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Haiti sun ( November 22, 1959 )

Digital Library of the Caribbean Duke University Libraries
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: November 22, 1959

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00239

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: November 22, 1959

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00239

Full Text





Weekly
Every
Sunday


un


lOc


VOL XII SUNDAY,. NOVEMBER 22nd. 1959 Port-au-Prince, HAILTI No. 3t, Aenue Marie-Jeanne Cite DUMARSAIS ESTIME No. 3




US SEN. CAPEHART BACKS


Loans For Haiti: Carlson Bigger Sugar Quota


-l A a- r --
I'- ansas 'enalor Frank Curi-on talking .niih Pr-iidenl II E. Doi il1 rrancois DuralIe-r at tie National Palace.
;* ____________________


SMiss Haiti Beauty Contest


SCreating Great Interest


a The E'.rerh ,r i L-: H1_-il iiiather at) the PL ,urtileie- rumnt-clur, Viidrn
ed m ,ner.nltu,- rl.-; .-. k a_ i4.,r. -;i -;.j . o I. 'si i u a d.- ii
".- NilchT1 cl'l:.; ald e..:-Ii -.}r, le t. rmis ,l..:rhs, ei :. r\^\n :fe:e rn.: ,?.nrri- ...p.
e'; ,ecr ed the 'l Ar. ilf S' t pai[. _r,.a iiir .'.e Il; nLi, ['in. Fi.-
il; ie iat oDrou ri .-ut ineur d .: tn. cieI h. L.R -'..-li il., ..Aii A :pir.i.
teil lie i- in r -:. a :-,ior' i:,ti rin .-1 app!a'.-e gre-r- d i ri,: Deaur'tiil-
aln ir'-.l;,' -ian iC ,JdninLT FOjutliiald i-,hn -ine ap-
T n, t- r-i.o, iii i, B a :. .u l.- ..ii 1 :- r ai ,,, a ;.:r I a rt! ,
Th, ,L, r,:,n ,1 i ,,,:,*i;,., ,: 3 rr,,.d ,-_ h e "fw i.r l %I-n


Ghirlaine Dr.- I1n i-- -
is-i Holel Rvnier-r


Marie-Florence Roy -
Miss Bacoulou


Th: C ntrt-, t : :i n IluL C.,: :i i i.viil
down Pr-;d,. -n trirj ar1mn-:.t d,-j.,
appearani, e: .:.f r.: lit,-l:antri i-: :.
hfyliL H.I rl H ii.iii tnlt h:. pu ,:rei ti.
.: i'-c i.-.n ..i' it:. i l, iir.ir. lt
we,:i- Th i ,na lini-- pace ._.a u .
necL'-e.'.ai ti e, iTJ n 1 is ri-r i-
pri t ii :[ I ,r.i.-. .-lui rt.: D ., .,:ne-c.-.r
loth dcadlii;, r.:. n Ci. :.- ir i i.- 1 :..-
0 1 .',l lo l repi .'. rt i i-irr tr i.r r.
teram iln- crie. i.'.i :.l inr Ca.1 CL-l--ni
bla t'oni J'!i ar ,' I r..

I n ,:l .. I e d l i, t.,: i ..,l i. i n iil
-r_ .:,| ir.- i h ri-- 1.ii- H ULr :)ni
i ,.: i r i ..:- [ri i., -I .'i .) p ['

rt li_- itf u ', -.,' i-:E .'t riiire- .
21,i ri ,iif ,r-,iin-J t'i- F-.i-- to ,S in, e
'anioj I q.l-~ .ni li i app. ar in illii

r ,e! pace 161


NageJa Hakinie -
Miss Ford


Ambassador And
Mrs Drew Return
km-reric-an Arltnib0 :.--i ald L.Lr:
G rilj.1 1ir ,% I.:runt.d r. P.nr-aJ.
Prillce t'r- l i, Si har ia, i .rr.rii r.u ab-
Iou thel Pa-ain iir r [lt-.m Ni,-.

ThiLT- s -r.: Lr.. I. ni...1arlh
ti rri U, ri.s A l r S I, cr tr n ..tr.
i. I hiu-,_i.r in i a-hii-ir i', r. ,:.ii .
in .'r -'rh rI-iuii citi.i-r-r-i ittJ .1 .er-l-
..- tlir- n



ARCHBISHOP
IN HOSPITAL
it iii.,ion x r F raiin .::. P C L. ,e t. P .: r '
1.i C i t-'i, Arclir ill.)p -it FPort-r u
F nr..: n-j )`..r. .r.nl .i' 51 r"i,1

,i'i t r ii r.- Fr r i.- t Aro.-i-rd : n-
,p .- ,iln' ; .,r l: 1 i F rJC
-SeCial ri9i a i i r ri-
Cirr .Je ll NI --Li-- r.an,- rl. nv-l i-

ri,-n uI' ij :rii-i.i r J F-u i r r \i 1. 1-,i .
'i-1p o F:iil--au--Finrc


1959-1960 BUDGET
i niiLi i-r -it Fin ri0e- NIr Xuii
_Trr.. : 1 }'a,: ,J 15, b :rore U',, .. .h ,

H p .:p:---1 t.-Jud,-ir f-.r rt i- r
: l' i 14 ii [r umnminr : to ll i: 1--


Sirial.r H,.iin.r E C.ip.-hiri in-
dirc-ar. rr Fr!-id :i, ha lie i nrni-ji
i.L pu[ .EE irIii-ri-'_- i n E lit-b.- I
'r- r--. iir, ld Si [.ti' S i-ri l .r.. -zn.
P lar:, i. ,a-irn.: ar.: C rr-i.
cmei Rel ri AiDe-niier erl ion- o4 r' .
Haint; ,an Goerrnmern t. bi l ". .
weaker-,-d Ecoi-im,-
Tre H.xster Senator pn.:.r tio c:n -
tiluing Il hI.- our Loi erht Lemn An.
,n in Cioti,. ri en rtaled ine telt C.:,n
lidenr that e ha i,:t -. rtid *wheel .
tur-nm irkn .-, rd i .erijallv Era0-
I H .une .. pu1 elt uI r -, f f
rat-Oil fute-
(CALSON qEES N icREAsE OF
H.AITS' ',UGAR QLUOrA
M1.,-, lii.e S-,-,r Frantiek taIl..

'.u F:i-rui R.i- ri-n c-:mirrurte- .)n Tte Public -orks p.Iot c n which
al rid'p hridont tih Co iEr, huIr Senator Cape-riar-r ,d ni ilas espe-
.-. L ,n i-r, Madea it I-ar- _ail. i nr-'e! ed ii v-. er-e- t i e co.M e ns.

Ct.ntr J.Lilus -rs and Sug.ir inter. ifcitnri P..rr.wraruPrirce a the only
. -it .r, thiat fin ,dl. H,,t Capital rn I thI e aretl iktihout jet
..-,id r-cei ,i prirr, cons.deit'-,on rtrdi-ir The enlargemrnent o the
,-,r- rn n man.'r oti US S' .ear qu-, Ci,: F:,rr o -mpleaion of the by-
" .aint r-,eior-t tr.. Senar .- .-ei n.- e ,iirner rtng plant or, the
in l ,irk.n, i -, l aL. e Eii i P, e. Darrn anrd recon-rntruction of
prr..r.I i, s ,,tn Prie ,d, irr ,. I. rni tn m irku roadl- and to better
Firiar .- ,mi i-_ r r-k.r 1, T.t-r -ur,-,rai,,- rn ati oincn' ei rts
F,,.,n [.n- L.u._ l I- ._ TI', r-. ,,, S'nator said h had
u i- n ib-ier i i-.n e----.-- ii -- phipit h Me t-aith
'u' 0 .iriin-.,- C.lnt-ri.:-'r ,iip 11-- ra ll. i-r r q ,h l t i d t, ri- atrd lirtitf
I *t r etii'in dnr -i le t a r i .i-- -n, and that
.i i ,' -A t .nr ir, d ani ur,1 "t,. h j -r.rT- ,rfl .- ag- a st itse in
..I ,'-, Au- -- n --r i ., st.: ,- .i i rimra i, ,_r.uin it, p- noted out
p n.r r, nir-i ',IL u ,,i, Continue-d on page 3j


'.-


r- ud. r r" r it

-Colorful Armv Parade
The Gen. erceron Marks Anniversary Of
The Gen. Merceron Decisive Battle Of
Interview Vertieres- (1803)
In-tr iw PTr_,,:-_r,.E.L E.oct.or Frirnc. .s DuTa-
AJarnied b., the aiJlati-.on c r.nL -,ed Ir a Ln iri:L- p.tA, i ieu d r, [ it .i 31 :,-,rrt, p;tini d t'. 'rJe of Staff
Amer.-3-in irmi zinre "TUlE" N n -knl:t..:r 'lJ. 1-, 'r,.j ih Er., Gr enririr Pwirire [itr--eror,. Ma-
reprduced eitrn- mor- derit a, the ,KI;, Hu,-ie Fun and tu d,-_ai5! p A, r Claudt' Piam.:,-ri ,,:onrnmander of
,:mrnniSiar U'.i- appreh-ensr-or, of a ual.:rih pu l.: .p.iruii.:, -ir h e'ar. -i. r : pri. .-.Jri.n l GuJar ,i r-id Caser-
nrtirJiioni diar r., we de!ie at-,d c ir- r Editor. Duunias..ii CLThajlib r i.:i) nr-r .. ,u.t-irn-- ,:..rn i ndnn officer
BriaiLr-r.Gner-i I Pierre Ml-rner-,, i- ',lt .:.- Star ,i[l h, Ainrii.i Fi.: i it ul r.:l, i n F:ri n- Br.u u,.'. ,J LunipeC&t-
.4[ Haiar. Mr Cr,-arit-er is also Sccretdt. Gf-ntr-l, 1i I uf [r.' A n :. ti. r ,in rUhiii ,... Hii.r,'- Arnm d Forces
Vi H-u ian ji:ijrri -_ter i-C- nrs -uin wa-s t -i'lArii o;lu.:liiio n L,,n r uh- ,:,ii p riV-le er-iL re tr-, CIarn-ip de
I)e:t and in aldl r.ndepenaence, or.- Euch n .m a porant qu.':.on '.i : T,-'i,,-re
Our Editor ias anmiably reci-i'.d ,\eir':i';, at 111 3.1 A r.., G-r. rai Tit- Mlan ,r-, piJ ade ,-ne of the
M-rerupron, i. a.red re, Colonel Paul Larin-Tue meri:nt-rr of: -II s:ian .'nd ar rr-.ir: i.n re birth of the new
Ene dajaJ'-e -itl: plen as foUr.. -rmy ,'L3 t-, hi-hihht of Army
I-Question--]ie neral. rve read in Time MaX=rrn-' of Not,.ent-r 9 it,; .- i- no. h-id on the anni-
Iue. i-_r. articie- ennuied L"H- TI Tre Mflnn.ric- Hae. C--om,-r B ti: .n .er' ir. oI f rb. .: 1-t h 1l03 decis-
wniln certaiLn rather i;urpns;ui reclatiru ..-r Tiade re.Jle L,0 h-_ ir biriie fruh t. t:,he t I-hatia.ns
Armed Farct-. of Haiti and to Lthe Amerrn:.ea Na.al 1'.,i~,on i- il p.i.-ole aqgu-iri mei fren.i-: s-t Vernreres in
ito Ibrain somr ec-cplanauouns' i-,:nth H.ar
Answer-CertairL:..- We are disposed to respond to il q-uai. u:.rn- rat:r,. I Dritne trii- Pardc Pre-ident Du-
to the mntrlir domain for the purpose ie of erdinterung pubic opiri.:. i aijer defended _ee.erl tdines fl3or
(Continued on page II; iCentinued on page 15)




. r. -- ,- .-
,r.
V i /


"HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY,. NOV. 22nd,


Excerpts From Rockefell


CALLS FOR A
Following are excerpts from Gov- of you know. I was Coordinator of
ernor Rockefeller's address before Inter-American Affairs and then
the National Foreign Trade Council, Assistant Secretary of State for La-
at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in Neri tin America for a period from 1940
York Nov. 18. through the end of World War II.
Let us consider one promising Today we all see with deep con-
program of economic regionalism corn how anti-American upheavals
which the United States well might in Cuba, in Panama and in other
sponsor. Here in the Western Hem. parts of Latin America are under-
isphere we can effectively promote mining Western Hemisphere unity.
the kind of regionalism that we W'e are even more concerned by
want. I invite your attention to our the fact that the forces behind these
opportunities for developing region- outbreaks interfere with the most
alism in this area because I know important aspiration of the hemis-
it well. phere, namely the provision of a


Latin America has been a major
concern of my public and private
life for over twenty years. As some


fuller, better, richer life for the
peoples of all the Americas.
Neither these nations, nor we, can
be individually self-sufficient. Be-


PAN AMERICAN EC
cause of their low standard of liv-
ing. the peoples in some Latin-Ame-
rican nations are subject to exploi-
tation by elements with in and with-
out who would take political advan-
tage of their economic and social
aspirations.

