of the sick
-that have the League as their only "plankhe de salut".
A modest budget of $10,000 would cover expenses of the
first year thanks to the free help of the doctors, nurses
and volunteers.
The League 'has organized the "Semaine du Cancer" from
November 30 to December 6 1959 with the hope of collect-
ing this sum.
'We ask all to 'give generously. The representatives, of the
League count on the -support of 'all: rich and poor, young
and old, as cancer strikes anyone at any age...
SWe 'are 'counting on your 'annual contribution for the sup-
port of this humanitarian work and your presence at our
fetes this week.
The 'Cancer Week Committee.


PANAMA LINE HERE TO STAY

In view-df the many rumors current this week we questi-
oned the local 'Agent of tohe 'Panama Line as to whether
his Company intended to withdraw its 'Steamer service from
Haiti.
The agent replied: "My Company has no plan, intention
nor wish to change our 'present schedule to Haiti. Cargo
has- declined considerably in 'the past year 'but we know 'that
it will build up again. 'However, if any additional change
is made in the amount of cargo accruing to us, the company
may re-study the entire question.

"We hope to continue 'our present service with our first
class hips, each having a capacity of 214 passengers, for
Many years. We call here 41 times per year direct from New
York City and 41 times per year direct to. New York City,
an. nd we feel that we may 'be making some small contribution
to Tourism, to the importers and especially to the exporters
of Haiti".



Lunch Dine Have C
By The SEA-SIDI

-00-

KYONA BE


-00-

Swim, Spearfish, Snorkle,
And Sail In Safe C(
Waters From Kyoi
u-00-

HAVE YOUR PARTY A


DRIVERS BUSHED OUT ON
AVE IALIRIE JEANNE
Director
Haiti Sun
En Ville
Dear Sir,
'fk, appeal may seen trivial but
as your newspaper is on the Ave-
nue Marne Jeanne you will underst-
and when I say the Pubbc Works
Dept. should either trim the small
trees on the center island of the
avenue or dig them up altogether.
Not a day went by this week
that an auto did not crash into an-
other while making a turn on the
avenue. Cause of the accident the
drivers did not see each other until
it was too late. The big four feet
tall bushes of flowers cuts out the
visibility.
(St Neighbor.

FRIENDS MAY OPEN
PROJECT HERE
Bernard Diederich
No. 37 Ave. Marie-Jeanne
Dear Berrne:
This is just a brief note to thank
you for all your help during my
recent, brief visit to Haiti. Your
counsel and introductions were in-
valuable to me in making my visit
not only enjoyable but most worth-
while. I hope it may be possible
to get some kind of American Fri-
ends Senrice undertaking in Haiti
sometime in the future. In any ev-
ent, I shall return for another visit
and will look forward to seeing you
again.
Cordially,
Robert A. Lyon
Executive Secretary.
American Friends Service
Committee Incorporated
New England Regional Office
P.O. Box 247 130 Brattle Street
Cambridge 38 Massachusetts

LE CENTRE D'ART
Founded 1944
Exclusive agents:
Alix, Amiama, Armand, Bazile,
Benoit, Bigaud, Blanchard, Desro-
siers, Duffaut, Hyppolite, Joseph,
Leveque, Liautaud, Montas, Nor-
mil, Obin, Pierre, St. Brice, Ste-
phane, Turnier, Vital, many others.
17 Rue de la Revolution
From Pan American
in town one block toward
bay, half block to left.


Open Monday
Saturday
9-1 3-6 Phone


Cocktails
E




ACH




Water-Ski
astal
na


T KYONA


through

2055


NON-UNION
COFFEE CLEANERS
ATTACK
UNION HEAD
Dapper Jacques St. Lot, Presid-
ent of the Union of Coffee Cleaners,
is recovering from head and body
injuries received Tuesday when sev-
eral dozen-female non-me m b e r s
of the "Syndicat des Trieuses" att-
acked him at the Reinbold coffee
depot opposite Bowen Field.
Mr St Lot, a.onetime fire-
brand revolutionist, was set upon
shortly after he arrived at the Rein-
bold Establishment to arrange the
placement of old and new coffee
cleaners.
Union members came to Mr. St.
Lot's assistant and a battle royal
was in progress when the Police
were brought to the scene by the
"vacarme".

POSITION OF MASON REINBOLD
There is no Labor conflict bet-
ween the syndicate of Coffee clean-
ers and the Maison Reinbold de-
clared Mr. Erwin Burge" Vics.
President of the company to "LE
NOUVELLISTE"' Thursday and ad-
ded that the Labor Bureau recog-
nizes this.
Regarding the dozen persons ar-
rested Mr. Burge said that to his
knowledge there existea a small
disagreement between the cleaners
syndicate and the non-syndicate
cleaners concerning the places they
should occupy in the work room.
According~ to Mr. Burge, Mr. St.
Lot who intervened to solve the
problem entered the ateliers of the
Reinbold factory without advising
or asking authorization of the man-
agement which is contrary to the
regulations set down in the Labor
Code.


Inspector Fareau of the Labor
Bureau who was to make a check
on the situation had recommended
that Mr St. Lot wait because he
proposed to go immediately to the
Reinbold factory. St Lot entered the
factory and spoke to the cleaners.
One of them grabbed him by the
throat. Immediately a "bagarre"
followed and the police were called
to establish order.
The Maison Reinbold contends it
had nothing to do with this squabble
in which none of its employees were
involved. The Coffee House, the larg-
est exporter in Haiti. intends to
give bonuses to the syndicate memb-
ers and non-members.

PARAMOUNT
Sunday, Nov. 29th at 3:00 P.M.
Mysterleux Dr. Satan
t7th and 8th episodes)
Second Part:
At 5, 7 and 9:00 p.m.
UN GRAND FILM
Prison de Femmes
Monday Nov. 30th
At 6 and 8:15 p.m.
Mighty Joe Young
Tuesday December 1st
At 6 a"d 8:15 p.m.
Prison de Femmes
Wednesday, December 2nd.
At 6 and 8:1i p.m.
Tonnerre Sur Berlin
(Cinemascope and Color)
Thursday, December, 3rd.
At 6 and 8:15 p.m. :4
Mighty Joe Young
Friday, December 4th.
At 6 and 8:15 p.m.
Prison de Femmes
Saturday, December, 5th.
At 5, 7 and 9:00 P.M. .
Mysterieux Dr. Satan
(9th and 10th episodes)
..Second Part: UN GRAND FILM.


Sunday December 6th

10:00 A.M. 10:00 P.M.




Christmas



Bazaar

AT THE

HAITIAN-AMERICA INSTITUTE


Toys-- Clothing -- Misc


For Children

CHILDREN'S PARTY AT 3:00 P.M.!



You are cordially invited to the GARDEN PARTY at
VILLA CREOLE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4th

At 7:00 P.M.
Dinner 'and 'Fun $2.00 a plate
PROCEEDS GO TO -THE CANCER FUND.
GIFTS OF FOOD APPRECIATED!
Get your friends together, .go, have fun and
help the Cancer program!
(TICKETS AVAILABLE AT
CARAVELLE BOOK STORE)


"HAITI SUN"












V-4




tic
4
p



9

















I-


I,


PAGE


Two privately owned
lines have asked the Pan,
to go out of business ace
an article written by Geor
in the New York Times N

The Grace Line and th
Fruit Company proposed tl
tinuance of the Federall
Panama Line in a present
.the Department of the A
July. They charged that
ernment concern operated
action of national policy an
tax-payer's expense.

The proposal was disclose
;in a hearing on the Grai
application to the Federal.
Board for permission to


Panama Li
steamship au-Prince. Haiti, to its Caribbean
ama Line cargo and passenger route.
wordingg to Regular Service
rge Home The Panama Line maintains a re-
*ov. 18. gular service out of New York every
nine days with the liners Ancon and
he United Cristobal, carrying cargo and pas-
he discon- sengers to the Panama Canal Zone
y owned by way of Port-au-Prince.
station to As an intervenor in the Grace
rmy last Line's application, the Panama Line
the Gov- maintained that the entry of Grace
in viol- in the Haitian service would be da-
id at the making to its business.
The Panama Line is an arm of
the Panama Canal Company and,
sed today through it, of the Department of
ce Line's the Army.
Maritime Grace and United Fruit say that
add Port- their nationally owned competitor


FOR INSURANCE

SEE-


et


ne
is primal
cial pass
loses moi
action witl
losses ar
written
which ar
and Unite
Both lit
ama Line


rily a carrier of commer-
engers and cargo, that it
ney in an inefficient oper-
i aging ships, and that the
e to some degree under-
b3 Panama Canal tolls,
e paid in part by Grace
ed Fruit.
nes declared that the Pan-
e caused them substantial


||hNO CHANGE IN PANAMA LINE


III


VICE


U. S. Asked To Drop Its


losses and that its existence con- to Haitian tourism, Importers ana especially mte exporters. -
travened national pohey by offer- DA
ing Government competition with DR. D'ADESKY -A FOU" IN
private business. HONORED IN U.S. THE SENATE .
The proposal for the discontinu-
ance of the Panama shipping serv- A MNarquette doctor has been elec- Our confrere "Le Matin" repo ;
ice was brought out by Theodore ed a Fellow of the American Aca- ed this week that an individual res-
P. Daly, counsel for the Panama demy of Pediatrics. ponding to the name "Italien F; .
Line, in questioning Ted B.est- He is Dr Raymond G. d'Adesky, rian" wearing decorations (red
fall, executive vice-president of 125 Washington St., according to Dr handkerchief, medals and effigies of
Grace. Mr. Westfal. and Ralph Kea- E. H. Cuhistopherson, executive dir- all the saints) etc and declaring -.
ting. general manager of the freight sector of the academy's internation- himself to be elected to Peligre .in .
and passenger departments of the al headquarters. Evanston, Ill. the Senatorial election of Novemi.b-
United Fruit Company signed last Dr d'Adesky is one 256 Fellows er 15th forced entry to the tribune
July's proposal in a communication \oted into membership at the orga- of the Peres Conscrits and furious-
to George ,H. Rodernck, Assistant nization's scientific meeting in Chi- ly gesticulating spoke in a violent -'
Secretary of the Army and chair- cago. manner to an empty room.

