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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00233


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
V. 1.


* .


VOL. IA ~UNut.L, mati lu1m and 17th 1959 No. 32 PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI



FIRST MAJOR FOOD DISTRIBUTION

IN NORTHWEST DRAWS THOUSANDS


The first general food distri-
butioni- to hn entire popula-
tion was -madd Satuirday7
May 2nd, in the city of Jean
'Rabel, heart of the starvation
area in Northwest Haiti. A
Stampede took place at one of
the two food depots in the corn
munity as the people, fearful
that there wouldn't be enough
Sto go around, broke through a
cordon to get- to the head of
the distribution line. One wo-
man was trampled to death.
Seven persons received injuries
.before the milling mob could be
,brought under control.
These people who even in
normal times have lived on a
bare subsistence diet were push
ed over'the border from subs-
istence into starvation by a 10-
'innth drought which cost them
three crop losses. -
Despite the arrival and com-
meenement of the distribution
of food from the United States,
.hae emergency is by no means
over in this area where an es-
timanted 100,o00 persons (bet-.
ween one-half and two-thirds
of the population) are suffer-
ing ..from various degrees of
starvation.
Doctors who surveyed the


ONE KILLED
IN RUSH
---
scene agreed .that thousands
more would have been added
to the hundreds of people who
have died of starvation or rela-
ted diseases since the first of
the year, had help not finally
come, to avert a major disaster.
CatholKc and Protestant chur
ches had been distributing food
to the members of their own
congregations in this marginal
.famm area fhr the past three
years.
With the arrival of food for
the eunire population there, all
the' villagers were notified, by
police courier and by'the' ctele-
doil to come and get it, and
the stampede to the -distribu-
tion centers resulted in thou-
sands of families getting their
first balanced meal in months.
All the sections have not as
*yet received their shipments of
the American-surplus food gift,
and' the main problem is to get
.the food from the port cities
into the hands of tbh mountain
villagers. Both transportation
.and communication are major
lebstacjes in this province where
there are practically no work-
able phones, where the roads
are but rocky trails and where


,'MNISTER-. BLANCHET DECLARES :

JACKIE DESCHAMPS INNOCENT

COMPLICITY IN GRENADE DEAL


Jacques Deschapips who was
arrested when an employee of
the commercial house .Henri
Deschamps, Sucesseurs. was
diiiovered manufacturing hand
grenades in his small foundry
last month, has been released
from custody. Savinien. Simon,
. the maker of .the bombs, is be-
ing held- for trial charge joint-
ly with Robert Deschamps for


plotting against -the internal se
curity ofathe State.
Saturday morning, Minister
of Information and Coor-
dination, Paul Blanchet, told a
newsman that the Government
had released Jacques Des-
champs because the investiga-
tion -had revealed nothing to
implicate him in the plot.
(Continued on page 6)


it takes a villager half the day
to journey 20 miles by cbou-
rique, to a food distribution
center. But the grateful North-
'westerners are falling into line
withli confidence at the good
news that there is enough food
for them all.
The situation of the drought
victims which came out.in bold
relief when a newsman here ac
companies missionaries to the
area and published a report and
(pictures -of the starvation vic-


S', r .. l t ..


' '. .
a lr. .., ,

9T I,


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".. *' -.
.
s


PRESIDENT DUVALIER Opens Anti-Illiterate CaPpaign at Workers
City, standing before jumbo sigii headed: .GRAND COISADE D'ALPHA-
BETIZATION.. (See story on page 11)


Foreign Minister
Ask Chambers To
Vote $ 32,070 For
Haitian Embassy
At Tokyo


A proposed law creating a


time in Jean-Rabel. Iaitian diplomatic mission in
A team of doctors visited the Japan at the Embassy level
Northwest and returned with was presented by Foreign Mi-
reports thai the populace gene- nister Louis- Mars, this week,
rally was in advances state of before the Legislature. The Mi-


starvation.
The doctors visited the three
hospitals in the region and went
into a number of villages, talk-
ing with 'the ministers, doctors
and teachers .those closest to
the people.
Their report stated there was
an increase in edema in hbil-
(Continued on page 16)


ANTI-ILLITERACY
PROPOSED STAMP
The emission of a new series
of Postage Stamps for the An-
ti-Illiteracy Campaign being
undertaken by the Haitian Go-
vernment .for the sum of
$ 140,000, was submitted as a
proposed law this week by
Commerce and Industry Minis-
ter Clovis Desinor to the Le-
gislative Chambers, authorizing
the stamp.
The text of the law calls for
Six million stamps of five cen-
times: four million stamps of
ten centimes. These stamps
will be required as additional
tax on all letters,.patkages and
other objects of correspondence
given to the Postal Service, the
five centimes stamp for the in-
IContinued on page 16)


nister asked for the sum of
$32,070.00 to 'be affected for
the furnishing and functioning
of the F nbassy. This amount
had been provided for in the
budget for the ,Embassy in
Israel-Turkey and Minister
Mars asked that the amount be
transferred and used. for the
Mission created in Tokyo.
Justifying the demand,' the
Foreign Minister declared that
a Japanese diplomatic mission
had beentrated inaHaii-,ain~e
(Cohtinued' dn page. 15)

Saturday Night -
Fight Has
Repercussions
Alan Danzig of the Casino
International d'Haiti was em-r
prisoned, shortly after noon,
on Wednesday, pending trial
on charges brought by David
Talamas, CQ-proprietor of the
Canape Vert Tourist Shop.
Mr. Talamas accuses the Ca-
sino men of assaulted.
Tiny Harold was released by
Attorney General Rousseau,
and absolved of Talamas' accu-
sation. He attempted to break
up the fight according to the
Justice.


Atherton Lee of'Chatelt des
Fleurs stepped of Pan-Am
Flight 433 last Sunday with
"the International. Trophy. of
the 1959 few York Flower-
Show held last March in the
Coliseum. It is probably the
most valuable award in the
show available to foreign coun
tries.
On alighting, his chauffeur
broke the. bad news to him
that the previous day vandals
had wantonly pulled out. about
two acres of producing flowers
and seed.beds. The most .incon
.gruous feature was that the
vandalism was. directed by a
Justice of the Peace, one Rene
Raphael,- and an employee. of
the Department of Information
and Coordination,. one Michel

.Lee s.ys he buys land when
he can and.. also: has long 18-
*year leases for- other gardens.'
There was litigation for owner
ship 6f some of .the leased
lands, .which did not concern .'
him; and this atrocity was on;
such lands in litigation. The.
(Continued on pago,,i6)
-


SThe book ,Ten Years of
Struggle for Liberty;,,' by the
late Georges Sylvain, will be
presented. on Monday morning,
May 18th, during a ceremony
at the clubrooms of the Wo-
men's League on Avenue Ma-
rie-Jeanne, in the Exposition'
City. The presentation will
take place between 1000 and


(Continued on page 151 12:00 o'clock.


MODERN OASIS (FONDS PARISIENS> HAS ITS NEEDS


The EngirTeering Corps of
Haiti's.Armed Forces has built
Sa model, village at Fonds Pari-
siens, a sloping land overlook-
ing the lake, I'Etang Saumatre.
:They utilized native woods for
the buildings, and gave the vil
:l.age a water supply pumped
up from over a hundred feet
below the surface of the earth
by electric power. There is land-
for the farmers to plant their
gardens, a school, a dispensary
,and church, and the arena for
S (Continued on page 15)

^ "


THIS COCKFIGHT ARENA is the center of the new Fonds Parisiens
village. Many of the villagers own valuable fighting cocks.


OLD VILLAGE on Haitian-Dominican frontier destroyed by the Port-
au Prince Fire Brigade.


a.




*3


Vr
S~r


1118~


FLOWER FARM
HIT BY VANDALS


L






PAGE 2

f*Thprld DICKINSON, chief I
Sof the United Nations Film Ser
L, vices, aqd producer and co-
i -author, with J. C. Sheers, of
e-t:,?he'-U. N.'s first featurelenght
: motion picture, cPower Among
; "en.. (a movie we'll get to
l' E is n : with a receding
presently), is 'a tall, spingy
i gray pompadouir, lorn-rimmed
:. glasses, and an exceptionally
,prankish expression.- He is a
.. '.:.c. clergyman's son, and hisances
ti -~ ar; known *to have include
::' .E- Lady Godiva !and are' us-
Spected'to have been at least
lr mixed' up with Thorld the
SDwarf, whd isr or was, one of
:' the five personages identified
ia the Bayeux tapestry; aThor
'.oldp was- Dickinsons mother's
S maideri name. The other day,
9.i:, arranged to meet Dickinson
S. .irt: the delegates' restaurant at
i:;: i..t'eU. N. Secretariat, at which
i -tine he told us he is a compul
;"' sive globe-totter. He ran away'
From Oxford thirty-three years
ago ,' e said, when he,was
,,- ;~ ept*-two, to serve as interpret
-"1.: location in Phris, and has since
..ter, for an English film crew on
.-,been a free-lance'film director
-,. -I. gland Spain, Israel, In-
di, and elsewhere, turning out,
;. ':: sutc diversified products as
S il tp 1940 4Gaslight'f with Dia
:!. n:i iWyntyard (its prints were
-, i.t1i and, destroyed by Hol-
'lyWood to clear the way foi
Stle .Ingrid Bergman version),
-f the Iritishl wartime ariti-espio
-Ki- .iis is still playing in
nage raining film .Next -of
6 "'iqt popular entertain-
aient 'le, Qeen of Spades".
*IieIsraeli work called wHil
24' doesn't Answer', and--sin.
.. eOctobler; 1956, when he
a'- "b~e to work for the eighty-
,' ... 4.' : nations represented over
N. t:1t& east end of Forty-second
ret;-- a ninie-*iuiut Apde-
S: i aiad :, nominee '- called
." erture-, whose saiBud track
S camris nothing but Beethoven's
S, ..4;:,rjonta Overture, and anot
er short one, rot yet.released,
entitled iPablo Casals Breaks
S :" His Journey..
Itf wams to discuss aPower
'""' Adixong Men", the trail-blazing
inety-minute job, that we
-: sought out Mr Dickinsbn, the
; 'day after we'd caught the film
t a small advance 'screening
at the Museum of Modern Art.
'l (This movie which is possi-
bly the first to acknowledge in
'." the same. screen-credit frame
thle helpful cooperation of the
S atomic-energy )establishments
of the U. S. and the U. S.S.R-
S' had a second preview last
Tuesday at the U. N. General
Asesmbly Hall, but thsre will
be nol official premiere until
late1 in June, at the Berlin Film
FestivaL) IPower Among Menu
contains four in-person, on-tne
scene episodes, reconstructing
crucial encounters between
groups of people, and demons-
trating the human capacity fpr
both destruction and creation
the rebuilding of a blitzed
village ne.r Monte Cassino; the


;. i .,'
r .'', .