By strengthening our ties -poli-
tical, economic and social- with
the other American republics, we
can go a long way to help alleviate
the unrest, the trouble and the un-
happiness in Latin America. It is
good news that President Eisenhow-
er just appointed a six-man advisory
group to assist Secretary of State
Herter in the strengthening of rela-
tions between the United States and


SUN OFFERS REWARD FOR MISSING CUBAN.


N.B.C. in New York reported this week that it uas strongly rumored in Havana that the missing Cuban Army
ehief Commandante Camillo Cienfuegos was in Haiti. The popular original member of Fidel Castro's 26th of
July group that landed in Oriente from Me\;co has been missing and presumed dead since last month. There
is no reasonablje indication of Cienfuegos' presence on this island, but if any person possesses information
that might lead to the finding of the Cuban, Haiti Sun will pay a sizeable cash regard if it is give confid-
entially. The above photo was taken of Cienfiuegos the night after he took over Camp Liberiad -in Havana.


"R EFRIQERATOR STOVE WATER-HATER

,-AMO.TRATIONT A,--TROPI CALGAS -CO., ICu AVE .AU
I 0R TROPIQAS DgALUR 1N- THE PROVINCE. Phone. 3883.


her's L.A.Address

ONO MIC UNION .
our neighbors in the hemisphere, the levels of per capital income iM..
Eocnomic Unity Urged the north of the hemisphere .and
There is a concrete step, a bold in the south.
action that I think we can take to In' 1958, United States per.capitae
respond to the real needs of inter- output averaged $2,500 and Coana.
American solidarity. The time has dian per capital output $1,900o. .:i
come for the United States to move the per capital output of Latin A,t!S
toward a Western Hemisphere eco- rica as a whole averaged less t, -
nomic systefn as a basis for true $400. The highest per capital lau:,."
unity and for the realization of the in any Latin-American county i.':
hopes and aspirations of the hemis- far below the Canadian level1 ua;
here's many peoples. the lowest is not much higher. tha.
I believe we should work to ach- the level prevailing in the le
ieve a Western Hemisphere econ- developed parts of Asia and Afrlca.. ,
omic system which would bargain This painful fact leads me to &-'.-
as a unit with other parts of the gister two convictions:
world and which would establish 1. With the degree of'mutual'i'
within the hemisphere as a whole terdependence that' exists-in the he-3
a free flow of goods, capital and misphere, the economic lag in Lr 's
manpower. tin America which embraces more-,
Such a system could well be call- than half the population: of the e'I.
ed a Pan American .Economic Un- misphere is costly to the pres
ion. I can think of nothing that welfare and to the future growt..
would do more in the long run to of toe whole hemisphere.
promote human well-being, person- 2. In a world where "w4eCs'
al dignity and understanding in the emerging regional accords. i
henusphere. people that have far. less in s- i
I have no illusions about the dif- on than we have here in thedj.
ficulties of achieving such a grand sphere, we must catch up an"d6v
design, and elt us be fully consci- ahead by developing a hem S
ous of the conviction of many that wide economic unit that bringst
a move in this direction must come benefits of regionalism to- at..:lli
by gradual steps over a period of people of -the hemisphere. -.
time. We should be quite willifig Assistance Held Vital ,
to accept regional accords within We must do all that we can to
Latin America as interim stages help in raising the living.standa. t.,
toward an ultimate goal. of the Latin Americans through i
But to speed the attainment of dustrial development and 'trade. -I
the interim stages and to assure Given half a chance, they will con-
the attainment of the ultimate goal. sistently expand their own product'...
let us even -now set our sights high ive genius, their devotion -to free ':
on the final, fruitful Pan American institutions, their great role in the':
Economic Union. The profound in- future of mankind. i
terdependence of Canada, the Unit- .


ed States and Latin America seems
to me to make a hemisphere econ-
omic system both logical and ev-
entually inevitable.
More than one-hall of total West-
ern Hemisphere trade is. bet-
ween hemisphere countries and
the United States is the hub from
which most of interhemisphere
trade radiates north and south. He-
misphere investment also radiates
north and south out of the United
States: the United States supplies
about 16 per cent of gross capital
investment in Canada and 10 per
cent in Latin America. In. both
cases, United States capital makes
a genuinely significant contribution
to growth.
hIvestniens Are Cited
Furthermore, t h e United States
gets 55 per cent of its imports from
the hemisphere and sells over 40
per cent of its exports there. Ame-
rican private investors have staked
$25,000,000,000 in the hemisphere
as-against less than $16,000,000,000
in all the rest of the world. I need
not elaborate further to this audi-
ence on the interdependence of the
hemisphere.
But despite this acute interde-
pendence, there is a tremendous dis-
crepancy in the hemisphere. I
speak of the great discrepancy in


We must do all we can, to prom-
ote political stability and. economic.
and social progress in the hemisphl-:
ere. But I am also keenly-awin'.
of the fact that by helping others'.
we can help ourselves. Spec,'Ai
I mean that the more we can.ieliP
to industrialize Latin Anierica.:'b:
more our Western Hemisphere d
will grow. '
'From 1950 to 1957, the. oe
tin Americae-increase in mn
during production was 37,-"p
At the-very same time, I.Lati
ica's to talI manufactlit
increased 55 per cent. -The-
clear that good mahufac
good customers. Thus,, ny!
al for a Pan Americant:E:
Union opens up -new av.,
prosperity and rowt4, n
the rest of the hemispherejA'
to the United States. .-
If we can help Latin,'
grow -and with joint Me."
statesmanship I am sure e'!
the Western Hemisphere caim
resent more than half thie'
ive powers of mankind. A-PaFt
erican Economic Union -can"b.
powerful factor in giVi"ng .tWi
ern Hemisphere this strengtb...'
the Western Hemisphere re
ty forces for world peace and
dom. '


December 14




Grand Opening)




Oloffson Show
I:...;_

... -s i


PAGE 2


. .
.'* '. -. :


I







' SUNDAY, NOV. 22nd, 1959


.Capehart Backs Loans For Haiti


also that his position .i thnt Ai-
ithe United Sitaless cannot permit
any' neighbor country to de.rerinrari.
Wednesday morrnig tr.e Ser3aor
got a helicopter v-ew -,i the pr.-
gress of work tn the Arntrbti. V\al%-
ey. Accompanied by fMir Harr-, Yoi-
Point Four cnief in Hait] he 'Aas
flown around the valley in te N3.
val Mission 'Copter

Following a special mi-.-:.n of
the Haitinan Senate called to honor
the Indiana Sen., Fr.day a rc:eprin
was held at liontada and luncne.:.n
wAth American businessmen in
Haiti at Le Perchbur. He Cas pre-
sented with two mahogan:, r-ifts by
the members of the Senate.
Greeting Senaror Capehart. An.
Ioine Marthold, president of the Hai-
ntan Senrate, said-
"The Republic of Haiti, ihos:e


dtkuin., lie in tihe hands of our %.,n-
iracie Criet oi State. Dr Fr-an.ois
u..&ier. z a iaer-iicriCt, sailing
* uura.-0usl. r-rard 11 Z.:)5 -
\\.- renur. :.ou also. ho"' we
are clos t.- :,ou .:, the nrait and
in -piari larid how v.e ".ouiId like
to be close to .our great country
in our struggle ior a better di-tri-
bution of the w adih in the Amen-
tan hrriiiphere '

Senator Capehart r'old me Hai-
tians he was visiting wilt Lhem in
a de're to e:-.changre deas. ortim-.
Eice and ceran e to the knuturil ad-
tantage if both coiunrnes.

, 'We v ant I,) Oiscu.s with you
men, as I ha-.e diicussed .ith ;.our
Teat President. the problems that
face uis, and learn i'hat the road
blocks are that tught present the


(Continued from page 1)


Senator Homer E. Capehart with President Duvaller at the National Palace
e w of commerce between us." derakings Rain wil be self-sus- Senator Capehar
e ma rea neded un attineg All that is apparent to the spen' bve hours
SMany of the greatly needed un- 1d_ bou le. .


I m
well
CRUISE OF Haiti
SS. FRANCA C ce.
Th' ga.Nest crowd for months In,
vaded our shr rs last e-ik when
the Franca C ol the Allartic Line .
came asnopre rr with more ',tar.
three hundreds pas$enger.s ncui.d-
tng new srnmer, 'ano othe-r pruromnerit
American personnali ies.
The Franica C kas uiauguratng
its brst cruise in the Cariboean
sea, in making a one port Cruise
to Port-au-Prince The Haitian FoLk-
lore troupe has been invited to
make the trip fromn Miami to Port-
e ~Sti-Prince to entertain the passenoc-
ers.
Special parties were given in hon.
ior of the visitors at the El Rancho.
Beau Rivage and the Casino, Amonng
the.modt impret-id b3 the Ha.1an
"- ~hospitality wre yo -ung attnorne. at
.i+ ,'Law J. Leonard Diamr d and1 h s
beautiful wife Ronnie. a .stitdent of
the Trrisirtritva (A hilam n its-c On0
marinen in education, ho caught Pre
e'..-bodv' e:,.s :~and Cot s ,iem Oa,
U.S. Charge d'Affaire_ Philip Williams and EHaitian enate Pre-.sident pzzled asin, she 'an an arusit;
Antoine Marlhold ,with the Indiana Senator at Hotel Montana reception. et i-i sbtan ColJ be a srrtd Li
for HoUlJ.wood piarmist-actor OCscar
Leiant t!3 r.,us-mbiartnce ezt trap-


HOTEL


MONITANA
PETION-VILLE





Tfheng Tw paN e W ws

0 oo 6 ti/e Oaw1 1eenti/ e C4,

the Valey Canap Veot anL the


AV46 Sele`fl 4Mes t-m PORTN.PRiMCvc
OwD5&iElAME MnMACEMET AS HoTfE CHOUCo6M'


panic' the President os Centirmnix
incorpf)at'-d Ide.sgnter and Matnu-
facturers of pr-ecjnon el ctr-rue
,:quipmenti .and i.Irs Sgnnjrid P
Ro-sen o:f Mbim

Mrs Rornie- Dam.mono tcJd audi.-
nece in raprurr.s in d'neirg Lbe
nieflringue at the Casino.


HAITI TO BUY
NEW ZEALAND


MEAT

Mr. J A MANilm. the Ov.erseas
R-presentate ,oi the New Zealand
ilear Producer, Board. .sited Hai-
ri r _'ntl' As a result ilis country
ei EXpmiecEd to imprrt meat from
Netv Zeajand. one of toe greatest
meat exprning countries in the
world
ir is Mr. Malcolm s dury to visit
the areas .nc-re New Zealand -trad-
es and heree there are potential
markets .,:* that the New Zealand
Meat Pruducer- Board may have
ari overall picture o tne market
ituation
Tne Meat Board itself is not a
riding bod. The buying and sell-
ing of New Zealand meat is left
in the hands of meat Leporters.
of thi-Ib there are a number who
hate dealings in many parts of the
world.
He was accompanied on his visit
by the NEw Zealand Government
Trade Commissioner i the Caribb-
ean, Mr. E. J. Sutch who is head-
quartered in Trinidad.


t and his party
in Port-au-Prmince
i h, r


e atp nee K- Lt grea % e I ng r aracas
an people is proper a.;ztan. the nextfutiur days.


hand to welcome -Senator Capeharl to Porl: Lady Douglas Hamilton
sident of Friends of Haiti in .e U I.8 and Haiti's Washington Lawyer
ar Chapman former Mlinisler ol Interior under Pres. Harry Truinan.
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Reservations for Night Club Recommended


"HAITI SUN"


PAGE 3


i


J." -








. HAIT SUN"


rAG 4


General Merceron Defines Army's


INTERVIEW WITH THE GENERAL PIERRE MERCERON:
OUR ARMY CHIEF OF STAFF CONTRADICTS "TIME"
HE DEFINES THE AFFINITIES BETWEEN THE ARMY AND THE
/ MISSION AID MUST REST UPON RECIPRICAL
FRIENDSHIP AND DIGNITY


2-Question-According to the ar-
ticle in? question, Colonel Robert D.
THemI .Jr Fhief of the Mission.


nization of tactic units at Port-au-
Prince and in the Provinces. These
initiatives brought their fruit at the