Canal of the boan d of the P Dr. d'Adesky met the academy's The antics of this madman, not _-
Canal Company. eligibility requirements which are: his first explosion in the senate
An identical letter was sent to Practiced pediatrics for five years, brought forth two "huissiers" who -
Maj. Gen. William E. Potter, presi- passed rigorous tests of the Ameri- chased him from the senate. "


"HAITI SUN"


6


DIRKiECTOR ITELLS SUN

The Panama -Line does not intend to change its service. to Haiti
Mr. John Cusick, director of the Panama Line in Haiti told the--Su
in an interview this week.
Mr. Cusick while not commenting on the statements made by other
shipping interests, added that the Panama Line has been making
forty-one calls per year at Port-au-Prince South bound from 1Nw
York and Forty-one calls North bound direct to New York.
He explained that the Panama Line has been making these calls
with 214 passenger capacity ships and "my company tells me that
it is their wish and intention to continue to give this excellent service


--
*,'.' ~,-.V


SUNDAY, NOV. 29th, 1959


I'.
A












4



*J1' .'I.


Bony Chen



& Sons


30 YEARS' OF EXPERIENCE


YOUR PROTECTION

I S

OUR PROFIT


15 Ave Marie-Jeanne Cite Dumarsais
Phone 2603


dent of the Panama Canal Company can Board of pediatrics, exhibited ,.,
in Balboa Heights, C. Z. evidence of high ethical and profes-
The Panama Canal Company says sional standing and clinical experi- DADLANI OPENING 5
continued operation of its line is ence, and showed productivity in NEW STORE ON
essential to the operation of the teaching, investigative work, clinic- -
canal and its locks. General Potter al studies, publications, or public TOURIST AVENUE
has testified before Congress in the or governmental activities in the
E last year that the company's two field of pediatrics. ~I Dadlani proprietor of the Mai-
ships are twenty years old and that son Orientale on Rue -Bonne Foi,
maintenance of the craft has been The American Academy of Pedia- a street often referred to as-Tour-
limited in recent years because of tries is the professional' society of ist Avenue because most of its stores
economic pressure, child specialists in the Western Hem- chter to the tourist trade is. open-
In its request for carrying rights isphere and has Fellows in the Unit- ing-a second store on the Rue du-
to Haiti, Grace Line contends that ed States, Canada, Central and Quai corner entrance to the Avenue.
it would provide better service South America and the West Indies:
not only to Haiti but also to the Its work is dedicated extensively to Formerly the home of Tam Tam,
ESSION canal itself. The Panama Line's the improvement of child health, and Janine Chauvet's tourist shop, Mr_ i
only Atlantic port is New York. and welfare. Dr. Christopherson added. Dadlani plans a December .opening
Grace believes that the cost of sup- He is the eldest son of Mr. & Mrs for Maison Orientale Number T'o .P .
Estime plies to Panama is unnecessarily Raymond d'Adesky of Port-au-Prin- and will install airconditioning-eaL'-'..'I
lugh because much of the merchan- ce. He left Haiti in 19-45 to study ly in the New Year.
dise originates in South Atlantic medicine in Paris and then moved Mrs Dadlani will manage the new.
areas and has to be sent to New to the U.S. where he passed the Na- store which is expected .to add a
York by rail for sea shipment. tional and State board exams. colorful note to the street.


ARRIVING ON THE.
CRISTOBAL TUES.

The SSI "CRISTOBAL" of the Pa-
nama Steamship Line will .'arrive
from New York at 7:00 A.M. Dec-.
ember 1st, 1959.
The following. 41 pasgegers.l '
desembark at Port-au-Prince -
Mrs Lise Alexandre,.. Mrs' Ma e
Lorette Alexandre, Miss .Raymonde /.
Alexandre, Mr's Germain'e Bernald,'.
Miss Audrey Bierlein, Miss Roge-
mene Charles, Mrs Marie R6se Hor-
tense Colon, Miss Micheline Joseph.
Miss Irene Colon, Miss-.Claife -;es,
sources, Mr and VfNrs Nicolas Ha-ge,
? Mrs Simone Harrigan, Mr and Mts
Eugene Hochman, Mr and Mrs Jo-.
~ seph W. Holosky. Mr Claude Jeager,. .
Mrs Marie Joseph, Mrs' Isabelle L .-
S....raque, lVrs Iris Laventure, M is
Ghislaine Martin. Mrs Elvire i-
chel, Miss Nicole Mompoint, Mrs
Gabrielle Mussotte, Mr arid MVir Jo'-i-
., seph Nadal, Miss Jacqueline Nl, .
Mr John F. Nelson, Mr andi "l
Melville Newmark, Miss Janet Ot,
L Mrs Fernande Raymond, MIsLeO.-
nie Rosenthal. Miss Sandra M ... "
.\. ell, 5 Mnths, Mrs Romain St-Aude,
2.,j '"M. rs Paulette,P. St. Urbin, MI. an"
".-. .Mrs Harold Silbert, Mrs 1V delein-
Sklar, Mrs Calvin Surprise...-







iW









SUNDAY, NOV. 29th, 1959 "HAITI SUN" PAGE 7


Do Your


-u %


Shopping

in Haiti.

It is getting so that people are
taking vacations as much to
shop as to play golf, lounge in.
the sun or just relax. And, no
wonder when you. consider the
savings to be had through Free
Port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they can
buy the same gifts, in free-port
shops, at savings up to 60% of
U. S. prices. So, for the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
wonderful vacation in Haiti.
Perhaps the most famous free-
port shop in the world is La
Belle Creole. located in the
heart of fascinating Port-au-
Prince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable wonderland
full of the world's most de-
sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
ches, Cashmeres, Handmade
bags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
meras, Liquours and a seem-
ingly endless array of native
handicraft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
sider that one can buy the
world's most famous Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
guet-at discounts of 50% of
the U. S. advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
Belle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be well worth your time to
consider a trip to Haiti.

Al Noustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
Sis perhaps another reason for
the surge in popularity of
free-port shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
licy of cooperating with tra-
vel agents in their various
promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tle of free champagne to any
visitor to Haiti who happens
to, be celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
' honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niversary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts "to make
the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
mous brand merchandise.
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
sands ot tourists this year will
come hbme from vacations in
Ihaiti, richer, in a way, than
When, they went away.


i n


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER


PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI


P. 0. Box 676,


AROUND. THE WORLD IMPORTS


A,
.
.-


MINTON, WEDGWOOD.
ROYAL CROWN DARBt,
ROYAL COPENHAGEN,
ROYAL WORCESTER,
ROYAL DOULTON,
ROSENTHALE, SPODE,
AYNSLEE, COALPORT,
GUSTAUBERG.


GEORGE JENSEN,
HANS HANSEN, GERO,
DRAGSTEU. GENSE.



The Finest of FRANCE,
ITALY. AUSTRIA.


LALIQUE, BACCARRAT,
ORREFORS,
WEBB & CORBETT,
VAL SOLAMBERT,
STUART. LEERMAN.


OMEGA, PATEK PHILIPPE,
JUVENIA TISSOT, BOREL,.
AUDEMAR PIGUET,
JAEGER LE COULTRE,
ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO,
ATLANTA, STUDIO,
VULCAIN.



KISLAV,
ENGLISH DOESKIN,
ITALIAN ANTELOPE.



PRINGLE. BALLANTYNE,
BERN HARD ALTMAN,
LUISA SPAGNOLI.


GUERLAIN, LANVIN,
CARON, CHANEL,
RAPHAEL, PATOU,
BALMAIN, WORTH,
REVILLON, VIGNT,
CARVEN, LE GALLON,.
FABERGE OF PARIS.
JEAN D'ALBERT,
JACQUES GRIFFE
FATH, .PIGUET,
CORDAY.

MINOX,. CANNON



ROYAL COPENHAGEN
ROYAL DOULTON,
HUMMEL.



HARVEY'S BRISTOL
CREAM, All FRENCIH.
DANISH and
SPANISH LIQUIEUBS.





RAFFIA BAGS
& SHOES


HAIT!IAN MUSIC
- Collector's Items


--- -~
A--
SDANISH SILVER,
GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY
and BRAZILAN GEMS.


HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS


VooDoo Inspired
JEWELRY




Native-Insuired
SPORT SHIRTS


' SCULPTURES


Factory Outlet
MAHOGANY
- The Best.


Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS

World Famous RUGS & DRAPERY

Haitian RUM BARBANCOURT


i


Have us send gifts to.your friends in the U. S. A.
without affecting your quota.- See us for more information.


SUNDAY, NOV. 29th, 1959


S"HAITI SUN"


PAGE 7


fV 0 .


4-


6s




.g" -ri -- -- -.
. .. "'**
,j


HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY, NOV. 29th, 1959 "


Drumbeats Of Discord


*. By Stan SWINTON"
POMT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI (AP.-
-' The drumbeats of discord grow
painter in Haiti.
This only Negro republic in the
Western hemisphere has experienc-
ed change for the economic and po-
litical better in recent months.
President Francois Duvalier still
is a tough boss. His attitude toward
democracy and civil rights remains
less than respectful.
Nine months ago most informed
observers expected a prompt reapp-
earance of the traditional Haitian
pattern of political pillage and re-
volution. Now Duvalier is gaining
grudging respect, if little personal
popularity.
Probably this is only an eye in
the hurricane of Haitian history.
With an annual per capital income
of $65, Haiti's 3,.800,000 citizens re-
; main the most impoverished in the
Western world. Age-old political and
s. cial tensions, such as those bet-
ween light-skinned Creoles and
.blacks, make political unrest end-
emic.
But the progress of the past few
months has been encouraging in a
nation which has no place to go
but up.
Duvalier has sliced the 1960 bud-
get to $28,000,000, a reduction of
nearly 15 per cent. New excise
taxes on such items as imported
canned goods, autos, gasoline and
cigarettes should boost revenues by
more than one million dollars.


