UFDC Home  |  Search all Groups  |  Digital Library of the Caribbean  |  dLOC  |  Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library  

Haiti sun

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00235


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text





Ilialli. .. 6-:
''. J^.^^W '^ ^ \~-^^S


VOL XI SUNDAY, MAY 31st, 1959 No. 34 Port auPrince, HAITI



COLOMBIAN VANISHES!
A' VAN- ---


8Now Three

SDisappear

Si.enor Raphael Jesus Velasquez of MISSING:
.'B6gota, Colombia, flew here from SPANISH
iCiudad Trujillo two weeks ago AND COI
checked in at El Rancho Hotel, and nation later
-a day-and-a-half later walked out of police inves
';ihis rooni'and disappeared. Behind in the missing
'lis hotel room he left, personal eff- deglia but
ects, passport and plane ticket. rently want,
T' The vanishing Colombian brings that the pri
the, score of known missing foreign- Peron had
ers on this island of Santo Domingo, twist of fate
-t shared by Haiti and the Dominican cized. Sever
;Republic, this year up to three. of July, an
SThey are: Signori Vittorio Radeglia, hit the head.
the Italian-born private secretary of this case w
ex-Argentine President Juan Peron, investigation
Alfredo Perena, a Spanish Born Me -
'xican National and Raphael Jesus
'i Velasquez. .
S.The disappearance of Senor Velas-G r
,qUez follows closely the pattern of
the case of missing Senoi Radeglia.
Signor Radeglia flew in from Ciu-
dad Trujillo, where his boss resides,
and checked into the Castelhaiti. The state
Some..days later lie' 4eft the hotel ent of the
i' never to return. A plane ticket to was said t(
Rome with his personal effects, and prove to the
a hall bottle- of whiskey were left ors.
behind. The Police failed to turn The news
S up an, identification papers othei President E
than the Haiti tourist card. Infdr- was ill anc
--later con-firi
GERMAN TOURISTS.' 'muniicnie fi
COMING TO HAITI dilation ani


t __
















Herr Rudolf Flaxa head of the
Germap Auto Club described Ger-
S many-Haiti Tour this week (Story
p Page .1)


Haiti's C

ABOUT MR. GATES '
William B. Gates, Jr., Profess-
' or of Economics at Williams Coll-
Sege is here on a grant to study
..,.the economic development problems
in Haiti. The eminent Economist is
on a Brookings National Research
Professorship.
Mr. Gates obtained his Phd and
M A at the University of Chicago
and previously worked as an econ-
A dimist with the Export Import Bank
.'of Washington, D.C. and the Tax
SResearch Division of the U.S. Trea-
Wry.
This is the full text of a speech
Professor Gates delivered to a week-
Sl meeting of the International Club
Sdq Commerce.


Mysteriously


On This Isle


: AN ITALIAN,
BORN MEXICAN
OMBLIAN
r furnished to Haitian
stigators revealed that
secretary, was not Ra-
an impostor who. appa-
ed the world to know
vate Secretary of Juan
disappeared in Haiti. A
e left this case unpubli-
'al days later, the 29th
eightman invasion force
lines and overshadowed
rliich was under Police
at -the tire.


Latest To Vanish

it was the Colombian Legation in
Port au Prince that drew the Pub-
lic's attention to the disappearance
of Senor Velazquez with a notice in
the daily newspapers of the 'Capit-
al asking for information as to the
whereabouts of this Colombian Na-
tional who left his Hotel room Satur-
day, May 16th and- failed to return.
turn.
Described by persons with whom
he came in contact during his brief
appearance here, as being a ,man
(Continued on page ?)


ippe Confines
SPresident


of health -of the Presid-
Republic,at week's end,
o be continuing to im-
satisfaction of his.doct-

, Monday morning, that
Doctor Francois Duvalier
d confined to bed, was
med by. an, official cruni-
om thfe Ministry of C'or-
id Information. The,- bulle-


nn.on mthe siate-o nthe Presidt stat-
ed that, he had been confined to bed
since the 'day before 'and that he
was progressively recovering from
an' attack of influenza. Signed by
Dr. Jacques Fourcand, the Presid-
ent's private physician, the bulletin
stated that several days rest had
been counselled.'
The illness of President DuvaliFi-
-is continuing to cause concern here.
and'letters and cablegrams are pou-
ing in from the- Provinces and ab-
oad, as well as those expressed in
the local peess sending wishes for a
speedy recovery.
' This is the first time in eighteen
months of working almost around
the clock, that President Duvalier
, has been. ailing. The non-smoking,
notl-drinking Chief of State's workday
is ope of the most gruelling of ant'
of Haiti's Presidents. ,
Rising at 5:00 A.M., it is ofte-n
2:00 o'clock in the morning before
he finally leaves his desk in Palais


National for a few hours of sleep.
The President has been ordered b.3
his doctors to rest up and shorten
his long' work-day..
4JpctPors D. K!?iel" an.d, -La-wrnce
Cone, specialists from New York
were summoned for consultations
on the patient's case, on Thursday.


D. L .F. L(

Artibolit
A loan of $4-,300,000.00 to complete
irrigation works in the Artibonite
Valley has been granted' the Haitian
Government by the "Development
Loan Fund." This will permit cover-


"MR. DEMOCRAT" REVISITS HAITI


MONTANA reception Mr. Farley (Center) 'with U.S. Ambassador Dr\'-A
and local Coca-Cola Company executive William Guercy.

BIG JIM FARLEY SPENDS TWO DAYS. HERE
ON COCA-COLA BUSINESS
James A. Farley "Mr. Demo- the Coca-Cola operations. He re-,:-
crat" to most old time members of called that in 1949, the Coca-Cola'
the Party3 in the United States. Te- plant occupied a'small building "
visited Haiti for tw6 days this week another part. of the city. On.. this ""I
in connection withs his Coca-Cola trip, he said :he was impressed with-
interests. His last trip to this repu- the modern equipment recently, .-_1
blic was in 1949 for the celebratons tailed at the Brasserie. -
of the bicentennial of Port au Prin- "'-.
ce- MONSIGNOR 'AUGUSTo stE
Accompanied by Juan Basseda, OBSERVES CONSECRATION'..,.::
Regional Manager of the Caribbean ANNIVERSARY .. -
Division of the Coca-Cola Export. -. :'
Corporation, 'the 71-year-old finan.- Today, May 31st, brings a-::
cial and political giant had to make anniversary marking the Ejis.cd l
his call on Haiti brief in order to Consecration of Monsignor '
meet a tight schedule to visit ten Augustin, Auxiliary to the.'Arehi
different countries in eight days. op of Port' au Prince, and' the-i'
Haitian- to be named to the'Cath6lii
Mr. Farley was conducted on a Bishopry. ,,
tour of the bottling plant by Bras- On this occasion, MoAsignor A ._-
serie de la Couronne Manager, Ri- gustin is receiving the hommage.
chard J. Forrham, and was. pleased of the faithful followers of the Cath.
to note the many improvements in olic Church, on the eve of begi hi
his sixth .ear. .
The disti riguihed prelate i:..a'''
00'A~ N FO R member of a Haitian family,whict;,)
D a counts two priests and fQour,',n n=
e Signed among its numbers; .,. ,:

The aims of this agreement revole LETTER TO .
about Haitian-American technical -
cooperation in the maintenance, full THE EDITOR
utilization, and intensive agricultur- "iJ.-t;
al development of the vast Valley. CN: 8 Avril 1959.. '


ing an area of 32,375 Hectares of At the present time only one-third
land. of this area possesses a complete
irrigation system. The main canals
The Agreement between the Ame- have already, been fmislied, but
rican and- Haitian Government was work still remains on the- creation
signed at Port au Prince on May of secondary canals and irrigation
29th by Haiti's Minister of Finance drains.
Andre Theard, and USOM Director The money, coming from the -*De-
Harry, W. Yoe, after the signature development Loan Fund" will be used
in Washington, on May 28th, by the to complete the canals which will
Hawhan Ambassador and a repre- then bring irrigation water to an
sentative of the "Development Loan additional area of 23,000 hectares.
Fund." ODVA Director, Agronomist and
This agreement which compliments Economy Expert, Garvey Laurent,
the loan accord is dedicated to tech- clippered to the U.S. this week on
nical cooperation between the OD a special mission to Washington in
VA and ICA in the Artibonite Valley. connection with the project.


coffee And Economic


Deve


In my opinion the role of the for- by William B. 'GATES can be extremely difficult or relati-
eign expert in the economic develop- vely easy, primarily depending upon
nment field is a quite limited one. velopment Ties in with coffee how generally and how strongly eco-
Whether e o n o mi c development in the Haitian Case. nomic development is desired by the
takes place or not in most low per III-A Description, of a Coffee educated class 'of -the country con-
capita income countries is 75 per Research Adventure. cerned. When it is difficult, as is
cent up to their own educated class- IV-And finally an Appeal' for usually the case in the low per ca-
es. These people already know most Help on a Research Problem. pita income countries ,joday, there
of the requirements for growth any- I--Some General Remarks about is little' purpose in attempting to con-
way. In the second place I have Development ceal that fact, nor to conceal the
come to Haiti to learn rather than The most widely accepted defini- fact that even availability of size-
to advise. Nonetheless, a Professor tion of economic development is a able capital sums from abroad will
always enjoys lecturing preferab- steady, cumulative rise in income not make the task an easy one. (As
ly to a polite, captive audience. per capital. In the free world and an aside, in Haiti there is a good
My talk is divided into four parts particularly when dealing with a deal of evidence that the long-run
- each of which will be excessively peasant economy this definition trend 'in per capital income over
brief: probably also implies that the. rise the last 75 years. may well have
I-Some General Remarks about in income must be rather widely been down rather' than up. This
Development. shared. could hardly be called an encourag-'
IT-Some of the Ways that De- Starting such a cumulative process ing observation.)


MICHEL C. AUGUSTE, Avt'.'.
Roe des Miracles, Port-au-Princed,'
Port-au-Prince, May 25th, .1959'" ."7i
To the Editor- of HAITI SUN '
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Dear Mr. Editor, ..-. -
It is only today, owing to the
ness of a friend, that I hav'be e'
aware that your newspaper ha.eall&
e dme to account, inasmulh,..as
am, a Government employe'twl
than a lawyer everybody ti"Je
(Continued on, pa


lopmena
In order for the task to be eh
the educated people of a codntry..
most have decided that deVelopmentb
is so important that it is worth ehitel-"
to sacrifice many other things whi d'i
they cherish. For example, develop-'?
ment tends to be relatively .easy.
where there are the following basic 'a
attitudes and values: ...".
1. Talented people are fascinated-
with practical, dull, routine product
ion problems at home rather than
with the great sparkling world ab-.
road.
2. The intellectual, the artist, the',
person of culture takes a subordli--
ate role in the local prestige sysem
to the factory manager, the extend
sion worker, and fhe village schoi-o'--
teacher. (Continued on page)


4::... ':---: s-.. ats: ,


Sun







. .PA .. .' .,.-: .
P.AG.E.2 -, ... .'7,


"HAITH SUN"


SUNDAY: .~


COLOMBIAN VANISHES: BRINGS
S,. > MISSING SCORE TO 3

(Continhied from page 1)
..4.-- :, ,- ,- .. '
s' 'rnall statue, slim -and two front. Mrs. Perena alerted Mexican .au-
"mising under a well -trimed thoities when she heard no word
ustahe. from her husband who was accus-
.. Senor Velazquez was believed last tomed to cable her from very
sn-when he took a taxi to down country he visited during his sales
tb i' Port au Prince where he
alighted at La Belle Creole telling trps.
.A;''Athe Chauffeur he would take anoth- The Mexican Government sent its
r 'er Cab 'to return to the El Rancho. Foreign Office Section of Justice of-
i-'The missing man on the eve of ficial, Doctor Cardenas to investig-
..is disappearance was reported to atethe case. and after verifying on
hs..'i-h've. dined with Dominican Military Perena's presence and departure
;.,Atat.he Colonel Luis Trujillo and from Haiti,. left on March 30th to
-'o ladies. embassyy Councellor, Se- continue investigation in Ciudad
ir Dr. Fed. A. Didiez Burgos de- Trujillo.
'itdlared this week the report 'was Mexican, Investigator, Senor Don
-. -false and this affair had nothing to Melchor Cailrdenas Gonzales, follow-
d.-4do' with them. "See the Colombian ed Perena's trail and his findings
'egation", he advised, have not been made public.
i Colombian Minister Ernesto Es- Perena. arrived in Ciudad Trujillo
querra Serrano admitted he in 1939 as an immigrant Spanish
had interested Iimself in the case Refugee to the Dominican Republic.
ti' of his missing countryman and was He had sailed from the horrors of
n t.he.act of gathering information the Civil War in Spain with empty
an effort to trace the man. He pockets and a pregnant wife.
^.'asholding a diplomatic- tight lip When the couple opened up a pri-
on other details and information mary school, "Christobal Colon"- in
r-hi.ch could only be obtained the Dominican Republic, Trujillo's
through his Foreign Office. son, Ramfis, was among the stud-
Petionville Polie haive the case ents. This was reported an economy
S tldJiider investigation and it is expect- ic flop and after a year he went
S':Pt>ed, 'that the Criminal Research Bu- broke and closed down the school.
.reauwill be called in on the case. To make a living, Perena started
.FLEW WEST giving private English and Litera-
'There months ago, Alfredo Perena ture lessons to rjch Dominicans,
43 1ales manager of Hormona Lab- but insecurity and poverty badger-
t -o.qratpries of Mexico City, on a reg- ed the family.
-.- ir .,sales trip through the Caribb- The Perenas moved to Mexico
eL-. took PAA flight 433 (Feb. 20) City in 1941 where he became a na-
S:.A'-t "Bowen Field for Ciudad Trujillo. turalized Mexican citizen in 195Q.
..He has never, been head from Finding, work in 1947'with the Phar-
maceutical Company, he travelled
k-^'"Twvo days after Senor Perena's yearly, covering Venezuela, Cuba,
i eparture, Haitian Pharmacist Jo- Haiti' the Domiican Republic,
seph C. Valme who has '.been the Puerto Rico and Mexico.
A,'^representative of Hormona since The mysterious disappearance of
sincee 1949, received a short cable three foreigners during the year,
.rom Horrona's Ciudad Trujillo some observers feel, follows too
1',gent Jose Roldam asking for news close a pattern with political over-
ot Perena. The' astonished Valme tones to be marked down as isolat-
S,.after checking, airport and immigra- ed cases of amnesia or individuals
ton~cabled his reply that Perena
..-" .cabled his reply tha Pernaattempting to lose their old iden-u
%,'Xlhad taken flight 433 at 3:30 Februa-
-t ity and take on a new one. Some
i'ry 20th for Ciudad Trujillo.
"-" FWebruary 26 Hormona director in believe an international detection
%01 exico' telephoned asking Valme agency should be called in to help
Sfbr ,confirmation of the reply give clear up these disappearance and
oldam 'and to further enquire into put an end to the using 9f this Isl-
O'k.APerena's movements and possible and by individuals or a foreign un-
-,whereabouts. friendly power in an effort attempt-
Mrt Valme described Perena as ing to smear the Repubic with a
a quiet sober man, devoted to his e similar to Jesus Calindez.
,job and family back in Mexico. On
this, his fifth trip to Haiti, he was
n the act of transferring the agen- 0
cy to Importer Lelio Bailly. Mr. -
Valme, in his 35-year-old-Rue des
Miracles Pharmacy was unperturb-
ed over the losing of the agency.,.
Mr. Bailly said he had one meet-
ing with Perena during which the -
Salesman showed keen interest in
pushing local sales of his compan-
S y' products.
While on his last visit to Haiti,
Alfredo Perena stopped at Hotel Ri-
viera from February 18th to 20th
of this year, and left for Ciudad .
I ...- . ..i W 1k a .