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upon his arrival here in January time of the recent invasion of our
of -this year, fund the Armed For- territory which was settled by the
ces of Haiti in a lamentable state; crushing of the foreign invaders,
this declaration is found confirmed without loss of life for our troops.
in another. article appearing in the As you know, the Armed Forces
number bof the newspaper "Haiti of Haiti, has two fundamental miss-
Sun" of November 8, 1959 where ions: interior security (Police), ex-
it says that: ."When the American terior security (Army). These two
Mission really began work last Apr- distinct corps (Army and Police)
il, it found an Army in a state of have been fused into one. It is the
complete unpreparedness. What" do model handed down by the U.S.
you think of it?, Marine Corps. We have no possibil-
ity in the immediate future to sep-
Answer-It would te a grosj err- arate the Police from the Army,
or tp consider here the American as it should be, normally. We there-
standard as a basis of comparison fore had to constitute, in the cadre
or criterium of appreciation. First of our present structure and accord-
of all, it is advisable to note that ing to our limited, means, these
before the arrival here of the Ame- tactic units which are like the
ridan Naval Mission, the Armed embryo of our future National Ar-
Forces of Haiti, inspire of the errors my. /
.and the blundersq committed, hd 3-Question-In the article of the
attained, under the JHaitian comrn- "Time" as well as that of the
mnand, a status distinctly superior "Haiti Sun", mention was made of
-tod the organization which Lwas left' heteroclitic arFms, of out-moded mo-
by the Marines on their departure deals of guns, of ammunitions in
, from the country, particularly from bad condition, what about this, eff-
the view point of technical prepara- ectively?
tion of the cadres, For years, many Answer.-The underlying questions
UHaiiafi officers, graduates of our is this: when a country does not
MiIaiy Academy, have benefitted hAve manufacturing oh arms afbd
frpm scholarships to study 'abroad, munitions, it is' necessarily tribut-
in the United'States, as well .As in ary of the foreigner. When it is
4tin. Amerlcah or ih Europe. Sev- small and poor, it buys there where
eral among them weae outstanding, it .finds the best prices. We are the
and W' Aere the -laurdates of. their first if hot the only pdrty interested
"clses. They know, besides, better in standarlditlhg outl aritharent and
th~A.-Anybody, the pfoblertis of their dur eqi'ipment but it" not always
Organization and of their couttrd. easy to obtain the tiecessary aid,
-In this :domain -W s -in others, the- nor even desirable 'facilities.
chfiiical transpdithiions are- to be Therefore vwb have arms and aA-
,dissuaded from. It is true that, munitions of -American and Europ-
sinice the fall of Magloire, the vi- ean manufacture: that is the truth
eis.itu'des"of politics have caused but from ,there on, "the facts are
us to lose competent technicians mistapres e n t ed and caricatured.
.l;Iut this 'is another story. Thus. everyone,'knows in HAiti that
From the time of our- arrival at our'soldiel-s do. nodt use Rrlg gutis.
the hded of the Arrpy we have had Only certain agents of the 'Rural
..wo essential initiatives: the creat- Police still hold Ja few of these.
io' dt the 3-rd Sectibn 'f the Grand But' the article In "Haiti Sun"
general Headquarters (Plahs, Oper- declarrpshat it was thanks to these
atidns arid Traini g) and the orgh- Krag guns that- the invasion was


(Continued from page 1)
crushed Taken aside fro the infr- of Staff and s collaborators, the


lesque aspect of the affair, what
should be retained is that this in-
formation, false in its presentation,
- either due to a poor comprehen-
- sion on the part of the authors of the
two articles in question, or because
they are impelled by a-taste for
the sensational or by a spirit of
disparagement ,or finaHy for any
other reason can cause us much
harm because it can easily be uti-
lized for any kind of purpose by
no hatter what eventual enemy of
the country.
4-Question-Is the Chief of the
Mission authorized to discuss such
questions' with journalists?
Answer-Absolutely not. They.are
military questions of a secret nat-
ure. The agreement relative to the
American Naval IVgsidn IN titi
stipulates that in matters tIf1s
kind, the mefiiers of thd said Mis-
sion are equally bound to secrecy.
5-Question-What is the purpose
of the American Naval Mission in
Haiti?'
Answer-The object of this bMiss-
ion such as it is defined in the
above mentioned Accord is to col-
laborate with Us in view of increas-
ing 'the efficience of 'the different
Services of the Army and of the
Coast-Guard of Haiti. There already
was an independent Mission for A-
viation. I
6-Question-What is the status of
the Members of the Naval Mission
with regard to the Armed Forces of
Haiti? /*
Answer-As' I was telling you, the
Mission has the duty of collaborat-
ing with us. In this collaboration,
the power of decision is ours by
right and by fact. The Mission has
twoL types of members: members
accredited,, at the expense of the
Haitian Government, and non-accre-
dited members at the expense of
ihe American Government. The,
non-accredited are utilized' exclusi-
vely, except by an understanding
to the contrary, for the needs of
internal administration of the Mis-
sion and have nothing to do with
the service of the Officers of the
Armed Forces of Haiti. The rhemb-
ers accredited, the maximum num-
ber of which has been fixed at 30,
have the status of Codinsellors. The
Mission is centralized At IPort-au-
Prince. The Counsellors are affect-
ed to certain Organizations of the
Armed Forces of Haiti. As their titib
indicates, they give advice and this
counsel is not "obligatory"; they
make suggestions and recommenda-
tions that the Army Staff may ap-
preciate for their just value. But
they have no authority to decide
anything whatsoever. The command
is exclusively under the Army Chief


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Officers of the Armed Forces of
Haiti, under the high directives of
His Excellency the President of the
Republic.
7u-Question-The article of 'Time'
is illustrated with a photo of' Col-
onel Heini with Haitian soldiers;
is -the training of the troops done
under his personal direction and
that of his American collaborators?
Answer-Absolutely not- Contrary
to what was advanced, by the "Ti-
mes" and !"Haiti Sun", the train-
ing of the'troops is not done under
the direction of the Mission for it
does not dispose of a commandment.
This training is done under dirbet.
orders, of Haitian officers, with the
help of the American Military ad-
visors. The photo in question -may
have been taken as a scheme to
illustrate the thesis to the contraryy
or to create ambiguity but cold
'facts are hard-headed. You will note
that the photo' shows only a part'
of the troops and not the soldiers
in corplete formation. The Hpitian
Officer who is commanding these
soldiers and who does not appear in
the photo normally -is to be found
in the center of the .formation. It


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Position

amounts to a sort of trick phdto.
8-Question-The title bf the'art- '
icle of "Time" -- "The 'Ma
Are Back in Haiti" did not fal& t :
shock the Haitian public dpin.al."
what can you tell us on his sub-s'1
ject? .
Answer-There is an essential. """ .:
tinction to be. made: The troops t:';,'
the U.S. Marine Corps 'tre ntii.i
Haiti. We have an Ameriqan Npq ,
Mission composed of members .'o
the U.S. Marine Corps and ota"tl"!
American Marihe. I have ihdicite-'
to you the purpose and the -staz
of this Mission. It has all the'teic.
nical qualifications to 'help ,us. to.
increase the efficiency of our 'serv
ices in remaining strictly in the
cadre of its attributiobs. The "'Tae'
may proclaim loudly that the Max'.
ines have returned to Haiti, we Oall1
know that it ir-not and can ever'
be under the -same conditions as int
the past. '-'
9-Question--Do you think the Ar.-
med Forces of Haiti will obta :i
material aid from the United St es?
Answer-Material aid is highly"
desirable. We wish to obtain' it.i
mutual respect, reciprodal' friad-
ship and dignity. '


!


*1,
-. -.
- '1


' *. :.. V








SUNDAY, NOV. 22nd, 1959 "HAITI sUN"


HAITI SUN
T- HE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
F Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning -
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
jleratt-!Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
".MBER OF THE INTER.AMERICAN- PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1950 HAITI AS CLOSE TO MOON
SAS REST OF THE WORLD
Dear Editor'
TOURIST VOODOO FOR THE BIRDS After rune o clock at night we
Sight as well hie in the moon
SFew countries in the world have a muath to offer 'the visit- and watch the luniks and sputniks
'or as Haiti. There are so many wonderful tourist attractions zmmin, by. for all the communica.
M iepr to this exceptionaJl iRepublic. -The vaunted Blarney ton a. have -,th the outside
-Stondf Trdithd has nothing on the CftadeiAe Henri Ohris- world.ne tr Cable offices close
Stdihe.. down tignrtiv tor the night as does
-We often do not sufficiently exploit our own resources. the international telephone s stem
I What is worse, however, is that too many visitors are being .. and thb is a Capital city. It is
al wed tob.ke away wrong impressions of our country. enough to make one's civic pride
S ke curdle.
single instance 'will illusltralte our contention. For Hai- or sil is the attitude of the
,'n.ans and visitors the Troupe Folklorique Nationale offer, Internaional telephone Companv
twice weeldy, a magnificent presentation of Haitian dances. They have obviously made their
rilingn, authentic, varied, 'the dances stem from a history pot of gold and are nolonger inter-.
folklore 't a-Uleied any w'here anid thy are ested in making profits or modern-
,fm -a folklore unpwarniteled anywhere and they are lp edr s
idong an already andquaed serve.
Jiaesented-with a race combination Of spontaneity and of art, Daily the, lose dozens of calls be-
sby. .Haiti'aj n perfortaers, in whose blond the fire of the dance cause they are out of commnunics
tun wild. tons with Porr-au-Prince two hund.
Buttturits are told by certain travelbrochures that the red yards aay and Petiondlie
'Biatre de edre w h itsef is a beautiful conception some further three miles. Whei
nimother cilis Papa [towm liamr to
o offers onTy a' -watered-down version cof Voodoo. In the hills ,ask hIm for more. spending money.
on iSaturday 'nights, or in the "tonnelles", the posters 'hint or 1t. break eien more tragic rnes
you can see the real thing... -he mtist 'ait indethnetely for that
.o, led, by unscrupulous guides they are taken into the mp t e, 'to fiq P d
underworld. to witness a tourist voodoo -put on, not seldom, ow building that rise- like a toad-
iby charlatans. A goaJt of chicken boughtht a little earlier with still ou ot the. Harr, S Tnruman
dnie ~Ul.bes money, is stain, the blood drunk, to the dis- Bld lavn. '-hy d.)ni tey purch-
"*gu.st of- mtoat visitors, arid a dance inspired not 'by a loa ase a motorcycle or small car and
""_ t'" is "ptg o.n". -thereby natie a mbide messenger
tby alcoholic spirjta is "pult on". ody
that can nlorrn somebody that r.-
The tourist iaetirns to 'his hcmedlnd muttering dark things erseas is calling Pleas use your
.lonltihe P1ak Repirflic. 'Is it god-publicity 'for our cournt- co'amns to help the community
Sri'S .eT a 'U.S. d, tor Who spent a weekend here, tells all step forward one smple calculated
a -iients- the year round. "Yes, I spent a part of my 'ur
j-vaalbia. in 'Haiti, but, my God, what'revolting things they Crlr C MINDED
till 'odbw- .i there...?"
S CaO-Hainen. November 11th. 1S59.
HAITIAN FISH COMPANY BRINGS ADVANTAGES M'r. Bernard Diedench
After'a century of importing biliions of pounds of smelly
-t ,2rom. abroad a group of enterprising Haitians are giv- Edaor, Hait Sun
i" *ig"fisg h lfrom Haiti's coastal waiters a fair chance to romp- Port-au-Prnnce.
'te: r a place on the dining 'table. Dear Bernard,
Glad to hate tercn our San. more
lTt is wortt whie examinig 'a few of the advantages a and more sg a 1 the sky.
company. sui'h as the "Fhruts de Mers" operated by .Guy Congraruations.
(A and Jean Olerie 'and. Pierre 'Hudicoruzt bring to a country [t i, quire imp.,s--Tbie for 6aere,
r like RHaiti.. bods cre to remember ho,'. manm
i times Haitn-Sun defended the rour-
Witch ttwo lfisWing boats, more 'than a dozen fish buying- -t coranerta of the Normh and rried
Stations along the Coast, two NveH-equipped fish-mon'ger to promote tias do den nune"
f eere we Lyceans and ether stud.
h ops ideally located and a chain Of stores in popular Port- euts are rejoicing about the 're-
Sat-Prmte 'markets it is only a matter of time beforee they surrectiorn" of yoyr paper, the3 us.
,yo the imported fish. ed to improve their english o.% rai.
-d ig it
There is no question but that the Oatholic Churnh can now
flake the aJbstinence from meat on 'Friday obligatory.
A'-AtiAgng 'with fish come a regular supply of oysters, rock- SincereJl. Yours
obster, sea-turtle ad shrimp whidh permit 'tourist hotels
provide a mufth more elaborate .menue for their North Ern F ErIENNE
te r guests.

Besides setting the stagnant economy of many isolated
'.coasmtal areas in -motion again the company is 'lifting the Li
Iitiha, atisM spirit and setting an example to be followed
_. by Haitians in countless other fields.