The scandal of the Artibonite Val-
ley has been ended. More than
100,000 people over a 200 square
mile area were to have benefitted
from power and irrigation produc-
ed by the $14,000,000 Peligre Dam.
Thanks to corruption and inefficien-
cy, the dam ended up costing $30,-
000,000, with generators still unins-
talled. Duvalier h a d t h e payroll
sliced from 1,200 to 600, put in a
bright young project head and now
rice is growing on what was an
arid, salty area. Per capital income
in the valley is $95 a year, nearly
50 per cent higher than for the
country.
"Judging from one year ago, I
would say they have made tremen-
dous progress." was the recent com-
ment of Rollin Atwood of Washing-
ton, D.C., Point Four director for
Latin America.
Haitians live on an island but do
not like the sea perhaps because
their ancestors came from the Afri-
can mainland in slave ships. As a
result, between $1,500,000 and $2.-
000,000 in dried cod and herring has
been imported annuall. Now. en-
couraged by Martin Routh, a British
adviser from the U.N. Food and
Agriculture Organization, a Haitian
firm has gone into the fishing busi-
ness on a comparatively large scale.
Refrigeration stations have been set
up to protect catches from sun spoil-
age until bigger boats collect it.
"It will save foreign currency and


HOTEL


PMONTANA
PETION-VILLE


Grow Fainter
here now. The number is scheduled ing. Duvalier hopes that Msoon the
to climb by another 20,or 25. U.S. will give them modern rifles
Their fields -vary from agricul- to replace the relics they now
tural specialities to the testing ass- shoulder.
ignment of controlling Haitian traf- Duvalier has made his peace .with
fic, which outdoes even the motor- the Roman Catholic Church .-afteir
ized anarchy of R o m e or Hong an ill-timed and ill-tempered clash
Kong. with the local hierarchy. -- '
Haiti's tough boss has take. powei Haiti's unique Franco-African cul.
away from inefficients originally in- lure again is bringing in toArists
stalled because they supported him who had been frightened away bj.
politically. Now he hopes for admi- a series of comic'opera revolts,:.,
nistrative efficiency through ,Amer- Fifty miles across the windward.
ican help and advisers, passage from Haiti is Fidel Cas-
Most surprising of all, a U.S. Ma- tro's tumultuous Cuba. On the other
rine Mission has been here 10 side of this island of Hispaniola
months training the Haitian Military. is Generalissimo Rafael Trujillo's
Duvalier showed his self-confidence Dominican Republic, the most corn-
and political courage in asking Ma- plete dictatorship now existing in
rines back to a nation they once the Western Hemisphere. A political
occupied by force. explosion in either could have chain
The mission has been a success. effects here. But, at least for the
Haiti's 5.000 soldiers and national moment, life is getting bett6r- for
po.cemen are getting modern train- Haitians.


Thousands of farmers and their,


families on the parched Northwest
peninsula were saved from starv-
ation by the distribution of six mil-
lion pounds of United States surplus
commodities and rain.
Last August a special four month
"crash" program -that provided
food for an estimated one hundred
and fifty thousand drought victims
was closed out.
Ha t i' s agriculture department
then" sent teams to the Northwest
to select groups to distribute food
supplies on a reduced and selective
basis for half the population for
another three months. This phase
of the program is coordinated with
CARE which returned to Haiti on
the request of President Dr Fran-
cois Duvalier shortly after reports,
ot the severity of the drought be-
came public.

The total number of persons who
died as a result of the long drought
was never established.
Lester J. Gottlieb. in Haiti for
four eats %with the United States
Operations Ilission and fluent in
French and Creole, travelled thous-
ands of miles b; jeep, plane,
horse and on foot during the
four months coordinating the food
distribution with Catholic Relief Ser-
vice and Church World Service who
have beon carrying out Title III iU
S. Gift Foodi programs in Haiti
sine 1955.
Gottlieb. a New York University
graduate who has worked with for-
-ign assistance programs in Yugos-
lavia, France and Noi-rwayv, saw the
Nortrhwest out of danger prior to
his departure last week for Wash-
inrigtun and reassignment.

Shortly after food distribution got
underway in April, a little rains beg-
an to fall and it w.as discovered tne
farmers had no seed left, having
sold or eaten everything they poss-
essed in some instances to keep
from star ing to death. CARE sup-
'!r-cr :.o;e t, tho,.r.I..A.ids poind-
of seed, a Baptist nussionary $320.
Ithe Oxford Comnittee iBritaini for


dOF EXQUISITE aFETITD RushD
Designs Rush
AND SUPERB AND FAMOUS
S'. Quality. e am noos Si'sat
7 GRAND RUE ifa -b A .axr ,M < tes U-6.. PHONE : 2.6 84


Famine Relief sent two thousand
eight hundred dollars of which half
was used for seed, and the peasants
managed to scape together enough


to plant their small gardens.
When the Emergency Aid Progr-
am was launched in April, the arid
peninsula was a scene of desolation
Trees stood stark anid lifeless. Even
the weepds haid vithered In the door-


and other diseases were widespread.
The small market places are once
again humming with activity as the
market women carry in the veget- -
ables from the hills; sellers of bric-
a,-brac and visiting higglers are find-
ing sales for imported articles. Even
traffic on this peninsula, almost-iso-
lated because of a single highway.
in a bad state of repair, has in-


ways of huts stood pot-belied child- creased signitically with the end of-
ren with spider-thin legs and eyes the drought. :
haggard with hunger. The livestock According 'to the United States
had nothing but the points of acacia Operations Mission e x p e r t s,.the,
trees to Lick on Green mangoes Northwest penninsula of Haiti" is.
were the sole food of many fanuili-
ties. Tuberculosis. liver ailments (Continued on page 9,









i .

'FIRE CAR PERSONAL TRAVEL "




*, *

______________,____________________, ______ "'


In rAlwiQ


P-AGE"'8


The eMoste Ect/;iXe orU_.

f' wA Tomu pn mmNpaba6e VCuwo

Go6ki the Iay ,the entwe c

the Vaile 4 Cana$ Veot anda the


Vn t3/' Mkff/Suks wm PORT#A-PRNCEC

jDERTIiE.AME MANAGEMENT AS HOTEL CHoucoUN


give the population needed and nu-
tritious food at cheaper prices." a
Haitian said.
Other experts are helping rebuild
the cacao industry so that it can
resume exports. Hybrid corn has
been introduced, with yields of
three to five times those of Haitian
corn. Roads, irrigation ditches and
anti-erosion projects are being push-
ed.

To do this, Duvalier has turned
to the United States and, to a lesser
extent, to the U.N. for help. In La-
tin America this can be a political-
ly dangerous step particularly
in Haiti, which remembers its years
of U.S. Marine Corps occupation
with wounded national pride.
Duvalier's Haiti received s ome e
$4,000,000 in U.S. technical aid this
year roughly one dollar per Hai-
nani Some 70 American experts a.'e


vr 1 4;,t -


;b7-d


' ."t


Starvation Averted In Northwest


I


y




I.
- -


SUNDAY, NOV. 29th, 1959


"HAITI SUN"


Tourism Is A Business


By Irwin ROBINSON
Underlying the Bahamas' remark-
able 10-year record of tourist growth
(reported in these columns last
week) is a travel trtusm that de-
serves the attention of many West-
ern Hemisphere areas which long
for tourist dollars but which have


sales headquarters were established
on the mainland, where the busin-
ess originates.
The procedures seem routine in
the telling. But in the tourist world
"especially in much of the Latin-
American area" they may be re-
volutionary.


ion is acknowledged practically ev-
erywhere. The desire to encourage
tourism is on everybody's lips. The
tourist "product" is generally good.
What, then, is the missing link?
The answer is to recognize that
tourism is essentially a business.
For the most part this concept has


STARVATION AVERI


and he
margin
given
crops
ply the
pulatio
lies in
upon


not fully grasped the how of tourist For many years these and other failed to penetrate the higher eche- supple]
development, tourist "facts of life" have been ex- Ions of government leadership. Unt- in their
In 1949 the Bahamas received posed to those attending the bien- il it does, the social, political and These
32,000 visitors, This year the total nial Inter-American Travel Congr- economic benefits that can flow ing, ct
will be eight times as great ar- esses. from tourist development must re- cordica
ound 250,000. A decade ago 90 per Despite hundreds o61 well-meaning main an unattainable goal for many plantat
-cent Nassau's tourist volume was resolutions and thousands of ex- areas which need tourism desper- imals,
concentrated between January and pressions of intent. Central and ately.
April. Now the business is practic- South Americans have yet to im- From: Travel Weekly Mern
ally year-around. In July. for exam- plement t h e well-worded phrases. 124 Madison Avenue said t
pie, 22,247 visitors arrived more The need for economic diversificat- New York 17, N.Y. of this
than in any month of 195S! months
The lesson to be extracted from availab
Nassau's experiences and applied by FISH ER S ART & CURIO SHOP Some
virtually and country that really twelve
wants tourist trade is this: tourism Rue du Quai distribi
is a business. In the Bahamas it is task. 'I
a big business, about $40,000.000 this SOLE REPRESENTATIVE OF to cau
year. This is more than the whole person
continent of South America took in GUERLAIN'S BEAUTY PRODUCTS rush a
from tourists last year.


Having long ago recognized tour-
ism as a business, both government
and private enterprise in Nassau
organized their program along the
lines of a business. They adopted a
sales and merchandising approach:
appointed a top-flight sales mana-
ger; opened sales and service offic-
es in leading U.S. and Canadian
markets; allocated promotion funds
consistent with the size of the mark-
ets to be cultivated. They proceed-
ed to develop a business.
Two aspects of the undertaking
were especially note-worthy:- politi-
cal interference was eliminated; and


inn HA ITI is proud to announce mthe arrival of Mrs. Claire SZANTu,
Specialist of GILERLAIN PARIS.
Mrs Szanto speaking fluently English is at your disposal

for Treatment and Make UIp from
9 h.a.m. to 12 h.a.m. 1:30 h.p.m. to 5h.p.m.

or special appointment

at FISHER'S ART & CURIO SHOP

Rue du Quai across Customshouse .

N.B.-The consultations are entirely free of charge.