Trujillo by plane, but according to
Dominican authorities, he never
reached the Dominican Republic
and nobody seems to have had news
of him since.


LtC PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUUt
HAITIENNES



I PLACE GEFFRARD e_-'


TODAY IS DEDICATED TO ALL
THE MOTHERS OF HAITI

The Republic today is animated
with the sentiments of "Mothers'
Day, when all bow in hommage to
that glorious being whom no one
can replace in the lives of her child-
ren. Haiti's national observance of
this tradition goes back 25 years
when President Louis Borno, talent-
ed poet, adhered to the proposals
of a group of eminent citizens who
felt that the country' should conse-
crated a special day to MOTHERS
as practiced through the years in
many countries of the New World.
The First Mothers' Day in Haiti
was fixed for the last Sunday in
June, but provision was made for
future years to have the date esta-
blished for the last Sunday in Ma.,
And so today all the county's
sons and daughters will have the
opportunity of honoring their moth-
ers and of making her know that her
love and tender care has made life
more beautiful. A red flower if she
is alive, a white one if she has gone
on to the place reserved for, her
in heaven.



LIBERIAN AMBASSADOR
WELCOMES
NEW DAUGHTER

Little "Patricia Anne" is the
charming new baby daughter 'of Li-
berian Ambassador and Mrs. John
Francis Marshall, born Monday,
May 25th, tipping the scales at 7
pounds. Their first child, Janette,.
now two years old, was. born in LIn-
don .a few months before her par-
ents left for their post in Haiti.
At Dr. Poux' Clinic, on Rue Rivie-
ra, mottber and daughter are re-
ported in excellent form.

They will return to the Embassy
residence early this week to begin
preparations tq receive grandpar-
ents, former Liberian President and
Mrs. W. A. King, parents of 'Mrs.
Marshall who are scheduled to ar-
rive in Haiti early in June, Mr.
King is presently a member of the
Government Council of Liberia, and
was formerly his country's Ambas-
sador to Washington.



FORMER "JULY 26" COORDI-
NATOR ARRIVES HERE TODAY

Senor Celestino Fernandez Suarez,
Inspecteur General of the--Cuban
Sugar Mills is due to arrive here"
l'jay by Delta flight 401.
Mr. Celestino Fernandez who was
Coordinator-Adjoint of the "July 26
Movement" in the Antilles is expec-
ted to spend several days in the
Capital.


CANADIAN
LEAVING


ENVOY


Canadian Ambassador Allard is
expected to come to Haiti next
month to take leave of the Presid-
ent Duvalier and his government as
he is returning to Canada.


LOAN OKAYED FOR ARTID
IRRIGATION TO BE CONTi]
.* .,fi.


L:I


'k r'~.'r F ~rA~ W\P
C,. -A ~.,--~'t *-:-~~
4 4Q~r t;' -
~:'
~ ~~tv~4,1


A view of the three year old Peligre dam which
Ibe Artibonite Valley.


JULY 29 REPORT "
The report o0.1 the abortive inva-
sion of Haiti last summer by sev-
eral Dade Country deputies has
been effectively squelched.
The 200-page report, prepared by
ormer FBI agent Charles Mathews
or a fee of $5,000 was carefully
kept secret. Simultaneously, both
Federal and Miami authorities clos-
ed the case.
Only unofficial mention of the con-


tents was made by. a
reporter, Bella Kelly,wi
it as detailing "enoug&i
al skullduggery to maki
elly look like an amateur
"Not only were they''(,t
teamed up with. plitieal'
killed'in the plot, bufthe;
links them to former' .
two countries and a .e
two."
(DOMINICAN.


ARGENTINE -CHARGE D'AFFAIRES ',
AT "ECOLE REPUBLIQUE ARGENT
anniversary, of the Mayi'25


Argentina Charge d'Affaires Fede-
'ico Massott spoke at the SchooL of
he Republic.of Argentina here,'this
week, before the large student body
and *staff of ,.his establishment, on
Monday mornjhg.
The diplomat described the cross-
ing. ot the Andes Mountains on May
25, 1810 by, the Argentine Army, in
his lecture.
In the evening' the historic event
was commemorated by a large re-
ception at the Argentine Embassy
in Bourdon. The celebration of a new


tory, however, was sadd'
announcement of the deai&
-American, former U.S
State, Mr. John Fs.d
Charge d'Affaire sa
to his guests.
A ininute of sienc
the Statesman was then.
the 'request- of the ,hM
,Among" .the disthng
attending the -receptfoli
Chiefs of the differgtt.
Missions' accredited- if'
ce. .


The above painting is the work of the wellknown Hdt
woman Artist Luce Turnier


DISCOVER THE FASCINATE

OF HAITI

Through Its Postage Stain

For complete information in H!
Stamps and other details which .
furnished you free of charge, w.i
D.O Box 723 Port-au-Port-aiu-


.,,'.


=67


7777


"-'.s


I




* .- : ,-- ._-.- -- .


WAY MAY 31st 1959


'HELMET SA VES SLEEPING


Engineer In


A t Wluminiuni construction worker's
helrbet is credited with saving the
w of Engineer Jean Vorbe ~ ho was
Seeping with it over his face when
l-automobile in which he.was rid-
ished into the side of a large
port on the St Marc -Port au
ce highway. He is, convaleasing
hat home with a broken rib and
Sed nose and arm. Mr. Vorbe's
o companions are back at work
t recovered from their head
and arm injuries.
Engineers Jean Vorbe and Raoul
1Mallebranche and MarceJ Alphonse
were returning to Port from their
wharf construction job with Sedren
at 2 p.m. Saturday in a Volkswagen
i'hen a camion in the process of be-
."ing manovered by a mechanic sudd-
'"enly blocked the road.
.'When the small automobile cash-
ed into the side of the camion Raoul
Mallebranche was at the wheel and



Chicago P



Chicago-born Barbara A u b i n is
here on a Fulbright Fellowship 'for
a year's painting in- the bright tro
pical sun. One Fullbright fellowship
holder comes to Haiti each year.
Differing from her predecessors
in that she has displayed keen inte
rest in Art as taught in the school
here, Barbara has given much c


her time to instruction and advice.
She has created great enthusiasm
among art students af4the Centre
d'Art in Port au Prince where she
conducts Tuesday and Thursday
classes.
Her present scholarship brought
there to Haiti on October 4, 1958,
after she was given a leave of ab-
sence as a reward-fdr her work at
the Department of Exhibition at the
University of Wisconsin. She *had
taught, drawing, painting, design
and artistry at the University and at
the Art Institute of Chicago during
summer courses.
Miss Aubin studied painting under
the best teachers, including Louis
Ritmnan, who spent seventeen years
in Paris, before coming to
teach at the Art Institute of Chica-
go.
Barbara Aubin is the, happy win-
ner of many prizes, her first was
in 1953 for her work exhibited at the
International Water Show of the
Pennsylvania Academy. She won the
Purchase Award from the. Walker
Art Center in Minneapolis.
She spent ten months in Italy, and
, five. weeks in France where she
K painted in both these countries Lnd-
er special teachers, and later studi-
-ed in Florence.
Last year she received prizes
from the Wisconsin Salon of Art, and
holds cups from many Art Exhibits.
The young artist has been includ-
ed in JnuI Exhibitions in New York,
Chicago, Florida, Alabama, Penn-
sylvania, Wisconsin, San Francisco
and St. Louis. Her works are on
exhibit at the Art Rental Gallery in


Auto Smash


ean Vorbe was in the front seat
eside dim sleeping with his helmet
over his face.
Engineer Vorbe awoke in hospital.
lIe had to forego his bridge date at
,ellevue.


TWO VIRGIN
ISLANDERS HERE

Two Virgin Islanders spent two
ays here this week at the Castel-
aiti. Miss Zeatha Arrhstrong on her
third visit here, and Mrs Inez Baird
her first) arrived Thursday from
amnaica, stating they could not risk
osing an opportunity to spend a
moment with their friends of Haiti,
ve'n though for business reasons it
ad to b& brief. They left Saturday
n the return trip to St. Thomas, V.
1.


"HAITI SUN"


RESORT AIRLINES TO BEGIN
WEEKLY PACKAGE VACATIONS


winterr Helping Local Artists

On Fullbright


Barbara Aubin with one of her recent works


'hicago, -the Waker Art Center in
linneapolis, the Coptemporary Gal-
ery of Evanston, 11., Cromer and
Juint Gallery in Chicago.
Her affiliations include the Chica-
So .Chapter of the Artists Equity, the
collegee -Art Association 6f America.
he, is a member of the Renaissance
Society of the University of Chicago,
.nd has written many articles for
Art Magazines including the North
hore Art League News. Miss Au-
-in has worked on a Dictionary of
Art.
Her activities as a lecturer are
sell appreciated by audiences in
hicago Milwaukee and Evanston,
nd she spent a period demonstrat-
ng jewelry designs in the WGNTV
f Chicago.
Barbara is packing French less-
ns into her busy Haitian schedule,
nd she teaches English at the Hal-
'an American Institute here on Sat-
rdays.
An admirer of the early Italian
pointers, and also El Creco Modi-
liani, she admires the animated
oloring. She also admires Haitian
artist Antonio Joseph "for his sense
f being an artist he has the
heart and soul of an artist."
Miss Aubin is an abstract painter.


Her sense of colors is deeply dev
oped. Something beautiful sing i
within her and she expresses it i
a rainbow of rambling s.yibo
which "seem to come from somu
where beyond the range of her con
ious faculties and to extend into
here of meaning which. transcend
national comprehension." As an ab
tract painter she has her own style
The 'beholder enjoys first, the fies
of colors in her works before reaching
he gracefulness in the movement
I the symbols. All the-e symbols a
hown in a rainbow of colors, ha
nony, music soft and pure.
The noted artist possess an u
early desire and ability to explo
hat which is on the other side .
he apprehensible (like the po
likee. She is on a permane
earch for images.
By Aubelin JOLICOEUR


*. *.*; C' '


PAGE 3







IL.....
........


A series of Afteen day package
vacations to Haiti and Jamaica will
be offered by Resort Airlines each
Saturday from June 27th through
September 12th.
At an all-expense cost of $389
which includes round-trip air trans-
portation from New York and stays
at hotels on the islands, those taking
phe trips spend a week on each isl-
and, with sight-seeing and recreat-
ional activities arranged.

IERS HARRY YOE IN GITMO
FOR OPERATION
Mrs Harry Yoe, wife of, the US
IM director, few to Guantanalno
a .ly this week for a medical check-
ip and possible operation.
Mrs Yoe is an active member of
he American Women's Association
f Haiti which was former here by
rives of members of the USOM in
laiti as a means to promote mutual
interests :and charitable endeavors.
Prior to this illness Mrs Yoe was
n. bed for several weeks with a foot
injury.


Is
e-
s-
a
ds
s-
e.
ta
ig
ts
re
ir-

in-
re
of
)et
nt


SECRETARY WANTED

Must be experienced, and have
knowledge of bookkeeping. Com-
petence in English language ne-
cessary. Steady work.
Apply in person to
CARLOS PEREIRA
Rue Pavee


MRST CLASS PASSENGER SERVICE


ORPTAU-PUU"" -



NEW YORK
WEST 24th STREEa
Only 3 h bys direct to the center o uew Yprk
Cit modern American Flog Cruse hips
ANCON CndFriOAys
Sailings Mondays anvcd ridy'

a oWAltcoNBDIoNE DD9ING4 SALON
onrJ)Oo rTILED S fWUtpoOL
250 IBS. BA 60 ALLOWAI


As abort round-triP sea-air tickets.
Comple accate information only I
iASTEAM SHIP LINE
PAN AMA e .0
Rue Abraham LincoN 36


p


-T





-a


Mr Farley conversing with Regional Coca-Cola man-ager Juan' Bassed"i
(left) and local Representative Richard Forgham.