TIDAL


IN THE NEI
rehabilitation of a backward
farming neighborhood in Haiti;
the establishment of, first, a
hydroelectric project and, neit
staggering British Columbian
a set of tensions among the
thirty-one nationalities recruit-
ed to operate' it; and, lastly,
Jhe lessenmg of a 'Norwegian
beekeeper's suspicions of his
neighboring atomic-energy reac
tor. The episodes are strung t gatt
ner with pictorial alluiions to-
such related thematic material
as defunct civilizations and ther-
.monuclear explosions. It had
struck us that the formal deve-
lopment of the movie was a
composition 6f associated ideas,
rather than a string of narra-
tive events, and we asked Dic-
kinson about that.
,Exactlyn, he said' affably. I
think it's, a kind of musical ar
rangement, more than a visual
one. That 'makes the whole
I can't recall aiiy very close
thing hard to describe, because
precedent.. The film isn't a fic-
.ion feature; because it's fac-
ual, but then' it isn't, a docu-
'-nentary, either, or even a pro
agendaa piece.' You see, I've
.ever found ot -exactly why
they asked me, a coinmercial-
ntertainment film man, to
ome over here aAd take on
what is an information job, but
Hon that it; .as to put some
've proceeded on 'the assump-
'. ro~.tion, .inty .the. .iforatiaa
-or at least to, prevent all
the intrinsic emotion. .from
iraiiing out: The idea for
,P o, we, r Among M e n'
ame from the late,'tnder-Se-
,retary of the Qepartment of
iblic Irnorimation here; Pro-
ssor Ahmed Bokhari,- of Pa.-
-istan, who died lasi Decem-:
'er a learned and very witty
.nan, who did things like trans-
3ting -Oscar Wilde i'i:o L'ru.
le said he wanted a political
film, a film of ide s such as
the idea that ordinary people
are capable of learning to sitr-
rive in the atomic age, and
that one needn't be terrified of
nuclear ,power as such but
hat there is indeed a grave
u-man dilemma and that it is
* advisable for the audience to
'e vigilant>.
Dry Cinzanos-on-the-rocks
arrived at our table, and after
i motherly waitress had writ-
'en down our-lunch order, Mr
'Dickinson continued, ;or Bokhtri agreed with me
hat our one-reeler5 amounted
inly to so many little. wavelets
lapping a vast shore, and that'
:t would be well to make ode
big movie a tidal wave to
'wash right over that shore and
;weep away. its accumulated
debris of indifference, if you
4on't mind the figure. People
asked us about the script, but
Professor Bokhari answered
that a script would be no use-


/ SUNDAY, MAY 10th. and j7t


cHAmI SUN,



-WAVE-
V YORKER
.,e would have to go to the
countries that seemed likely to
offer some expression of our
ideas, talk the thing over with
the people there, and let them
act it outs. i
Poached eggs arrived, arnd
IVr. Dickinson'went on. right at the outset Julien.
Jryan, of the International
Film Foundation, heard of our
project and let me lodk at a
short documentary he and Vic-
cor Vicas had shot in 1946 and
never released a film show-
ing the return of bombed-out
peasants to the runs of their
village in southern Italy, and
Lheir reception of UNRRA aid,
and .the explosion of a mine in
a field they stated plowing
again: After the screening, I
wondered what'.had become of
the village afterward. Julien
couldn't even remember its
name, but finally he located itf
on a road map, and Gian-Luigi
Polidoro the young Italian
director, who was with us
then took the map and his
camera, and filmed the '.ieven-
years-after sequence' that fol-
lows the Julien Bryan fdotage
:n the 'first episode of-:Power
Among Met.> Tlat was in Sep-
tember of 1957, and it gave us
our sniall village and our small.
mine explosion. Next, we wan-
ted something, on a slightly
bigger scale, both in the way
of community and in the way
of explosion. I asked the Tech-
nical Assistance Board if they
could, give me a nice wide
community, scattered over a
good maxy miles. They had
several thousand on hand, and
we took.Haiti. We' went there
in January, 1958, and found a
U. N. Technical Assistance spe-
cialist named Georges *louton
a Belgian, and a real-saint-
crea.ing oases of agricultural
plenty in a starving wilderness.
Around the oases-around the
farms of Mouton's converts -
there were unreconstructed
farmers wio took me right
back to the 'English slums I'd
seen as a child, where I'd
known- people who were.stupid
not because they were born
that way but because persist-
ent lifelong hunger can prevent
minds. as well as bodies from'
functioning. It's a recognized
disease now, and' it even has
a name kwashiokor, an
Ashanti word.
reconstructed farmer and as-
led him if he'd mind very
mich if we made his farm un-
to-date. He said O. K.. and
within six weeks Mouton's
converts transformed Ihat farin
;n front of our cameras. Next-
keeping in mind the important
Question of scale-we looked
into the vast Alcan hyaroolec-
'ric project, in British Colum-
bia. In Haiti, the explosion we


Oyer coffee, Dickinson told
us that the finishing touches
had- included ; m....icnl score



PERMANE


R


pa
te

tr
4

pi
fo
pu
fa


ci
w

ti
th
Ie
te


used was dynamit:ng in road
construction; in British Colum-
bia we found company film of
the blasting! away of whole
mountains, and we assigned
our distingiAished Czech-born
director Alexander Hammid to
take his camera and do the
story of the boom town sur-
ounding the company's project
-a somewhat tense stoiy,.
which led by no great leap of
thought to considerations of the
potentialities for good or ill of
explosion on the largest scale
known. By then, it was summ-
er. We jumped ovet 'to the
Joint Establishment for Nuc-
lear Research near Oslo. The
neighborhood's real beekeeper
proved shy,, so there we had to
hire our only professional ac-
tor, to reenact the beekeeper's
dealings with the atom. We got
back here last .Aucust, and
started editing. ,


An 'Opinion From U. 'N. Technical Assistance Si
Our (Literary cialist are in Fermathe, a n
review Department)) north of Kenoff. Prob'blii
In t1i 'edltoiial columns of U. N. spent '$24,000 Yto $3 0Oi
.e New Yorker lMarch 14, 1959 or even $50,000 there in saa
age. 4 is a discussion of a Uni- and expenses over the 3 y4
,d. Nations flhnm entitled er Among Men,, ....... the project was to develop farimer
ail-blazing 90 minute job cooperatives to "produce an.
finons rating 'the 'human ca- market vegetables and otdei
acityfor both destruction and grictltura'l produce.
reaction 'The fihn icontai.n Drive by there sometidhe-fa
nir in-person, on the scene e- dbservie the human -
isodes, among which Was the for creation. and the oa
rming neighbor from in Haiti agricultural plenty,. P. 1
- a U. N. Technical Assnstaine one of the :wbrst exaJp
specialist creating cases of agri- soil-erosion in the Caribb~i
tit ral plenty in a starving I But the project aided i'
ildernessa. New Yo(rcler does yield .I
If the U. N. -public rela- chuckles ard wite crack
on man could onl' iransport -al readers have sigge
iat fertilizerto these baeass was largely a .,waf .
c would at leatt have one ma- .taxpayers mopey and..:
riall accomplishment.' gett. laugbh ,without hati
The <.oa'es created 'a. the -oi money. .
-. ....
_?^ ^ ^j


and his magic drum

THE ROUND-BAR

Smart Rendez-Vous

Monday: International Buffet.

Friday: Pool-Side Barbecue Dinner

I .'U..'',_


by Virgil Thomsoi. ho isV
neighbor ot Dickinisor'. j.d n 'i
wife (the latter, when -t1oi|
in England, is a practicizig' r
chitect) at the .Hotel Chelse~
their New York headquarteir
Summing up, Dickinsohi said,
including secretaries atnom'uit3,
to only thirteen .peopi
representing seven of eiglhi
the sponsor nations The oto'
cost was exceedingly 'apUi
We're negotiating at the i
inent with commercial .disti.
butorq, and we, hope to-circu
late it on a paying basis ,..'
least initially, al. overt
world--which, of course,:incI
des Russia. To qualify
showing at the Berlin Fil
Festival, an entry must ndt
have been sho\n previously in
any country besides its coqnt
of origin, which gives' Pow.
Among Men' considerable la
trde. Peing a U. N. product,'
has; eighty-two countries'.
origin. It is a political film
really the largest senses, .


.NT WAV!
I I~SUN
CNIWI1V


I


I ;






riMAY 10th. and 17th. 1959


--- -L


aHAITI SUNa .


Iotel School Graduate Selected
,For Specialized Culinary Art
Training In U. S.