The
funds
sportat
it cam(
in sma
linuted
and sl
in the
planned
visions
pick-up
blic \\
broke
truck.
111 foo
The pi
a .eeiE


(Continued

ias been for some time a sub-
lal area. Food production,
even normal rainfall and two
annually, is inadequate to sup-
e minimum .needs of the po-
o. A large number of fami-
that area habitually depend
other sources of income to
ment what "may be produced
ir garden and land holdings.
sources include sharecropp-
harcoal and salt making, de-
iting sisal from abandoned
ions, weaving and raising an-
mostly goats.

bers of the distribution teams
hey believed that-the people
s area during the past four
s have had more food made
)le to them than ever before
peasants walked eight and
hours to obtain food. The
ution of food was no easy
'he first handouts came close
sing riots, and at least one
was crushed to death in the
t a distribution center. .

Government of Haiti made
available for the island tran-
ion and distribution costs. but
ie slowly with difficulty and
ill amounts. Coastal shipping.
d to begin with, was irregular
ow. Vehicular transportation
* drought area to move a
d three hundred tons of pro-
a week consisted of three
ps loaned b.\ USOM, one Pu-
'orks truck which continually
down and one Haitian Army
In addition to this. the Title
ds were not always available.
rogaram plan which scheduled
<.N distribution sometimes ex-


[TED IN NORTHWEST
from page 8)

perienced a two and even three
weeks delay without stocks avail-
able. On the whole, however, most
families in the drought area receiv-
ed an average of eight rations of
twventy-five pounds of food over the
thiee-month period.

Recognizing that soil conservation
and irrigation are the greatest needs
of the Northwest. United States Op-
erations Mission (Point Four) last
August sent their water resources
engineer to study possible ways of
instructing the small farmers on how
to irrigate their land and to keep
their soil intact by halting deforest-
ation.


Distribui.or

JOSEPH NADAL & CO.


PAGE 9


-^w,,


EXIT









"HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY, NOV. 29th, 1959


U. S: GENERAL MCGEE SEES ARMY

AND BAGS DUCKS

ON ORIENTATION VISIT

Brig. General "J H. M'cGee, corn- Wednesday and lunched with mem-
manding general of the U.S. Army bers of the General's Staff at Le
Antilles command stationed in Fort Perchoir. The guests were Colonel
Brook Puerto Rico spent three days Paul Laraque, Col. Marcel Colon.
here this week on an orientation Col. Christophe Mervilus. Col. Harry
visit. Neptune, Lt. Col. Max Alexis, Capt.


This is General McGee's first vis-
it to Haiti since assuming the An-
tilles command in July.

Accompanied by Lt. Colonel Wat-
son and aide de Camp Lt. J. D
Hagan the General met with Brig.
General Pierre Merceron Chief of
Staff of the Haitian Armed Forces


Musset Despeignes, and Lt. Gaet-
jens along with U.S. Military Atta-
che Colonel Dollard and Naval Mis-
sion's Col. Reichner and Lt. Col.
Tighe. USNMC.

The General an avid duck hunt-
er spent Thanksgiving in the Artibo-
rute bagging them on the wing. He
departed from the Riviera Friday.
f


o IFFBRMMiu.T


- e-a!Z
HAg CMMBRBW



-


ronfi 6fiiore de la band d&
Xlement donne une traction t e)
,curit. suppl6mentaires. Un ing nie
'dtpositif de silence r6duit les diff&
rents bruits d6sagr6ables' du pnem
Wand& -que la construction igjre do
uper-Cushion Sans Chambre lull
-~ermtt d'absorber les cahots de laI
i'oute. Vous aurex moins de pneus &
plat, et moins de' d6lais parce que lao
Construction Grip-Seal exclusive deo
Goodyear 6limine pratiquement les
wcr9vaisons' abituelles.


a G E s a am es .SME iL r H -I ON
Ge) 0s DesA ilEA


First Hotel Seminar Of C TA,

A Whopping Success! -


native foods can be used to create
attractive and tasteful dishes. Co-
conuts, cucumbers. oranges, sudd-
eniy assumed new shapes and uses.
These colorful and savory displays
met wv i t h tremendous enthusiasm
and inspired many of the hotel peop-
le to try their own ingenuity with
the use of tropical foods.
Other speakers at the Seminar in-
cluded Rafael Benitez Carle. Direct-
or of Tourism in Puerto Rico and
former president of CTA; G. Bland
Hoke, general manager of Horwarth,
and Horwarth. hotel ac-
cou n tants, who spoke on the
standardization of accounting syst-
ems for small hotels; George J.
Barral of Maxim's in Paris, who
spoke and Champagne; William C.
Roettgert, Pan American World Air-
ways superintendent of sales and
special events, who- spoke on the
meaning of the jet age to the Car-
ibbean area; and Pierre Cosandey,I
hotel consultant to the Department


of Tourism in Puerto Rico and
Chairman of the Seminar, who ex-
plained Puerto Rico's hotel school
to the visiting hotelmen. Mrs. Kar-
wick explained the purpose of the
Sermnar to the hotel representatives.
One important outcome of the Se-
minar was the formation of a Hotel
Chapter within CTA. Chairman of
the Chapter is Peter G. Morgan,
general manager of the St. Lawrence
Hotel in Barbados; \ice chairman,
Alphonse W. Salomone, Jr., general
manager of the Caribe Hilton and
president of the Puerto Rico Hotel
Association; and secretary, Mrs.
Douglas S. Armstrong. manager of
the Buccaneer Hotel in St. Croix.'
U.S. Virgin Islands.


The First Hotel Seminar of the
Caribbean Tourist Association, held
last week at the Dorado Beach Hot-
el in Puerto Rico, was an over-whel-
ming success, according to Mrs. Lee
Karwick, Executive Director of C.
T.A., 20 East 46th Street, New York
City.
Approximately one hundred hot-
eliers from thirteen Caribbean coun-
tries gathered for the Seminar,
which was sponsored by the Depart-
ment of Tourism of Puerto Rico
and CTA. The Seminar discussed
mutual problems and the better co-
ordination of action by CTA in the
development of the hotel industry
in the Caribbean. Owners and man-
agers of small hotels and guest
houses and representatives of large
hotel chains met with international-
ly known members of the tourist
industry to discuss more efficient
methods of operation and the stan-
dardization in services.
Keynote speaker of the Seminar
was John \V. Houser, vice president
of American Express Company, who
gave an account.of the global trav-
eler of the future in his talk "Geo-
tourist". He pointed out that the
hotel industry must plan for the
impact of growing air transporta-
tion and the tremendous growth of
population during the next 20 years.
Robertson Ward, architect and in-
terior decorator of the Mill Reef.
Antigua. W.I., emphasized the reten-
tion of local charm and architect-
ure as a major tourist attraction.
Mr. Ward called on hotelmen to
push the passage of laws to preser-
ve local architecture, landmarks.
and historical monuments.
James J. Roche, project develop-
ment director for Hilton Hotels In-
ternational, talked on training meth-
ods for small hotels. He also ex-
plored ways and means for effect-
ing better personal relations bet-
%ween employer and employees.
Mrs. Erva Thorpe, food expert
and owner-manager of the Little
Maho Guest House. St. John. U.S.
Virgin Islands, urged the use of
native foods in food and beverage
operations.
Charles Bell, food and beverage
director for Hilton Hotels Interna-
tional, also pointed up the use of
local products, including arts and
crafts, and outlined procedures for
food and beverage planning, contr-
ol and merchandising.
One of the highlights of the Semi-
nar was the versatility and .imagin-
ation shown -in the serving of food
to the delegates. All the menus
were planned to demonstrate how


t. the Se-
Barbados,
Guadelou-.
Iartinique,
St. John,


Caribbean Construction Co. S-A.

Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD

Phone: 3955. P. 0. BO.. 284


more pace

more pace

more space


more luxury

and a flawless sporting pedigree


Sweeping ahead with alT the zip, sparkle and road-
hugging stability inhei'ent in its breed, the new M.G.
Magnette wins outright on performance alone. Yet this
thri lling sports saloon has much more to offer-inspired
continental styling... panoramic vision... extra space
for luggage ... the luxury of real leather upholstery..:-
flawless craftsmanship throughout. Come and see-

the completely new


MAGNET rr
MARK III


AUTO S. A. DISTRIBUTORk

360 Grand'Rue P.O. Box 147


Telephone 3134--2772


'.3


.1 + .:.A


Anl', in


MODERN COMFORTS WITH OLD WORLD CHARM



IiOTIit IL SANS SCIJUCII
IN TURGEAU RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT

A Distinguished Hotel In The Heart Of The City
Conveniently Located To The Shopping District
All Air Conditioned Rooms with Private Baths and Hot Water

New Pool Terrace with outside Bar and Swimming Pool
Air Conditionned Bar Unsurpassed Cuisine Finest Service

DINNER DANCE EVERY FRIDAY

From 7:30 P.M. To Midnight

TO THE RYTHM OF "THE SANS SOUCI CUMBO"

MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR THE BEST TABLES!


Countries represented a
minar included Antigua,
British quiana, Curacao,
pe. Haiti, Jamaica, N
Puerto Rico. St. Croix,
St. Thomas and Trinidad.


I I










SUNDAY, NOV. 29th, 1959


"HAITI SUN"


Noustas Explains 'Free Port prices'


.Q. What do free port prices mean?
A. The term "Free Port Prices"
was coined by us to mean that
we sold our merchandise at pric-
es similar to those communities
where a'free port existed.
4. Do you not have free port here?
A. No. No we do not have a free
port in the true sense of the
word, but our merchandise is
sold in many cases at a lower
price than a real free port.
,Q. What is a free port?
A. A free port is a community
where merchandise is imported
without paying duty. There are
very-lfew of those in the world.
Q. Why then are Curacao, Virgin
Islands and Jamaica called free
ports?
A. First of all, let me differentiate
between these countries. The
Virgin Islands and Curacao pay
a very low duty and the mer-
chandise can be sold to anyone
tourist or resident alike.
Whereas in Jamaica no duty is
paid and the merchandise can
be sold only to tourists or to
departing residents being deliv-
ered aboard ship or plane after
departure from the country.
-Q. Which do you prefer of the two
systems?
A. I prefer the system used in the
Virgin Islands even though a
duty is. paid.
-Q. Why?
A. Because the system used in Ja-
maica requires complicated ac-
counting, organization both in
government and business and a
very high standard of ethics.
Secondly, it is good for the peop-
le m the country to be able to
purchase some of the delux mer-
chandise right in his own count-
ry as those people who have the
money to buy usually have the
means to travel and when they
do buy in other countries, the
profit remains outside of the
country.
Q. What have we got in Haiti?
A. Having begun to understand the
importance of free port shopping
as a tourist attraction, the Hai-
tian government in '55 lowered
the duty on a few items such as
watches, cashmere sweaters,,
gloves, cameras, musical instr-
uments, fans, headed bags, the
French perfumes and wines al-
ready carried a relatively low
duty.
SQ. Why do you say relatively?
A. Because the F ra n c o-Haitien


Jean Theard Tells
.'Puerto Ricans About
Haiti's Efforts To
Stimulate Tourim

Jean H. Theard. representative of
Warner Lambert in Port-au-Prince
in an interview with the Island
Times during a twentytwo day vis-
it to the company's Puerto Rican
branch, told how the tourist indust-
ry had done wonders for Haiti and
noted that that island had missed
the boat on one important item-
folklore.
"Puerto Rico, although no one
-.could say is not a leader i-' the
-field seems to be missing the boat
in one department... that is our
strongest-folklore," decla r e d Mr.
Theard.