-5if





SSwim, S
An




HAVE


PAGE 5


COFFIN AT THE PALACE?
Dear Mr Diedench,
I am very happy to see your
newspaper reappear and I would be
obliged if you would clear up the
n3'stery of the Coffin in the palace
basement as menoon in Tune ma-
gazne
How come. Peons daughter
could be in the Palace basement
when the entire place was levelled
by an explosion in 1911.
I honestly think this is bologne.
or there is something fishy about
those "rests". When the old pal-


ace blew up not a bone of the then
President Leconte was recovered.
Whats gomg'on. Please invesnge
the matter for us.
IS) N. J. D.
Ed. Note-The tomb that was called
a coffin when it was recently mov-
ed out of the Palace basement pro-
ved to be neither It is a simple
sarcophagus a marble coffin comai- .
on in ancient Greece. Although it
bore the inscription, name birth and
death date of President Alexander -
Petion's daughter it Is questionable
whether or not her remains are
contained in it.
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i PAGE






At the
small artist
age of Ca
all night a
from an a
The gall
ort, diminu
,.: Novemb
work which
something
Lazard's
est demea
since his
were "disc
S and since
1P Haiti's mo
and illustr
S responsible
d"- ining-roomn
: Montana.
-,A painter





.
FOR

















YOU







S 15- j
-I






N


SUNDAY, NOV. ,2nd


"HAITI SUN'


,azard Preparing


Gallery "Brochette", the
t. colony behind the Vill-
Lrrefour the light is on
nd the only sounds come
artist at work.
ery's backbone of supp-
utive 31 year old Luckner
quietly working towards
'er 28th showing of his
ch includes he promises
new in his style.
bashful, smile and mod-
nour have changed little
powerful artistic talents
covered" not so long ago,
he 'has become one of
st sought-after muralists
ators. He is the painter
for the murals in the
i of the -Ibo Lele and

r of extraordinary imagi-


nation, strongly subjective in ex-
pression and unlike many other
Haitian artists economical in his
use of colour. Lazard surpasses in
his delicate water colours, but he
-also likes the freedom of painting
on large surface which the murals
offers. Before the lbo Lele murals
he did- another for Cabane Chou-
coune depicting affranchis in the
colonial period. Some of his mur-
al work may be seem at El Rancho,
Thorland's and at the airport.
Luckner Lazard was the second
of a group of three children whose
father deserted them early, leav-
ing his-wife in poverty. From this
unhappy childhood the boy sought
escape in a dream world of sketch-
es and crayon drawings. At school
at the Lycee Louverture and the
College de Province he pored ear-


INSURANCE

SEE



tony Chenet



& Sons


30 YEARS


OF EXPERIENCE


JR -PROTECTION

"IS

OUR PROFESSION

Ave Marie-Jeanne Cite Dumarsais Estime
-- Phone 2603


Nov. 28 Showzn


Luckner Lazard at

nestly Over reproductions of the
works of the great masters. Formal
training came in 1945 after his
work was seen by Dewitt Peters,
director of the Centre d'Art. With


Lucien Price and other artists,
American and Haitian. Peters gave
the different youngster encourage-
ment and coaching, and watched
his talent rapidly develop.
Soon Lazard began giving a ser-
ies- of successful exhibitions dist-
inguishing himself particularly with
his rather introspective water col-
ours, hauting reflections of his ima-
ginings, or sensitive vignettes of
Haitian life. "I use /quiet sober
colours",-he says, "it is, I think,
more compatible with my person-
ality. For murals however. I use
livelier colours and vary tints to
give added expression to the per-
sonages I depict."

In 1949, for the bicentennial Ex-
position in Port au Prince he paint-
ed the decorative panel of the pav-
ilion of Agriculture -now Pigalle-
and later that year with a school-
mate aged 18, tield a successful]
two-man exhibition at the Centre
d'Art. Since then his work has been
widely exhibited overseas, notably
at the biannual exhibition at San
Paolo in 1952.


self gained. Back in 1954 he :di:w
tribute to the country's-edut
programme by p-reparing" iCla
tons at the Apdio Visual dente. .
UNESCO headquarters in Haii-'
Having visited Mexic, -e-eapd
miraculously with only head a:ajtak
w hen he piled up his little e
earlier this year Lazard is nowr.".eo.
tent to live across from the--
chette Gallery and work toe
C it into a "Left Bank" i
which will help open. new.-
.-u.y' i Pafor Haiti's artists, -

So of oePANAMA INE&.-

NEWS ..N
The SS "ANCON" of the
Steamship Line arrived fro'ti
his Brochette Gallery. York at 7:00 A.M.,. yesterday ...
a total of 90 passengers ofiw6p
In 1951 "une aimable dame etran- the following ,16 di'emb arkead.
gere" who prefers to remain anon- Port au Prince:
ymous gave him a scholarship to
study in Paris. There for -nineteen Mrs Marie Alisca; Mir. iym
months he attended courses at the B. Borges; Mrs Lisella Clejstw
School of Modern Arts. In April Rev. Albert Loulie; -Hon,.&
1952 with three other young Hal- Gerald A. Drew; Miss M h VaryyF
tians, Pinchinat, Dorcely, and Tur- land; Miss Ray Glantz; Mr s A
nier, he held an exhibition at the Gustave;. Mr & 1:s Henry M
Cite Universitaire which attracted Mr Duff Merrick; Mrs E
highly favorable comment. During O'Connor; Mb s Thereje lr
vacation he toured Spain to visit Louis; Mrs Jean M. Verl,"4
-the Museums, and Italy, studying C. A. Voegeli. -
works of acts in Rome, Florence, -.-
Venice and Pompei. He returned '
home via United States where he
visited art galleries in New York, .::- :
Balti-more and Washington. :


On, his return he managed the
Foyer des Arts Plastics a group
of Artist that set themselves apart
froth the Centre d'Art. He likes to
keep very busy even at commer-
cial painting because through he
is content with little, "il faut .man-
ger", and besides he is married to
Rolande D2nis who is also, he shyly
confides, "d e e p l y interested in
painting".

Lazaid is always .-ready to help
other young artists whom he would
like to see benefit from the expe-
rience and instruction he has him-


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the sun or just relax. And, no
wonder when you consider the
savings to be had through Free
port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they can
buy the same gifts, in iree-port
shops, at savings up to 601o of
U. S. prices. So, for the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
wonderful vacation in Haiti.
Perhaps the most famous free-
port shop in the world is La
Belle Creole. located in the
heart oE fascinating Port-au-
Prince, Haiti. Here one can
ind a veritable wonderland
full of the world's most de-
sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
ches, Cashmeres, Handmade
bags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
meras, Liquours and a seem-
ingly endless array of native
handicraft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
asider that one can buy the
world's most famous Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
guet-at discounts of 5Q0.% of
the U. S. advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
Belle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be well worth your time to
consider a trip to Raiti.

AI Noustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhaps another reason for
the surge in popularity of
free-port shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
I. leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
licy of cooperating with tra-
vel.agents in their various
promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tle of free champagne to any
visitor to Haiti who happens
to be celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niversary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts to make
the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
Sshop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
mous brand merchandise.
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
thrs at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
Vands of tourists this year will
Come home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
when they went away.


-I


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER
P. -0. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI





AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS


MINTON, WEDGWOOD. OMEGA, PATEK PHILIPPE
ROYAL CROWN' DARBY. JUVENIA TISSOT, 'BOREL
ROYAL COPENHAGEN, AUDEMAI PIGUET,
ROYAL WORCESTER, JAEGER LE COULTRE,
ROYAL. DOULTON, ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO,
ROSENTHALE, SPODE, 5 ATLANTA, STUDIO,
AYNSLEE, COALPORTi VULCAIN.
GUSTAUBERG.


"4Z5


GEORGE JENSEN,
HANS HANSEN, GERO,
DRAGSTER, GENSE.



The Finest of FRANCE.
ITALY. AUSTRIA.

LAL1dUE, BACCARRATi
ORREFORS,
WEBB & CORBETT,
VAL SOLAMBERT,
STUART. LEERMAN.


VooDoo Inspired
JEWELRY




Natlve-Inshired
SPORT SHIRTS


KISLAV,
ENGLISH DOESKIN,
ITALIAN ANTELOPE.



PRINGLE, BALLANTYNE,
BERN HARD ALTMAN.
LUISA SPAGNOLU.


DANISH SILVER,
GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY
and BRAZILAN GEMS.


HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS


'g SCULPTURES


U/


Factory Outlet
MAHOGANY
- The Best.


Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS

World Famous RUGS & DRAPERY
Haitian RUM BARBANCOURT ___

Have us send gifts to your friends in the U.
without affecting your quota.- See us for more in


. . : : .'. :"'" ,.:. ....:,,.


GUERLAIN, LANV]
CARON, CHANEL,
RAPHAEL, PATOlI
BALMAIN, WOITL
REVILLON, VIGNI
CARVEN, LE GALL
FABERGE OF PA!
JEAN D'ALBERT,
JACQUES GRIFFE
FATH, PIGUET.
CORDAY.

MINOX, CANNON



ROYAL COPENHE
ROYAL DOULTO1
HUMMEL.


J..



k. .


HARVErS BRISTOL
CREAM, All FRENCH. .
DANISH and .
SPANISH LIQUIBU. '

**.


RAFFIA BAGS
& SHOES




HAITIAN MUSIC
Collector's Items










S. A. I
formation.







L. .


-1~ uuvr eezj&e6 oIf


SUNDAY, NOV. 22nd, 1959


"HAITI SUN"


PAGE 7.


.1


a








"HAIm SUN"


SUNDAY, NOV. 22nd, 1959.-


The Living Fences Of Haiti: Farming


by
The plateau of Fond-des-Negres, in the southern peninsula of the
Republic of Haiti, is a fertile, well-watered region which produces
coffee, sisal, and vetiver root for the world market, and millet, maize,
rice, and root crops for subsistence and for the internal exchange
system. The plateau lies at approximately 300 meters and has an area of
approximately five and one-half thousand hectares.


Most of the land in the plateau
is held in small plots, such that
all production, whether for export
or for' local consumption, is carried
out on peasant holdings. The peas-
antry traditionally devotes some
part of its land to the cultivation
of coffee for export. Since law for-
bids the cutting of coffee trees, and
since world market prices is rec-
ent years have not encouraged the
expansion of coffee land, variations
in the amount produced have been
conditioned mainly by changes in
climate, hurricane 'damage, and the
apparently reduced labor invest-
ment cultivators have been willing
to make in their coffee lands.
Though it is not possible to obtain
statistical confirmation, it seems
certain that the production of crops
for subsistence and for internal ex-
change, has risen during the past
ten years. Sisal production, which
expanded sharply in the region ar-
ound the start of this decade, is
now declining, in accord with the
decline in world market prices. It
seems likely that the Fond-des-Ne-
gres region is more oriented to the
production of subsistence -today
than it was a decade or two. ago.
. The settlement pattern of the re-
gion is one of scattered homesteads,


but with the. houses located mostly
on the crests of rolling land and on
hilltops. The peasant house lies on
a small plot of land usually surr-
ounded by living fences if houses
are adjoining each other ,they will
be separated by such fences unless
they are part of the same family
complex. There will usually be
some cultivation within the "lakou"
but it is minor and specialized. The
cultivation of basic crops in large
quantities is conducted on fields
which lie some variable distance
from the houses This division into
house plot and held in Haiti app-
ears to be paralleled in other Car-
ibbean' sub-regions. The lakou of
Haiti corresponds to the "yard" of
the Jamaican peasant, and to the'
"batey" of the Puerto Ricap peas-
ant. In those instances as in Haiti,
the house plot serves principally
for the growing of a few minor
vegetables, which are semi-decor-
ative, such as eggplant, hot pepper,
and tomato; for items which may
be commercial in use, but are
grown near the' house in ,very small
quantities, such as cotton or sisal
or vetiver;. and for trees which
provide fruit, shade, or craft mater-
ials, such as avocadoes, guavas,
coconut palms and lataniers. Some-


Professor SIDNEY W. MINT
times crops which are likely to be
stolen if not guarded may be plant-
ed near the house plantains and
bananas are examples. But in any
case, the cultivation near the house,
within the lakou, is mixed in its
nature and in its objectives.

In the Fond-des-Negres region,
those plants used to form hedges
around the lakou, to form paths to
the door of the house, and to mark
boundaries b e t w e e n agricultural
holdings, are few in number. Their
use is plainly traditional in charact-
er, and they are chosen for plant-
ing according to particular traits.
As will be noted, it is particularly
important that some of these plants
serve a soil retention and conserva-
tion purpose, and that this is fully
known to the peasantry, What is
striking is that such plants are not
used more for frankly conservation-
al purposes.

One of the commonest plants for
forming a Living fence is the "pen-
gdin" (Bromelia pinguin) This spi-
ny plant grows in thick clumps to
a height of perhaps two feet.
Though it is a short plant, it is
useful for bordering houses which
open on major paths, since it will
keep out all passing animals. Neith-
er human beings nor animals can
easily cross ,through pinguoin -
beasts will turn away from it. How-
ever, this plant harbors snakes,
mongoose, rats and other small an-
imals, and most people in the re-
gion do not prefer it as a hedge
when it will be close to the house.
Pingnoin holds earth well, and is
often planted .where' considerable
passage -of men and beasts has
packed the, paths down below the
surface of the land adjoining.