JAMES J. FARLEY HERE
(Continued from page 1)

He enjoyed an informal chat with the post in 1949. .
employees at the Cotes Plage resid- It was n 1946 tha( James Fgrlg y-,
ence of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Forgh- was appointed Chairman of the B-'
am, on Monday afternoon, ard of Directors of the Cbca-.Cdla.5
Born in Grassey Point, New York, Export Corporation. He was also
Farley's extensive academic back- Board Chairman of the Coca ..Col4a
ground includes diplomas from Lin- Bottling Companies of Boston,,-
coin Memorial University, an LL.D. Canada, of i Rhode Island. .'. .
from Villananova College, Cinisius An inveterate Democrat, Big ,ri-r
College, the John Marshall College Farley is one of the few men .wbd1
of Law, Seattle University, a D. became a legendary figure .. -..
C. S. from New York University, hi stlie time. Perhaps his most. ti..
and Suffolk University. standing role in the AmericAni' poli-
His first job was a bookkeeper tor tical scene was during, his p.st ps
the Merlin Heilholtz Paper Coinpa- Postmaster General of the- Unitted4i
ny in New York in 1906, after gra- States duri'ig the Franklin Delaio
duating from the Packard ComrriL--. Roosevelt era.
ciai Schodl. He later became Sales His career in 'his owni Nev #--:O
Manager of the Universal Gypsum State began with a Town. Glerkljcih-
Company, but in 1926, he organi,- at Story Point. N. Y. in 1912.
the James A. Farley ,.& Company was later Supervisor of' RocIkna :-
and this firm merged with ,ive ot-." County, Poet Warden of the Potf-
er building material firms as the of .New York, and in 1923 becamem.
General Builders Supply Cori-.orat- a member and later ChairmanLo'4.
ion. He served as its President-Di- the New Y'or State Athletic Coni,,
rector until 1933; was reelected to (C'ar.ntinred on page 4rai,

4.' *. "' s
17A, W1.4 '



n "A,.y r'.7 ,
",, ", z: & A, 9.







iPAIGE 4


sNAFu SUN. SLN!I


I-EISH S9ZE OF SUB SIGHTED OFF GERMAN TOURIST,
-COAST HERE'
TO HAIT
A. fish,-which caught his attention
and'ivas recorded on film by Itali- ty i]elligent citizens of West-
rann Captain Claude Idoluca of the Germany are going to escape
Costa Rican freighter SS "BORDA-
SCCO) off the coast of Haiti, this the rigors of winter and journey in-
week, is believed to be a monster. to the sun this year after reading a
an doua whose small folder put out last month advertis-
.* ptain Idoluca whose small e
Dutch-built vessel goes into Dry uig a guided tour to the Caribbean
Dock here this week, told friend by the German Automobile Club.
Claude Stephen, on arrival, that tie ADAC's dapper Travel Dept. head
monster was neither a whale, a flew in to Port this week from Mu-
shark or a ray. Nor was it like any
E.fish he had previously sighted ott iucl to acquaint himself with tour-
his years of cruising on the seven
^^-" seas..
-. He "shot" parts of the, giant fish FEMININE" HOLDING
-with his Japanese Richo camera, MOTER'S DAY FESTIVAL
as they broke water, the tail, when AT FRENCH INSTITUTE
-'.first sighted ,he said, gave him the HIS IMORNING
"impression of a submarine breaking
Ssunface. When he closed the dist-
ance between the fish and the boat, The "L i u e Feminine d'Action
'it opened its mouth, but this shot Sociale" is organizing a Festival
which would have been the best of this morning at the French Institute
:the pictures, was lost because there in celebration o Mothers Day.
was no film left in celebration of Mother's Day.
Mrs. Denise Idoca arrived from During the fete, the drawing of
Puerto Rico to spend the Dry dock the lucky numbers in the League's
--i'i.time with her husband in Haiti. She Lottery will take place, and many
,is a member of the Benitz Resach other attractions await the public.
familyy. Hotel Normandy owner and
: ", Miss Marie-Therese Colimon heads
Z,';proprietor of several yachts includ-
:' 'ing the "Moineau." he 25-year-old Women's League.





HOTEL SALVADOR

Petionvile

CORNER OF RUE GREGOIRE & RUE VILATTE

SRestaurant

IDUCK a l'orange FILET MIGNON
B B TER au ihium STEAK au poivreC
AMBaI. a la sauce rustique 'OHICKEN a l'Haitienne

SEuropean Plan

Every Room With Private Bath


Single:- $0.00 Double: $7.00

S For further information write:

ANTOINE DUPOUX P.O. Box 474
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Telephone: 7894






40




I ; -
.













tht', Why ever



hits he mark,




-OF HRITI S-.A"


S TO OPEN TOUR
I BY AIR

ist problems along the route his first
group will travel this October.
Herr Rudolf Flaxa who makes
headway in French as well as his
native language, explained how his
countrymen, bitten centuries ago by
the travel bug, responded to a tour
set up by the Automobile Club to
Belgium Congo in such numbers that
three trip had to be arranged.
The sixty German tourist will in-
augurate the tour from Europe to
the Caribbean via New York in a
chartered KLM sky liner. Mr. Fla-
xa is convinced this tour will be-
come regular and popular with his
countrymen.
Delighted to learn that german
was not an unknown language here.
Mr. Flaxa conversed with George
Kenn Manager of Hotel Montana and
Choucoune where the tourist will
stop and Andy Andersen of Souther-
land tours. It was pointed out to Mr
Flaxa that there are numerous Hai-
tian students of his language.


JAMES FARLEY


(Continued from page 3)


mission. In 1955 he was a member
of the New York State Banking Bo-
ard.
He also served on the New York
State Assembly.

His decorations and citations in-
clude the Order Francisco de Mi-
randa of Venezuela, the award for
distinguished contribution to the ad-
%ancement of America foreign trade
from the Captain Robert Dollard
IMlemorial, the Freedoms Foundation
Award of 1953, the American Irish
Historical Society award of 1956,
and Spain's Cross of Isabel la Ca-
tolica.

Mr. Farley is affiliated with a
number of clubs and associations,
including the Pan American Society,
Inc., and the Knights of Columbus.
He has been 2nd Vice-President of
the National Democratic Club of
New York since 1930. and is a mem-
ber of the National Press of Wash-
inglon.

He has written three books: "Be-
hind the Ballots" 1938); "Jim Far-
ley's Story" (194S', and "Why I
Broke With F.D.R."
A widower since the death of his
wife, the former Elizabeth A. Finn-
egan. in January 1955, James A
Farley lies at 301 Park Avenue. in
New York, and keeps offices at
515 Madison Avenue
Oi his visit to Haiti this week, lie
called at Hotel Ibo Lele to see an
old friend, Andre Roosevelt who
has lived in Haiti the past ten years
and manages the big hotel in the
mountain resort town of Petion-
ViLle.
Upon leaving on the next leg of
his Caribbean and South American
tour, Mi. Farley expressed hius re-
grets that an interview with Presi-
den tDuvalier had to be cancelled
due to Doctor Duvalier's being ill
at the moment. He made calls,
however, upon U.S. Ambassador


PUBLIC INDIGNATION HIGH
OVER DESECRATION OF CAL-
VARY AND STATUE OF
CHRIST BY VANDALS

Twice the past week, persons un-
known, committed nocturnal acts of
desecration and vandalism, includ-
ing an attack on the religious land-
mark in Bel-Air known as *"Calval-
re". Public indignation is demand-
ing that the vandals be hunted down,



Gerald A. Drew at the American
.Embassy, and also visited the Arch-
bishop of Port au Prince, Monsi-
gnor Francois Poirier.
He had entertained the American
Ambassador, the Embassy Counsel-
loi Williams and a small group of
local business people at a supper
party, at Hotel Montana, on the eve
'of his departure.


and in the. zpne .
se tup a .night squa.
the sacred plade._ A:
On Wednesday night'
the home of Inspeta
ce, Volcy Sanon, at R 0
was besmeared in a ni
member of the local pi
as "inqualifiable.": T i
made out a complaint i'agi
sons unknown" and..a
ice protection. Hi- comp- S
that he had been threa
At Bel-Air, the ram
tinued Fridqy night,
converging upon the'st
Calvary. The Chrit w
similar smearing, an th
the three statues were,. r
electric bulbs lighting' th
group were lifted'by thi
Police have thrown outal
in view of bringing thie
justice. i


'I ,,


You cruise l up to 600 miles per hour in the
wonderful new let World af Pan American


PARIS


*:^^

*, .. .

;, i: .


":;*-'V,

"-; '. e .
... 4J;



'


LON.O
.: .


FLY THE


ATLANTIC IN TI


WORLD'S


- 4.. .

I,


FASTEST JETS _-

Only Pan American flies mighty Boeing 7O",
Jet Clippers* from NewYork to London,YaRi
and Rome... and only Pan American offers-
Economy Class fares for jet travel. Six out:
of seven jet travelers to Europe choose PL,'
American. To arrange your flight to Euro4P.
by Jet Clipper see your Travel Agent or


AJLV AVIE RFLCA LV
WORLD'S MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE ,

Rue Dantes Destouches-Port au Prince-Tel: 345l

9 "I


SLNm


aHAFIT SUN





IUNDAY MAY 31st 1959


"EAITI g1W-,


-H HAITI SUN
THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
OrERANT-RESPONSABLE PAUL E. NAJAC
ESTABLISHED IN 1950
'7

DECREE 365 ARBOR DAYS A YEAR IN HAITI

Arbor Day this past week drew a s mango whereas other non-
: short sguib in newspapers and on fruit hearing trees will go to market
; the radio and one of Haiti's chief s charcoal or salad bowls.
ills moved into another year with- fts the rainy season that swings
out any drastic cure being sighted. he spotlight on to erosion.
"The hard working new Minister Almost daily the Repub[li's rich
of. Agriculture spoke his part but top-soil may be seen coating the
the gigantic task of even halting oulevards of the Exposition city,
erosion brought on futile sighs and knany miles from its source of ori-
only a few discussions on practical in the mountain farms. At the
remedies. iouth %f the Bois de Chene, the
In the barber's chair 'this past ich deltas are growing bigger with
S ach rain. The rich soil from which
week Prince distillery manager
SJean Fouchard described how he
covered a bald hill on his planta- rops sprang has now a verdant
tion with inexpensive flamboyant
seeds which took root and sprouted Along the coast the azure of the
up without any trouble or labor be- ea has changed to br6wn.
l ing involved. An idea, according to Up in the hills, where the earth
should be firmly knit by the restrain-
Mr. Fouchard would be to drop tons
So seed from a plane over the Rep- lig roots of trees, ragged limestone
uhlic's bald mountains, to check ero- ock, and long sweeps of marl and
sion. gravel are relentlessly thrusting
*.. through the threadbare top-soil.
Contractor Gerard Theard receiv- Every day should be decreed Arbor
ing his monthly trim -neither men Day in Haiti.
appeared to be handicapped by er- If the land is left unforested and
osion volunteered that he has are, the holdings that once brought
planted fruit bearing trees on somq vehhood to the planters of the hills,
land he has in the country. His the- 'ill be bald elbows of bleached
ory being, that the country people Imestone productive of nothing but
will not cut down a fruit tree such- ock and "sable".



LATIN-AMERICAN AFFAIRS.,

The steady development of new policies toward Latin Ame-
rica and the expansion of previous efforts by the United
States are assuming gratifying proportions. In these days
we have seen- an economic meeting in Buenos Aires which
achieved some satisfying results; a request by President
Eisenhower to Congress for an appropriation of $450,000,000
as the United States contribution to the new Inter-American
Development Bank; the opening of discussions in Panama
looking toward the formation of common markets with our
blessings; discussions on stabilizing the 'production and
prices of lead and zinc; and a thoughtful, farsighted report
by the House Subcommittee on Inter-American Affairs.
It is no accident that the attention and policies of our
country toward Latin America are being intensified and de-
veloped today .Such policy movements are necessarily a res-
ponse to pressures, demands and necessities. Any nation has
to be concerned primarily with its own interests. A country
like ours, with global responsibilities of a political nature and'
vast trade and investment dealings, naturally finds that its
well-being and security depend .,on the well-being and the
goodwill of many other nations. Ip our case this is especially
true of the Western Hemisphere, whose peace and prosper-
ity are of vital importance to us.
The extent to which our policies and our failure to meet
the aspirations of Latin-American nations had been building
up a dangerous resentment against us was brought drama-
tically to our attention when Vice President Nixon made his
trip to South America last May. The decree to which
criticisms of the United States were unjust or based on mis-
understandings is almost beside the point. Latin-American
feelings may be partly irrational, but they are also partly
justified, and this is what must be faced.
There is still much progress to be made. Even so good a
- friend of the United States as the distinguished ex-President
of Costa Rica, Jose Figueres, could tell the Overseas Press
Club last week: "I've just finished a tour of Latin America
and I'm afraid that anti-U.S. and anti-Western feeling is
.,, growing." Like other Latin-American leaders, Senor Figue-
res believes there must be a more positive program of cornm-
(Continued on page 16)


J
]







I


THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE AGENCY, S. A.
Place Geffrard, Phone: 3216 or 3929

Garage, Rue des Cesars, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Ask also for a demonstration of the Pick-Up and Trucks 'their saving of fuel.
solidity, power and capacity are already universally nmown.
-~-----------


.:.t~
I'.--.'