"A foreign visitor-to Puerto Rico
is hard put to distinguish the Puer-
to Rican from the mainlander". he
added. "Most of the entertainment
I"ve seen here has a definitely
ti"non-native flavor" he said explain-
o,'ing the all out effort Haiti is mak-
..ing to stimulate more tourist tra'-
;el.


treaty forsees 5 per cent but
v.itn tax and surtax it reaches
almost 12 per cent whilst in the
Virgin Islands the duty is 3 1/2
per cent.
Q. Are your prices higher?
A. In the main our prices are low-
er because we work on a small-
er margin.
Q. What about chinaware?
A. We do not have a free port on
chinaware, but we do have in
Haiti the most complete delux
china store and at the lowest
prices in the world.
Q. What is the duty on china?
A. Between .tax and surtax about
48 per cent.
Q. How then can you sell your
china for such a low price?
A. This is a long tory. On the in-
ventory that we have in the
store, we constantly lose money
but thank God some of our sup-
pliers have agreed temporarily
to deliver the merchandise dir-
ectld to the tourist's home in
the states. We lose money on
what we sell out of stock. We
make a little on our direct ship-
ments and at the end of the
year we brenk even.
Q. Why then do you do it?
A. Because we have faith that the
community will wake up com-
pletely to the importance of
what we are doing and give us
its fullest cooperation.


Q. Would it be better business
sense to mark -up your stock at
the normal business rate?
A. In the long run no. We tried
it for a year and discovered
that it would require a much
larger staff of very capable
people to help us keep track of
the thousands of items we have
at the two price classes. We
feel strongly that the residents
should benefit from the free
port prices.
Q. What about diplomats? Should
they not benefit from the dip-
lomatic privelege of not paying
duly? \
A. The prices quoted in the store
are free port prices, or I should
say "diplomatic prices". I re-
peat, that the merchandise
should have been marked up by
another 30 per cent but for good
business reasons we do not do
it In Curacao, in Jamaica, in
Amsterdam, in Tangiers tourists.
residents, diplomats every-
one is on the same level. The
diplomat in Jamaica pays no
duty. A Jamaican resident leav-
ing Jamaica on a plane or boat
has the same privelege of buy-
ing at the diplomatic prices.
Q. Does that ever create misund-
erstanding for you?
A. Thank heaven, most buyers of
this kind of merchandise are in-
lelligent and appreciative. Every


now and then we will have one
person balking at our system
but it does not happen often
enough -that it should become
a problem. I repeat, we make
from 5 to 10 per cent gross pro-
fit in our china department
which is not enough to cover
the interest on the money invest-
ed in that department. Our on-
ly means of covering our ex-
penses is by making direct ship-
ments to tourists residing ab-
road or to diplomats residing
here. 48 per cent duty on land-
ed costs equals 33-1/3 per cent
on selling prices and this marg-
in of profit is lower than an.
similar store in the world. The
same goes for the crystal and
silver departments but we have
faith that sooner or later all
concerned will see the light and
give us the necessary backing.
Q. What about your watch depart-
ment?
A. We are very proud of this dep-
artment. The brands we carry-
are the finest in every price
field. Our prices in most cate-
gories are controlled and guar-
anteed. We make a regular
mark-up of about 1/3. The wbrld
having become so small Cura-
cao today is just across the
street. Tangiers is two blocks
away and, therefore, we can not,


A -WONDERFUL NEW WORLD O


FOR 1960


60


FO


FORD -The Finest Fords of a Lifetime,


FALCON The New-size Ford

-TI UNDERBIRD-The World's Mt _


Ut


)BUILDS THE WORLD'S MOST BEAUTIFULLY

PROPORTIONED CATPS


THIE NEW-SIZE ORD




TUEsCA1?HERDWORLDRD70
EA/S/ESr CAR IN 7THE WORLD TO OIW


PAGE 11 ..



To Sun

even if we were that kind of a -'-.
firm, play around with our prie-
es. In the discount houses in .. ;^
the States money is made oh ^
lesser known brands on which
a hair mark-up is put on so
that a greater discount can be
given. Omega, Patek Phillipe ',-
are aristocrats in their field and
will never be found in such in- --
stitutions. People come from all
over the states, Europe and the
Caribbean to buy from us be-
cause our prices are low and
because they have learned to
respect our word. When some-.
one buys a watch from us, he
buys the best in that field at the
lowest price possible. We happ-.
en to be the only firm in the
Caribbean to belong to the Na-
honal Business Bureau of Amer-
ica. \We strive to live up to its
veri high standard.
Hoiw come then you have a gam-
ter of watches with a 25 pl.':
ee:it discount?
Every good businessman knows
that every now and then there
ma;, be some surplus stock for
one reason or another that has
to be disposed of. Late deliver- .
ies mai, cause this and there-
fore \\e get special permission
to dispose of a brand or brands
at a special sale. Believe me,
'..'ien ijs happens the public
should grab them fast.



F FORDSIb
















RDS .






.
-*.^







, -
PAGE 12



Bainet "Venus 0O
Way off the tourist-beaten track is full recompense for an arduous ce
i: the south of Haiti,. 18 kilometers journey. Neatly arranged substan- of
west of Jacmel, is the sea-side town tial-looking maisons in white, with the
of Bainet, a town whose handsome red roofs and gables; a few are tLi
lay-out no less than the marked of wood like Swiss chalets in their Pe
beauty of so many of its female proper mountain settings. Shaded the
residents, earns it our title of the
"Venus of Haiti."
You cannot get easily to Bainet b.
by sea. For tho u g h situated a- M I V
the head of a pretty southern bay,
and lying parallel to the sea shore,
it would be hazardous to try the by huge almonds, and other hand- di:
disembark on the sand and shingle some trees of the river plain, the ar
beach. All day long, heavy blue town is well ordered, a fine expres- th
breakers, raising their white tops sion of community sense a fit sub- en
ten feet' above the flood rush on ject for local pride. Gravel roads se
the beach or foam against the cliffs, are smooth, and clean. There is Th
In August 1915 high waters swept a pretty church, and a neat dis- re
ashore, washed away a whole street, pensary within stores are assort- re
of which there is no trace. Occa- ments of the best imported goods th
sionally waves still rush in. Inhab- ranging from Chinese prints to Nu- dv
itants of threatened houses leave remberg clocks. an
the doors open, and the sea washes co
through the ground floor out into Tius quality of community deve- by
the streets. lopment, the evidences of high stan- ni
Nor is it too comfortable to ap- dards of living, and greater skills to
S preach Bainet by land. You may and techniques abound all over the do
"travel to Carrefour Fauche along area. Fields are carefully fenced, ar
the ubiquitous river bed which mak- tilled, terraced, Bois-Chene and thi
es up the greater part of the Jacmel mahogany trees are noticeable de
road. Then you take the high' road everywhere, evidence of a long tra- hu
to Trouin,- through Blockhaus, over edition of enlightened forestry policy. ex
mountainous country. The road is Rather curious are the coconut of
good, that is to say, there are good, palms which grow right up near is
engineering grades curves and so the hill tops, a hundred meters ab- a
forth, but the surfacing is much ove sea level. thE
r, n, and rough. The people of Bainet are also the
But the view of the town itself striking. Most visitors notice at on- Ha















1'


61
I.,





























ICA'S FINES. AN.
SFU R INITE
T 8UD T PRICES
lew your 'avorife upholstery p
b, erns od colors from a wide'on eof
fabrics. Enjoy the comfort of spring-
filled cushions .ippered for easy ..
cleaning. Tables feature mar-proof
: ble d mahogany Micarta to.




SAgent Distributor: HAITI TRADING CO.
Im .


"HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY, NOV.


f Haiti"
that the women of Bainet are
a beauty more arresting than -
at of any of the other Haitian
wvns, except perhaps Jeremie. .
perhaps their glamour comes from
e marked sense of style which
....... ..


tie 7Vwude


stinguishes Bainet dwellers. Folks
e well dressed, well groomed in
e latest Paris mode. There is
lough coffee wealth around to
nd daughters on a trip to France.
he people in this area are also
markably light in complexion. Pe-
Labat writing in 1700 menboned
at a large number of affranchis
welt in this area cultivating cocoa;
id later history has it that some
mpanies of Polish soldiers sent
y Napoleon to recapture Saint Do-
ingue, had switched from swords
ploughshares and had settled
own happily with wives from this
ea. In any case the farming in
e area is proof of a older, more
veloped tradition of agricultural
sbandry, and tlus is probably one
pianation of the greater measure
prosperity with which the district
blest. Everything in Bainet seems
little better than elsewhere, and
e good citizens of Bainet will feel
at the appellation "The Venus of
alti" is rather fitting, indeed.