Another popular plant for creating
a living fence is the "kandelab"
(Opuntia ficus-indica MIl) This
cactus grows to a height of five
feet or more. When full grown, it
forms an impenetrable thicket, yet
it is "clean," does not bunch at
its base, and can be grown in. or-
derly lines. The kandelab will grow
in areas of sparse rainfall. Other
than as fence and' decoration, the
plant has no use; its sap can be
used as paper paste.
"Pa'resseux" (Polyscias sp.) is
another popular plant for forming
Living fences. Paresseux grows tall
in less than six months: if left
alone, it will grow to a height of
ten or twelve feet. It can be plant-
ed in very tight rows, and while it
effectively prevents trespass and
holds land'well against erosion, it





F. I! WATC
1/ /


is more attractive than either pin-
guoin or kandelab. Unlike pinguoin
it grows tall, and does not clump.
Unlike kandelab, it is not prickly
and harsh-looking. Those fences
formed of paresseux are the most
attractive and useful of all.
Probably the major disadvantage
of paresseuk as a living fence is
the fact that goats and horses will
eat the leaves: peasants say that
mules must grow used to it, but
that then they will eat it as well.
Sometimes paresseux is grown more
widely spaced, rather than to form
a thicket or hedge. In these cases,
it is sometimes made into a fence
with bamboo crossbars, tied with
lian persil (Serjania polypylla'L'
Radik.)

Croton ("kroton") is another
plant used for living fences, as
well as for decoration in the yard.
There appear to be several varie-
ties, that identified being Codlacum1
variegatum (L) BI. This plant usu-
ally serves for the hedges leading
to the door of the house, at the
entrance to the lakou, or will be
planted in clumps within the lakou.
Rarely, bamboo is used to form
a living boundary ("lisiere"). It is
a plant having ,many local craft
uses: for fencing, the manufact-
ure of musical instruments ("vak-
sin"), rain gutters and chicken
cages, etc. But generally, clumps


of bamboo mark intersections of
plots of land, rather than serving
as continuous boundaries. Peasants
often plant bamboo along water.
courses, or where their land ad-
joins streams, since it flourishes
near water and holds land well.
Otherwise, it is most commonly
found at property intersections.
The- plant called "medsiin" is
commonly planted' around houses,
and around fields joining the la-
kou. As with paresseux, media.
may be planted widely, and tied
together with bamboo crossbars. It
is, however, a less satisfactory
living fence in general, less a bar-
rier than a marker.

"Gad mason" is another plant.
used for living fences. Like croton,
it is mainly a yard plant, and may
be planted either to form a hedg6
or in clumps, for decoration. It
is perhaps the prettiest of these
plants, along, with croton.
There remain the two commercial
plants, "pit" (Agave rigida L., Var-
sisalana Engel) and "vetiver" (A-'
atherom zizancides Hitche & 'Cha-
se). Neither of these plants has a
long commercial history in the
Fond-des-Negres region; both are
grown in greater quantities on the
plains southwest of the plateau. But
the Fond-des-Negres p e a s a ntr y
have' taken up the cultivation of
(Continued on page 9,


Caribbean Construction Co. SA.

Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD

Phone: 3955. P. 0. BO.. 284


NOUVEAU BT
SAFFERUNT


SANS CHAMIWBR



i^ 3-.. --- _


to Broffl aiiS6!W& de la bal&&A
ioulemest doae m une traction a*
s6curit6 suppl6mentaires. Un g
dipositif de silence rlduft 'Is i i
rents bruits d6sagr6ables dc paes
tandis .qu .la construction 6gke dc
tSuper-.Cshion Sans Chambre hil
.d'absorber les cahotb do to
pase. Yous arme moiis de pofle .
moins de deis,perce que


-.dyew. ,Oir pratiquEi t,





so c A R


CaOP4~t


sPAGE 8a








.N2 1. "


PACE F.


On The Plateau Of Fond des Negres
SIontinued from page 8)
tornm of these pl-i-rt ii r.:e:r. i -,:.ar. &rti .tar a.tl,: i thrie, d,: aned ril-r ir.- bridle h'adsialL, ifor crouprJrs jt tlb, mo,'t practice f covering Ott b t,)-,llsinm ho.,e rrr noitiing is
ard both ot in interEiring ".s u-i- -.,l i'r.t iur .r:- crop:.. Si l ho' ar r.i- o -ie s. en, pi-t._rls ii l ei v. veva er t ot r ,dfr O ine rL rnou a or nri,..sIh the
with the local e-onom c'. r, e.er .i i7 n,. ;rr,,.i.J spe- g a ic [ tha .r.ltin and. aftr bha'inr c.j[ lh- ;i.. i Murro'er ri-'a-ur's [to prev-
thouuhn present crt-id marKel prners Ing nicd,: '-o much as a suppl.-_- ,SometriE of the same may ma e ger-' s eteral time;.. -dil pull up tr-l eri-:.i.ron 'aJ ir, rare Normally,
do noit ineniuriae mi:n e-.t-rniron ,:; m.ri,[ i.:, *uc. nhec-.e Ti- prn.'e :,!f ad i.:.r o.fivetr T-ut gras is irn the rct.XS tI .Sell The are a nunit-er lIare- trees are nor cut and care
then (ditiaino-n iifi .:.n rthe i..rid mairKi has runi- 1,.: used l,:r t- undaj- marker-, c t umies on [t- pla rau -.mhic rend- i. taken not i burn badlI- when
bled in r'ctrnr ,ari, i.'i tr. -.a' but r..,:i a- a tbarrer Bera-is of er oil from tr.E ri,..,ts Lth brush is .:-t and burned off
Sisal r*pltl" is gpIr,n al:.ng main there no, ra.:.n 1t e1sp.c:p ils r,.rd.en. roa.'Ser, i..i eat .euver. bh.r.re planting B0s trees are only
paths, but it irel, series as a prdhrijct,,:,n i, increase in the Fond i.o thiit.r nnot be plani-ted lo S.'I aind setner tchn. ,dier rai-cl> planted. and terracirne and
-living fence ,iLUi el '. 11re c(:rmin d,-.'N~Etr are ic.r in Ha rj for ,ire-l. -here animals pass At the some-hat from nte other plants re.r ..:ur cult1anonll are simple' not
on;, It i r'- ron an r.:. -rc -'ide a nist master, in the near hiutiur ri me. r '. -Lrats will nut ea n i t. ment.ontd. since they ia l.e airls prac I C e d Nar the boitrms,
sinrig fcnce mad: o.f s,,om obher ii,i''.er, it rem'rin a plant with arid paea-sa.- rae dOi--,o.cred mtat important dotniestic use which s ti the nod r'.i-:lcE., more lfaored
plant Sisal has E.O be plar'-d at men; .c i:,ca craft applba,:a.nr, and it ma:.';s rood root tial.chinc tor them spanr Hoauier. neither makes tmr-tmrent land lih,ainc a good war-
some distance in irnm the path, the pi-,aanrr., ..-i doubtles- aJs'.a\s tru. rea-on Though T i a n,ut as an dealJ l\-tr fence, and nei.thr er suppiN b.ir remor.ued from
since is ieas5s gtro. long. It can oinrn-i.ie io plant some si-.a it durable a. certain tier lra.sE: caln s:e'e adecrually,. as a barner tream-a is i drar.. n the ei-rly
be cut comnmiecall., tith fur he rmuaf:. good rope. iS uied as re.ini:r- u-ed as tuatch. the iact that rats For UiiS parpoie. kandelab and pa-
quency but groWT to fil b:--.m c,'_nient on -ertain kInds of baskfl.sailJ nrot at iI romerimes miral,; res rseux are probably Lhe mr.ii suit- iConnnued on page 10)
j, a .year. It dies Lo he it I, ab-le plant' What needs remiarkan:
o' r less and rmuSt iUlc be rplani- is the failure, at lea.t in me Fornd.
ed Properl, planrit-d. si._l plair F I S H E R S ART & CURIO SHOP des Negn-r region. to employ l.c.Ee
should be approrn.rraili tor ted plants fuU.. The plateau. rarhel- -
apart, one reason that ii canrior Rue du Quai than consisting of ienel tebleiand
propel.r] seinrt a a i."ii hnid"e us in man;, areas mbrked bm rollin~
il S-id by the pehi.antr.i that SOLE REPRESENTATIVE OF ralsides a-d cuilnanon i carried
sis.il ri-rn' up Lhe "ut.bu J it will or(, both in [be bottoml]ands, norar
otien be planted on "'old tiat i5 GUERLAIN'S BEAUTY PRODUCTS vaier. and on the ilnpEi In a
muc t es'ultai ld' lan.d,. "'-ti r at number oi b nietan ee r. _cre cultf. 'it c
ounrid "uiirg isaplinr .Arun-als v.-illin HATrf is proud to announce the arrival of lMrs. Claire SZ-LNTO. tion h3s prc-ceeded on sharp mi
nult disiurob oun, rr-t iT.I are. cinri. ero-sin hin otretn seetre
surrounded by siil plant-, and Specialist of GLUERILIN PARIS. There is no plough culdtaon. Lar-
besstrags ri-. noi sal. :ner theain Mrs Szanlo speaking fluently English is at your dispo-al is cleared With 1Kh buLh Icnle. and
beasts ne ~iSeial. i-ince planting r machete the brugb is allows t, ',
It around a -TAnd vf .,:ung [rees lor reatrment and Make Uip Iron dri, and is then burned ofR PlIi.t-
serves to protect the sapings from )g Ls done using the hoe or a
..erything but man i tihe plant 9 h.a.m. to I! h.a.m. 1:30 h.p.m. to Sh.p.m. dibole In some casts. nor instance,
Jemaain .gandb.ng forr th hir lictnme. when nee s cuLm ate' in lor pock. f[ .a H
the tre W'id, hake rd an i oppr or special appointment w nin d s cus, attn k ple aler e
t ra, tO jakR hi.Sd Farther'ore ART & CURIO SHOP supply seed m. efen be o"-
the perajtnls .:ay hi' if a crop I' at FISHERS r.adcast Land uuIaiy MlIC- 1 '
put nir me land on which s.ild Rue du Quai across Custom-shouse cited fil nterrbp!ediL. for tnrce or .P
has been gnrwin, they ill do four Nenrs, then aIjowed to rtl fuor i-
ert, Aell. particularl In trhe sec-
ond and thrd nea.el The -sa) N..--The oppsUltatjons pre entirely free of charge. another Lhret -- or i,,.r-yr per- EP Distributor
rootr and raeu The id beic re cultivaton ODier than JO Ed PI NADA.L & CO.
roo: rot and breax up during the,1


SSUNDAY, NOV. 22nd. 1959


I


HAITI SITN"


I I




"-*'* ":~ 4


"HAITI SUNm"


STib4


Newsman John Blavace!

"Mad dogs and John H]i
work in the hot tropical no
sun" is the saying applied
old Clina, India hand who hai
*ed wife, five children, camera.


'Rgdh















L/ WA




HASSILI.AD

BRPunf


et To Haiti His Beat
THE ENERGETIC HLAVACEK
typewriter to the Caribbean as a at his teaching post for two years
freelancer. when war broke out then spent one
An exhibition of Mr Hlavacek's year driving an ambulance and an.
speed went on record at the Army other working with the U.S. Milt
day parade on the Champ de Mars tary attache in Chungking. During
Wednesday when he encircled the these years he met the remarkable
marching soldiers at the gallop and New Zealander Rewi Ally who t(
shot them from every conceivable this present day runs a string o
angle with his bolex and nikons for cooperative schools in North Wes
Magnum and the NBC television net- China.
work Returning briefly to the States in
1944 he set off again for China a.
H Born of Czech decent in Illinois a united Press correspondent bu
Hlayacek learned to do things on got as far as India where he work
the double during world war II in ed for thirteen years- covering a]
North China and in thirteen years major stories.
in India. During the last ten years While in Bombay in 1952 he me
in India he headed United Press and marred the American Vice
with his territory stretching into consul one of the prettiest "in th
k Afganistan and Ceylon. States Department Wife Peggy wa"
In 1939 twentyone year old, Ha- at one time woman's page editor
avacek vacek went to China as a teacher for. the Washington Times Heral
on-day on a scholarship. Following studies and reporter for the Fairbanks A
to the of the mandrin language in Peking aska Daily Newsb oiner.
s mov- he went to teach and learn m Cheng- With a. brood of five -three son
as and tu, North West China. He remained and twyo daughters- and an India
Ayah tMamie' the Hlavaceks mad
their home in White Plains New
York for a year will Papa studied o
a Council on foreign relations fel
owship and then sailed down inti
the Caribbean to set up headquari
ers in Jamaica.
Their freelance kingdom has sl
far extended to Cuba, Haiti, Dorm
nican Republic and Puerto Rici
working on stories for NBC and a
number of publications. In Jamaica
they are also correspondents fo
NI THne & Life.