PAGE _. 5 .,


---- PAGE 5,


thanks to the solicitude o fthe Chief is to be commended for his pain-
of State, a step has been made in staldngly detailed survey, his sym-
the direction of saving the popula- pathetic and understanding descrip-
tion of the Northwest. I thank all tion of the life of ope of those Haiti-
those who in one way or another an women familiarly knpwn, as MA-
have helped to obtain this first DAM SARAH. We very often hear
Port-au-Prince, te 29 Mai 1959. result, and for this reason, I have that this country of ours is carried
Mr. Bernard Diederich the pleasure of sending you a on the heads of our women, and Pro-
Directeur, Haiti Sun heart-felt "Thank you." fessor Mintz shows us vividly how
En Ville In fact, you did not hesitate a true that is.
second ,once news of the sad news
lonsieur le Directeur: vas received a few months ago, to By the way it is a wonder that not
Apres de multiples demarches et o personally to the area to report only the language but also the soul
of our people could be caught so
grace a la solicitude du Chef de with sincerity all that you say in aof ourately and in such a short sotime
'Etat, un pas a ete fait dans le his Department of the Nothwest. accurately and in such a short time
auvetage des populations du Nord' Once again thanks to "Haiti Sun" by a foreigner.
1iuest. phich, as always (we hope) will nev- nOrchids to you also, Mr. editor,
Je remercie tous ceux-la qui d'u- er bargain for its precious support not only for printing such an out-
e facon ou d'une autre ont aide a in the struggle for still better solu- standing article (it is a pity that
btenir ce premier resultat, et, c'est lions. it has not been translated for the
ourquoi je me fais le plaisir de benefit and enjoyment of non-En-
ous envyer Ile plus chaleureux Yours sincerely, glish-speaking Haitians) but for
olerci. Car, vous n'avez pas hesite (s) Candelon Lucas many others features such as "The
ne second des a reception de a Senator of the Republic towns of Haiti", your clear and fact-
ne second des la reception de la '
ual accounts of local happenings, .3'
riste nouvelle, il y a quelques mois, ua accounts of oca happe gs,
THANK PROFESSOR MINTZ your continuous plug-ins for Haiti's
vous rendre en personnel sur les
eux, pou rapporteur aec sncerte To the Editor of HAITI SUN tourism and many more.
eu.x, pour rapporteur avec since te Dear Editor: Keep up the good work.
e que vous aviez vu dans ce depar- a w ga
ement. 1 hate read with great pleasure
NANA OF DUVERGET. The author SATISFIED READER.
Encore une fois Merci a Haiti Sun
qui, come toujours, (nous i'espe- '-.
ons) ne march andera pas son pre-
ieux appui dans la lutte pour des BEST IN CAP-HAITIEN
solutions encore meilleures. UfiOa a s1'A .
VeuiUez agreer, Monsieur le Di- HOSTELLERIE 'DU ROI CHRISTOPE
ecteur, mes salutations distinguees.
CANDELON LUCAS e The Most Wonderful Hotel in Haiti
Senateur de la Republique New York Times

The only hotel in town with:
.ort au Prince, May 29, 199. n. ". mminnl
fr. Bernard Diederich, A r Conditioned Rooims. wn r 1
Director, Haiti Sun, Tropical park Magnificent verandas-.l
city. i Tennis court.
Mister Director: 0 "
After multiple efforts made and THE BEST FOOD OF HAITI



SENSATIONAL


THE AMERICAN VEHICLE, IDEAL FOR HA I T I

It is the LARKa manufactured by STUDEBAKER-PACKARD
CORPORATION. Neither large nor small or rather, large and small at once
Offering all the advantages of large cars, 6 to 7 passengers,
Stability, Comfort, Power and all the advantages of the small car Low \,
fuel consumption (30 to 32 miles on a gallon.









PAGE 6



'Haiti's Coffee Ani



J 3. The educated people are pre- COFFEE-THE MAINSTAY OF THE
pared to see politics become dull, HAITIAN ECONOMY"
routine, stable, and basically unim-
S' .- portant.
portent. Haiti is still a coffee economy and
4. The general attitude is one of will doubtless remain such for many
living for the future and of calm many years. In my opinion diersi-
acceptance of material and other
-sacrifices now. fiction is a desirable but very long-
l,'w: Tr term objective. In recent years the
,. 5. There is a general willingness indust has onsistely produced,
to see income distribution move in
:Pr favor of growers, processors and sixty to seventy percent of total ex-
I manufacturers and at the expense port values and has contributed
of traders, white collar workers and directly thru export and other tax-
most professionals. es on coffee about twenty-three per-
6. Finally, there exists a real id- cent of government tax revenues. Ap-
entification by the educated classes proxinmately a quarter of the fam-
of their destiny with that of the mass ilies of Haiti are directly involved
.'-"i of the people.
:. Under such circumstances I am in coffee raising, and whether times
j- prepared to say that economic de- are good or bad for the rest of us
q. velopinent will take place fairly ea- depends primarily upon the size of
sily. But a good deal is' sacrificed. the coffee crop and the price obtain-
Perhaps, too much? Whether the sa- e world market.
.. ed in the world market.
S. rifice is worth-while or not is a
v; alue judgement which I am not In the long-run every country fin-
N, prepared to make on behalf of any ances the bulk of its own develop-
-' educated class. Of course, economic ment. Haiti's will be financed direct-
development has taken place in the ly, or much better, indirectly by the
past and will in the future in coun- me
1'"'- tries lacking some -or even many-
qf these attitudes. But one should that tls leads inescapably to two po-
i not expect the initial steps to be licy conclusions. High priority should
-. certain, steady, or rapid. Indeed,.one be given to coffee improvement
should expect substantial waste ofment
effort and capital because basic de- projects in any development pro-
velopmerit bottlenecks have not been gram. Second, great care must be
,. eliminated. By bottlenecks I mean exercised in international coffee quo-
.. Such. things as: ta negotiations to allow for expan-
'. lac; of a strong, stable civil ser- sion of Haitian exports.
vice and of dynamic agricult-
T-- ural extension system
f.'".-"" -COFFEE TYPIFIES THE HAITIAN
lack of security for the peasant DEVELOPMENT PROBLEM
in his land holding or in im-
provemerts he may make on Coffee in Haiti is a peasant indus-
.,,. -r"". leased land
S eased land try, widely,.dispersed throughout the
S lack of security for productive country in which technical meth-
property ahd of respect for con- ods have not changed significantly
,_^ .;" ." tracts in the countryside. '
.ts in the courtside. in at least seventy-five years. With
I ---Some of the Ways that Deve- growing population and the narrow
lopment Ties in with Coffee in land reso rce base tins has theant
S. the Haitian Case. that the long-run output and export



NOW ENJOY HI-FI.


5 Radio Pleasure

,'- "














PHILCO TROPIC 103
k'\ INTERNATIONAL 6-BAND RADIO
',: Listen to the High-Fidelity brilliance of this Philco master model and
:you'll thing you're in the studio, so keen and clear is every' programme.
;.,' But that's only one of this model's many fine features: others include:
Complete short wave and standard broadcast reception on 6 Bands.
'Fascinating 'long-low' styling-fully 2ft. in width-with rich walnut
El ".' Gitist cabinet.
.. High-Fidelity sound from speaker network of duo-cone front speaker
and dynamic side speaker.
Be Built-in antenna.
,, .Separate bass and treble audio controls.
kA,..-

A' ..

X'vwss

r ~llI


FIRESTONE INTERAMERICA Co.


"HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY MAY 31st 3


d Economic Deve


(Continued from page 1)


trends have been those of a stagnant
industry. The problem is basically
one of changing agricultural meth-
ods and thereby yields from existing
plantations, improving thie quality
of the product, and developing de-
centralized small-scale processing
near the growing centers.
None of this is news to the pre-
sent audience. And you all know
that the task is not an easy one.
Most of the policy questions in coffee
growing are outside my field of spe-
cial competence. However, in the
past few months I have come acros-:.
several ideas which seem to me to
be worth trying. Further tax discri-
mination in favor of washed coffee
might well be helpful, not only in
improving the product and cutting'
crop losses, but in exerting indirect
pressure for changes in peasant
practices. Easing into cooperatives'
thru small coffee decorticating
plants equipped to handle rice, petit
mnil, and corn, where appropriate,
might be worth trying. And finally
there is much to be said for the
dea of expanding extension workI
thru use of a sizeable corps of cof-
fee "technicians", recruited in the
coffee areas and given brief training
n such fundamentals as nursery de-
velopment, transplanting, mulching,
pruning .clearing, and proper har-
vesting practices. Mark you I do
not put forward the above ideas as
any panacea rather as several
promising weapons which might
well be a part of the general arsenal.

THE INDUSTRY IS HIGHLY
COMPETITIVE


The research I have done empha-
sizes one extremely important fact
about the industry its competitive
nature. The number of firms is large
enough so that competitive bidding
for the crop can be relied upon to
keep exporter margins at reason-
able levels and to pass along chan-
ges in world prices directly to the
producer. This is important since it
relieves government of the onerous
task of price regulation. Essentially"
government's hand is freed in the
case of this industry for the more
important job of directly aiding the
peasant. The competitive structure of
the industry does mean that govern-
ment must reco g ni z2e that tax
changes (up or down) will affect the
peasant in the same fashion as world
price movements.

THE PEASANT RESPONDS TO
PRICE INCENTIVES

Sthdy of Jhe industry indicates that
over a period of years output
(and even more markedly exports)
responds to sustained price changes
up or down. Falling coffee prices in
the late 1890's fits with a twenty
percent decline in average annual
exports in the first decade of tius
century and rising coffee prices cor-
relates wTith virtual recovery of the
ground lost by the late 1920's. And
again declining coffee prices re-


suit in a thirty percent or more con-
traction of exports by the late 1930's.
Although exports have staged a par-
tial recovery since that time, the
great coffee price boom- of the 1950's
has failed thus far to bring recovery
to previous export highs. My study
indicates that, quite possibly, a full
output recovery was underway, but
was cut off by the effects of Hurri-
cane Hazel in the South.

This responsiveness of the indus-
try to price incentive should make
us cautious in the burden of direct
taxation p I a c e d on the industry.
(This past year something like thir-
ty percent of the value of the coffee
crop went to government in the form
of direct taxes.) Price responsive-
ness also raises some interesting re-
search problems which I will turn
to in the final section of this talk.

THE PROBLEM OF ANNUAL OUT-
PUT FLUCTUATIONS

The current development problem
in Haiti is peculiarly difficult in con:
Sequence of violent fluctuations in
the general economy, the balance of
payments position and government
revenues caused by fluctuations
in receipts from coffee. In part such
fluctuations @an be traced to insta-
bility in world coffee' prices, but in
recent years this has been a very
secondary factor. Since 1951-52 each
year has seen a violent .change (up
one year and down the next) in the-
size of the coffee crop. One must go
back to the years proceeding World
War I to find a similar series. Dur-
ing the eight crop years 1951-1952
through 1958-59 the average differ-
ence between successive crops has
been only slightly less than fifty per
cent of the average crop of the pe-
riod.
In the next section of this talk I
will explore the reasons for this phe-
nomena. Before doing so I would


like to say a word or two more ab-
out consequences. Under such cir-
cumstances maintaining a continu-
ous government development progr-
am becomes n e x t t o impossible.
What happens all too often is that, in
good coffee years. the sudden wind-
all is spent on ill-conceived projects


1 ;\'


most carefully conceived',
must be halted. Anything .wi
be done to take advantage bf
tionally gdod coffee year
proceeds to be used to."il
element of stability (howeA
into Haitian Govt td"o
programs would be dai
boon. One aspect of any f
tax revision program in REi
well be not only a readi
the direct tax burden 6n;'.s
industry but also introduction-,
systematic practice -of-ear
funds from the coffee tax.,t
fashion that windfalls f6.lm
average crops or high prices
special development fund.-Se
pose of this fund should be'-u,
Uze direct expenditure for..d'
lopment program or to ac iip
the same objective by se.n.
development loans. Actually,',itti
not be difficult to design.legisql
making a- small start.' atog
proper road. .'

m--COFFEE RESEARCH O '*.-
ADVENTURE '" 'W
I '4
I thought that you might, be .i
ested in hearing about onep
research experience of mini;n
an coffee. It is an expleo
unexpected research results
and how dangerous it is toa
hypothesis without proper
It all began as an 'attdr&i0
cover the reasons for the a
ly violent annual fluctiuaidns
coffee crop a pattern oP.D
ceptionally large crops in f,
years followed by unuua.,il
ones.
There is a standard bi lob.
planation for such fluctuati
seem to characterize the u
many coffee countries: Thi
runs somewhat as follows.
vorable weather conditionsi
a large crop which taxes..
of the plants particularl'y


are old and do not have:e
of fertilizer or adequate
There follows a year W.h
plants rest, and the pa"ttfQi
tablished repeats itself untik
upted by very marked ciai
ors. I am reliably informnied'.i
!:,


while in poor coffee years even the (Continued on.fli



rawwe 'c Me rw& ':n

cr>T?^^.^ ^S*&


Caribbean Construction Co. SA24

Builders Of The Military City-
Gen. Manager: Gerard THEAREh
Phone: 3955. P. 0. BO.. 284 :I|


':- .' .i Z .I.:. -




SAY .' "
~ JDYMY31st 1959 'HATI SUr : ':PAGE ~ 7 ii


Do Your
2 = 1*. .


,.1
U.


It is getting so that people are
'. taking vacations as much to
; shop as to play golf, lounge inr.
'M- the sun or just relax. And, no
.. wonder when you consider the
,. savings to be had through Free
Port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 en
Christmas gifts finds they can
buy the same gifts, in free-port
shops, at savings up to 60% of
U. "S. prices. So, for the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
wonderful vacation in Haiti.
Perhaps the most famous free-
port shop in' the world is La
Belle Creole. located in the
heart of fascinating Port-au-
Prince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable wonderland
full of the world's most de-
sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
ches, Cashmeres, Handmade
bags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
meras, Liquours and a seem-
ingly endless array of native
handicraft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
sider that one can 6uy the
world's most fanuus Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
guet-at discounts of 50% of
the U. S. advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
Belle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be well worth your time to
consider a trip to Haiti.

Al Noustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhaps another reason for
the surge in popularity of
free-port shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
licy of cooperating with tra-
vel agents in their various
promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tle of free champagne to any
visitor to 'Haiti who happens
to be celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niversary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts "to make
the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
mous brand merchandise.
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
sands of tourists this year will
cope home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
when they went away.


Shopping

in Haiti


MINTON, WEDGWOOD.
ROYAL CROWN' DARBY.
ROYAL COPENHAGEN,
ROYAL WORCESTER,
ROYAL DOULTON,
ROSENTHALE, SPODE,
AYNSLEE, COALPORT,
GUSTAUBERG.



GEORGE JENSEN,
HANS HANSEN, GERO,
DRAGSTEII, GENSE.



The Finest of FRANCE.
ITALY, AUSTRIA,


LAIJQUE, BACCARRATi
ORREFORS,
WEBB & QORBETT,
VAL SOLAMBERT,
STUART, LEERMAN.


7-
4.wr


OMEGA, PATEK PHILIPPE
JUVENIA TISSOT, BOREL,
AUDEMAR PIGUET,
JAEGER LE COULTRE,
ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO,
ATLANTA, STUDIO,
VULCAIN.


KISLAV,
ENGLISH DOESKIN,
ITALIAN ANTELOPE.



PRINGLE, BALLANTYNE,
BERN HARD ALTMAN,
LUISA SPAGNOLI.


DANISH SILVER,
GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY
and BRAZILAN GEMS.


HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS


VooDoo Inspired
JEWELRY




Native-Insured
.SPORT SHIRTS


SCULPTURES


Factory Outlet
MAHOGANY
- The Best.


Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS

World Famous RUGS & DRAPERY
Haitian RUM BARBANCOURT


Have us send gifts to your friends in the U. S.
without affecting your quota.- See us for more infoi


I


-------- e -at----













FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER
P. 0. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI





AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS


-Al















GUERLAIN, LANVIN,
CARON, C -
RAPHAEL, PATOU,
BALMAIN, WORTH. 4
REVILLON, VIGNY,
CARVEN. LE GALO..
FABERGE OF PARIS,



CORDAY.

MINOX, -CANNO




ROYAL DOULTON,
H- UM'EL



HARVEY'S BRISTOL
CREAM, All FRENC
DANISH and







A& SHOES
mGOI,.IANMUS '.














Colle 's ][&a=










A.-
rmation.


Y ...++

.: _. r


^zd' '0 o A


.





.: ,


'PAGE .8

I PARISIAN PRESS C ONTRA Vi
'Antigone en Creole" hit the Pa- of trau
risen Press with impact following myth
the presentation of the play by auth- theme,
or Morisseau-Leroy and his cast of drawn
Haitian actors and players who went Caribbd
p' to Europe earlier this month on a better.
tour which included the Sarah Ber- "I ai
nhardt Theatre in Paris. the na
Wiener
On opening night and the second -Isme
presentation, the Haitian artists raine;
played to a packed house, and the (and s
following three evenings of their sinvil-
engagement at this theater they o; Fe
played to a capacity house. How
French
The Press of Paris gave a maxi- group
mum of attention to the perform- for ou.
ance, and theater and drama critics Do
were generous in their comments. Playwright Leroy half p
a- Aca1demie Francaise famous critic, edition
- Robert Kemp, gave over two cot-
mn.Re toemelt the t r.a p wrigoh F gonee. creole version, was thund- Wiener
l,. mns to the Haitin playwright Ft etously applauded by Alice Cocea, be pro
Mosseau-_roy wholy had adapted e Marcel Carne, painters Labisse, Jean The d
the Greek mythology classic to the Oberle, Cliude Aveline, Willy Mu- Haitia
Haitian community and put Creole cha, Marguerite Jamois, and Philip- to con
into the mouths of the tragedy-ridd- er f h Gn ut ordina
Spe Heriat, memboero f the Goncourt ordina
en characters. Said Kemp in 'the Acatemy. eo"
Someena thea
S-May 13th edition of "Le Monde": I we w
neither -felt the tragic frisson nor Less enthusiastic was "France- tied b
| ve a. .n shock of C
even a smgle shock of grandeur Soir" which said that for the black dou r
"and Majesty." public which understands Creole, the of th
Kemp's reaction was commented play is excellent, but for the French with l
upon by Paris-Journal in its May people, Morisseau Leroy should have move
1.4th edition stating:- "It was notic- adapted a more specifically black the da
ed, however, Mr. Robert Kemp and folkloric theme sacrifi
did not seem to find that the Hal- This opinion was shared in "Le able is
tk- i.a language is up to the measure Parisien" by Georges Lerminier not re
'. of the French language. But that who said that 'he appreciated Mr. pettico
-min his affair on the other hand the Morisseau-Leroy's humanism but at ies a
spectacle of the local dances in "An- any rate, he wondered if this trial vocati




SSomething NEW





Calling




SYou C





WHOLE V




For making




For Your Ca


"HAITI SUN"


SUNDAY MAY,


ERSIAL On "'AA TIGO E En CREOLE"
...... : '.-'


I




LI
a


r
L,

s
e








L
n
El
a



rl


Something


All Bakers!!


.- .I-^
--''

... ::.^
," "' ".
:'.,.

, 1


,an Now Buy


HEAT FLOUR


SGraham Bread




ustomers'Delght


-i


IN MILLS, INC.


'~'*1.
r.


inscription of an old Greek of the fields, the heaven, the wind Morisseau-Leroy's pr
is not too literal. A local and the earth were above all a gra- to increase the enthusiasts'
Mr. Lerminier thought, cious rising of the curtain, and Ma- directors of the Theatr'
from the rich history of the demoiselle Beauvoir in particular Morisseau's lecture y.
ean would have pleased him gave gentility, sweetness straight up atre on May 12th on
to the frightening contorsions of theater movement, drew
Lm recopying for my pleasure death trapped by death." ary orbits as Claude .
Lmes of the actors: Odette G. Joy in "LAurore" iGuerin, Mr. Julien; Dir
G. Joly in "L'Aurore in comm-
--Antigone; Gilberte Lavache Opera and former Sarl
ending on "Antigone" said the play
ne: Merancia Renaud-Mar- Theatre director, hi.sa
Clo Bonhoreon served for him a delicate savory dame Pelletier and a.
stage manager); Gerard Dor- praise. In the tragedy of opho- posing personalities .of-e'
Hemon; Gerard Dussek-Fi- letansposed in creole dialect of the arts. This "jury",'
uch a sweet accent and caressing
elix- Morisseau-Leroy-Tersias. of the lecture, recognize.
inflections... where the voudou my- o p y'l
these flames sound their of the Haitian playwrig
thology is substituted for the Greek
, province! Welcome to this stood laborious discuss
who live from our culture and Olympia having the gods familiar- monstrations following ~.
r culture." ly converse with men, and takes an as being just.
unexpected aspect, to be sure. but Artistic Week in Panris
which joins profound humanity in
age in "Combat", MaW 13th h joi ound humani ved from May 11th
to the artists of-the Odette this eternal debate opened by the in- Jean Anouilh, reputed
r (Bacoulou) Troup who could flexible daughter of Oedipe" severest of all 'the i
ud of a well-deserved triumph. The Committees of the Municipal French Press had *.is
ances of the first part of the Council of Paris and the General seems to me that'the
n play, he said was not enough Council of the Seine organize each this "Antigone", Mr. e
vince him, but that this is no year the theatrical season in view of seau-Leroy, has thought
ry spectacle. "We were not in permitting foreign artists and dra- oine with much force. and.
water. For a few minutes were matic authors to produce their art gence...".
watching the rituals accompa- before the grand Parisien public, Further on,. Anouilh c:a'
y' frenetic rythms of the vau- and in spite of the language bar- "This apparent naivety i"
religion. We were the adepts riers which had been believed a longer hide from us theo'..1_t
i magic ceremonies colored great handicap, the experiment has entmand the dignity of the6l
ove, the carnival, death. The produced satisfactory results. of thi* "Antigone", that.the,
nent replaced the language, iarities of language .of Antig
nce, the prayer, the magic, the The critics and the Press of Pa- Jean Anouilh could not"-d-
ce of the mass. What is adn-ir- ris have often pitilessly criticized 'seems to me even, for lvi,
s that these delirious rites were many of the presentations, as was the text of Mr. Felix M1riss
.pugnant... The costumes, the the case of the Swedish play "Una roy, that "Antigone':
oats, the grace of young bod- Saga" by H-jalmar Bergman, play- "Creoh" have 'fewer arrid.
attenuating magic. /This in- ed the week pi-eceeding Antigone. and relatively less ni'eQ,
on in six dances to the gods The Parisian critics' comments on the good white .pedplieft


:: ..!:I
-All


. ...,.




'A' .. .


SUNDAY MAY 31st 1959


AGRICULTURE MINISTER AND USOM CHIEF
ATTEND DEDICATION OF YOUTH CLUB


Proud citizens of Grand Pre
Said neighbors from as iar afield as
SGrande Riviere du Nord assembled
Last Sunday for the dedication of the
youth club and Agriculture develop-
-ment center, the first building in
-.fie Pote Cole program, constructed
.'y'-olunteer labor.

Agriculture Minister Gerard Phi-
b-ppeaux, USOM director Harry Yoe;
:Casper Green. Lee Winters and Igor
Allen were present along with loc'u


creole was %well received and a non-
listed speaker, a visitor from Gran-
de Riviere on behalf of his commu-
nity stated that they would like to
be shown how to make a similar
building.

The tIrst of four such centers to
le built in, the Pote Cole area on
volunteer basis the long house is
nade of compressed earth blocks.


"HAITI SUN"


The local student, daughter of Mr
and Mrs F. Salzmann is completing
four years of study at the' co-edu-


national secondary. school operated
by the Seventh-da Adventist Church.
Commencement exercises for sev-
enty-two students will be held on
;unday morning at ten o'clock with
Elder H. E. Fagal of Miami, Past-
or of the Teniple Seventh-day Ad-
v\entist church as the speaker.
Diplomas will bo presented' by L.\
C. Stricklaid., principal, assisted by
]lis. Grace Keith, registrar. Music


The men who worked on this self- will be provided by members of the


iheip project were served a free ,noo


S-dignitaries. neal. Work started early and ended
Minister Philippeaux' speech in ate in the day.



HYDRAULIC SERVICE HEAD OFF TO STUDY
WATER SUPPLY IN THE U..

SOM in Haiti announces that En- about the size of Port au Prince
gineer Roger Olivier Ferdinand has with 150,000 inhabitants or more. En-
been selected by ICA Washington gineer Ferdinand is expected to
to participate in a Short Training tay in United States from three to
Course in Ground Water Develop- our months. On his return by
ment for Public Water Supplies. raining others lie may bring near-
Mr. Ferdinand is employed as Sa- er to solution the intricate problem
nitary Engineer. He is currently the of fresh water supply to the popu-
technical head of the Hydraulic Serv action of Port au Prince.
ice with headquarters in Port au
Prince. EVELYNE SALZMANN
The course in Ground Water De- GRADUATTES IN
velopment for Public Water Supplies 'FLORIDA TODAY
is scheduled to begin on June 3,
1959, in Washington and will last ab- Evelyne Salzmann, age 17, Port
out 10 weeks. It *ill be followed by a a.6 Prince, Haiti, will graduate Sun-
perfod of observation and active day, May 31 from the Forest Lake
training in a North American city Academy, Maitland, Florida.


vlusic department of the academy.
The week-end commencement ev-
nts will begin on Friday night at
i g h t o'clock with a consecration
Service. The speaker will be W. E
Dopp, pastor of the Sarasota Seven-
th-day Adventist Church.


JOSEPH NADAL & Co.


L ~JEa D


fo l -2 o voa nd e-I


SCOT





'I I


lo; and a suite by the Haitian com-


CHAMBER MUiSIC TODAY
On Sunday, May 31st at 5:30 P.
II., a recital of chamber music will
le given at the Haitian-American
institute in Port au Prince. The per-
ormers include Fritz Benjamin,
irst violonist; Raphael Stines, sec-
nd violonist; Auguste Durand, vio-
ist, Robert Durand, 'cellst: Depes-
,re Salnave, guest flutist; and Mil-'
ed L. Klein. guest pianist. The pro-
gram \will consist of a Beethoven
rio for piano, violin and 'cello; a
Mfozart quartet for flute, 2 violins,
'iola and 'cello; a Mozart quartet
for piano. 2 violins, viola and cel-


V.








'I


vpw


~."n.


tiAVIV n


1


poser Werner Jaegerhuber. The "-
]program is scheduled to be repeat-
ed for the classes of the School of
he Episcopal Cuurch on June 3. -

jUY DUROSIER LEAVING WITH
WIFE FOR VANCOUVER
Haiti's top artist of the song and '
Sax, Guy Durosier and his artist
wife Madeleine Durosier are soon to '
eave on a tour for Vancouver.
After a successful season at, 'the '
Casino International d'Haiti, Guy
will offer a farewell recital before :..
going abroad. -*:S
---------------- -T








rCH WHISKY






. "h ,*** .






STh .. .





m l im* '':






\ ,-

























X Z.
:. ...'X.


.1








PAGE 10 ,

'" S. TO SEND NEW MILITARY
, ATTACHE TO HAITI


'S.
II


by his wife, Ruth, his son Michael
Dob, 15. daughters Mary K. Dob,
13 apd Sharon A. Dob, 12, and son
Patrick Dob, age 3.

WORK PROGRESSING ON MILI-
TARY HOSPITAL SCHOOL AND
CLUB.
Work on the large hundred bed
.,. Military hospital, -school and Club
is expected to be complete in eight
months according to the contractor
': r. Gerard Theard of The Caribb-
ean Construction Company.
S Located in the Military'iity above
Chancerelles, the 'military hospital is
expected to be one of the most mod-
erm in the country when completed.
Special drainage and sewage was
laid down along with well paved
streets before the building was start-
ed. The school with twelve classes
will Tmave enrollment of 600 pupils.
The club is tor enlisted men.

GORPUS CHRISTI OBSERVED
HERE THURSDAY
The "Corpus Christi" was observed
here Thursday with impressive reli-
gious ceremonies. The inter-parish
procession which starting from the
Cathedralq t 7:00 A.M. was joined
by thousands of the faithful who led
by the Cure stopped at the various
"reposoirs" set up in the Capital.
A Pontifical Mass followed the
procession.


"HAITI SUN"


The nomination of Lieutenant-Col-
onel Edmund J. Dollard to the post
of United States Military Attache'to
Haiti was announced here this week.
He is a member. of the General Ar-
my Staff of the U.S.A.
General Pierre Merceron, Chief of
the Armed Forces of Haiti had ad-
vised the Ministry of the Interior
.and National Defense of the nomi-
nation in a letter dated April 27th.
Forty-two-year-old native of Syra-
cuse, New York Edmund J. Dollard
who served in the European operat-
ions theater in World War II, holds
the Bronze Star Medal with oak
leaves and the Cordon of Merit with
metallic pendentive for his heroic
showing as an officer. '-
He holds a B. Sc. from Syracuse
University, obtained in 1939. He ob-
tained his diploma for Advanced
Courses for Infantry Officers, and
Aeroport Basic Courses, and is a
graduate of the College of Precepts
and of General Army Staff.
Lieutenant-Co,.inel Dollard is ex-
Spected here to take up his new func-
tion at the end of August. He will
be accompanied to Port au Prince


- n-nraTCn innflX ASfl'V A mr's'


SUNDAY MAY ,


CARIBE HOTEL CHAIN D


S
V


ftuhtnricksReeod
a' a


4e0 64itp.


*'*.;*
-:, *
*A ''.


"Ft







I


your individuality o
yet sausying way. .7
'"L" "-t. '..
.i S ,',..J;


/""^^


'7-.