WEDS PRIOR TO DEPARTURE


:.lThe way to Big Tourist bu-
,iii is through a Hotel Kit
-a retired General once
t;agathering of green-horns
B ..trade, after a trip abroad.
l .-i is also the philosophy of
Nations Hotel Industry
t: and Mrs. Robert Angel-
:-..who entertained in their
IEin.Ville residence, Wed-
0yesda evening, in honor of
le.eol Hoteliere -d'Haiti gra-
ida, E mic Lafond-FavieTe.
aimre :.of Mr. Lafond-Faviere
The reception was to mark
ie.soccasion of the coming de-
a e of Mr. Lafond-F--iere
46r the United States to partici-
ate'in a training programme
where twelve graduates fom
pany parts of the world will be
en rfection courses in cook

-M Lafond-Faviere bas been
Sby the management of
enown resort hotel,, *The
rier, White Sulphur
West Virginia. -There
will specialize in culinary
working in the kitchens of
iGrieenbrier under the direct
Cigion of Food Director
~ ann Rusch, a colleague of
Angelvin. The young Hai-
ti~hotel student will also at-
nendi daily lectures offered by
yi, of thle hotel's brilliant
&aif- af administrativee directors
bhi lel operation and organi-

ai.i.suneasful candidacy for
tifeo'Che trainee openings was
ii'er-" part to the honorary
L -.Favieres'obtained as a
te 4f the Hotel Training
ihool in' 1958 ,and classes in
i binary art which he later at-
-tended as assistant-instructor at
the hiatitution under Mr. An-
rinB fifuperivision.
'i.U." N; Expert Angelvin has
4 hien istrumental in obtaining
*o"i'tlier similar scholarships
"jyoming Haitians of the
staff and student body.
g Wednesday evening'a
on over champagne, Mr.
counselled the young
1 man concerning the ap-
ticeship he was about to
ertake mentioning that it
N.only with- tle disinterested
..perption of such farseeing
Directors as Mr. Truman
Pglt, that suoh opportunities
d be provided. Mr. Wright
..jTiie-President and General
ger of the Greenbrier Ho.
fandtis working so that can-
to the hotel industry


Eric Lafond-Faviire
may practice-train in a truly
'professional atmosphere wi-
thout' cost to tbheselves, and
was announced to his colleagues
during the. reception. Th e
young couple will be married
before his depauitlure.
Among the guests present
were Labor .Department Secre-
ary General, Mr Max L. Fou-
-hard, Hotel School Director
tlaurice Liau-taud. and news-
aman Lemaire of La Phalange,
thus gain invaluable experience-
Mr. Eafond-Faviere's coming
marriage to Miss Yoland Leon
and a large number of relatives
of Mr. Lafond-Faviere and
friends of the scbbool.

PERE GEORGES DEPARTS
The Reverend Father Jean-
Baptiste Georges, ,ex-Minister
of National Education clipper-
ed Pan American Airways, last
Friday on a frip to the United
States and Canada.


Through correspondence ex-
changed between President
Duvalier and the well-known
industrialist Oswald J- Brandt,
publisher here Saturday, it was
learned that Mr Brandt had
contributed $10,000 to aid dis-
aster victims.
Mr Brandt's letter of May
4th to the President was as
follows:
,Excellency:
For more than two years Hai


Noted Haitian Sing-
er Returns After
Success in Europe

Miss Claude Germain, Haiti's
.foremost nightuigale, is back
home after three years in Eu-
rope. The talented artist retuir-
ned Wednesday from New
York, after her triumph in Mi-
lan, in the star role of ..Ma-
dame Butterfly>>.
Miss Germain who was pie-
sented in New York with the
Katherine Dunham troup later
sang in Paris, Brussells and
Copenhagen and other Capitals
of Europe. She was selected
during her performance in Mi-
lan, to play, in the operetta
, one of
her greatest roles. Her su, -e:s
was hailed by the foreign press.
She is expected to perform
for the Haitian public during
her visit and 'vAcation here
,vith the family.


YAL'' -*F'*r"El TEAM TAKES LEAVE. At Bowen Field,
Professor Sidney Mintz who is studying marKeting in Haiti (wrote last
week's story .Nana of Duverget.) for the .Sun.). and local bird specia-
list and Entomologist .Fito. Bonnefil, saying .NA oue, tendez. to Professor
Philip Humphrey and Sarita Van Vleck.
The Yale teamers flew- Stateside this past week, with six cases of bird,
reptile and amphibian species found in Haiti during thdir three months
sojourn hunting, searching and bird-watching, under the. combined
auspices of Yale, University of Florida and the Pan American Section of
the Inteivational Committee of Bird Preservation.
Their junket took in three weeks on La Gonave, four weeks in the Pine
Forest, several days in the Plaine du Cul-de-Sac and D'Leau Guillee.


RENT A


ti has been submitted to a se-
ries of difficulties with truly
painful results for the popula-
tion which has valiantly resist-
ed up to the present, supported
by Your great moral and pa-
ternal aid.

Troubles of a political or-
der. seriously deficient harv-
ests, a prolonged drought per-
iod, almost general, but espe-
cially in the Northwest, and
ironically enough, the recent
-flood demolishing a section of
the Capital. and causing not
only enormous material losses
but numerous losses-of life. All
of these are disastrous and dis
encouraging ordeals.


The Societe National d'Art
Dramatiquie (SNAD) inaugura.
-tea its First Grand Festival this
morning at the French Insti-
tute.
A special programme will fei
ttre such artists as Ti-Paris-,
Jacques Belizaire, and Alti Ri.
viera. Guy and his Dancers of
the Isle. and the

BRANDT DONATES *10,000

TOWARDS AID TO DISASTER

VICTIMS


of the SNAD will also be pre-
sented.
The proceeds from the festi-
val are to be used for the cons-
truction of the Society's new
building.
This Association which groups
some of the country's most -ta-
lented actors was founded by
the late Charles De Catalogue.


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TO

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Complete accurate information on0y bIr n
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^ R~~~ne Abraham Ltcine ^,^ ^i


DRIVE- YOURSELF VOLKSWAGEN


m SOUTHERLAND

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......-... ,.. ..
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I share with you, Excellen-
cy, the sadness which You
feel for Your people, and con-
gratulate You for the fortitude
which You show proof of each
day before Your hard task.

Permit me, Excellency, to
humbly express my since sym
pathy for the numerous afflict
ed citizens, in my quality of
honorary citizen, or rather as
you yourself designated me aco
citizens, by sending the enclos
ed check which is to be used
.in your wisdom for the bene-
fit of my suffering co-citizens.n

xxx

The President of the Repu-
blic reSponded to Mr Brandt's
letter acknowledging receipt of
the check of $10.000. on May
6th as follows:

(continued on page 16)


SNAD Giving 1st. Grand Festival

This Morning At Institute Francais


TOURS

45 AVE. Marie-Jeanne
Tel: 3591


.


PAGE 3
i


\'i





. i*?i
~*






'&AGE 4R


The Pefite Rivi&re de 1'Arti-ERE- DE LARTIBONITE
Saeetl "' r";PETITE RIVIERE DE LARTIBON ITE
'bonite, situated on the right
shore of the river, gets its name
.*6m a stream which starts in bloodiest and most glorious d'Hector, Commander of the away from Spanish General
the interior of the city and oatries or Haiti's Independence division of the Artibonite at Santacilia.
emptied, into the Artibonite, was fought, in March, 1802. the time of the campaign un- In February 1802, Toussain:
less thar a kilometer from its There is to be fund the Pa- dertaken against the Domini- Louverture, organized the re-
source. lace with 365 doors built by cans by Emperor Faustin I. distance against ;he expeditio-
The project of erecting-Pe- King Christophe, This Palace Returning to his home, Gene- nary forces of the French Ge-
.tite Rivi6re to the rank of pa- still called cPalais de la Belle ral Thomas d'Hector died 4hor- neral Leclerc, brother-in-law
rish goes back to 1723. Its diviere*, was one of the eight tly afterwards. His last wish of Bonaparte, serrc te Petite
cmall charal was dediriatend to projected by King Christophe


Saint Jerome and the first in view of a display of his
church-warden of the parish realm. According to the plans
was elected on Christmas Day of the architect conceived as
in 1725. 'dictated by Christophe, the


construction was to contain a
number of doors e.iial to the
.ays of the year that is to
say 365.
The Palace was unfinished
at the death of Christophe in
1820.
The impressive ruins of the
ground floor were restored by
the Stenio Vincent Govern-
ment, recovered in galvanized
zinc, and now is used as a pri-
mary schools, the Municipal
Service, the Prefect's bureaux,
and the Telegraph Service.
The rotonda transformed in-
to a social welfare center, is
often loaned to young 'people's
organizations for balls and for
congresses.
He \\ho is accustomed to dig
into the history of this country
knows that the Petite Riviire
is one of the most heroic cen-
ters of the territory of Haiti.
On the the Petite Riviere which also
serves as the market-place, the
tomb of Monseignor Saint-
Louis de Grand'Picrre, Due of
the Emipire under Faustin I,
second Emperor of Haiti, is
still to be seen.
At 'Da Cr&te h Pierrot>.,
anong the tombs of the sol-
diers who died for Ihe Inde-
pendence can be seeh also the
tomb of General Jean Thomas
.