Newsman Hlavacek has been
to Tibet and back since he last visit
Haiti in February to cover, hung-
er in the North West. When ,news
broke that the Dalai Lamn was
fleeing Tibet HIavacek clipper off
from Kingston half way around the
world on a news hunt. He was
there with his cameras when the
living God hit the India frontier and
as they were old friends from Dalai's
1956 tour of India they had a few
words together. The living god he
reports is making progress with the
English language.
As the story cooled off and news
came of Ceylon's Prime Minister's
death at the hands of an assassin
he flew South to Colombo and was
in time to film the funeral of S. W.
R. D. Bandaranaike from the air
in a hired World War One training
Plane.
This week Hlavacek was back in
Haiti with Senator Homer Cape-
hart. After shooting pictures of Pre-
sident Duvalier along with Senator
Capehart, the Army Parade and
Artibonite Valley he clippered on
to the D.R. polishing up his lens
and captioning his exposed footage.


spring and planted with rice hav-
ing a short growing season. After
the rice is harvested, in June or
July, sweet potatoes may be plant-
ed in the same land. Erosion in
such bottom is slight, and the soil
is generally protected. On the slop-
es, however, run-off is likely to be
considerable unless there are stands
of coffee with their protective cov-
er of fruit and other trees. The
most popular crops for open slopes
are maize and millet, and three or
more harvests of these crops may
be taken from the same plot with-
out interruption. In these instances,
it is rare to see measures takes
to prevent erosion, though the land
may receive the simple protection
of standing trees.

The use of living fences composed
of such plants as paresseux and
kandelab is already traditional in
th e Fond-des-Negres region, and
such fences commonly separate
house plots from paths and from
each other. Less commonly, they
are used between cultivation plots,
but almost all such boundaries are
marked by some sort or fence. It
is conceivable that the people of
Fond-des-Negres would respond to
encouragement to plant such fences
along the ridges which form on
eroding slopes. Since neither plows
nor wheeled tools or vehicles are


.4


used in cultivation and transport,
parallel fences of this sort. would
not interfere with planting and har- .
vest, except for the land they took.
up, or in casting excessive shade. K
If planted on the creats of ridges,
they would occupy land otherwise,
not cultivable, and the amount of 7.
shade they gave could be controll-
ed by the selection of particular'
species for particular crops, and
by trimming. '". j

A measure of this sort could not':
be expected to make a significantt'
difference in conservation. In areas'.,!
where deforestation has proceeded ,
aphce particularly where char..
coal-making is economically imipor-'
tant devices of this sort could...
have only very limited positive ef
fects. Genuine reforestation, and.1-`.
the employment of more basic con-'."
servation and soil-enrichening.mea--...-
sures such as the use of fertilizers,
contour farming, etc., are obvious- g
ly much more important. But liv-
ing fences are already a firm feat-
ure of peasant life in the Fond-des- '.
Negres region and in many other.-,
parts of Haiti. If their use could be
extended by simple demonstration
and explanation, it would illustrate
once again the practical value of
directed change proceeding through
techniques already familiar in a
particular culture.
"


more pace

more space


more luxury"...

and a flawless sporting pedigree


I.'.,










;c


PAGE 10


SUNDAY, NOV. 22nd, 1959


THE LIVING FENCES OF HAITI-
(Continued from page 9)


Sweeping 'ahead with alf the zip, sparkle and road- 4
hugging stability inherent in its breed, the new M.G.
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AUTO S. A. DISTRIBUTORS

360 Grand'Rue P.O. Box 147

Telephone 3134--2772


S tme.f &of it s;


MODERN COMFORTS WITH OLD WORLD CHARM



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IN TURGEAU RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT

A Distinguished Hotel In The Heart Of The City

Conveniently Located To The Shopping District

All Air Conditioned Rooms with Private Baths and Hot Water

New Pool Terrace with outside Bar and Swimming Pool
Air Conditionned Bar Unsurpassed Cuisine Finest Service

DINNER DANCE EVERY FRIDAY

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TO THE RYTHM OF "THE SANS SOUCI CUMBO"

MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR THE BEST TABLES!


:. .4 "








'SUNDAY, NOV. 22nd, 1959 "HAITI SUN"

H AITT ORCHID SOCIETY NOW Fihe Haitian Radio NORTHWEST FARMERS
-AFFILIATED WITH AMERICAN Announcers To Attend PURCHASED HERI
Havana Congress Sn aul lajrd oa reti-is los their EaJ
affiliation of the Orchid So.ici. exceilennc: in the development .:,r F- Hatian radi, aLLinctr- ill ,i and ,d istne dunr.g the rvcci
-- :fHa withl me nAmrica.n Orcrud c,: .rei ol oru.hid.- a,.d er,r all'. arti"d Ue Ann..in.e C.oncr.. ,. to .. ar ught ti the J eanRat-1 ull
.soie with is thousand- 0f m.m- t- eM-snd the lHn,,letd-. proiuci r-: .t p&l., "r Havs'i hm DLcc'-m area i N,:,rnih t Haim -vi ri- areas
;"* all oer the world iva- con- ion use and 3ppecI.[iiton hi ,rer.- e. r 3 ti ceicv sc'd in a distribution prog.--
'-ined this %eek b:y the Haiti So- ids of ar\ Kinrd and .rn anr mann- am :in raniza c, Care's Por-d,- Fan
h ciety president Horace A&uon er H t.xk.illc r Jn.Baplite it d, Fux atoice tndcr the d, recon of An
Seen members ,o the recndri. The Cr.hid S:,cRer; oi Hau- met" H'uh. damE Dupont I dio Long islander lean Burdick .An
oregamni& local soc.en ar mrrbrEi the second- W,:-dne-da olt ,ch C,:,rrierei arge Ar.broi'e iRFidi. Ditnmbub.n ,t n'nt)-ejght thous. photo
,"ot me parentit snaoiy -ho.e h-ad. mn.,rth at r, '.:.n&Te o0 onrie -, C D.ti -'.:'ir i, H, enn-_ Jacqu.E Deca- ,,1ad p:,uns of s-d. crn, milUt-i oam
rtrs ae m ihe BotanricaJIu," emoer ad an.:,rn.: asn n.:.u u.. u I-J ,.- i' .EC, and Antoinm H-;ira arnid r-d earn pur,.hased in Hain tro I
_'.telm. .utof Havard U'niver-i.,. Can, terest.d in t.- c.ture tl Orchids iRa-i:', P-aLtPI uls represent Hauo b, Care, is being conrdinated itlh Male
' 'idAge Ar Ms.'Tue soc_-ie p.rpo, Is Aeliome to attend Pre~ide ut lfch,?let Jn-B-apr te a jurnalt 'e [jNorthwest rain;, season. wh h ci ihi
.---described; 'to promote, carr.'y Horace Asht.:.n of "Viarina,-'" ma\ %' it rado 'sepritrce vill at.com, cornrrinc: this month. TrI
n'.i.aid in e\ery possible '.a, to. coniacitd P.0 B&% 1f; for f.-th. p:n. tr.- le_- ltior At the taime time R,200 Lamnsles pher
.-'afte deteloprieht. umpr.:..tm.-r and 'r detail. oin the relief roll ui the Northeat at C
c%...'reernation of orchids of all kinda 'e. Prr-_dutit is Nltl S-ruti. Tie pr'Y.-.ic.ral r.m.trrnnct ,,t-the ap rec1'.-ing their fortnighll., alitc- t.it d
-inauding, the umporLtatin and. th- Secrem3 is .irE PLbird L iEr-t. HaiJTan Atio..Cion ot Radt arin- eit:.ll oi tiid r.m Care while 2; for h
movement by culti'.aton a-rd I:i. er; and oiasuesi ,i h'r. Georone ,.-inersi composed oi Ant-ine ricteens are supplied by Cart w-nv Lift
rbnaation of exotic or.rlnds aid t-he Har'.-ara Herard Preid.:-en, Senre A.rbroise r .'constituted daily meals rts,
riV p rselVaton and perp,-r.Jnir, .:.( Vic, -Pr-.dent. Mme Diupoit Secret- led
.i- d orcbida. to ,ondu.it oir caut, Bl- Ra Mr Sniain and H-i_ i a i. Galard Pii-rrnfAnt.onre reas.ur- Care director in Hait. Jacques whet
t', .be conducted scientaric ti atrcrh are tri.n' Ha'. '-u r.he r.r t;. had er Jean Saulel anad [lichelei Jh Lainae explained that there are of i.
e'for the-.impro..eme'r, l'ip- .'.r.-aderar.tl e-enenc- t Orcrnd Eapt:lit concellors ,,r, si xr. n cariltens lintton.- gus
im t-or preservation ot or,-hids and ra-ring and .:ihi biin il.h'n ,is r triroaghoui the cointir. and the RE.o
S'firte promonon ol alt-iger dc--c'- rr,..st '.aluatti to the r,,-i' Cr':.i-et --r.-rne ma ncim. t,: 10i) before the enjo
o4etclency in the growing thcie- here ttcadtse the cnimatie oLnd. 'End of the eair. Care supple-s thre taria
r Eto cotIet arid dasseninr.at_ in ,rm.' here ar ,,e no' different in.,m 2 EGGS LAID NEAR to,, alid cul.. ing ast.-us' s vwhe at Sa
:';drnation relating to the po..nria lie ne, State U. S. EMBASSY ehr.r.:,es. co:irmmnita. centers, arnd
X.aid development of o rid.-s rand i-.- The ,e-kl\ nieen.?e ar-. m.:. i Shr..iru. ait-, .; pn Tue-d, two school d. trhe actual sen-ing. IMI
.ciure, -hybr'idzanon oi d'elop- ,nteresitng as th-,oee members h, u :, bornis eIp: olen. orchids bo merrhi an of exti ha-e hi d ba om e xpenc-rE. or.:n. .:.. St Pi::rre'- Col.r-Cg nesicrirng ,:.1 te Go.emrnent and Relifgiou_ Mi.
Jtl-iitons, lecture', putbe.arsons .-i id -]ro.rig atr, generouial placJne the American Embass, on the bodies stated tati he %as saunstf. nE1 w
F b ..l.rwise; to assist thous- enata, the.r kn.:-i.'l-e ai the d,:s.:-:.tl of C'i-,mnip de Mars "La Phalange" re- %ith the results from the cqnle.r. this.
h. e growing oi orchids r.\ ;-,ch ile r,,ii m-'r.'brs O tirs t LEh. 'ill- polmtd Fnida.. s,.st-m and remarked that ann, com- the
Y'tesearchles and dis-errunria nn I's be enciiouraged to continue and .'i- murur:. tiat can shot. thetir'-eedi to
I ake awards in the foimr of c'r- panrd thmer 3trivtuei n ini: tisciis- Thre kio ex-pio_..:,r.i eau.-d a n- i and set up the errng of- neals by
.ticates, medals or ,ther.vse, for ain; h-aibl, damrag.. ma., letee supphes 'l


'. .o d.L

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In



Fo
eAI r .o-r 'eea
Uof
7od
C
yow Individuality ho n wda ro


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R






ICA'S FINEST AN .
A"FUR.IT E Be
AT-.j"D T PRICES se



fabrics Enjoy the co fort of spr ng
filed cush ins zippered for easy

bleed mahogany Micarto Ions .
A "G



Agent Distributor: HAITI TRADING CO. C mber. of Commerce Bldg.
:-D L 1ie


PAGE 11

TO GET SEED
E BY CARE
Qly next wear Care expects to
\e mobile nai.Eth chinc which
take mediifne- t10 thi rural


mous Photographers.
drew St. George Visits
drew St. George a top [light
grapher who gain world-wide
for his coverage of Fidel Cas- -
mrm nh Sierra Mfaestra to the
com in Havana is visiting Hai-
is weeK.,
e Hungarian-born lie-photogra-
who was srudeimg for a PHD .
olombai when the shutter-bug "
eep won a half a dozen awards .
tis output on Cuba's revolution.
magazine carries a picture "
week of St. George beingjost-
by a mob that became ugly
i they learned that.the report
he finding of Camilio Cienbue-
was iJse?. He .'as rescued by
lutionary Poilce and is now
.,rig the 'iew and pool at Mon-
Hotel. He vi-,its Mellion hospta,
unda,'.

TERIAL FOR
CMEL WHARF
atenas for the construcuton ot the. -
Jacimel w hart arrived hi'e .r -
,past Ace and T-cun man on
job John Wdeu was arrange
a,' c it mo.ed Iu the- Southwest
tr.ck and srup
he hundred meter long pier that
perrrnt cargo uhips to berth
the cotfee Port aind so dispense-
h the anc:ent practise of light-
g gaos to and trom ships at
hOr Ln thu harbor
econ e\'ptcts I he construction.
e .dl ta.e 5ix nI.mtihs

surance Pioneer-
odernizes Operation
un', Chtrie is a Hajtian whose
me s ,:;;,on. mds with insurance.
r thiri% tno .ears he -bs pion-
red insurance and weened two"
his sons on the profession and
lay they form the company of
ony Chenri and Sons".
'enet senior recently returned
mrra fanmiranition rnp nm Europe
d the U.S nas completely remo-
led and reorgar.,zd his company
th new reprzentations to better
erc their ciientele Their Avenue
Lne- leanrne ofics on the Cite de
xpos Iion uitiri. undergone a com-
te modern rturblsnnlrg job. Air-
nditiorang is to b- added shortly.
.)l,%- Chenil .Jr back from two
irs '.vth '* AthurI .lion Insur-
ce AXcencie.' of New York, stu--
ing the laIq; t mtrrrds in sale
omutJon in nrs : 5-ing his tath- '
Another son Li. '., a graduate
our larit of McuIlEl lJrusersity in
nada is. now iu .liaree of the
Bis finances.
rTwo other eXpenrier,--co insurance
n in the brrr are II alrc Lebon
3o i knoTwn for hi_ prompt and
cerit attenton I c. claims and
).mond Crann in charge of poll-
holders department.