H.A. Is


has Neo
One of over tifty similar Bination-
al Centers in Latin America, the
Haitian American Institute is a cul-
tural i nstit ution dedicated t o


ricks Reed


o mmv Ih rall =FsMO

your Indviduality h abmu- Oia


Chamber of Commerce Bldg.


f Localel
strengthening understanding between
Haiti and the United States.
Its activities consist-of English.
and French teaching, the operation .
of a library, and cultural programs \
of various kinds such as lectures, .
film showings and art exhibits.
The Institute is operated by t.
joint Haitian-American boards of di-
rectors and a full time director, Mr.'
John A.. Floyd.
Mr. Floyd is a former professor'
of French and Spanish at the Uni-i "
versity of New Hampshire, and has
taught at Boston University as.well 2
He is former director of cult u..a.
centers in Turkey and Costa.JUO',f.;
The Institute's staff' is- compo4-
of a secretary, 2 librarians.arid
een teachers of English and f'renc
Over eight hundred students "
currently attending English
age classes, with a waiting list -o.
one hundred who cannot be a-com.
modated now because of 'lack Cl a'
classroom space. -
Special Saturday morningc.plasseI'
held for children. C 4
Stress on the spoken word is thie .
Institute's approach to Englis
teaching, every effort is m&de-."f'
keep classes small enough i- u
dividual attention. .-'.-. .
The Institute's 3800 volu4mei lb fib
contains works- on fiction; scelpce&".J
medicine and engineering,. a~ I
as a collection of books on Ange-'
ican history, ail, music and.folk
lore. It also has a collectioh- of m
basic books on Haiti in.-'rech "and ''
English.
The latest and most wid~~a
American magazines ax ..6 ikew;ise;
to be found in the library ".'
A record collection .dfiAledAf t'
and Haitian popular' aud,.st
music is also available to nimemi_.;c
The Institute's new quartes
at:

Rue 6 en face de I'Avenue 0. 1
Commenting on the Institute's '
ture plans, Mr John Floyd declared
"While the Haitian-Americaln _ii-*
stitute is operating with a full all
active program, we want to see i4.
performing an even greater cpltu
al service to Haitians and Amei-
ans. We plan for the new .auditoon,
ium to house art exhibits, concerts,i.
and lectures. We would like td- .'d
kitchen facilities, a music list
room, and make some other n
improvements towards our & ...10:
establishing t h e Haitian-A'b~e '
Institute as a dynamic eultural.'c,
in the community."


I


DJq




iI- ;


SUNDAY, NOV. 29th, 1959


"HAITI SUN"


Hasco Gives $1,000 For
New Agriculture
School Dorm
Because of the numerous demands
for admission into the National
School of Agriculture the Govern-
ment has decided to construct a new
building more spacious than the
.old establishment to lodge one hund-
red students.
As it is done in foreign countries,-
the Department of Agriculture, Na-
tural Resources and Rural Develop-
menit has written to agriculture ex-
port enterprises in Haiti, asking
them for contributions towards the
building of a new agriculture
school .
Replying immediately to this app-
eal of the Department. Mr Albert J.
Hill, Vice-President of the Haitian
-American Sugar Co., HASCO. con-
tributed $1000 in the name of his
company.
The check has been deposited in
a' special account at the National
Bank of Haiti. A committee in char-
ge of controlling the funds of-the
building has been formed.



JETS OVER HAITI
IDENTIFIED AS U.S.
Jets that laced the Port-au-Prince
.sky with vapor trails and provided
background to the city's noise for 3
,days this week have been identified
as United States Navy Sabre Jets
on manouevers.

The Jets .it was explained were
on authorized training flights over
Haiti. They were using the Haitian
coast in photographic tests.


I.


Armand Show Opens Dec 4 th
At Art Center


The twenty-three year old Croix-
des-Bouquets painter Gesner Ar-
mand who shunned his families en-
ticements to stay at home and in-
stead ventured off to Mexico in
search of expression and develop-
ment of his art is showing the res-
ults of his summer's work on the
Cul de Sac in a one-man show open-
ing at the Centre d'Art December
4th.

Gesner was fifteen years of age
when the Lycee Petion drawing
master Maitre Bance spotted him
and recommended he go to the Cen-
tre d-Art for guidance to develop
his talent.

Five years later with the money
he had saved from selling his
paintings Gesner took off on the
first of two trips to Mexico. '
His first taste of a foreign count-
ry was bitter sweet. He ran into
the strongly competitive Mexico city
art movement and on a trip North
almost ran foul of the Police when
selling his watch provided him
with funds to pay the hotel bill in
Laredo. Texas.
Returning to Haiti with three
months of travels behind him Ges-
ner had his first one-man exhibition
at the Centre d'Art in March 1957.
On his second trip to Mexico,
which lasted a year Gesner worked
with Jean Soriano the well known
Mexican non-objective painter who
is also famous in theatre and cer-
amics. Before returning to Haiti
this summer he had a showing of
I I-'.


his work at the Galeria Diana in
Mexico City.

PREFACE FOR
IGESNER ARMAND
CATALOGUE
It's marvelous!
Marvelous to know that a great
painter has revealed himself.
A year ago the paintings of Get-
ner Armand resembled embroider-
ies in good taste -the colors were
serious- the drawing excellent.
In Mexico a new Gesner was
born and his pictures today re-
call to us Vertes or Raoul Duffy.
But Gesner remains a Haitian
painter. He is the revelation of the
Centre d'Art.
It's magnificent.
It %%ill be fascinating to follow his
development in the framework of
international painting and it is a
pleasure to salute here at the Cen-
tre d'Art Gesner Armand, twentS-
thiee years old, so greatly talented.
Roger COSTER

inerican Writer
Doing Book On Haiti
Marian Koshland of Los Angeles,
a noted American writer is here
doing research for her next book.
Lodged at Quisqueya in Petion-
ville Miss Koshland is to speak on
Contemporary African Poetry Sun-
day. December 6 at 10am at the
inauguration of the library of the
French Institute. It is under the
sponsorship of the Women's Social
Action League.


Gesner Armand with a recent painting.


You know
!! it's a really fine
SScotcb when it's
JOHNNIE
WALKER



JOHNNIE ViiALKER
Born 120o-still ', nI strong

PREETZMAN-AGGERHOLM Distrib: ,. For HAITI


AWAY OR AT HOME A CARi OF YOUR OWN





SRENT- CAR


r 0,"[ice i r f' "Ik
NET O ._Sbu : ,
Opp-RYA BAK C AD
7 hn -36


AMERICAN EXPRESS AND DINERS CLUB


Featuring Hilman High Style
AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING HOTELS
For Reservations, 'Road Maps,
P. 0. BOX 662


Write or Cable:
and Suggested Itineraries


CREDIT CARD HONORED


FREE: "

Road maps,
information
Pick-up and delivery
from hotels, airport
and pier


WEEKLY RATE
$35,-per Week

Plus 84pepMile


ALL RATES INCLUDE
QRS.-OIL.IN~URRNCE


. AVIS CAR RENTALS -
Port-au-Prince, Haiti


%, -*-P--


PAGE 13


in


- ~'- ~ -









"HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY, NOV. 29th, 1959


tiJoseph report


Shigeru Obayashi, First Sec. at the Japanese Embassy in C.T. enjoyed
lunch at Le Perchoir with Japanese honorary Consul in Haiti Engineer
Daniel Brun. Mr Obayashi was here to arrange for the visit of the Jap-
anese trade mission arriving Dec. 7... Antoine (Zoupim) Tassy our
football star is opening the newspaper "Haiti Sport" this week... SS Bor-
Jenfjord brought -100 Tourist here Tuesday instead of Havana... Dr Adrien
Raymond Ministre Conseiller at the Embassy in Mexico returns to his
post this week with his wife and two daughters.'... Willy Frisch of Maison
Deschamps is back from his health trip to the States in top form. Wife
Paulette has the chic maternity clothes out of closet... Bernhardt Kirke-
gard Vice-president of Midwest Chapter of Asta advises that the next
annual Asta convention will be held in Haiti on April 25, 1960. Robert
P. 0. Malley of Indiana will preside... Mile Nicole Pierre-Louis daughter
of Dupleix Pierre-Louis of La Phalange is back from three years studying
nursing at Hospital St. Joseph des Trois Rivieres in Canada... Claude
Arty vice-consul of Haiti in Miami returned to his. post Tuesday... Ben
Aboudi the uncrowned bachelor king of Textile Avenue is back from sum-
mering in Europe... Mrs Vera Gallop private-secretary to Ambassador
Drew is back from vacationing in the U.S. with her mother... 47 Diplom-
ats had a send off dinner for British Ambassador and Mrs Sidney Sim-
monds and Peruvian Ambassador and Mrs Alberto Perez Saez at the
Montana Wednesday night... Col. Edouard Roy (Retired) is over visit-
ing his homeland from Miami... Discussing Hotels in his column is the
Miami Herald last week Jack Bell wrote.... "take a look at the November
14 Saturday Evening Post and read about Hotel Oloffson and its crazy-
like-a-fox owner Roger Coster in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. This ancient ramb'-
ling ginger-bread structure, surrounded by lush tropical trees and climb-
ing vines, is the most picturesque spot in the Caribbean. And Coster
is as unconventional as the building he owns"...Stanley Rosenfeld of his
pa's Morris Rosenfeld-Photographic IllustLTations-dropped off the SS
Borjenfjords cruise to stay longer in Haiti. Their firm is unique in the
world, specializing in photos of racing yachts...
One of the first things Bishop Voegeli did on his return to Haiti this
month was to visit the Centre d'Art and look over the Gesner Armand
paintings. The result was he purchased three, one for his own collection
and two important examples for the permanent collection of the College
St. Pierre... The Bacoulou dance troup is off to Puerto Rico for a series
of engagements.... Saturday lovely Audrey Brake, who according to A.
J. "catches everyone eyes", was joined here on vacation by Brooklyn girl-
friend Enid M. Rhoden... Roger A. Steckler an accountant of Young and
Rubican Inc, N.Y. is returning bientot to mend his broken heart. .
Appolon de Paris on a sales trip through the North for the Shering
Corp miraculously escaped with, a broken crown when his Volkswagan
rammed a lumbering Camion on tde Derac highway last week... The
Division d'Hygiene Publique published a notice this week explaining the
kind of Marchand fresco to buy from for health's sake... Serge Lescou-
flair has gone to France on a scholarship and Roger E. Desir to Puerto
Rico... Jean Sassine has replaced Emmanuel Mainville at the Service
of Information and Documentation... Vinton Burns was up from Vene-
zuela for a day last week. Wife Sheillagh and mother Mrs Anne Kennedy
in Caracas are expecting to winter at their Diquini villa... Major A. Kub.
ellus in charge of the Interamerican Geodetic Survey here spoke to busi-
nessmen at the Wednesday International Club of Commerce on the act-
ivities of his service in Haiti...
Venezuelan Charge d'Affair Senor Rodreguez Morandi who returned
to Port from a brief visit to Caracas is said to be leaving soon. Mrs Mo-
randi is expecting a new addition bientot... Doe and Better Taicher were
in town for a two day visit from Miami... Senator Homer Capehart told
a group of American businessmen here at Le Perchoir that he is going
to make Haiti his pet project for at least the next three years he is ass-
ured of being in the U.S. Senate...