AT4 DET PRICES
Select your owrifei upholstery p -
Ierns and colors from a wide'-an e of
fabrics. Enjoy the comfort of spring-
filled cushions zippered for easy
cleaning. Tables feature mar-proof
blond mahogany Micarta tops.




Agent Distributor: Haiti Trading Co.


.Ap
Nk.^1


[4


Chamber of Commerce Bldg.


MOONLIGHT EXCURSIONS PROMEKU NADES. .Nrw ,-V.rf --.--. --.J -, A -.-L-- uL .
ON THE SEA TO START HERE TODAY FEATURE HAITIAN TYPE .HOT

The two new motor launches, re- there is a full moon, the launch will The Haiti method of building hot- of the chain during the o
ently acquired by the Tourist Bu- sail in the evenings, more particu- e, of a relatively small but highly Other hotels will benefit s
eau here, are to be used to take arly on Thursday evening. luxurious type, well steeped in atmos tion will be drawn to.thte'
ea-lovers out on guided tours in the The moonlight excursions and pro- here, is expected to be adopted by public regarding the adv
Waters off Port au Prince. The an- nenades at sea have been added a group o finaners and hotel men the smaller hotel which
ouncement was made on Wednes- particularlyy for the visitors and tour- in the Caribbean area. Their plan to give every guest, a m
ay by Director General of Tourism, sts, as well as for the pleasure of calls for a chain of deluxe hotels al type of attention.
. Jacques Honorat. residents. though the most popular islands in -Although it has be
The National Tourist Board will he West Indies. They will keep the that the major part. of
inaugurate the promenades at 10:90 ARRIVING ON ANCON capacity under 100 rooms. for the deluxe hotel chin
..M. this morning when the motor- The hotel men feel that due tr through Jamaican capitol.
'oat "Haiti Cherie" leaves the Quai The SS "ANCON" of the Panama their size, a warm and intimate at- originated in Haitia.and a
'hrislophe Colomb. Line arrived fro mNew York at Inosphere in which eyery guest will ablished in this country
On these promenades a guide will :00 A.M.. May 30th, 1959. eel at home, will be created and years will be included -j
be aboard to furnish visitors with On board were a total of -15 pass- maintained in the hotels. al Management.
explanations on the under-sea fauna engers of which the following 16 Negotiations are being made with'the The initiators.of this,
nd flora.-and under-sea fishing, the disembarked at Port au Prince: op U.S. tour operators who will approach are to be 64
,avigability in the Port. the history, Mr. & Mrs. George Bierly. Miss use the entire chain of hotels for since this will be the f
I the Port, and Sea lore. A musical Gloria Denzler, Mr. Renauld Fran- their package tours. he area to reject t..Lr.-
rio will also be aboard to keep the risque. Mrs. Simone Francois, Mr. Publicity and advertising will be f gigantic Miami-Beabh'!
promenade gay, as well as a star Roger Heurtelou, Mrs. Antoinette done for the entire chain nd to employ the small.
rom the National Folkloric Troupe. Lespinasse, Miss Maby Nebel, Mr. n a cooperative basis to facilitate imate type of builiidg^
These sea excursions are schedul- Harold C. Parks. Mr. & Mrs. Edou- he small hotels which are unable ,hole families to spend-;
d for twice a week, on Sundays ard Petrus, Mr & Mrs Felix Pilorge, o put tp as much money as requir- more time in the
nd Thursday, from 10:00 A.M. to Mrs. Magella Salomon, Mr. & Mrs d for the promotion program. This they are made to feel at"
1:00 P.M. During the month when.Stan Schoenfield. will aid in keeping high occupancy receive special attention

h --JI..,,' -,


C C -









SUNDAY MAY 31st 1959


Haiti's Coffee And
(Conti

.theory is not fully accepted in scien- come from
'tific coffee circles. It seemed logical, food prices
however, and went far.to make sense beans and ri
of the facts in the Haitian case. high This se
The difficulty was that it did not did not bothe
'; seem adequate as an explanation of ary reason f,
',te sudden violence of the fluctua- that, with li
ons beginning in the 1950's. In add- economy, de
ition for tinrty-five years previous be greater ar
o that time there is as much evid- gentlemen. tl
;'..ehce of a three year cycle as there be the case.
isfor the recent distinct two' year coffee crop f
'pattern. A good deal of digging ar- for these bas!
ound resulted in a supplementary the.small cofil
hypothesis which seemed to provide with the larg
the missing link. You can gui
High coffee prices plus an initial being driven
Jarge crop put pressure on the peas- seems to have
nts to harvest as rapidly as possib- expand coffee
le. The result %was stripping of the raise or lower
.,. trees and damage to the crop in the so powerful t
following year. Thus the natural fluc- demand effect
l .-Ilruation was intensified by a man- that this must
I- made one. This somewhat more comrn- le climatic co
plex explanation was. appealing in large coffee c
S'that there were definite policy impli- time, abnorma
-cations. These deadly crop fluctua: petit mil, red
tions with their disorganizing impact fact that the
on the economy might be countered hold as \well
not only by better mulching and re- is probably c
newal of old plantations but by these'are prior
better harvesting practices. With Finally, the c(
that I rested content for some posite cycle fr
months. tain seasons
Quite by chance I tumbled into damaging to (
another line of thinking. I had had wet season. en
the strong expectation that when in- il.


. "HAITI SUN"


Economic Development
nued from page 6)

coffee was high local I have constructed rainfall tables;
(corn, petit-mil, red in the hope of pinpointing the corre-
ce) would tend to be nation. Thus far I have not been able
emed so logical that I to confirm the thesis with this di-
r to test it. This prim. rect evidence, perhaps because of
or it, of course, is my lack of skill in interpreting such
ots of money in the data.
mand for food would I find this retreat to a natural ex-
id prices bid up. Alas, pianation somewhat disheartening.
ie contrary seems to The mathematical odds against seven
In all seven of our consecutive years of favorable, then
fluctuations high prices unfavorable weather, seems great.
ic foods correlate with Even worse, the theory tends to re-
ee crops and low prices duce the scope for corrective action.
e. I suspect, however, that enough va-
ess o, where we areidity remains in the first two ex-
. A common factor plantations for real inroads to be
Sonprated to ,.du, or made on the magnitude of the fluc-


e production and to,
food prices a factor
hat it overwhelms the
. It seems to me now
be weather. Faiorab-
nditions bring about a
crop and, at the same
illy large crops of corn.
beans and rice. The
correlation does not
for rice and bananas
onfirming evidence -
marily irrigated crops.
cotton crop is on the op-
om coffee. Rain in cer-
which favors coffee is
cotton, and a generally
courage the boll weev-


tuations.

I-AN APPEAL FOR ASSISTANCE
ON A RESEARCH PROBLEM
I would like to conclude ihis talk


with an appeal for help. Accept for
tie moment my thesis that the peas-
ant responds over a period of years
to sustained high or sustained low
coffee prices. In order to simplify
the problem let us simply consider
he case of high prices and a lagged
increase in coffee production. Just
what does that increase in .output
cost the Haitian economy as a whole?
There are several possibilities:
1 Coffee planting may gradually
spread to lands formerly used for
food crops. In that case the cost is
clear food.

2. Or, it natural factors make
land use specialized (that is, good
coffee land is not good food land and
the converse) labor may be transfer-
red from the cultivation of food
crops to extension of coffee planting
on unused land or to better care of
existing plantations. In this cage- too
here is a clear-cut cost food.
3. Finally, if labor is "in surplus"
in some meaningful sense and there


HOUSE TO RENT AT "LA BOULE"
VILLA "LA MUSARDIERE"
1.5 kri. from Port-au-Prince. Asphalted road-Fresh and
healthy climate. Altitude 900 meters. A Thorough cure of
health delight of life.
The most elegant, the most modern house in "La Boule" -
Richly furnished. Abundant hot and cold water automatic
pump. -. Gaz and electricity Cooking range and oven.
.3 bedrooms 2 bathrooms Garage verandahs enclo-
sed with wrought iron Frigidaire, radio cage full with
turtle-dt es... Orchard French gardens Paved Yard.
VERY AVANTAGEOUS PRICE
Write to Mr. Lissade P.O.B 1101 Port-au-Prince
Or see hin at "La Boule", or Mr. Gabriel, 72. Rue Pavee,
Electrical store near Telegraph office.


AWAY OR AT HOME A CARE OF YOUR OW




SREN T a CAR


American


Express
/


And Dine rs Club Credit Card Honored
I-


-. **..-*


FREE:


Road maps,
information
Pick-up and
from hotels,
and pier


FEATURING HILLMAN HIGH STYLE
AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING HOTELS
For Reservations, Road Maps,
P. 0. BOX 662
Write or Cable:
and Suggested Itineraries
AVIS CAR RENTALS

Port-au-Prince, Haiti


delivery
airport


WEEKLY RATE

$35,pe Week

Plus 8 pep Mile


ALL RATIO
CiRS-OL


PAGE 11

is land available for new coffee .k
planting, or the peasant cultivates '
coffee more intensively, the only
sacrifice may be peasant leisure' .
ime. The food crop will be unaffect- '
ed.
I have an idea or two on' this
problem, but nothing I am confident.,.
f. The problem itself is a critically, ^'!C
important one. I leave it for you as. '
a challenge.
William B. GATES, Jr. ,.
Professor of Economics l

Williams College and
Brookings National Research
Professor.



It'( all waiting for you at..., .






12 TO 2 P.M. 1Z.:'c
BUSINESS LUNCH
NIGHTLY: DIjNER BY-)
CANDLELIGHT'-. AND
DANCE TO THE M'SI
OF THE CASTELCOMBOS;
SUNDAY: ...
730 FILET MIGNON
.DINNER -
TUESDAY: '
73o POOLSIDE BAR-B.R
FRIDAY: .
7a3 SEA FOOD DINNER. .4',
See C. d la FUENTE
For Reservatdi .




N I .0-

I .




























00
-/






ES INCLUDE
INSURANCEE


I 1''


'rf^
*' .;








f;AGE 12


"H[AITI SUN"


Mc Connell Reports Visit To N.W.


*^ General Sthement vind Report of
gVisit to the North West of Haiti, by
j'':V"ev. H. Ormonde McConnell, M.B.
E., 'Administrator of Church World
p', Service for Haiti.
*- This visit wias made from Wed-
a n qesday 20th to Friday 3?nd May
S1959, in company with Mr. L. Gott-
r' lieb, of U.S.O.M., Coordinator of the
special Committee for the Program
of Aid for the Famine Area, and
S Dr. Bonlos, Representative of the
i"5" Haitian Government on the Commiit--
ee.,(Father Yves Pouliquin, Admi-
";-'.- nistrator of Catholic Welfare, like-
wise member of the Committee, was
.prevented at the last minute fromn
making the trip.)

4' General Situation

It is now fairly evident that the
V',. help already sent to the North .West
-* area has removed the likelihood of
-. there being a large-scale disaster.
In general it may t said that the
p. situation is now in hand.
-!1 A--generous ration (20 lbs of cere-
al nd 4 and a half lbs of milk powd-
'er) has'been given to each of about
20,000 families., A' second ration of
similar -amounts has already been
"' given to many of the families. There
'.-- e now supplies in the area to en-
'-' able the remaining needy districts
to be provided fjr .This will mean
a complete distribution of full ra-
tionto a further 8,000 to 10,000 fa-
fmilies, and on a lesser basis to an-
other 11,000 far.ithes.. Rains have
SnQw started in the area, and iq
ome parts millet will soon be ready
r harvesting.
.* '- Most of the North WAAt Depart-
'ment is stony, arid and banrren and
one wonders how 'the land can poss-
'- ibly support the population.
The people in general are in good
heart and very grateful Ifor the help
sent.

Collaboration of the Charitable A-
-gencies
It is no exaggeration to say that




,
-. .x-.: ...




























i,/- ,.,;...--:- ;~.* ::~::-. ~'<** : ~>- M '
q'. o













A, i ~~,




-.C


A Priest surveys landing of food supplies in the Northwest
from the Albatross.


he wholehearted and harmonious
collaboration of the representatives
f'Catholic Welfare and Church
World Service has been and is ex-
mplary and to be most highly com-
dended. This has been shown in the
centrall Committee where relations
ave been most happy and helpful.
ach organisation supplying help as
it could and one supplementing the
other as circumstances required.
The same delightful spirit of mutu-
al helpfulness was also evident on
the field, especially in the Jean Ra-
bel area. which is the hardest-hit
region and where there are 11,500
families in dire need. Special men-
tion must be made of the indeiati-
gable efforts and self-sacrificing de-
votion shown by Fathers QuiLtric
and Cornet and Rev. Pas'.r Shreve,
who literally worked day and night
o'disembark, store, and then disici-
buti' the provisions. The samn. cca.
The said of Father Laroche at Bom-
bardopolis. (A very *careful census
made by him revealed that the aver-
age number of persons per family
is four.) It was an inspiration to
see these good men working togcetlh-
er so harmoniously.


olas and Bombardopolis are, with
he exception of a few parts, indes-
t-Ibably bad and can only be tra-
ersed in a four-wheel-drive vehicle
o' a large truck. This also means
hat most trucks in the area are fre-
uently in a bad state of repair or
re broken down. iWhen we' were
t Jean Rabel during disembarking
rom the Affranchie, the only two
available local trucks were both
temporarily broken down, and it is.
kilometers from the sea landing
place to the town.) While most plac-
s can be reached from the sea,
landing of provisions has to be made
n' small boats, which 1t a tedious
and sometimes difficult proceeding.
casess of special need


In the hospital at Jean Rabel we
aw advanced cases of oedema,
which \were specially significant in
he cases of some meni, indicating
evere famine conditions. At Bom-
baniopolis we happened to see, on
our arrival, a seriously starved
mother with an infant in her arms
shrivelled to a most distressing con-
dition. '
Organisation of the Distributions


In view of the urgency and the
Communications magnitude of the task the\dist'ribu-
Communications by land, and sea tons of food so far have been made
re difficult. The roads linking Port extremely well. Now however, with
e Paix, Jean Rabel, Mole St. Ni- the help of new food cards, previous


New! Sensational!