It is interesting to study the
curbe of ascendancy of the po-
pulation of the Petite Rivibre
t from Colonial times:
In 1730 346 whites, 85 af-
franchis, 4,758 creoles
In 1739 224 whites. 9 af-
franchis
In 1765 202 whites, 151
mulattoes, 44 free blacks Du-
ring this last epoc there were
to be found:
10 sugar mills producing ref-
ined sugar
10 sugar mills producing raw
sugar
410 indigo manufactories
126 cotton mills
140 coffee houses
3 rum distelleries
7 b'r i c k factories, or
pottery making houses
50 white-wash making fur-
n aces
several stations of cows,
horses, goats
In 1751, Petite Rivi&re was
struck by an earthquake which
destroyed numerous houses.
When the name of Petite
Riviere de l'Artibonite is pro-
nounced it evokes 'he souvenir
of the cCrzte h Pierrot> a small
fort built by the English dur-
ing their occupation of the
birg in 1794 and later rebuilt
byToussaint. It was
there that one of- the
"0


was to sleep his last sleep on
the land which had been flooded
.vith the blood of 'he soldiers
of the Cr&te-a-Pierro'.
The tale goes that under the
Government- of liviert' He
ard, a conflict arose between
the Judge, Adams, and the
General, Saint-Louis Grand'
Pierre, Commander of the Pla-
ce. Judge Adams, at the head
of a group of conspiratorF, met
vith them in a house to plot
against the security of the
State.
When the conspirators v.ere
ordered to, surrender, they
obstinately refused. General
Grand Pierre had the General
beaten, 'brought two canons be-
fore the house where 'he cons-
pirators were huddled and
upen ,fire. All of them perished.
Since then, a deep enmity
has existed between the des-
cendants of the iwo families)
which ceased only 75 :. cars la-
ter, thanks to an amorous idyl
which joined two descendants
of these two fairilies conside-
red as the XCapulet> and the
'Montaigu of the Petite Ri-
,vire of the Artibonite.
But let us take the history
of the Petite Riviere by chro-
nological order. ,
It was not far froth the Pe-
tite Rivibre, on the Plassac Ha-
bitation, where the rising of
the Affranchis took place in
1789. A3 one of them had re-
fused to take the oath of alle-
giance to the whites, he was
arrested. Eighty Affranchis
met then on the Plassac: Habi-
tation to protest and to demand
the liberation of the;r compa-
nion. The *Marechaussee sent
the ferocious Borel at the head
of an army of 1.2,000 nen
against them. They w-ere dis-
persed, their chiefs eniprisb-
ied. Several of tihe escaped
the massacre by miracle. To
frighten the Affranchi \\ ho
demanded thdir civil and roli-
Tcal right the white colonia-
lists stuck the head of a colo-
red child they had killed, at the
end of a pick. Bu' far from
daunting the courage of the
Affranchis, their :a n!n was un-
l'a'hchj. In November, 1793,
'he inhabitants cf the Petit-.
Ri vire gave up to the Spanish
while those of St. Marc lost
their city to the English.
In 1794 Toussaint Louver-
ture took the Petite Rivii.re


I


SUNDAY, MAY 10th. aind1


r^ 7fwe|


SCOTCH W SKY
SSCOTCH WHISKY


The
Celebration
Scotch


' ;




-...:.
i





,.



;;.
It,


So
So


hits the mark jp9 e-




OF HAITI S.F.


-In~n(err~w
: IIIIIIIIL~HI
Sly~ --


AHAITI SUN*


mingue by a scientific Sioo1
desirous of studying the
and minerals of the county.

It was at Petite riviere dei,
l'Artibonite that the first ind i
genous flag was created by Dee
salines, himself. It was the tri-
color which at first carried the'
French coat of arms. Then- ij,
harder to better mark the inau:
guration of the indigenous, w61.
it became a red and blue flag
made of a red handkere.h
ani a .part of the blue dress:o
his sister Corimene who lIt
became the wife of Nicolas S 4
get, and grandmother of Niv.
sage Saget who was President -
of Haiti in 1870.

When the Marine Corps di
sembarked in Haiti in 1915,- the'i
Petite Rivire de I'Artibonit e
became a very active center oft
Resistance against the occupa.
tion of Haiti by the Americans?

On September 26, 1913, the
U. S. Marines Sergent Platt
was killed thereby the t (,guerillas who hid in the
mountains and swooped dowii
on the town at night) and no-j
body could be found to transit
port the body of the Americini
With the -except;on of a poor'
derelict which the pv'ple riiL -
cously knick-named ," Pot6-
blanc mourir. (He who ca.ries'
the dead body of a w.ite man);)
This soubri.quet reraiaied1
for a long time attached to thil
individual as a mark of infamy.
Petite Riviere de l'ArttbopitJ
is one of the rare communitei
of the interior of the coiun
which was developed '.to
point of being designed a's:.i
Haiti are ordinarily to .
found on the littoral or se
shore.
This is a commercial cent
of primary importance fot'
Haitian economy. The popl&
tion is very laborious. It is"p's
secrated to commerce, agricul
ture and cattle-raising.. '

(By J. D.)


Riviere of the Artibonite, a
large sum of money. r -which was
then sent LO the Cahos, great
chain of mountain ; whiwh en-
circle the Petile Riviere.
The legend goes that these
fabulous sums of Toussaint
Louvertmre were buried in the
region of Petite Riviere.
In March 1802, Toussaint
sent numerous whites who
had been arrested at Gonaives
to Petite Rivibre. They hid out
in the surrounding woods.
some in white-wash furnaces.
some under beds,' in'the -,ugar-
cane fields, others under hays-
tacks or in trees.

But the indigenous soldiers
tracked and discovered tCheir
hide-outs and made a report to
Dessalines. He ordered then
tied up and almost naked and
carried to a hill. Dessalnes
then ordered them massacred
when the signal was given by
three strikes on his snuff-box.
The place of the massacre? is
to be found not far from the
Crete-4-Pierrot and is stilled
known as Calvary>.

Thanks to the Christian spi-
rits and great heart of Madame
Dessalines, however, a few of
the whites were saved. Let us
cite among them the names of
the great Naturalist, Descour-
tilz, author of cGuide du M4-
decin de San-Domingue or
> in eight
volumes, also author 'of Vo-
yage d'un Naturalistev. Des-
courtilz was sent to San Do-


~6n Irp ~




,M.AY 10th. and 17th. 1959
-Y, 'MAY 10th. andi 17th. 1959


(HAITI SI'UN


PAGE 5


-HAITI SUN
" ItE 4HAIlTIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
j .Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
,: EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
4lcEANT-RESPONSABLE PAUL E. NAJAC
ESTABLISHED IN 1950


-.
VOLUNTEER FIRE BRIGADE
FOR PETION-VILLE
: IF NOTHING ELSE
l-.iheniever disaster in the form of fire, flood or earthquake
h' its:Petion-Ville, thevneed for a Fire Brigade for that mountain
..:irsort city becomes startingly evident.
:VW.ith-unreliable communications between the ever-growing
:y 'town,-and the only Fire Brigade some seven miles away in
Port-au-Prince, it is perhaps time citizens either subscribed for
i theii own brigade, or set up an emergency volunteer Brigade
which could plan ahead on how to combat fires, Floods and
Seathquakes.
S- ..During the April 29th. flash flood, neighbors remained ter-
';rified for two hours when two elect'4ic wires broke and spit
~ tinselss and. detonations while the rain kept the short-circuit.
alive. Frantic telephone calls and two trips to town under the
storm still didn't bring the fire brigade nor the electric com-
'pany truck.which had their full share of Labor in Port-au-
Prince.
.;'A branch of these two important companies would be a boon
t o the families and hotels of the large community of Petion-
Ville.
CHECK SCHOOL SANITATION
-. Several parents have asked that the Health Department make
a rigid control of toilet and washroom facilities of the schools
i in the Capital. The parents pointed out that some of the toilets
'in private schools are disease-breeding grounds, and that there
is no available drinking water.

MENTALLY ILL NOT ON SHOW
Nobody questions the sincerity and purpose of the psychia-
!.triE center, but a small detail over-looked can have disastrous
'.., effect on the public and the patients._
SThe present set-up does not give enough privacy to the
patients. The new modern, well-built edifice should change
-its entrance. This past week it was registered that curious
passersby went forward to peer into the Center, and when the
patients came close to the windows, .the curious ran off yelling.
It sho ld be idealized that the patients receiving treatment
at the Psychiatric Center are not on exhibition.

-AID TO LATIN AMERICA


In the New York Times
SThe question of economic and financial aid to Latin America
Sby the United States sometimes resembles a tug of war and
.i-sometimes a process of shadow boxing. On one side there are
underdeveloped Latin-Ambrfcan nations which need more ca-
pital than they are getting. On the other is the United States
with its global responsibilities and the limits on its ability to
provide capital. Unreality enters when Latin Americans de-
mand more than the United States can possibly supply,- or
when the United States calls upon Latin America for a degree
of economic and political orthodoxy and austerity impossible
in the present state of affairs.
The weekend events in Buenos Aires, where the Committee
of Twenty-one is holding a hemispheric economic conference,
was a typical performance. In this case Premier Fidel Castro
of Cuba garnered the sensational headlines by proposing that
the United States provide $30,060,000,000 in public capital over
the next ten years fo.; Latin America.
The United States has faced siriilar demands in various forms
at other inter-Aipneican economic meetings and its reply is
always more or less the following: United States constitutional
, provisions and the division of powers make it impossible to
give ~open-ended, pledges of financial aid stretching over
years. The United States is always willing to do its best to
finance any and all sound development projects and programs
linked to good-internal and economic controls. The record of
American credits and grants, public and private, is a good one.
-All this must be known to Latin Americans. Their -reply is
that we are going to have to change our system of operation
and that we will do so when qr if the situation becomes serious
enough. They say they are simply asking for an expression
of intent, not a commitment, but no American negotiators would
have'the power to make that kind of a pledge.
Such inter-American verbal contests end, as at Buenos Aires,
Sin a draw.


ties of the country was men-
tioned in a recent editorial in
the Ha i Sun. I hope this mat-
ter was noted by the U. S. au-
S tlorities. I recall that your pa-
per suggested it would be a
a C B Pobem great contribution if the U. S.
SCp' ig Problem would facilitate ,three new air-
Ihr. Bernand Diedericl. craft of the DC-3 type for Hai-
Editor. Haiti Sun. ti's internal CORATA lines.
Dear Editor, Sincerely yours,
I am writing to you because A. CAPOISE
I really that your newspaper xxx
has constantly spoken out on
the problems. fadcng (the citi- Health Activities
zuse., of the Noha.i and th.,.) For Children
efforts to devtalop more inte- Dear Editor,
rest in CaFp-Haitien as a tou- I think i.t would be great if
rist attraction. attention could be called to
Through your columns I am the numerous Ihoabbies that chil
calling attention to the need dren in Haiti could easily de-
for something to he done for velop a liking for and enthu-
our section of the country with siasm for. The children of the
regard to airline transportation community a'pppear to have so
We have only the Monday, Wed little time to engage in things
nesdav, Friday flights right other -than their heavy home
now, and the service should be work duties after a long day
dailyy for the summer time. in school but now with summer
As the need for new passen- coming ori they will soon be
ger aircraft which could gii-e on vacation and their lime
full service to the principal ci- free for Jdoing other things.