E CENTRE D'ART
Founded 1944
Exclusive agents:
AUli, Anulama. Arnmand, Badlie,
noil. Bigaud. Blanchard, Demse-
mrs, Dunfaut. Hyppolte, Joseph,
veque. Liautaud, Montas, Nor-;
I. Obin, Pierre. St. Brice, Ste-
ane, Turnier. Vital, maWu others.
7 Rue de la Revolution
From -Pan American
town one block toward
ay, half block to .left.
)pen Monday th-rough'
Sat. ir ,
9-1 3-6 Phone 2055


ii


- m'~.


- C 1







RAGE 12













HER

ABLE .

ALL

MORTG


ALL

SMENTS



1


SU..ND. N .. -, ..m -

SUNDAY, NOV. 2fnd, -10


"HAITI SUN"


Haitian


Industrial


'Mortgage Bank


EBY NOTIFIES THE PUBLIC OF HAITI THAT THERE ARE FUNDS AVAIL-

FOR THE FINANCING OF HOME CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS.

APPLICATIONS WILL BE RECEIVED AT THE H A I T I A N INDUSTRIAL

AGE BANK'S OFFICE ON RUE DU CENTRE.


PARTIES MAKING APPLICATION WILL. PRESENT THE FOLLOWING DOCU-

At THE SAME TIME:


.-CERTIFIED

SHOWING


"SURVEYORS PLAN"


OF LAND


OWNED


BY APPLICANT,


ALL MEASUREMENTS OF LAND.


2.-CONSTRUCTION


PLANS FOR HOUSE


TO BE


BUILT, IN DETAIL, CER-


TIFIED BY. CONTRACTOR, AND OR B ENGINEER WHO DESIGNED


SAID HOUSE.


3.-CERTIFIED

TRACTOR.
/


ALL APPLICANTS

OWNERSHIP, SUCH

NO OUTSTANDING


ESTIMATE OF CONSTRUCTION COST. OF HOME, BY CON-


WILL


HAVE TO SHOW DEFINITE PROOF


OF


LAND


LAND TO BE CLEAR AND FREE -OF ALL LIENS, WITH

INDEBTEDNESS AGAINST SAME.


PORT-AU-PRINCE, NOVEMBER 11, 1959.

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT


Clemard Joseph Charles


-i
1%


_______________________________________ . ~jI~


I .. -.


*- '










Ministers Of Agriculture
And Justice Return
SMinisters Luejen BetizLr, arid Ce-
rard Pntripp*-au returned W'Edn.e-.
day from Europe Agriculture Min-
ister Philippi-aux 3rtenned the FAO
conference in Romre nd .Justc-
iBnister Belizarie was on a special
. myniion to SAi't:rlard.

THANKSGIVING DAY
"'The tradtiurYA Tha:,rLsoivng DE ,
:s, ricee %i-il he held ajamn Ltns y,-ar
' j.at Hiol5 Trinity Cauncdr'. ,n Thurs
day. Noernrier e6, at sA i1 am
Everyone3' is conta, irr.-ite to art
BiOhop V'oeg b return- Nor.rmber
l 'on the Paranma Line after s.:-en
weeks in the United Stares, a here
.ep attended the meeting's of the Se-c
ond Promince arind the HRuse :*(
.Bishop. oi the Episcopal Church
as well as tilled -aterral speakinrc
and pre-aching engag-mentr


SHELL COMPANY
"A L'AVANT-GARDE"
NEH WORKERS CENTER
OPENED


The SheL] cmpano tn Hai triu- .
-urated tris weEk a center t their i
BLPotoo installanon 'destined to pre.-
vide comfort. relaxation for cdirtural
and d',erse reirearion oi its aork-
ers
Trie ep-ning f rIse ,tenter is m
kElping Ulth te vas t mo.erriza3.
tior. o[ Sheil restabihnbents and
S-rvce Station; now underwa3 in
Hi-.i It fojior.a. a i.w week. alter
ui'. oper.ruig ot the modern ultra-
moderr, Shell home attics :r the
urue P.i.ee in down-town Port au-


VICE-PRESIDENT
OF R.C.A. HERE .
The \'ice Prc3idenr arid Generil
'ales manager of R CA,\ Mr Lud-.
i',. EnglEr is on his- tLrrwi'vit to
Hnr, Ai',.mr,.ni;d h. Mr; Frnl.r-r


ELECTION DAY CALM hv -pni. Fnrda, and Sarurdi talk:.
BROKEN BY EARLY e Ln' o.. b'an .n "ite mar -
-r Lars,': acid s,,_htre'irrE Tr--
,-. 'MORNING BOMB io.ei at lorntara.

,.- A pr,.-dawn bombr e\plor,,:.n tmat
., ..':paniced the eo:,r, jantijon oit Sit I -
tad's t AlM .a-i ,-a. t,: ,nl CLEMENT BARBOT
incident to rupture n.: ele'mnr.n day RETURNING
'calm Srunda-.ne-r poll u opene-d in
three department t- oI elect ,\ sen. THIS EEK
; tors'
Although the bomtr kinared no oner F'rezidennai Prnate Secretar) Mr
a number oA the lfathiful ier- hurt Clement BarOrLt .9 ep.t .l In. re.
in tre brel panic at rth4 earl:, turn to Port.asuPrnce from Hamb-
.r mas Dozeps lefi their shoes be- ,ire Gtrman, ear!.\ trus riek
hind in the church Mr Barrot left suddenly last vSic
bected in th''Welt dparnrtment and flea to rus' son's hcLd.:e .ipon
-. which include? Port-au-Prince erre: recei.ino neAs tirru ri ,.-i of
T Me Dato Daumerc, Gerard MI1chel their s,:,n'i illnes.s He -ne Barriot
and Je.rNlane ibLis Il a medical student in Harnmlrg


AMIERICAN EXPRESS


The ne-t ediree to the workers is
independapt of the Snell install.
rainss Adr- In its Iarg I. in 'n ror.
has a radio, .ilEiniators lelephoni-.
rerigerrarr.r and tirnmture in Lthi
room frftr persons mna.\ dine in
orildort Trdt r-i< .vdil alsro .
ised as a cuorderence and traru.r.,.-
center for the pjmpitsc and
worier4 of i-11l. 'TicN. mai, assist
at the. petiecticir. cour-i fiio.lrinc
Lhe .-rIo'aing (. docunim-narj films.
I


AND DINERS CLUB


Featuring Hillman High Style
AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING HOTELS
For Reservations, Road Maps,
P. 0. BOX 662
Write or Cable:
and Suggested Itineraries
AVIS CAR RENTALS


Also it Adi be a center of appree.- With a siew of
ticeshjp and "*-lpnabeEiation .asit galliry-terrac
Apart rtem ine lsin- rlro m here a magnieicent pant
,s a wla"rooim ntth nrr-e separate of Goroave before
bo-..ers. four l'araor-es with hot
and tCold .aler and ft5s individual In the near fur.j
meral closets and volley-bail cou
Alsr. cach SnEil worker has all ed.
the ricei'sjr. for meals, toileite
i ;eEp ni. cloNitun asd personal eff. As one Shell em
ecLe an his pnr ae clozst for whdi eek-ki "sont avant
he nas the ke- bre- de la grand


,SHELL CENtER FOR WORKERS
. ... . -- ^ ^ ^=-^


AWAY OR AT HOME A CAR OF YOUR OWN


0f i

aO


CREDIT C.AD HONORED


Per.

Plus5

FREE. -

Read maps,
information
Pick-up and delivery ,
from hotels, airport
and pier ..


W WEEKLY RATE

$35,-pe Week

P6 pe Mite A


SITNDAV. NOV. 22nd, 1959 "HAm sur


ALL RRTE5 INCLUDE
*qRS.OIL. INURRNCE


a =-- -


pnw.au-Prlnce. HdIti


4


- . i,, .


' ,' :, = .----.,..-:^ ..-...-. .-.. .,- .....-.'. ... .. -


SUNDAY, NOV. ">nd, 1959


VIE 'RENT- 7CAR


iiL


1i


s I


h


Port-u-Prn~eHilt


"HAIMI SUN"


PAGE IS -

the sea fbra its,
te he worker has
orama of the bay
him
re V. badmington
t Will be install-

plovyee stated this
tous des 'mem- 9
r: famille Shell."








A" q,





















-:































L






SUNDAY, NOV. 22nd,
SUNDAY, NOV. 22nd, 195&,


"HAITI SUN"


yAAE 14.


District Inspector for the Caledo-
liand Insurance company in the Car-
. iblan Mr Harris is Port au-Prin-
ce to confer with William and Narr
to extend activities of this Scotch
Insurance company in Haiti.

New Zealander Gregory Aim till
.- call in Haiti next week enroute
home after three years with the
marketing division of the Shell Corn-
paony in England. He is returning
to New Zealand to take up a man-
agpment position.
.meI


Willy Frisch flew to
last week tp undergo
eye operation.


the Stales
a delicate


Alice Gagneron clippered to New
York Thursday.

Haiti's Consul General in New
York Raymond Moyse returned to
Manhattan Thursday.

/ynthia Minor 'flew to the States
this week with daughter Lesley and
son Michael to join her Texaco hus-
band who has been transferred to
Africa's Ivory Coast.
4* *


Marie Ida and Reginte Montrosier
left for New York on the 19th.

Raoul and Lelia Alexis are in New
York.

icheline Laudun Denis, Haiti's
leading. pianist has received a
fellowship from Academy DAAD to
study in cultural center's iin West
Germany. Her'husband runs "Boite
a musique" a record store on the
S Rue Pavee.

Mile Denise Rouzier recently from
Liberia where she assisted her Am-
bassador fathe. is departing today
for Chicago to visit ,with former
Amterican Envoy to Monrovia and
Mrs Richarld Lee Jones. -Denise is
planning to return hbme for Christ-
mas. '

. Jean Claude Carrie flew to San
Juan Thursday.

MIrs Willy Rpwe, former Gisele
Romain presented Willy with a ba-
by b6y Thursday at Clinic Lefort.

Dr. W. Earl MORRIS, a Surgeon
from Cornwall, N. Y. and his lov-
ely wife Fae spent 3-days here at
the Oloffson.

Mlle Marie-Simone Lafontant and
Carl Rouzier go to the Sacre Coeur
altar 6:30 on December 12th.

Senator Arthur Bonhomme flew
to Miami Saturday on a two weeks
trip to New York and Washington.

Caribbean Mills President Arthur
Haas is returning to town this week
with his wife and three year old
daughter.


Georgette Torres of Panam's
Bowen Field operation is back from
a months tour of Europe raving
about Jet travel. Georgette visited
England. France and Italy and
cannot wait to make another Jet
flight the service is "parfait".


Mrs Faber Carries Naar has a
new baby daughter prenommee
Chantal.

Here on a two week visit are Mr.
Malcolm E. PEABODY, Jr. Execut-
ive Assistant in the Department of
Commerce, New York State and
his charming wife Pamela. The
Peabodys are staying at the Sans-
Souci Hotel. They will visit Cap-
Haitien and the Citadelle this week.
S* *0
Gaston Baussan is back from a
pleasure trip to the Scandinavian
countries Europe and the U.S. Gas-
ton is back to his tourist cruise
business and will also take charge
of the department of water sports
of Cacique Island beach-club along
with partner Jean Coicous
,
The Bervip family flew to Miami
yesterday.


Issa El Saieh i-- lnck
month in New York. sans


from a
mousta-


Stan Swinton General News Editor of the Associated Press World Service
on a six day vacation here at the Oloffson with wife Helen visits Canape
Vert head and mask making factory. Wally explains the rise of the
Talamas Brothers to International eminence through mahogany.


Claude Gentil returned last night daughter Mrs Potensky were given
from a three-week. Vauxhall-c u m- a rousing family welcome home
pleasure trip to the States. on the late Panam clipper laqt
Art of Avis is down from Detroit night.
with news of a good Winter season
for Haiti. Fred Attie is solving the water
problem and making the swimming
pool nolonger the luxury of those


Marie Thomas of the U.S. Emb-
assy flew to Miami for a wqek-long
vacation yesterday.
Mrs e Alfred x and
Mrs Vve Alfred Vi ed x and


who live in districts with excellent
water supply. Fred has a'filter sys-
tem for pools of every size. You
can drink the water after months.
of filtering he says.


A WONDERFUL NEW WORLDD 'OF FORDS


FOR 1960 ; -


-.J-


60


FORDS


/ 'I
II


L "-- FORD -The Finest Fords of a Lifetime,


- A.<


rTHE NEW- SIZE ro J



FORDArIZLCOTI

EAS/EST CAR /N THE WORlLD 70lOV


n FALCON -The New-size Ford.

m v'THUNDERBIRD-The World'- Afs t


flY) BUILDS THE WORLD'S MOST BEAUTIFULLY

PROPORTIONED CARS


'
I


S


BISHOP VOEGELI
BACK FROM\U. S.
.Bishop Alfred Voegeli, head of
the Episcopal Church in Haiti sailed
back from a three-week visit to the.
States aboard the Panama liner.
Bishop Voegeli returned in time
to offer the traditional Thanksgiv--
ing service at St Trinity Cathedral
on November 27.