JS JEWELS *


I

AND JEWEL ROLLER BEARINGS


On Sale At: Canape Vert


Aux Cent Mille Articles


Dadlani's Maison Orientale

*2
t. .


errors and failures will most likely
be overcome. The new cards will
be distributed to the families by a


group composed of a representative
of the Catholic Church, a represen-
ative of the Protestant Church and
a well respected member of the loc-
al community, accompanied by the
Rural Police.,
Delay in certain areas
/Through the breakdown of one of
he ships bringing supplies, the Port
de Paix area tIsland of La Tortue
and district of Bassin Bleu etc) was
ate in receiving complete provi-
ions. However before we visited
Port de Paix the. provisions for that
/hole district had arrived and ar-
angements were being made for
distribution without delay. Through
sufficiency of supplies, about '400
families in the district of Bombar-
/
opolis had north' received rations.
Vhile we were there the boat was
ust about to arrive at Mole St. Ni-
olas with additional and adequate
supplies for both, these places.
Through insufficiency of supplies '
because of breakdown of ship ab-
ut 500 families in the Jean Rabel
district had not received, their see-
nd ration. The ship was unloading
When we were there.
Special Contribution of Church
Vorld Service.
To expedite receipt of supplies of
ood, C.W.S. in Jamaica very


houghtfully sent 100,000 lbs of flourL
and 100,000 of cornmeal from their
tocks to Haiti.


On learning of the'
eins in the affected
headquarters very 's nil
hased 300,000tlbs of Split
his cargo is due to. arri
side the next day oit twS
We have been able tb sen
86,000 Vitamin Table;td~
cited area and these a.
n through the hospitals
a packets of 10 to the
he more seriously affc
P)0,000 more of these' ta6
ust arrived from C.W. Eal
/ct to takh delivery with,
plantingg of Seeds .
In view of the fact't
ave now started in the1'
t is the moment to pa
a to plant bea, bli
till time to plant corn.
have received word-n
ord Committee for F
England) is sending 'a'
ounds sterling though
o help in this situationi'J
strength of this we havas
n to purchase 10,000 i.i
seed for Bombardopolii
6.000 Ibs of Corn and:.?
being purchased for'
,here a smaller distribdtl
ent through Rev. Walled
as already been most
made.


'are Foundatibn -
Care Foundation has also
ted in this Programto',
f giving and or lendi4g
Inent of food frqm thei.-
has helped t-j relieve'tfip
situation. '.
(H.. f


on the ,lah


,.. .. _


at is..nbout-le P p 'r
* U 1s.6ePautoular;breOCo. I-
te art unr.*ince ( r$10


Served excwusma at HaWs
HOTELS & RESTAURANTS & BY CONNbW
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
f


SUNDAY ll ',!iii
==


Palm,..


SUNDAY MAY .





AY- MAY '31st 1959


"HAITI SUN"


_____________________________________________________________________________ = .LU'


I.Pepi' Seeks More Democracy

In Caribbean Governments


r !'i The brass ring, good for one free
.Bound, today goes to "Pepi" Figuer(
rand friend of the American People.
F'*,'. -.


,.- Iby Drew I

WASHINGTON Gov. Louis Mu-
s-z.Marin of Puerto Rico picked up
AIe'telephone in Washington the oth-
day.
.. Hello, how is your excellency?"
Oaid the voice on the other end. "My
excellency is OK."
Dr. Jose Figueres Ferrar. ex-pie-
'sident.of Costa PJca. was on the line.
.and his tone of voice even one not
ieknowing him could understand why
fie is called "Pepi".
. .For the mian who long governed
the most democratic country in Cen-
tral America has a personality that
:.'bounces and a charm that is'conta-
glious.
He has been in Washington getting
better acquainted with some of the
','North Americans whom he has both
fAd nndd d it-i iA -


wo
the
"T
ca
'po
-.ha
- .be

cc
th
Sth


bh
C
wl
c


la,


t- TC
IP 1
n- "B
E; 11- **
'>;;- *; '' & -
^ s^
rl


ride on the Washington Merry.-Go- great triumph for democracy. So
es, stanch advocate of democracy far, American oil companies have
been smart. They were opposed to
Betancourt, but now they realize he
Pearson can bring stability and are cooper-
ating.
"My candidate for president of
Latin America," continued the fiery
ex-president of Costa Rica, "is your
governor of Puerto Rico."
"Can Latin America ever unite
into one federation?" I asked.
"The only thing that could unite
them would be opposition to the Un-
ited States and that would be sad.
However, finding leaders in Latin
America is not easy.
You hIave a hard enough time find-
ing one good president of the United
States to govern 170.000,000 people.
Yet we have to find 20 different pre-
sidents to govern about the same
"number of people. It isn't easy to
find good presidents:"
Figures was reluctant to talk ab-
PEARSON out his recent visit to Cuba where
Ihp w z istA f 1, k


Lnuueau cuU I. ..-.i. ie as iniVieu to ue tne omcial
munist "Third Internationale, once
guest of the Castro government but
"We have a group that has been lived in e.dle in New York and San
departed after a row with Castro.
rking together for democracy in Juan.
"Your column had most of the
Y Caribbean," Figueres confided. He was so distrusted by Henry ,,
story, Figueres said when I ask-
'here is Munoz-Marin whom we Holland, President Eisenhower's Fguees sad when ask-
ed him about the speech in which
li the poet. He's even a better first assistant seerctary for Latin
lie wanried that Latin America would
et than his father, but most people American Affairs, that Hollandith the United States
have to side with the United States
ive forgotten his poetry since he phoned Gov. Munoz-Marin to ask in the coming struggle wiRussia.
in the coming struggle with Russia.
ecaine governor of Puerto Rico. that he require Betancourt to leave
"Then there's President Betan- Puerto Rico on the eve of a Pan
3urt of Venezuela whom we call American conference. word to Cahtro that I wanted to
e politician. Then there's me talk to him. But I never got a reply.
r ., I sent word several times that I
should talk to him before addressing
This is the little group that has RUNNING for president of Vene- the Cuban people, I never heard
een fighting for democracy in the from him.
ee fighting for demoray in the zuela last year, however, Betan- from him.
aribbean for the last decade, and "Finally, on the evening of the
I court was the No. 1 enemy of the
hose three leaders hve no be- Communists and won. speech I rode with him to the hall
ome the No 1 enemies of com- "Venezuela is te most important and he said there %%as only one
nism in Latin America. est of communism n Latin Amei- thing he didn't want me to men-
President. Betancourt of Venezue- ca," "Pepi" Figueres told me. "If tion Puerto Rico."
a, one-time member of the Corn- Betancourt succeeds it will be a FIGUERES explained that the
L Communist line in Latin America is
that Puerto Rico is an unwilling pri-
Sr rn er mes soner of the United States and the
S For all kinds of French perfumesPuerto Rican people are burning
visit Haiti's Smartest Indian store for independence.
Select your favourite perfume "it has been my painful duty to
from our large collection talk about Puerto Rico in Latin A
merica and upset the Communis
Saline that you are guilty of colonial
JEAN PATOU 1ism." Figueres said.
CHRISTIAN DIOR "Cuba is the most difficult probi
We offer you the world's famous em you face," Figueres told me
f We offer you the world's famous


brands at free port prices

LE GALION

CARVEN

LANVIN NINA RICCI

CARON
CHANEL

RAPHAEL

MILOT
etc... etc...





IERE' THE LOWEST PRICE, IS THE OrLVYPRIF


a,


t
E
ti




d
s
t


AG E ..-
", i


Lur


-uu-

KYONA BEACH

-00-

Swim, Spearfish, Snorkle, Water-Ski
And Sail In Safe Coastal
Waters From Kyona
-00H

HAVE YOUR PARTY AT KYON4


!"


"What Moscow would like most is FIRST HAITIAN WOMAN
o have Cuba become an 'American DIPLOMAT TO LEAVE
Hungary' have the U.S. Army FOR POST
get involved in a bloody interven-
ion. However, I think your State Madame Lciennc Heurtelou Esti-
Department is too wise for that." me widow of President Dumarsais-
The clue to whether Castro really Estime (1946-50) is expected to leave
wants democracy rather than corn- for Belgium this coming week to
munism in Cuba, according to the take up her post as Envoy Extraor-
dynamic little man who has fought dinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. '-.
so long for democracy in the Caribb- Mrs Estime will be the first Hai-
ean, is whether he sets a date for tian born woman to take to head
ree elections a diplomatic mission abroad.




more pace


more space


more lu u ry

and a flawless sporting pe 'gree


S .1 ,. ; "-' :


i.

'' ^. .




71
Sweeping ahead with allr the zip, sparkle and road-
hugging stability inherent in its breed, the new M.G. -'
Magnette wins outright on performance alone. Yet this
thrilling sports saloon has much more to offer-inspired
continental styling ... panoramic vision... extra space
for luggage ... the luxury of real leather upholstery...
flawless craftsmanship throughout. Come and see-

the completely new



| MAGNE-. .
MARK III


fwelve Months' Warranty and backed by B.M.C. Serufce



D
AUTO S. A. DISTRIBUTORS

360, GRAND RUE, P. 0. Box 147
l-
Tel.: 3134, 2772



ich Dine Have Cocktails
By The SEA-SIDE
fin\







AG '4
v' ', ~ s .-. .".


~4 PAETF ii "HAITI SUN"


J osh report
--.Von-


.1.Merchants of Textile Avenue are brushing up on their Japanese as
i hey patiently await the out-come of the Japan Trade Treaty "presently
before congress... Port fashion world will, undoubtedly applaud the news
that Malson Christian Dior is scheduled to have a winter showing here
L at the El Rancho in January. les girls were here last some four years
ago... In fashion again is the U.S. Marine tropical headgear known by
many names Topee. pith helmet, hot pot, colonial 'at... Montz Katz
o:- f Broadway Theatre b(isiness spent the week at El Rancho with lus sweet
S' blonde wife of seven months... Reputed multimillion man Joe Brenner
builder of the Lincoln tunnel N.Y. to N.J. is scouting the construction
possibilities here... Kilen and Saks' Richard Davis returned from Wash-
.Ington this week is lodged at El Rancho... French born United Nations
assistant to Dag is stopping the weekend at Ibo Lele .. The World' Bank's
Harold Young is here on another business call stopping in the Montana
,' American Jim Oberstar is here on a special assignment. To teach the
.S. Marine mission to speak the language of Voltaire... Montreal is well
S' presented at the El Ranchd by lovely long blonde hair Caroline Singer...
; ur Top coffee exporter Mr George Reinhold is departing for two months
S, ip. Europe. His artist neice is also leaving town.. Pretty Betty Davis who
'is now with Caribe Air returns to Port first week in June for her second
> Haiti visit with the Dave Haralsons of PAA.. Naiff Hallouni flew to Kings-
ton Wednesday... N.B.C. news commentators Wilson and Lee Hall flew
'* ff to C.T. after a week in Port... Henri Weiner gave his friends a real
chance to appreciate his birth Saturday night by throwing a well heeled
mi.'.. anniversary 'party ,at his apartment on Pan American Avenue... The
i ;.. landrelhs of the U.S. Embassy are now the object.of a historical number of
"Au-.Revoir" parties. The popular young couple were entertained at a
S7-9. by their associates the Frambrini's of Morne Hercule Saturday night
.. Friends, Diplomatic mission chiefs enjoyed the fabulous Frambrini food...
Canadian Charge d'Affair and Mrs Charpentier.entertained the landreths
at cocktails, in their Jasmine scented villa in Petionville Tuesday. Among
the Diplomats attending were the Minister of Holland M. Gedeon W. Bois-
evin and Minister Harold Juell of Norway both over from Havana...





















"'. ..,

-. .' .: .. .













o, Iff npa.eabe V us

s%: | t6 B0a t6 entre Cut




.....o e&n M {o5 Poif /...N.

I-& -1H T&
Ih.R!.t xc &e oc-~


Letter


.:"


To The
when I noticed the procedure of your
newspaper mentioning Alichel C. Au-
guste employee of the Department
of Coordination and Information rath-
er than Michel C .Auguste acting
lawyer and executor of a sentence
rendered in favour of Brigitte Jo-
seph and Veristil Jean, a suit which
%was regularly entrusted to his law
office.
And to do away with further talks
taking in consideration the smart-
ness of American citizens in defend-
Ing the interests of one of their own
whenever such interests are opposed
to thdse of Haitian citizens, though
this American could be a land en-
croacher, I am sending you here-
vith three following photostated co-
ties to be published together with
he necessary comments and recti-
fications:


(Continued from page 1)
understood the reasori and read
the news published in your Sunday
issue of May 10, 1959 under the cap-
tion "Flower Farm Hit by Vandals".
Because of the rough insinuations
it contains and due to the fact that
you had not made any rectification
since my answer to Atherton Lee
published in Haiti Herald and Haiti
Journal, I am herewith restating the
question for both your information
and that of your readers, hoping that
in .compliance with the press-law
this restatement will be published at
the same place in your next issue.
I want to believe that you are of
good faith, I want to believe that
you have been misled, though I have
noted the great care with which you
had chosen only the Government em-
ployees by presenting them as the
sole authors of a false ad of van-
dalism, which is the product of your
conception, certainly a false one.
Thus, I appeal to your professional
ethics, through the photostated cop-
ies sent herewith, to make the com-
ments and rectifications to be dictat-
ed by your earnestness as a journ-
alist in quest of giving true inform-
ation to his readers.
At all events, I am sorry to ob-
serve that you, as a journalist, are
not aware that in the execution of
any sentence, provided it is not in
the street, the presence of the Jus-
tice of Peace shall be requested.
This gives an explanation for the
presence of the Judge of Peace Rene
Raphael upon the land of Brigitte
Joseph in the course of execution.
This was done in' compliance with
the law, "Dura lex, sed lex".
I laughed pitifully, sarcastically
Mf


and
rea
my
pec


8 A

Obj
1\Io
Cha
Ker
Mo
J
sou
at
dep
10
IO
pro
Nie
par
a t


MODERN COMFORTS WITH OLD WORLD. CHAR:'


DINE AND DANCE EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT



IlClt IL SA\NS SUII


IN TURGEAU


A Distinguished Hotel In The Heart Of The City


Conveniently Located To The Shopping District

All Air Conditioned Rooms with Private Baths and Hot Wate

New Pool Terrace with outside Bar and Swimming Pood'il

Unsurpassed Cuisine! Finest Service -Air Conditioned ..