DISCOVER THE FASCINATION

OF HAITI

Through Its Postage Stamps

For complete information in Haiti

Stamps and other details which will be

furnished you free of charge, write to

p.0o, nx 723 Port-au-Port-au-Prince


"OLD GLORY"
A LA MODE IN HAITI


WITH AN ENTIRELY
NEW CONCEPT OF
MAGIC
TOUCH
CONTROL
Its Easy For Everyone
To Operate A Wonderful New
BELL HIGH FIDELITY
AMPLIFIER
BELL is the answer to
ALL Your requirements
For HIGH FIDELITY Music


MOfEL 2520M


Agents TIPCO,
Place Goffrard
TTIPCO Bldg. Phone 3216-3929


u


U.S. 48 STAR FLAG GOING
INTO DRESSES AND
BEDDING
The colorful red and white and
blue stars and stripes that have
blossomed out as skirts, shirts and
bedding on La Saline and Harry
Truman Boulevard this
week have been identified
as obsolete United States flags.
They were out-moded w h e n two
states, Alaska and Hawaii, were
added this year to the forty-eight
that make up the United States of
America.

A little lady with a hand-powered
sewing machine on the sidewalk be-
fore the Croix des Bossales market,
busily making the flags of all sizes
into skirts shirts and pillow cases
objected to an interview Friday. De-
clining to comment on her supplier
she did not appear to know that
her material was old glory.


1.



j ...




*T


PAL ALm[E R[CAL
WORLD'S MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE

Rue Dantes Oestouches-Port au Prince-Tel: 3451.

H.VP *r'1~kPm~ **


... .New! Sensational!


.. ..J W FT. .


la .i&l R .aLJ I^n .T V .-J-



AND JEWEL ROLLER BEARINGS ,

On Sale At: Canape Vert


Aux Cent Mille Articles


Dadlani's Maison Orientale


.- '*>.
'*Ls^'.
*' ^<
*'- T
-i
s^ ^
" ^~ -f


PAGE 14


October 15 through March 31

NOW'S THE BEST TIME",

TO VISIT EUROPE

WITH PAN AM's

FAMILY PLAN





A trip to Europe in the wonderful world of Pan American
. .. what a glorious family holiday! There's so much to
see and do in the Old. World-famous art collections,
historic monuments, superb cuisine-don't deny your
family this wonderful opportunity!
MORE CITIES... MORE FLIGHTS...
Now, in addition to London, Paris and Rome, Pan-
American extends its Jet service from New York to
seven more cities Amsterdam, Frankfort, Cologne,
Dusseldorf, Brussels, Hamburg and Copenhagen. And
Pan American offers 48 Jet flights weekly to and from
Europe, many of these non-stop on the new Inter-
continental Jet Clippers*
MORE ECONOMICAL...
Remember that during the economy season hotel rates
are much lower. And for a family traveling together,
hotels and restaurants offer special rates.
SAVE WITH THE FAMILY PLAN!
With Pan Am's Family Plan only one member of the
family pays full fare. All others save up to $300 (dollars)
each, depending on class of travel. This means ona
holiday to Paris, for example, a family of five can save
up to $1,200 (dollars)
For details see your Travel Agent or Pan American.


W-




2 -
IM I--


* -' .-s5C-' .-'~2.-'-'i'-7'v.f-.5'r'~- 'tw-,-.
~.-~-' 1rb~--~'i


SUNDAY, NOV. 29th, 1959


"HAITI SUN"


A grandson was born to Mr and They are stopping at the Villa Cre-
Mrs John Cusick in Ponce, Puerto ole.
Rico they announced here in Port
Thanksgiving Day. His name is Dan.Allen is expected home from
Paul O'Dair. his month long State-side vacation
Snext week to reopen the Rendez


The star of the CBS television
show "As the world turns". Mlle
Rosemary Prinz is down at the
Oloffson on vacation. The petit ac-
tress is here jor two weeks in the
.Sun.
*

Mrs Florence Zinrinsky Friedman,
Chairman of the Bogart Manufact-
uring Corp of New York is back
revisiting her many Haitian friends.
Mrs Friedman is spending her two
-weeks here at the Montana. She is
a member of the American Associa-
tion of the United Nations.
*
Mr and Mrs Andy Anderson are
home from a Jamaican honeymoon.
'The long time formidable bachelor
and wife Romona will set up resid-
-ence in Petionville.
.5
Mrs Jean Claude Fouchard is re-
.covering at Hospital Canape Vert
from her recent illness.

Madame Vve Simon Lafleur pass-
ed away this week at the age of
ninety-eight. To Dr Maurice Lafl-
eur in charge of the Quarantainne
at Bowen Field and his son Jacques
the Physical Therapist were offer
our profound condeleance.

Madame Michel _Bredy died this
week. Two of her sons, Dr Raphael
Bredy working in Venezuela for the
past decade and Michel Haiti's con-
sul in Camaguey flew to Port-au-
.. Prince for .the funeral. We offer
them our regrets.
4


Claudette Anglade
New York Thursday.
S.0


clippered to


Mrs Marcel Fombrun flew to Me-
xico to join her husband with son
Charles Jr Tuesday. Her daughter
Marie Alice clippered the same day
to San Juan with her residence visa.
*
Francis Huxley, son of the fam-
-otis Aldos Huxley flew to the States
Wednesday. He has been doing re-
-search work here.

Mr and Mrs Joe Cichowsky (Car-
ibbean Mills) and junior flew to
S"Miami on vacation Wednesday.
Wallace and Christine Smallwood
-'.'.flew to Miami Wednesday.
Kyle Barnes, the Veteran. in his
-fifth year as the Administrative off-
Sicer at the U.S. Embassy is return-
ing to Washington December 6th
.:,-with wife Marcella and son Bruce.

Mr and Mrs Arthur Borden old
-:'friends of Haiti and world land and
Lt -sea travellers are back in Haiti at
the Oloffson after a yar doing Ve-
,,inezuela, Colombia and Central Am-
ca by auto.

',C -' "3 .
r Walter Pierce director of Tropi-
'gas here has returned from a three
.y'Weeek business trip to Caracas. Mia-
afi and Baltimore. Mr. Pierce is
V. eing. promoted to Venezuela early
-,In.the new year. He returned to
't)nwn with Mr and Mrs LL Peters.
1 Peters of Delray Beach Florida
N:is here on his second trip represent
Tropigas manufacturers in the U.S.


vous. This is Dan's first vacation
-or night off- in six years.

Anne Hollister of Time and Life
Inc. a top researchers continues her
Caribbean jaunt after delving into
the art movement, voodoo Haitian
Industry and the gingerbread peri-
od architecture. Anne stopped at
the Oloffson.

Donald Walker Born arrived Mon-
day from three years in the Amer-
ican Embassy in Camberra, Aus-
tralia Monday to assume the duties
here of Commercial attache and se-
cond secretary of the Embassy.

Boston born and Harvard gradu-
ate, he is here with, his wife Mar-
got and four children, Thimothy 5
Peter 4 Christopher 2 and Susan
four months.





/


THANKSGIVING DAY IN THE
VALLEY OF THE ARTIBONITE
Dinner at the Ward's

A turkey dinner with all the trim-
mings at noon, and two plays enact-
ed by the youngsters in the evening,
marked the Thanksgiving Day cel-
ebrations of the American person-
nel, in the Valley this week, in
which members of the Haitian per-
sonnel were invited to participate.
The employees at the offices irn
Borel and Pont Sonde closed down
shop at noon when the Haitian and
American guests went off to the
Deschapelles residence of the Ward's
to partake of roast turkey and dress-
ing, with cranberry sauce, hot rolls,
and mince-meat pie, all prepared
by the "cordon bleu" wives of the
International Cooperation Associati-
on (ICA, and International Engine-
ering Company (IEt personnel work-
ing jointly in the Valley with ODVA.
Amnng Ithe laro numbivn fp


group. Norman Ward served as host
with Mrs Andrew Peyton and Mrs
George Bradshaw serving as co-hos-
tesses.
Children in Thanksgiving Play
At 7:30 in the evening, residents
of the Valley packed the Clubhouse,
specially decorated by the teacher,
parents and pupils for the occasion.
The clubhouse at Deschapelles,. op-
erated by ODVA, was placed at the
disposal of Miss Penn. Potter. teach-
er and member of the Schweitzer
personnel whopresented her young
pupils in a "Thanksgiving Assemb-
ly", featuring two plays: "Johnny
Appleseed," and "A Thanksgiving
Hero." Satish Modi, young son of
the Indian surgeon at Schweitzer
acted as announcer.
The youngsters ranging in age
from two years to 10 were cast in
the following roles:
PROGRAMME
Thanksgiving Assembly


.........n t.i.le .a rge u,, Or u MiPss -enm'y Potter, Teacher
guests at the Thanksgiving Dinner Schweitzer Hospital Deschapelles
were members of the "etat-major" DeschapeUes Nov. 26, 1959
of ODVA, and the personnel of Announcer: Satish Modi
Schweitzer Hospital. Dr Larimer
Mellon returned thanks for the JOHNNY APPLESSED

Stopping in Haiti en route to his Cast of Characters in order of app-
home in the Butter Country, Gre- earance
gory Aim has been making a per- Settlers: Satish & Rajan Modi
sonal study of the Miss Haiti 'beau- Johnny Appleseed: Jon Hambhn
ty contestants their qualificati ons Guardian Angel: Stephen Hamblin
for the-title and their attitude to- Rabbit: Nicky Williams
ward their public. Having spent Three Little Girls: Grechetn Schomp
three years in Holland broadening Shannon Bickford, Barbara Ward
his field, Aim is returning to take Pioneer Thomas: Curtis Ward
up a new post with Shell Oil Corn- Indians: Satis & Rajan hM-odi
pany in New Zealand. Butch Ward, Gray Bickford, Da-
Panama will be Aim's next stop, vid Cotton.
where he plans to continue his in- A THANKSGIVING HERO
vestigations with an on-the-spot Cabin Boy: Butch Ward
checkup. Captain Standish: Jon Hamblin
Aim's hopes to use the knowledge Sailors: Satish & Rajan Modi
gained in Europe and in Haiti to Little Bear: Stephen Hamblin
help boost the sale of oil on the Indian Chief: Gray Bickford
twin islands of New Zealand One Indians: Satish & Rajan Ml.odi,
of hirs special interests in Holland Butch Ward, David Cotton
has been the study of marketing Pilgrim Women: Gretchen -Schomp,
methods.


o I


Shannon Bickford, Barbara Ward
Governor Bradford: Curtis Ward
Little Boy: Nicky Williams.