GRAND OLD LADY
OF ST MARC PASSES.

The death of Madame Vve Elias
Nahoum, known to her many friends.
as the grand old lady of St Marec
wap mourned by the entire Coastal.
town 'and numerous relatives and.
friends throughout Haiti and in the
United States. Dr. Antoine Nahoumr
flew from Detroit where he has a
successful practice to attend the fun-
eral of his mother. The last rites
were rendered Thursday afternoon
amidst a large gathering of sorro-
wing friends and relatives.


ABANDONED
CHILDREN'S
CONGRESS IN BQGAT-

Max Fouchard, Secretary Gener-
al of the Department of Labor and'
Dr Vil are attending the XIth Pan-"
american Congress in Bogat, Colom-
bia which is treating the problem
of abandoned children. The Con-
gress is from Nov. 22 to 29.


t


f


:. - V A


i,.,.








SUNDAY, NOV. 22nd, 1959


SUNDAY, NOV. 22nd, 1950 "HAITI SUN" PAGE 15


ai Joseph report


Frank Puweri r.,:risnalJ director -o Param adr i-id i i.:,; iitn.r-da,
in time to hate a chat with senal.r Ilomer Capbhail ab:-it Port .au.PruLr
ce's urgent lineE a let airport... Policemen caUri t ti- ..%E tru.i -.-:k
with their yelJc-, tells and pa.nted teetl htlnmets with "POLICE" in;:nrrr
ed upon them Its been iugcested that the, steil arltr a I.:? ni..lj-:e hit
and a inifornm Ari-ch ':-.ijd ni.e ihueii .,str i irnd pn'i:.o maic ai li.r tir.
louasts.... Bob and Eielyn ifurorm-r Mrlle D'Adeke)l Laughlin aire p.-i:'.
ring to enlarge their Ncv. Y--.i- hou..,:hold ea. niew -i .. r Gerardi
SMaisonneme is worlnc orn ltif) alarirnariae i-th :di%-rr. 'tri-a rgert-
Woodman ati the -L,,t-,iUollr ,o the n -e Industrial arid Mortgage Baunk...
Higher learn-re ha's ltaen t'.ir part of Christnia Tr-o lane. At I-kwi
t, u pronrur. n[ House of flowers hra bee-n ciiar.lid ii..o. .-, -.'.i (tre
inzne Paradtie Bar [h.i olli.,r i; L.I Palonia Blanci... 1 s- El S:,;i;h i.
setting up id- ova-i Art Gialler.- in a Rue du Qi.,j corr- i El-ie H.:.-p -
.to open for tii -:e-,Eour Madalme Malal la= opened a i.: ,- i-'.iri .r
of- modern :-,.rcn biti b,,r a"n-i are-rdi.rn.n; .:.n F.j- du QM .
Ham'i :i- crtoi:l pubicitain -LOuvpertrure 1. put out h:. Mur.- Dor


pestre air lui F.:rmr Ctr:je &d La Hart. *n Per.i,:,. .e l. -a.nldr
Daniel noatd Radia Harnr mid p'.:--r.nerial ot tr, i- Magic Cine 'ha t.:--
confined to br-d b', he' d-i.:tor i,-r Ute past i-orirm.i t.

Jeau Lumnarque ha inr._.m-IJ hi. rn:-A riELa.a'L-ril Pigalfe) Le-s Pal-
mlites on HIrr:. 'iru'.far El,.- Robert Snterl Nh-..- ELcUtl-r --I it, %.ath
olic OC'rier Journal of Ruchbetr- NY 1' hrri at Lhr OtluL-ur. Anune


lHollimler of Tir'ic amt~' Wedr.Enlas o. V-acanon A crevicli pro' tro
lor. new' comeat rhi c-ek -. "-Vie tole la berise ta soleil i pa cab brtiie
ac la pluie" -old triuuig can ifoo-l ilUihe ih- bS i't nhr ii Ii, 11 t-IC rain
Another "RKvet pas j.an ginm raison deanet poule" il ,ci.:oi::ti
-never has rea-ort l1-hfie a chicken The Japan'-e c.-ini'e.': mti,:'-i
airites her-- teteri-lt 7 The anrdi'ersair. .: p-eri -j.itbur .l D- 7
Formnnr Arrit.a sador Serge Leon Defly is nuriarig a ta- k. rr hand r-iTu
an adro ac-:denr Hiindr-da hire dris5ppL.,nlt-ed at -1*l.,-:. nS hotIl
Friday ri'U hi nJ hern at Lthe. jar nlit iuf t iICtPil'.l I', we Iri .r.:> rrei.id U)i1
parade o<: con.testnts for NlMi; Ha-,r .35a pal off till Lb-: fol.. inf Frin.-.
The excuse -uti bUeiauis hbit been appearing ti-. n-cl-mi ;c ratl ur-
poran-rl ormer'; t-rouiip- w Ibda d. from part piat-on in tire Latin Aine'
ri uia Women's Coneres S rIr.tiao de Cru.L .. l,--' bt.-u,: ,:t
alleged Commniuust doniorar.i. ci Ut- -rii nre ,j.:. Hi-tajran ? I.:-:;rji:'n
attended. R- esolucion the r,-.:paper of Prirrier C.tir.. ; li[F .--I luJ.,'
moem-enit hti.-d Dotior Leon as ir.e ne.- Cuban a ni t. a a -i d .a: r I,
- Han alihoueih Ni Y Time- reports Cuban F,:.rei.-n mirni-:r: n,:.
changes in diplomatic persa-annel bad been issued

Widliam R. Shelton Trnme and LJ- Bwcai cuief in Mi-amti and Wall-r
Youngblood Dei into B), en F',ld after dark on -arm, d1I., and Ift rli:
private Aparthe a? craft .-inL their natndtr.p The ioldr,)1 ea.Erd Ip r
smiled-afte-r the earnedd Then Ololbson Holel turm.inuo-ui rluJii i'S tl..ir
ing up LIe mnat office CaJS LI e million dollar .1 DPiCe art-_.- .:.ri
Roger C.'sler in itt (,Jrnt ir., ..SuC oi iE Satiurda, Ei naut.- P.i


Haitian Said Ready
To Seize Cruiseship
A Crie:-eahip rhne nas canceii-d
Las is-st' to Hair,. according to an
auni:onlrnemt rep-rn tirculating in
h- touriir-t irIu-ra bec:us? it ear
t Hal.mI'ai ui l ri. to stile one of
itlS iltin doluaJ itups in in effor
to collect rA.eit tri,.j-arid dollar-
av arded rum ba a Hatnian ca or
Th- ptriui in que:tir.on according
r.i [i-. p:.-;n Aais manhriadied bk
crc.. rie tiPri Slr b',~trd a cra i.:-:n'sp
and ca:n squenu, broiighr" ; u i t
og;-nIr the c-rrmp.ip;,. i-i< won il-,(.'ii
damages ii Ia Said
N -,ir..r tr rO:u11t *.r the Tounist
*affce '-did :orrnrin or deri:, tius
report

LEAFLETS REPLACE
RADIO IN CARIB
Haijt hi, zr ar i -tap.-d rii. n-.
a .I :,t Canhtri in r t .[poi.c .,,mast- ii
.;'Ml- l,,,t n.:r :.-. h r,.'=iutr-aJ .rtl,

p.nid a lr itar r Eniii
-s-ad adidr ,;i-dl t. Pr-i-1nt Romi-
I0 Biar:o.-L i.Of i rr.-,.la h-i ` i
S .:i- 5 ri Arut-a Iti-id L-rcan ofl
en -ine r-,ubl.:-.
Piljt Mlinual Ri-.ias t Diaz and
ICo--Poti Ci -at Rwicardo Can acho.


U'."r[l 'it': I JLIiU .b IUl .,r I
rrnanurr, 1 ifEitJi. ere s .;Ted Trie
leallet i-re fiin% d L-.. 'ic\ad \'e-
IIuelani Bng Crin .i-ui li.
C. ir.,Lacn. n,.' LVr- r. Lonloni
Tr, C0,jis, L .LII ci, took ot1
[runt i,'r tmi 1i tIh-e D.nrairu-nri F.,:'
putlir iL.,rn .ir- re r ;i-i riinridetld
.) ilI:. r. a ile 4iet-droppiru rmus-ion
*n-:r C ar I c Trie., rn-alj-[i'.n,
rno.chit r-. i-re *5r *: .e-I n ei ue lS
'hern n*., ni.lle ith..r drop -,
[Ini iliard 4t iule? o rh r rh '-


iarnly Da.--Continued irom pakel,

i- irand in it Triunie Once to
]ji ;e Um ute and i'.i n,. r r ue
iro,-.p and ati ii.-ltr urrit I,: p-.rsa n-
ai: p.ln mrr-l.is. iJn t- memreri or th-
AJ ine,- i',.ii i:e i.,. r la J IILPW.r Jsh
Ar ne. Pr- sdorinial GuatIw bu-d-.
in ,:> 1 ped A -lh -ILa hul-i;c I r-
tiii -. Ea iriairLua'rCd at hr WT-ot
.de t[ [lie Paiair


I


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"HAITI SUN"


PAGE 15


I










CONTESTANTS FOR MISS HAITI


Monique Poitevie'n


Monique Carthright Miss
Rivage "


Beau Elelyn Guignard Miss SNAD


Mary-Linon Sajous


Guilaine Sajous


SU. S, Senate Urged To Hike Latin Economic Aid


By DAVID KRASLOW anced nations, the report said, the
A study prepared for the Senate social revolution now in progress in
Foreign Relations Committee rec- Latin American not only will con-
ommended Wednesday that the U.S. tinue but will speed up.
abandon military. assistance to Lat- "Because this social upheaval will
in America and step up economic offer new opportunities for the Com-
aid. munists to exploit." the study said,
It warned tha U.S. security will "the Soviet Union will place in-
be "increasingly threatened" b.3 creased energies into turning this
Russian efforts in Latin America (revolution to their own imperial-
and that the "prospect is for an istic advantage."
indefinite period of cold war tens- T h e study's recommendation to
ion" in that area. gradually eliminate arms aid to
The report was prepared by the Latin America "within a few years"
University of Mexico's School of In- is in line with the thinking of both
ter-American Affairs under a corn- the Senate and House Foreign Aff-
mission from the Senate committee, airs committees.
Because the- Latin people are det- The State Department backed by
,ermined to catch up with more ad- the Pentagon, has resisted efforts





Vtireslone





4










R0VMEDSIJOCffY









USE ITS LAy-AWA PLAN


P*


IA.D.P


to cut arms aid.
U.S. economic aid to Latin Amer-
ica since World War II "has been
inadequate," the study found. It urg-
ed adoption of "long-range econom-
ic assistance policies."
These policies should be "based
less upon a concern for sound bank-
ing and business principles, alth-
ough these should by no means be
ignored, and more upon the value
to the U.S. security system of Latin
America's friendship and coopera-
tion," the study said.
It said achievement of U.S. objec-
tives has become difficult. "prin-
cipally because the aims of the U.S.
and the Latin American nations
have become increasingly incomp-
atibje."
The report accused the U.S. gov-
ernment of showing "little concern
for the problem of dictatorship in
Latin America, aside from paying
occasional lip service to the prin-
ciples of democracy.
"..Latin Americans should no lon-
ger be allowed to feel that the U S.
in its determination to resist com-
muunsm. is willing to sacrifice de-
mocracy in the process.
"..The U.S. (should) make more
distinction between high-handed mi-
litary dictatorship a n d struggling
civilian democracy, ."
As for Cuba. the study said, it is
"still too early to tell whether the
movement will be successful or be
perverted either by the inexperien-
ce and over-ambitiousness of Fidel
Castro or by the intrigues of the
PARAMOUNT
Sunday:', Nov. 22nd. at 3:00 P.M.
Mysterieux Dr. Satan
'5th and 6th episodes)
Second Part:
At 5, 7 and 9M00 p.m.
UN GRAND FILM
Tonnerre Sur Berlin
(Cinemascope and Color
Monday, Nov. 23rd.
At 6 and 8:15 p.m.
Valencia
Tuesday. Nov. 24th.
At 6 and S:15 p.m.
Tonnerre Sutir Berlin
(Cinemascope and Color)
Wednesday, Nov. 25th
At 6 and 8:15 p.m.
Le Temps de la Colere
Thursday, Nov. 26th
At 6 and 8:15 p.m.
Valencia
Friday. Nov. 27th.
At 6 and S:15 p.m.
Tonnerre Sur Berlin
Cinemascope and Color)


Communists."


keynote a "sweeping program


It said Castro's government is political reform, economic r
"broadly based'" and has as its alism and social revolution."


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