Music and poetry should be
encouraged then -among the
boys and ginls, for the choral
grouping brings out talent an&
expression during the sweek.
ness of childhood whlih in ma.-"
ny other countries is encoura-
ged by neighborhood activities.
Anrateur photogrpahy is ano
their activity to be encouraged
in children to develop their in-
terest. in nature, birds and ani-
male.
Children's clubs where the
results of their competitive con
tributions to tEbPir conmmmity
could be appreciated by their
friends and neighbors wouil
greatly aid the youngsters to re-
lax from the tensions through
which the'lfamilies have jupt
come.
Sincerely,
ITappier Children, Advocate

-o-

Mrs Henri Merceron was giv
en a surprise birthday party
Wednesday


'AND SUPERB aa- AND FAMOUS
QaityJ.- & &a So A L Sisal.
GRAND RUE :WM gdfO b brieA ainA 'L.SA. PHONE: .684|




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Ask also for a demonstration of the Pick-Up and Trucks their saving of fuel.
solidity, power and capacity are already universally known.
I
--.-.-.-- .,-,- ..-.- ..- ..,-..-.-..-,-.,-..-. ,..,, ..-.-.--.-. -. -,-- -.-..--.-,-.-. -.-


~rL -' '


IMAAMM 1






PAGE~ ~AITISUN SUNAYMAY 0th aI


Haitian Institute Of Statistics
SSurvey OFlash Flood *
The Haitian Institute of Sta- The residential sections
-. 'tistice has reported the results Louis de Turgeau, Sacre-C
.of teeir recent survey of the Ba'biole, Canape Vert, St
losses caused by the Alpril 29th. toine and Lalue heights a
flash flood that struck the Ca- ported to have been he
S pitaL On Wednesday the Mi- damaged.
S nistry of Infomnarion and Do- The properly belonging
S cumentation Service (SID) sent .Madame Maria oMuman
out its report containing a list on Rue Capois, and thb
of the Jheads of families affec- Ce cle Port-au-Princien o
I ill- flood. together with same street, have not as
a; c.-aliale (l tihe damages oau. been estimate.rl due to th
sed. sence of the occupants.


of St
C6uer,
. An-
re re-
eavily

ng to
Defly
at of
n the
s yet
he ah-
The


Deschamps...
(Continued from page 1)

xWe are not practising any
kind of discrimination*, Minis-
ter Blanchet said. The invest
gation showed .that Savinien Si
mon who is still being held by
the Police is the principal ac-
complice of Mr Robert Des-
champs who is presently in the
United States..
iThe era of injustice and dis
crimination is closed*, the Mi
nister said, stating that the pre
sent Government is a just but


According to the SID report 'losses of automobiles in the firm government.
'there were 3,348 families affeo- fl o o d also, and accidental He further stated that the
ted witl damages lisles as 219. deaths outside of tile zone in- real culprit is Jacques Des-
962 gourdes ($43,992.40). vestigated are still unknown. champs' brother, Robert Des-
The report covered buildings champs, co-author of the plot
furniture, clothing and animals. t D O and that together with Savin-
indicating 303 buildings over- east Da Observe n Simon, he will be tried for
run by mud, 94 buildings partly The Ascensiono of the Christ their crime against the internal
demolished and 7 completely to the leavens before the star- security of-the State.
demolished. tied eyes of the men of Galli- Minister Blanchet added that.
-Three death and 26 accident lee was observed here by tra- he is entirely available for any
victims were also reported. ditiorial religious services, on complementary information on
These figures represent find-' May 7,th. Considered a eFete thfe case.
wings in only l1 zones of the d'Obligation by the Catholic Mr Jackie Deschamp was
lower part city: other sectors world, the public services and reported at home this week,
were also submitted to losses, cormnerce and industry were not well, suffering from the
particularly those above the closed, Thlur-day, in commemo. grippe nervous reaction from
-Chanp-de-Mars. ratio of thii pious anniversary. his recent ordeal.



New! Sensational!

ell
.i
-1 4h JEWELS "'



.:i AND JEWEL ROLLER BEARINGS

S On Sale At: Canape Vert


X. Aux Ceint Mille Articles

4 Dadlani's Maison Orientale


--A- -







,4+.+:+":-MK++ e:+:-: :-:"+:+::+?:+~ M M: -K:^^ a :: ...f .
*


LET'S AID FLASH FL


VICTIMS

The active Association Haitienne de Secours et d'As
tances, headed by local business tycoon Otto Madsen has o.pen
a vast campaign to aid the victims of the April 29th flash flioa
at Port-au-Prince. -
The public is invited to visit the warehouse of the Associaio
on Rue Dantes Destouches, across from Curagao Tradxg Coja
pany and see the storage of provisions estimated at $ 5
which is to 'be distributed in the zones affected by theflood.
The public is asked to contributed, each one according ti
means, and may include old dresses, trousers, shoes, an.
of use, as well as contributions in ,money of any amount, AU
this will be used to aid the people who lost their homes ."a
belongings in the recent disaster, as well as many lives of.
who are ill due to exposure the night of the flood.
Mr. Constant Elie Joseph is Vice-President as well as Mir.1
L6on Baptiste and Gerard Vital of the Association. Other ofli-''
cers are Messieurs Jules Taylor, Treasurer, Willy Guercy. As-
.is:,'nt Treasurer, Eberle Beaubrun, Secretary General andl
3eorges A. Louis, Assistant Secretary.


HOUSE TO RENT AT <(LA BOULE,.
VILLA ((LA MUSARDIERE)
15 km. from Port-au-Prince.-Asphalted road-Fresh and
healthy climate.Altitude 900 meters.- A Thorough cure of
health.delight of life...
The most elegant, the most modern house in aLa Boulek|
--Richly furnished.- Abundant hot and cold water automa-1-
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3 bedrooms 2 bathrooms Garage verandahs enclekd
sed with wrought iron.- Frigidaire, radio cage full witji
turtle-doves... Orchard French gardens Paved Yard4'
Very Avantageous Price-. '
WFrite to Mr. Lissade P.O.B. 1101 Port-au.Prince.....-..-
Or see him at La Boulea, or Mr. Gabriel, 72. rue Payvee,
electrical store near Telegraph office......


IXHat 9;f44iuC Ife l Fsw.c '141 m


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Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD '
Phone: 3955. P. O. BO.. 284


SUNDAY, MAY 10th'anl


aHAITI SUNa


PAGE 6


'n


IpANt




MAY 10th. and 17th. 1959


, ,. ,


aHAITI SUN*


eo Your

... .....
I hopp in
: .,,.-
in Haiti

_. L-Isi getting so that people are
4 g 'titz vacations as much to
t'4 p z-to2 play golf, lounge in
W'_.or just relax. And, no
ier when you consider the
J to behad through Free
tt opi g. A couple who
s'oially mngiht spend $500 on
j:;.lfitit asa gifts finds they can
.uythe sanre gifts, in free-port
'' slis, at savings up to 60% of
"JtU: 'S, prices. So, for the'$250
i -s or rso they save, they enjoy a
f.4 Vqnderful vacation in Haiti.
l Perhi ps 'the most famous free-
l :.po.t Shop in the world is La
B..; Belle. Creole. located- in' the'
: ,Jheart of fascinating Port-au-
::'. 4ince. Haiti. Here one can
'-i.14nd a veritable wonderland.
i',;. f 0~'-- of the worl 's most de-
sired merchandise4 Swiss wat-
tches, Cashmeres, ,$andmade
% a': Gs,Gloves, Crystal, China,
,i*e;r,' French Perfumes, Ca-
m.'ieas, Liquours and a seem-
t ngy endless array of native
!Whaidicraft .nake La Belle
fc.brle more a shopping cen-
N khazgin a.bosdinary shop. Con-
ier ,that'.one can buy the
rld's most famous Swiss
.atches Patek Philippe,
t nega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissdt,
'"iCvadfa,a Jaeger Le Cotltre,
Br... *orel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
'. uet-at discounts of 50%/ of
;the U. .S., advertised prices,
i? and it is no wonder that- La
.)-Belle Creole is famous. The
'. .saqme applies in China, Crystal
ad"..: the rest every fine brand
-,::';s.. represented;-Before buying
Aix:, ; ex'ipensive watch ,it might
t;: well worth your time to
.sier a trig to Hfti.