DINNER DANCE EVERY FRIDAY

From7:00 P. M. To Midnight

To The Rythm of Joseph Duroseau's Ensemble -

In the Relaxing Atmosphere of the Tropical Flower GardeNi
.- :,,.
Choice Menus at $3.50 per Person

Cocktails, Wines and Drinks, Reasonably Priced ..,

No Cover Charge No Minimum

Make your Reservation for the Best Tables by the Pootf-gi
i -,r. -


~ ,,i ":


I equitable concluon
ders, please recv e
anticipated th aj'1
dtfully greetings'."1
Michel C. AU

'vril 1959 .

jet: Sequestre Graon
nsieur Atherton LE',
atelet des Fleurs ,
nscoff.
nsieur, '
'ai l'avantage ,de .'v
s ce couvet, t u..,b
rpentage de la p'rt(
pendant du sequester .
mise sous sequesftr.
I result de ce d
prietes des cols
*rre et Veristil Jeman
rtie du terrain e
it're' de fermne. '.'.
:n consequence, je Vq
e de respecter ]iad
-nommes.
ANDRE
.Directet


: 8 Avril 19593 '-i
: Directeur Genera4Y
: Prepose des.Coii1
Kenscoff. !;4
jet: Sequestre GarceOr
-Je vous envopieso
t, un bleu relabff
terrain depenia'i
rcon Bruno. .
.--n result de ce ..iO
portions .occupees
s Aristide -Pie'rre
font pas parties des
Aes. B 1
ANDRE.E W.


SUNDAY MAY


I .


"HAIT SUN"


1) of a letter of April 8, 1959 from
the Administration Generale
des Contributions to Mr. Ather-
us
ton Lee.
2) of a letter of the Direcqeur Ge-
neral des Contributions to the
Prepose des Contributions of
Kenscoff; CX
3) of an official report of April 15, Du
1959 recorded through bailiff Au:
Felix Latortue of the Civil
Court of Port-au-Prince. This Obj
report 'bears in .full the state- 1-
ment of the declaration of ac- ver
ceptance signed by Mr. Ather- du
ton Lee. Gar
You shall remark that from April 2.
8, to May 4, 1959, the latter date on les
which the so-called act of vandalism tier
was reproached, nearly one months ne
has elapsed. tree
Hoping that, with the three pho-
tostated copies, you will deduct just







rAY 'MAY 31st '1959


6


:. French-bol:i "Yolanda" Dumaurer
o has made a name as social
umnist on the Fort Lauderdale
ews is spending the weekend Lc-re
leaning material for her daily 'Yo-
:anda."

I' Well-known Commercial Attache
f "or the French Government in the
"Caribbean, M. Raoul Aglion is over
fromm Havana on a routine tour.
Stopping at El Rancho Mr. .Aglion
js meeting old friends and talking
it..he trade pulse. He departs Tuesday.


'.- Spending the summer in Canada
tare Mrs Clifford Brandt and her
4 three children. They flew Panam'
i'via New York Thursday.


: Mrs Clara Price-Mars return to
Paris to rejoin her Ambassador hus&
A. band this weekend.


ri' .Serge Corvington left for New
lk York this week. The former N. Y.
Consul will take up residence in
SManhattan.

Bishop Albert Cousineau of Cap-
Haitien .Panamed to New York
-Thursday.

*.e e
Henri Lousteau 'of L'Abeille book-
store and auto agency flew to New
York and Europe this week.
"1 .m '-.

Law school graduate and memb-
er of the Leger Cabinet, Mlle Edith
Godefroy is moving to New York
next week.

SColonel Dafliel M. Beauvoir was
-wed to Miss Ginette Laforest, last
i, Saturday evening, with President
-'Francois Duvalier attending the
-nuptials.


French national Antony de Puniet
.de Parry), was ordered expelled from
ilthe territory of Haiti by President-
ial Decree of May 21st.
..l
*.- *
r.if Bois Patate home of German leg-
.aton secretary Wolfgang Tranier
'Saw the gathering of members of
S.the German colony to meet Richard
,-"a'a Debricht visiting from Frank-
rt Germany Tuesday.


Barbacue to end all barbacues was
d Wednesday night at the home
the Gerard Fombruns on Place
Aoyer.

'. Miss Josselyne Chauvet and Jean
tClaude Fouchard are to be married
9on June 10th. The nuptials will be
.solemnized at the Sacred Heart of


Turgeau Church at 6:30 P.M., thus
uniting the Joseph Chauvet and Da-
niel Fouchard families.


Dr Sally Bodwitch is back at the
Sans Souci for 'a vacation. Dr Sally
was here more than a year ago
working with Point Four and has
now return ,to see friends and poun-
try at her leisure. A party .was giv-
en in her honor at the hotel Friday
night.


Canadian Embassy/ Secretary
Maurice Lemieux was given a
champagne send-off at Bowen Field
by the friends he made here during
his four and a half year assignment.
Mr and Mrs LemieUx and their
three children were given various
cadeaux during a farewell party at
Leslie Chenet's Sunday. One gift
was a lazard painting. Mr Lemieux
will swop posts with Mr. Boujle in
Havana'-who is expect to arrive
sometime next month.


Mr and Mrs Max Bausenhart are
spending a four months vacation in
their homeland, Germany.- The Em-
bassy councellor and .Mrs Bausen-
hart hail from Ulm. The German
Colony bid -them happy holidays at
a party given by MVfinister and Mrs
Kurt Lueddle Neurath In Bourdon.


Raphaille, Gilberte and Jean Se-
bastien leave next month to join
their parents Dr. Louis (Routol and
Mickey Roy presently living in
Montreal.

Loulou Gardere is on a month
long Rhum Barbancourt business
rip to Mexico and California.,


Gladys Angelucci of Cap Haitien
flew home by PAA direct from New
York Saturday.

'* *
Mrs Elizabeth Crew, wife of the'
Shell Company director returned
Saturday from placing her son in
school in Epgland, their homeland.


Max Neptune and Marie Therese
Torchon were married last Thurs-
day at the Levy Torchon residence
in Petionville.


Homme d'affaires Clemard Joseph
"Charles is in New York on a fort-
night business trip.

4 ', *
Music Professor Frantz and wife
Lina return to New York today oft-
er a visit with their families here.


"HAITI SU t"

Anite Alcindor clippers to New


York today.


Mr A] Noustas. member of the
Tourist Board and LBC head is due
back from a promotion and buying
trip to Europe next month.


Vinton Burns FAO tree man ret-
urns to Caracas this weekend. Pure-
ly by accident the former reforest-1
er of Haiti was here for Arbor day.
Mr. Burns was .guest at dinner with
former Damien Agronomist Jacques
lonorat present Tourist Board dir-
,ctor.


Ibo Itele proprietor Robert Baus-
san is back from New York. The
hotel man was in the States on his
Goat' Island development project.


Nicole Villedroutri returned from
-New York Saturday afternoon.


Family reunion at Bowen' Field'
took place Saturday afternoon when
Wilhelm Jansen returned home with
his wife and daughter Donna. On
hand to greet the young family -Who
have been away for the past six
years in Indiana were the Jansens
of the Royal Bank of Canada and
the Arnold Braun family. Wilhelm
born in laiti, of Canadian parents
met his wife while she. was working
at the American Embassy. He is
now in his last year in Chemistry.
They plan to vacation eleven days
here..
*
Belgium Consul George Naude is
back from. attending the Philadel-


phia christening of his
Mita's new baby girl.
A *t *


daughter


Jacques Aime, returned from stu-
dying in New York this weekeuid.

The Rankin 'family came to town
Saturday.

Mr. and Mrs Jacques Faubert ret-
urned from five weeks in Miami
with their Mama Faubert Saturday.


Sonia Dejean' is back from the
States.


Gerard Cauvin
urday.


flew to Miami Sat-


Lawyer of the Music Corp. of Ame-
rica Alan Hartnick is .a TTT (Typic-
al Tropical Tourist) lodged at the
Oloffson.


Wall Street financier Mashall
Dancy is in town. He has interest
in the new Slaughterhouse,


Flour Mills' President
Haas came to town Friday.


Arthur


Senator Moreau is leaving for the
States this weekend.


Carlson Charleston who is attend-
ing Upsola College.in S.Orange New


PAGE 15

Jersey is expected to take two ers in spite of tie rain, to the Haiu- :
months vacation in his homeland an American Insdtute Thursday.-
beginning in June. Carlson, the son "
of the popular Texaco Charleston, is Mrs LaruIer Mellon is flying to :
doing a five year course at Upsola. New York to:ay on business. :


L .Pq Fr


sue ,aLas. ult yuuthful second
cellist of the "Pablo Cassals orchegs-
tra in P.R. is visiting Haiti. He gave:
a' perfromance that drew music lov-


and his magic drum... .' '-

.- .7 .1-


THE ROUND BAR

Smart Rendez-Vous


Monday: International Buffet
a : n a ona-'W


Friday: Pool-Side Barbecue Dinner i


- I


I.. *'


,DIFFWRIT .


SAN .OIAUR

*AmB C' MA~fBR


"&cofs40 ,1met"6 do la U '



'&psift ci .'si ence .re
era.s u desag~rtales i pne
tan&t q" :' a co sr*' to. tq' "e
rC!asknla Sans atoh:amrebr.
f 4bibrber.'tes aldB
wag@e.-VUs areg maos n i puO= f6
at.-a moms-de da"s pars.c que


6 mine pratfliemntd


ScOoaFT CAl



^^^^^* ^^^^^ ^ MI^' BE
^ ; ~~~~~~~~~._ ^ ,. ^ <


k,-*; ,
.7; .
S* -N
, ". _



.,;!-
+4 jc.., -





.: t. : ; '..;:.% '
;.- I ..I
'.l
/ .-


'..--



A,.- : ,
*.: *t

r' 27.,,.. 4
S iJ'.'-


.- 2

, ;,**a i.


I


I







lAITI SUN.


-1
PLASTIC SURGEON IMPRESSED
WITH. SCHWEITZER HOSPITAL

omas HRes, Ph. d, a fine plast- ca and other parts of the world,
and humanitarian,.return- said the trip was well worth it, and
.(o New York Saturday morning, nowhere has he found such a wond-
-t'wtife' Natalie, after a 'regular erful spirit as at the Mellon's Hos-
c'rBisman's holiday, here. pital. "This", he said, "is what
. '"The youthful New York Doctor medicine is for."
f'travelled to Haiti expressly to op- In six month the plastic surgeon
Literate at the Mellon's Schweitzer hopes to return and do some more
Hospital and Monday through Thurs- work at the Artibonite Valley hos-
day .operated on some twenty hair- pital. "There is a ton of work," he
, b ,ps, several face tumors and burns. explained. m
Dr.Tom who has travelled in Afri-

LATIN-AMERICAN, AFFAIRS

Si'-. .. (Continued from page 5")

eatingg communism by strengthening the. material and spir-
'.iftual bases of democracy.
i The -House Subcommittee, which is headed by Armistead
4lS.ol den Jr., of Alabama, has made some excellent suggestions
uaboiut reducing and ultimately eliminating armaments grants,
:.'ir training our relationship toward dictators to "diplomatic
courtesy," and placing increased reliance on the Organiza-
,.:'4fIin .of America. States. ,
,' .President Eise ,'Iower's request for authorization to con-
:tfrilbute to the kiter-American Development Bank should,
Sof.course, be granted speedily.
(In The NEW YORK TIMES)


--. SIMIDOR INVITED TO MEXICO
;Tlya' Chamberlain mid wife Jan re- performances to last six weeks, be-
"i'tfned to. their little islnd off Me- ginning the 15tti of December.
eo Friday with H i .ta. objects The Chamberlains who are music
T :'at, fond memo&-ii; and an ."acon'! critic of world repute are fans of
t'.to k 'ep'In contact -'. li their lidn- the Choir and offered to pay all the
"".led. rls" lferie at tfit G.O. expenses during its sojourn in Me-
:--*iThe. operators : te soon to Lbi xico.
-:jmious Hotel Ma;,a 'm .con Uo.'.u:- A!thojgh .naiagements wee not
'nel,' Q.' Rop iexiico the Chamber- finalized before their departure the
yigirk hope to invite the choir Si- Chamberlains hope the tour of these
nndbr.- under th direction of' Ferrer good-will ambassadors can be ar-
ilTquerre to 'Mexico tc.r a series -of ranged before next winter.
H -' ----- _------


Increased ii
ending among


HAIT1 1N WO1RL


JAZZ FESTIVAL :
_______ _.'..
intercultural underst terms: A Pa
nations to. Jzz Through Parks


music is the dream of Jaz.. Festi.'al
Conductor Owen Engel famous Cla-
rinetist who for the. coming U.S.
Flag Day celebrations has included
Haitian trumpeter and band leader
Alphonse Simon and his orchestra
in the jamboree.

Alphonse Simon who left for New


here. vacatdioiUngJ w.IL1 .OL _
dnir


i'es, will represent Haiti at the 5th
Annual Festival which will take
place on Central Park Mall on June
14th.
Owen Engel. not content to per-
form the Festival once a year in
Central Park, hopes to make the
World Jazz Festival Orchestra a


York, yesterday, after spending 3 }visitor to- all nations i e


He believes th ja
of youth, expresmg A
the world in termTj
and, will providoe'its
ant factor not proly'-l._
but interchanges, o,
trade, strenghtening .
ity. .


Haitian Alphone Simon, trompettiste -

An".


OF EXQUISITE "U a
Designs t
AND SUPERB ANi
a Qual R14-m a&"% 00oe s n &ou
GRAND PUE h 4 O^ttc fl


.THE WORLD


SHOES :


FOR EVERY O


PAEGE 16


I.


SUNDAY,


" V, toll and
AMSTEL










7ported from


Agens t
.tINE A LACE NATIONALE, S.A. -
SPORT-AU.PRINCE
HAITI, W.IL


I weeks


FAMOUS




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E48Y6WN2L_6V8U5F INGEST_TIME 2013-08-27T21:27:21Z PACKAGE AA00015023_00235
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


  Home | About dLOC | Collections | Governance | Digitization | Outreach | FAQ | Contact  
  Powered by SobekCM
Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement  
© All rights reserved   |   Citing dLOC