THANKSGIVING HYMNS
Audience and cast before the plays
Come ye thankful people come.
All is safely gathered in
Ere the winter storms begin.
God our maker doth provide
For our wants to be supplied.
Come to God's own temple come.
Raise the song of harvest home.
Raise the song of harvest home.
Audience and cast at the end of

THANKSGIVING HERO
We gather together to ask the
Lord's blessing

He hastens and chastens His will
to make known.

The wicked oppressing ceases from
distressing.

Sing praises to His name.
He forgets not His own.

Acknowledgements
Music: Monsieur Julnev
Costumes: Parents & Children
Scenery: Children
Properties: Monsieur Angus Basil


Douglas C r e w, Manager of the
Port-au-Prince Shell Gasoline divi-
sion and family left by plane Friday
for a four months vacation in Eft.
gland.
The Crews formed a traveling
party woih Ambassador and Mrs.
S,diney limmonds.



Mo. lr. Rosenberg noted Associat-
ed i'.:c. writer on Latin American
Affaiis '.-ho recently returned from
a to'.L -.1 Russia is arriving to day
on a L.. ef visit.


THOSE WHO APPRECIATE THE BEST DINE
AT EL RANCHO HOTEL

Victorin MAUREL, Chef de Cuisine,
Member, French Culinary Abademy
featuring

*Wide Selection of Appetizers and entrees of
imported foods and meats

*Famous Dessert Buffet Table

*Complimentary Rhum Cordials with
After-Dinner Coffee

*Dinner Dancing 8 to 10 p.m. $5.00 per person
and Complimentary Hor's d'Oeuvres 6 to 8 p.m.
at the Round Bar
also Every Saturday Evening

"LA RONDE"
Haiti's Newest, Smartest Night Club
featuring the incomparable

EL RANCHO DUROSEAU ORCHESTRA

Haiti's new, popular, young 'Songstress and a new-style

LAVINIA WILLIAMS SHOW PRESENTATION

$2.00 per person minimum charge

Reservations for Night 'Olub Recommended


PAGE 1


on the label



























p ti.e.wn1iee 11,1...r












Served excusivEys at Haiti's Leading
HOTELS & RESTAURANTS & BY CONNOISSEURS
THROUGHOUT THI WORLD


I


PAGE 15







SUNDAY, NOV. 29th,


"HA SUN"


PAGE 16it


Protect Our CafshAnd KilTho


m -w IM F v-- v


(As Told By Marc PETIT)
Some twenty-odd years ago, alm-
ost every Port-au-Prince family pos-
sessed its cat. This animal consti-
tuted a precious guard for the home.
The "me-owww... me-owww..." all
the day long, announced that the
sentinel was every on guard.
Therefore "plume pas grouiller"
(not a feather stirred). Everything
remained calm. Even the piece of


bread or the "queue de more"
tentionally forgotten by the cook
(codfish tail), intentionally or unin-
outside the "garde-manger" (safe),
received not a nibble. A sign that
the rats and mice gave no sign of
life.
Good and crazy was the brainless
young rat or the unexperienced
little mouse which dared come out
of its hole. Immediately, Mr Cat


made it pay with its life, for putt-
ing feet on the sacred soil of his
domain. Always on the watch, he
sometimes invented a thousand and
one tricks to attract the e n e m y
which became more and more rare,
sometimes walking around as if
there was nothing on his mind, edg-
ing close after a suspicious move-
ment in a hole, making the gross
dos" (bristling up its back) at the
dog of the house with which he did
not share the pleasant moments of
the day. Some times lying stretch-
ed out in any kind of an angle on
the diningroom floor, his furry paws
under his stomach, eyes half-clos-
ed, and purring "ron...ron...ron..."
like an English wind-mill. But rats
and mice. distrusting "Monsieur
Chat" always, remained in their
hole, coming only at night to the
spot where the treasures of the kit-
chen absorbed the day before were
thrown out.
Now-a-days, all that is changed.
With the tree-cutting and the ex-
pansion of our old Port-au-Prince,
the "chats marrons", "vrai Attila"
(the Barbarian who came to Fran
ce and who left nothing living in his
wake) against which the old hupt-
ers, aided by the farmers, made
warfare, have disappeared. The
roosters, hens and baby chicks play
joyfully in the barn-yards. Unfor-
tunately, our house cats are tracked.
A society called "Cat Eaters" and
"Grog-men" have undertaken to
destroy the house cats. The former
like to eat "Tassot-chat." (dried
eat meat). The latter, during their
game of "Domino" or "TroLs-Sept
Bois ]an nez" (game of xx cards
where the loser must have a piece
of wood stuck in his nose, choose
o please their palate mixture made
of "cervelle de chat" icat brainsI,
'clairin" (raw rumi,. "canelle pi
ee" (pounded cinnamon', "musca-
le grage" (grated nutmeg,i all
nade more agreable by sweetening
,th sucree blanc" (white sugar.
They called it "Punche cervelle"
Brain Punch) and pretend even
that this drink increased one's vi-
ality.


Hams Help Recognized
Jules Tomar a Ham radio fanatic
iHH2JTi of Gros Morne told the
Sun this week of another incident
in which a Ham radio operator ren-
ded a remarkable service. One
night earlier this month when
Charles Wells of Greenville. N. C.,
the "ham" operator, tuned in on
a radio conversation between Accra,
Ghana and Israel. It was an urgent
call to get a brain surgeon to Accra
to operate on the 8-year-old child -
of an Israeli Embassy official there.
The physician from Israel could
not reach Chana until Monday mor-
ning, so Mr Wells telephoned the
Israeli Embassy in New York.
The Embassy got in touch with
the State Department. Josefph C.
Satterthwaite. Assistant Secretary
of State for African Affairs, reach-
ed Rear Admiral E. B. Grantham
Jr., who handles Near East and
African affairs in the Defense Dep.
artment. As a result a brain surgeon
at a United States base in North
Africa was sent winging toward Ac.-
era.
Israeli officials said they had been
informed that the surgeon would
read Accra that night.
The short-wave radio was resort-
ed to last night, officials said, be-
cause the cable office at Accra was
closed


W---


"Oui Cherie"



The Hotel



Oloffson Show



Is 'Best Ever !



Opening December 14


at, 10 pm.



Reserve Now


' ri
*


For all kinds of French perf ,iu
visit Haiti's Smartest Indian at
Select your favourite perfumne
from our large collection'. -


JEAN PATOU
CHRISTIAN DIOR


We offer you the world's famot
brands at free port prices. 2

LE GALlON

CARVEN
LANVIN NINA RICeI...

CARON

CHANEL .

RAPHAEL '

etc... etc...

MI LOT -1


MERE THE LOWEST, PRICE, IS


THE WORLD


FAMOUS VI


-~ -~ ~


SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCAS


"Armande



PARIS .PORT.*U.PRJHNCE








PHONE.


,- *


So, our houses have no more cats.
Port-au-Prince is almost entirely
depopulated of this feline creature.
Also, rats and mice, as they say in
creole "font ribambelle" have the
time of their lives).
The vendors of rat poison clutter
up the streets of the Capital. But
alas! this poison is almost "inope-
rant." As for the rat-trap, let us not
speak about it. A "pince-sans-rire"
Ipoker-faced jokers even pretended
to have seen a rat use its tail to
block the spring on the rat-trap
while another tried to catch the
piece of "hareng saur" (sour herr-
ing) which had been used as bait.
Then another answered him: "What
do you except? Science is in full
progress. The Russians invented
Sputnik III. the rats have come up
with t he "Anti-Rat-trap Tail"
These are 20th Century rats.
The ceilings are of homes are in-
fested. One is obliged to keep every-
thing under lock and ke.. At times,
during the night, the trotting of the
rats over the ceiling causes the
fathers and mothers to jump out of
bed, frightened, and grab their ro-
saries, reciting a "Je vous salue"


e Bats.
and then invoking "Maman
te" and Baron Lacroix"- (
terms of voodoublogy) in ogle
protect their off-spring fron m
"loups-garous" (were-wolves';. %-
The rats respect no one; .noeei
the children in the wards at'-t
General Hospital, according ..'to
daily of the Capital. They at
proportions of a cat. Measures ,
en by the authorities concern
have rapidly crushed this
of rats which threatened the,,
public.
Only the M"angeurs -de chj
and the "Grog-men" are res P.
ible.
Measures of protection for. o-
brave cats have become absolut
necessary. Otherwise, we are6
going to perhaps not "mourir"'
but will be attacked: outr toe
will be thoroughly .gnawed d
the course of a night. '

"De grace, Messieurs," (SP
us. gentlemen).
"suspen'n mange chatte" (cut|
out eating up those cats):;."
"chatte fate pour quimbe- ratv
(cats were made to catch rai




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EDBFPKD98_FYGYTV INGEST_TIME 2013-08-28T03:27:47Z PACKAGE AA00015023_00240
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


  Home | About dLOC | Collections | Governance | Digitization | Outreach | FAQ | Contact  
  Powered by SobekCM
Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement  
© All rights reserved   |   Citing dLOC