Is l- Noustas, President of. La
ell ~'ie Cole and Haiti's!most
S. rous, romotoer of wtohuristm,
:: s.pagents. n their reason for
i r sm. Amng e i mos pparity of
^4 'e-port shopping. His ad-
ffis ng in sujpott of travel-


: shoppingt has appeared in most
'. e ractin U. o. publications and.b
i';.e -oontio ues to pursue a po-
:,-- of cooperating with tra-
-..--' e'agents- in their various


j'oi: .mtions to increase tou-
:rism. Among the most popular
:,-in.iovations he has created is
H-'- the practice of sending a bot-
ile -e of free champagne to any
vi::-tsitor to Haiti who happens
Sto be celebrating a wedding
'^ anniversary _or to be on a
l-;^ honeymoon.
4:lW thais year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
.V "ersary and Al Noustas has
.:- led his efforts to make
i the world conscious of the
".';: vaitages of traveling-to-
; :; .'op. The store will bold a
't*o month long sale offering
,.: -i. jren greater discounts on fa-
.'1," ons brand merchandise.
j eiryday exclusive items will
i e selected to be sold to visi-
; ipr' t prices that will as-
t !rid them. No doubt thou-
; ds of tourists this year will
Shom frmm vacations in
i. iti, richer,-in a way, than
:en ,they went away.
.* ,.,4 -2 x

:-.4t ,


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P. 0. Box 676,


PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI


AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS


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GEORGE JENSEN,
HANS HANSE!N;GEI O
DRAGSTER, SENSE.



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ITALY, AUSTRIA,

LALIQUE, BAPCARBAT,
ORREFORS.
WEBB & CORBETT,
VAL SOLAMBERT,
STUART, LEERMAN. ,


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JUVENIA TISSOT, BOREL,
SAUDEMAR PIGUET,
I JAEGER LE COULTRE,
SULYSE NARDIN, RIVQ,
S A'LANTA, STUDIO,
SVULCAIN.



$ISLAV,
4 ENGLISH DOESKIN,
ITALIAN ANTELOPE.


PRINGLE, BALLANTkNE,
BERN- HARD I ~LTMAN
LUISA SPAGNOLI.



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GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY
and BRAEi LAN GEMS.


GUERLAW, LANVW
CARON, "HANEL, .


BIAPH*I EL, PATOW, '
BALMAIN, WORlS
BEVILDN, vxG[t,
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JEAN D'ALBEZBi
JACQUES niGRn4
FAtHi, GUET.
nok, CORDAT.
MIN~p, CANNON


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SCULPTURES


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Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS


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RAFFIA BAGS
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HAITIAN MUSIC
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IA


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SUNDAY, MAY 10th. and


. AIni aR


TEXT OF THE ADDRESS BY JOHN CUSICK TO CLUB INTERNAL

TIONAL DE COMMERCE, HOTEL SANS-SOUCI, MAY 6TH 1959


Your Speaker asks to be
allowed to differ with the kind
recommendation given to him
in the announcement of this
meeting. I know a little aboul
wharves and cargo-handling,
having acquired this knowled-
ge. by experience on the whar-
ves of many of the ports of th'e
,world.
I believe that all will agree
that Port-au-Prince is overdue
regarding a new wharf. The
present structure was built
around 1906 at a time when
sailing vessels dominated, the
thinking and the experience of
most of the shipping men and
pier operators then active.
That was a more leisurely time
in many ways and the tremen-
dous speed-jip of shipping ope*-
rations between that day and
this is hardly believable. As.in
most industries (and we .read
a great; deal about cautomo-
tion today) the necessity for
speed.is brought on by high
cost1,.parincipally of labor.
What -I- am trying to bring
forward- is, the fact that the
SWharf at Portrau-Prince, when
new, was' designed for ships
that were .in po great hurty.'
Now that.t, is old it tries to
serve ships!-that.:are. ii.n great
rush and which must compete
in this 'modern mechlanizied
wofl "-...-- ,.:
I wish to interject herethat
the- Administration of 'the
Wharf, that is the executives
and, supervisors, have a.mo-
derti~'efficient .attitude toward
the'peration of their facility.
They perform wonders with
an obselete plant.
.Let us now proceed to' study
the present facility and to ad-
vance suggestions for either.
improvements, additions or an
entirely new structure.
Some suggestions have been
made for the construction of a
new wharf in another part of


the bay. I believe that for rea-
sons of proximity to the Cus-
toni House, for the superiority
of approaches and frnr the
stanrispoint of searmat.ship in
general, the present position is
the-best. For example, no tow--
boats- or tugs operate here.
With this lack, a wharf must
be built a such a place and po-
sitioned in such a manner, as
.vill allow a ship's Master sa-
fely to approach, enter and
leave the wharf area. The many
:eefs and shoals of this harbor
must be considered. It is my
>pinion that the what should
stay where it is.
Many plans here have been
offered for new construction.
and the one which nfow put
forward is not completely ori-
ginal. Let us look at this dia-
gram and aerial photo of the
present, wharf. The feature
.which stricks out most '-istinc-
tly, and which at present, is
not used, is of course, Fort
Islet. It has become obvious to
anyone studying a new struc-
ture here that this island
should be incorporated into the
wharf. It is a natural gesture
and would made an excellent
anchor.
.Our present mspection qui-
ekly:.rings up another feature,
this'one a handicap and, I may
ada, the principal built-in han-
dicap of the present wharf.
This' ,is the fact that our
Port-au-Prince Wharf i a
bottle-neck. And it is an elon-
gated one which compounds
the impasse.
The largest proportion of
cargo which crosses the wharf
must be worked directly.to or
from flat-cars. here are only
,two tracks which traverse the
length of the structure and
it can be readily seen that,
although there are many
switch backs, each ship working
inland of another ship is bloc.


SUGGESTIONS FOR THE

CONSTRUCTION OF A WHARF,


king the steady operation of
the ship outside of it. This is
perhaps the principle reason
for the very low tonnage per
gang hour experienced by ships
working cargo in Port-au-
Prince. There are other fac-
tors: for example the frequent
non-availability of flat cars
when several ships are loading
or unloading at the same
time. One of the additional
blockages which frequently
impedes smooth operation with
flat-cars is the design of tihe
leading area in the export sec-
tion of the 'Custom House. This
is a dead-end track which ca'n
receive only 6 or 7 flat-cars. In
general, a great deal of time
is lost in just waiting while flat-
cars are being manoevred.
It can also be seen that loa-
ding general mixed cargo direc-
tly onto- flat-cars is a slow ope-
ration. It is an awkward way
of working and it is more dif-
ficult to rchecK cargo.
I need not remind any of you
who have had .he pleasure of
walking out-to the end of the
wharf of how unattractive
this promenade is for a tourist.
The visitor who gets his first
impression of your beautiful
country from a walk down the
length of the warehouse
must be frequently tempted
to turn back to his ship.
This wharf is a very poor
introduction to your charming,
exotic country.
.Now let us turn to a more
positive side of the question.
What should be done about
this structure?
Your speaker behe'.'es that
an addition should be made to
the present wharf, parralel and
joined to it, encompassing Fort-
Islet and, when completed the
ol:l wharf should be repaired,
altered and merged with. the
new structure.
I would suggest building a
causeway on the Easterly side
of the present causeway. The
new one would be about 22
,feet wide giving space for a
roadway which would handle


trucks in each direction plus an
additional railroad track. When
this causeway reached'the first
bend it would widen greatly
and its east ride would proceed
in a direction which would
join it with the north side of
Fort-Islet. The outer-side of
this-new structure would then
'turn and advance to join the
outer end of the present wharf.
Fort-Islet would be leveled or
brought up to the level of the
old pier and the entire area
would be filled in making a
large, triangularly s h a.p e d
structure, joined to the land by
a wide causeway or road.
The Construction forces
would then proceed to build a
two storey warehouse alongside
the old one and this new buil-
ding would cover most of the-
triangle, coming in to within
50 feet of the first.-arge bend
in the wharf.
Cargo Operation of the wharf
would not.be iipeded_ by any.
of this construction and the
new building could be used
whilst the old one is torP down
and replaced by a structure
compatible and integrated to
the new one.
This describes the general
picture of a new wharf as your
speaker envisages it. Some re-
finemeint- are suggested such
as extending the old niructure
a few feet to give the N. W.
,stringpiece additional length
and allowing for a. sheltered
taxi loading and turning area
on the Northeast corner of the
new wharf. This bears on the
Tourist side of our st irly and
more on that subject later.
Another refinement would be
raising the warehouse. floor to
flat-car level
At present, there is a tre-
mendous amount of handling
of cargo between the time it
leaves its place in a ship and
it is delivered out of Customs
'.o a Consignee. First the Iorg-
-hdrernen in a hatch brea;k-
lown cargo and stack it in a
net or on a round wooden plat.-
form called a "p'e-plate .. Th~-,
;s landed on a flat-car (or so.
metimes on the wharf) and
wharf workers again break-
'own the stack in the net and
stack it on the flat-car. The
cargo now moves down to the
Custom House area where it
is again broken-down from
the flat-car and.taken to comp-


LES PLUS BELLES OSA
HAITIENNIE


zH r'LWEi a -T5tt


. .


artunents and stacked wmaiat
verification and or delie
Every time cargo is mov-ed'.
runs the risk of damage
I see no reason why 'car
such as lard and canned go !
etc., could not be separate~
verified and, under CuWstAi
control, delivered directly':'
trucks which would go tuut:'
the causeway alrd back-up<_`
sheltered truck-level aprons% '
the Northeast side of the .wi'
house. The savings in tinij'i
damaged goods would be",rl
mendous. Of course, cargo siu
as textiles etc., which must .B
inspected and graded, 'wo6l
be sent down to Customs. BE
the general run of importsii9j
large pieces such as liftAi
and refrigerators could, be''dt
livered directly upder CuioI
supervision and insptio
This is the practice in M iost
the world. -
A system of-'escalator" .i
or elevators would- be;lirt.
in th9 new warehouse.-E~"-
cargo, especially coffee an
sal would be sent outto
wharf immediately onr
at Customs. -These -.1
would -be-stowed on th4se'
storey of the buildingand
usually -be loaded direct
there into the ship. This.-
save time and moneyno.w
ted by ships waitinThfg
cars to load export
I believe that thisgives;.
neral view of the sdggle
for, and benefits from" .
construction of a new,:;l
from the cargo handling v.l
point. We now will takel
quick look at the tourist s
This has become, since'thei
(Continued on page12


,o "



--.

".:- ......


Fort Islet referred to In Mr. Cusick's Speech.


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cHArl SUNa'


. -7-





iMAY 10th. and 17th. 1959


(HAITI SUNs


..rr :j
osept report


*1; i :.




iDbonair Albert Silvera El Rancho Prop. flew to Montreal
4iT'T.ursday to spend a week selling Haiti to the Canadian tou-
.,r'ts'. Frank Nugent famous Hollywood screen writer spent
o. :i`*eeks here doing movie research work. Mr Nugent hit-
ida ride through the North Cap and Grand Riviere with
;the Yfirtgii Randolphes of the American Embassy... David Tala
imas --bout was pronounced <'no decisions the gloves hung up
:'d battle scars mended... Loulou Gebara of the Capitol is
in New :York to pickup some new movies for his now popu.
lar Cinema. Brother Jacques Gebara has quit and gone to
Mexico....Haitian parrots will be for sale in the markets this
'month. They make great pets... Pierre and Future D'Adesky
Shave-purchased a large motor launch which they may christen
A . take'fishing parties to la -Gonave anqd Arcadins from
hkyona.,. Cahadian Embassy secretary Maurice Lemieux de-
-parted with his family of four after as many years here. The
:-French-speaking Canuk was made a qIember of the PNG
i lub.. A reeling sailor upset the PAA clipper crew and pas-
..;sengers with his alcoholic antics last Wednesday. Having
';been bumped off his ship in Trinidad for drinking even the
machine oil PAA officials off loaded the anebriated gent here
util he sobered up. The day following under strict prohibi-
iib'hoe wvas permitted to continue to Miami...'The Dog Races
:ie to -continue'as soon as- the partners in Miami find the
,'courage and cash to rebuild after the Flash flood.:......
l Mr.. and Mrs. Jean Fouchard gave a small country.style far-
'.ell party Sunday afternoon at Plantation Prince for depar-
tinig. diplomat Mrs. Dumarius Estime who is our envoy to
lgiun... '
-".s Ren6 Piquion and Mesmin Gabrie returned this week from
'~_participating in the 'Pan-Negro Congress held in Rome from
I- arch 27th. to April 2nd.
T. .'T Associated of Chauffeur-Guides, through the interme-
diary of its President, Mr. Henri Merceron, handed a check for
: O lo.00,o the. Haitian Red COross -to be used in--aiding the needy
v. victims of tEe April 29th. flood i. the" Capital...
K, 'Fritz (Ba-bal) Momplaisir had his left shoulder fractured
':i in an automobile accident:last. Saturday night while driving
;-in company with friends ,Ger.ard; Daumec and Leslie Bogat.
Ritzz is on the staff of the De`latentof.Cultes:.where he has
L ;worked fbr the past eight years...
ThAe summer schedule or industry and commerce went into
:.*et on May-:lst. Stores will close at 4:00. P. M. daily permit-
tiggemployees to have an extra hour of leisure: Certain news-
'.:ipers ovf-the Capital will observe, the schduleV V'Monday to
: .Friday publication as is done each year during the season from
SMay tp bOtber..
A. cofrere is lamenting the fact that the Port-au-Prince Ca-
Sthedral eBasilique -Notre Dame is tumbling down. Monsieur the Cur6 waiting for to save this Temple dedicated
't the: cult and which one of these mornings is going to make
n.,umerable victims?*, the daily asked, suggesting that the
Cir6 and his Conseil de Fabrique get together and withdraw
.wnrm the Parish treasury the necessary funds for urgent repa-
ions to the edifice...
:. Mr Lucien Daumec, Secretary td the President of the Re-
ublic, returned Thursday from his 16-day mission to the U.
'S Hewas accompanied by Mrs. Daumec. He visited New York
SChicago and is said to have entered into contact with in-
l personalities in view of business projects that will
.raw on raw.matprials to be found in Haiti for manufacturers
r investing here...
Jean Boulos who makes licence plates for the Republic at
ri.is Carrefour shop was among the personalities receiving de-
~ trttons from the Government on Labor Day...
"tjiied with diplomatic passports by the Government as
AVjas helping with travel .to Europe, Morisseau Leroy and
:4hist of f on, enroute to present the classic in the leading theaters
.and London for which it is reported call tickets and
tons sold out in advance...)
American television "specialist John Shelly arrived in Port-
nce Saturday, on his tour of the Caribbean. A resident
Saamento, California, Mr. Shelly attended a convention
Tew, York before undertaking his tour which .covers St.
2:..4 --

t., .
Jr


Thomas, San Juan, Ciudad Trujillo, Haiti and Montego Bay.
He will spend three days here at Hqgel Ibo Lele...
< commemorative ceremonies sponsored by the Junior Red Cross
of Haiti at the French Institute. The program included a Mes-
sage from the President of the Red Cross, awarding of diplo-
mas to rescuers, and the presentation of the sketch: Henri
Dunant and the Juniors...>


DIPLOMATIC
NEWS '
Snor Trajano Medeiros do
Paco, Ambassador of Brazil,
accompanied by Senor Do 2a-
co, sailed to New York on the
S. S. route to South America.. The
Ambassador after several years
,n Haiti %, i7l return to his coui!
try to take up his new pcs: as
Minister of Foreign Affairs.
Senor F. de Chermont-Lis-
bba will act as Charg6 d'Af-
faires at the Embassy here.
xxx
Mr. Raymond Moyse, Hai-
tian Consul General to New
York returned to his post "his
week, via Miami.
xxX
Mr. Luis Felipe Mejia Lizar.
zaburu, Secretary General of
the Council of Corporation. of
Peruvian Organizations of
Youth, arrived here yesterday,
as a part of his tour of Latin
America to make a study on
the -programs and official acti-
vities, official and private re-
lative to the youth of these
countries. He is travelling on
a scholarship from UNESCO.
xxx
Dominican Ambassador and
Mrs. Porfirio Basora, accompa-
nied by their son left Haiti
Tuesday afternoon, after seve-
ral years missions here.
Ambassador Basora will take
up his new post as Minister of,
Justice in the Cabinet of his
home Government..
xxx
Ambasador .John Francis
Marshall, on Tuesday, decora-
ted. Dominican' Ambassador
Porfiria Basora, in the name of
the Liberian Government, with
the diploma and isignias oi. the
Knights of the Pioneers. The
ceremonyy took place at 10:30
A M. at the Embassy at Lalue
n .the presence of Embps:sy of-
ficials of the two countries.
xxx
German Minister and, Mrs
Luedd.e Neurath will entertain
st a cocktail party on Tuesday
at their residence in F.ourdon
Park.
LOSES POEMS
G e r and Daumec, talented
young :poet, apart from almost
losing his life in an auto acci-
dent, last Saturday afternoon,
is reported to have lost his ma-
nuscript of unedited poems
which was soon to be published
under the title CCurfew. Con-
reores of the press this week
launched an appeal to the fin-
der 'to return the 22 poems
which if not retrieved would be
a great loss to the Haitian press.


GIRL TEEN-AGER
REMOVED FROM .
CIRCULATION
The morning daily cLe Ma-
tina in its May 5th. edition, re-
ported ajreport at a 17-year-
old girl, resident of Rue 3, who
was engaged to be married
shortly had been spirited off
to foreign shores. Le Matin
said:
cae of a great artist of the Ca-
.pital whose marriage date was
set for abientotu, was forcibly
transferred to foreign shores,


with the complicity o
tor. The medico is said
administered a drug
young woman.of 17 yea
who lived on Third St
hall attempt to obta
details on this affair
exciting public opinion
"Quelle est cette
the daily wanted to kl
ED NOTE:
It appears that the
asked by the parent!
teenager to give her
tive before they flew
out of the reach of a
on the prowl.
A lecture on Haitian
will be delivered We
evening at the French
by Mr. Joseph Augu
Auguste is Chief of t
and Propaganda Sectio
National Office of
Th showing of a fihl,
low the lecture.


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Chamber of Commerce Bldg.


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I : .


PAGE 9

f a doc-
I to bave
to this
trs of age
street. We
3in more
which is
n.
affaire? .
now.

Doc was
s of, the
a seda-
with her
a wolf


Tourism -

Institte ..
ste. Mi.
he -Press
m of the
Tourism.
wi ifoi-











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F*. .* .. .* ...--' 7
;:= i'` 'Si


SHAITI SUN


SUNDAY, MAY 16th; .


Minister Theard Promises


Government Air For Rehabilitating
The National Sport Football


During Friday's session of
the Chamber of Deputies, the
Question of the national sport
of Football was thoroughly
examined and found to be at a
stage where the future of the
sport was seriously mortgaged.
Referring to the matter as
c'The Tragedy of Haitian Foot-
ball, Deputy Andre Moise of
LogAne declared: If the Exe-
cutive Power does not take this
alarming situation in hand,
there will be no more national
sport,.
The Deputy submitted a re-
solution to his colleagues conmt-
aining the proposition of having
a special postage stamp emitted
for Haitian football. He then
S presented the situation of the
Haitian Federation of Football
as&6f April.30,-1959, as follows:
$ 23,069 Interest on $ 184,862.
69; due for Mortgage on Sta-
dium building due National
Bank of Haiti. at %
S$ 5,116 Salaries due person-
nel covering 10-months
$ 15,637.78 Amounts due va-
rious creditors from 1952 to
date -
S$ 800.00 -due Engineer Dalen-
cour for drainage of land.
S Total obligations of the Fe--
'deratioAl amount to $ 229,485.50
S inludin capital of 'Mortgage
S to 'National.Bank.
The Dciuties their' discussed
the. urgency o fthe question
and a e.ial~ t Cammission was
named to act onthe Resolution
presented by:-Deputy Moise,
since agiapeid l Football stamp
had already be- emitted in
"favor of football. .Deputy Fran-
,. klin Elie demanded to know


what had happened to the
money.


Minister Theard, former World
Champion, Sums up situation
of Football

Asked to speak on this affair
by the Deputies, in his capa-
city as -former world champion
.n sports and also as a member
of the Ministerial Cabinet, Mi,
nister of Finance Andr6 Th6-
3rd obliged.
Stating that he was former
university champion, former
football captain who had de-
fended the national colors on
foreign soil. Minister Th6ard
declared:
"I have served three times
on the Haitian Federation of
Football Council. I recall that
under h e. government of
Paul Magloire at the time
when the Pasquet-MacdJtesh
Committee managed Football
in Haiti,. there was scandal
upon scandal. A- report which
could be qualified as ..diploma-
tic>> was presented on the nu-
merous thefts committed at
the F. H. F.* He added that the
Investigating Committee de-
nounced everything in its re-
port 'but xfor reasons impera-
tive of the hours, the govern-
.ment could not be made to
take a decisions.
the time when Pasquet and
MsIntosh' managed the sta-
diumn, hie -cntintued. eFoot-
ball is our;inatiohal sport andt
I agree .,with Deputy Moise
that everything must be done


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to save it. Besides, every
country on earth, particularly
those of the Caribbean are ma-
king efforts to bring interesting
and wholesome amusements
for their young people. Per-
sonally, I give great interest to
the sports questicr. and Presi-
dent Duvalier i. continuously
studying the situation of the
Haitian Federation of Foot-
ball. One of the first things his
Government did vwas to change
the name of the Stadium from
:. to lhat of
-Sylvio Cator,, for tl'e name
of Paul Magloire I.rries rather
a political characteristic while
that of Sylvio Cator is of a
sportive characteristic. It w.as
to reintegrate the spirit of
sports and render a hommage
to one of the greatest names in
our national sports>.
Minister Theard concluded
by stating that the sp'it mu.st
be rehabilitated, and dpciaie-'
that the Government would do
everything possible to -solve
this problem.
(continued on page 16)


BRANDT
DONATES'
$10.000
(continued from page 3)

Dear Mr. Brandt:
I have received your letter
of May 4th 1959 and enclosed
check for $10.000. This check
represents your personal con-
tribution and that of your en-
terprises to the special funds
which the Government is rais-
ing to bring aid to the nue.
rous victims of the flood of
April 29th last.
I wish to thank you for the
spontaniety which your gene-
rosity has reacted. This elo-
quent gesture of solidarity ex-
presses better than any thing
else the interest which you are
taking in this painful ordeal
and the Government which has
already taken necessary measu
res to aid the residents of the
devasted sections is grateful to
you for having brought this
substantial help,
It is particularly agreable to
me to seize this occasion to
recall that in the past the
,schoolasltic institutions have'
benefitted from your financial
assistance. The circumstances
of the present have found you
in the same frame of mind, and
I wish, in noting this active
form of collaboration,and coo-
peration, to thank and felici-
tate you from the bottom of
my heart.
Yours Sincerely,
Dr Francois Duvalier
President of the Republic of
Haiti

FERGUSON HONORED
Cadet Carl E. Ferguson, Jr.
a Freshman at Texas Military
Institute, and the son of Mr
and Mrs Carl E. Ferguson, Sr
of Port au Prince, Haiti, was


GUERLAIN BEAUTY PRODJ
SPECIALIST FROM PARISi :,
PRESENTED HERE DURING
((GUERLAIN WEEK, AT FISHERS

Here from Paris for the past residents and visitors 'who "i .
week, Madame Claire Szanto, advantage of the demo i
of the Maison Guerlain Head- tion andadvice on beauty. pr
quarters in France, demonstrate blems offered through the: cOur
ed the products of this famous tesy of the Fishers.
house of Beauty Products to A feature which-enhaibie
the women of Haiti. the beauty treatments and
The beauty expert was invit- by Mrs Szanto daily from
ed to Haiti by Mr and Mrs to 12 and from 2:00 to.:4;
Kurt Fisher, well-known in the p. M., was her advice'.one4i
touristic industry and local dis women may increase-,,t-:1j
tributors for the Guerlain pro- .charm and beauty throtj
ducts. This is the first time their dress and knowing._
ihat the Guerlain firm has sent to combine details to brig;,
an expert to Haiti. their individuality. -
From May 4th to 12th, a :
complete line of the products After sharing .the secretisof
of the French company were Paris with the women of Port
exhibited in an attractive dis- au Prince, the beauty "expe
play at the Rue du Quai ba- leaves Wednesday on a'tor
zar aChez Fisher." Mrs Szanto the Caribbean before her, p
visit attracted a large public of turn to Europe. -


among the cadets honored at proved by Mr Addis .-
T. M. I. last week ROTC ord- Craig, Headmaster, ao
ers issued by Major Glen E. thip promotion of Cadet' Er
Miller, the Professor of Milita- son to the rank of Cadet Pr
ry Science and Tactics, and ap vate-First Class.


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360, GRAND RUE, P. O. Box 147 -'
Tel.: 3134, 2772 -


PAGE 16


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-Anti-Illiteracy Campaign Opens
SIn Worker's, City
:'The inauguration of the reads: Grand Croisade d'A]pha
:Grand Crusade against iliitera- betisation. Let Us Associate Our
b'cy took place Thursday after- Efforts Witli Those of the Go-
n-.Pon at .the workers *Cit6 St.- xernment'.
ItMartin with President Francois
:iaaiWer presiding over'the ce- The gdal of the workers is
Duvaber presiding over the ce-
eis nials, entoured by the that by May Ist. 1960, every
tFirat Lady and members of the -.'esident of the Workers Cities
'Cabinet and Armed Forces of must be able to read *with his
.. eyes and 'write with his
S a pe hands, the three names which
A-z.-. ftr. a speech by Director
Sterlin, of the Organization of symbolize all their pride and
!.Worker Cities, the President Eopes:
un.; eiled the huge sign which *DIEU, Le Grand Ouvrier
_.: -- de l'Univers. (God--the Great
Worker otf the Universe):


Edaucationi
Minister Visits
Capital's Schools
S." The active. Minister of Na-
tional Education,. Reverend Fa-
their Hubert Papailler this
week covered the principal col-
.eges and establishments of the
SCapital. Father Papailler called
i- at the Lycee Alexandre Petion,
T'Ayc6e Toussaint Louvertu-e
: and Lyo6e Antknor Firmin. On
..Thursday he visited the Epis-
: capalian Mission's new Collge
S, St. Pierre off the Champ-de-
U Mart
SThis tour of the scholastic
establishmentss is a prelude to
Sthe Minister-Priest's schedule
S'to visit others in the Capital
::and Provincesr-


*DESSALINES. L'Artisan
Supreme de la liberty (Dessa-
lines Supreme Artisan of Li-
berty ;
SDUVALIER.-L'Architecte
de la Nouvele Haiti (Duvalier
-Architect of tie New Haiti).
The entrances to Cite No. 1
were given street names: aPor-
te Antoine Sinon", and 'Portl
d e s Artistes*, respectively,
!P o r t e ,Dutmarsais Esti.mb.,
aPorte .du Progrisb and *Porte
Francois Duvaliern were the
names given the other streets.
Entrances to Cite No. 2 were
named' &Porte de l'Unit6 Natio-
nale and 'Porte des 5 Glorieu-
se e,.


Raffle Of Dorcely Painting To Help
Pay Expenses Of Theatre d'Haiti In Paris
El Rancho Proprietor Albert Owners of Haiti is publishing


Silvera, President of the Hotel
Owners Association, and Mrs
Lina R. Assad, owner of Hotel
Villa Creole, are organizing a
raffle of one of artist R. Dor-
celly's paintings, valued at
$ 200. The painting is 32 x 48
and is among the last works of
the artist before leaving Haiti.
The tableau represents the
epoc of the ochaises de pailles
in thepictorial lfe cf Dorcelly
and is one of the best drurinF
his past 17 years of painting.
The painting will be exibited
at the La Belle Creole stores in
the jewlery section, for a pe-.
.riod of two weeks, and raffle
'tickets may be purchased at
$ 5.00 each, with 'the lucky
number holder getting the
$ 200 painting.
The money will go to pay
the debts contracted by the
rTheatre d'Haiti for the trip to
Paris. -
SThe Association of Hotel
Froprietors of Haiti is reques-
ting that its members, business-
men and friends of the Theatre
d'Haiti to join in contributing
their aid in order to permit the
Theatre to rescind, to the
great 'honor which has been
conferred upon it of.
The Association of Hotel


the list of names of several of
its members, businessmen and
friends of the Theater of Haiti
whe responded to their appeal
to-contribute towards the ex-
penses of the- cAntigone en
Creoie cast on their trip to
Europe.
The Association's spokesman
stated that the great 'honor
which had been conferred upon
the Theatre d'Haiti to play
cAntigones in Paris at the
eTheatre des Nations was an
honor which reflected on the
entire country, and from the
touristic point of view it was
.promotion for Haiti.
Contributions were received
as follows:
'Hotel Montana $ 25.00
Hotel Villa Creole 50.00
Hotel Ibo Lele 60.00
Atlas Trading 25.00
Hotel Beau Rivage 25.00
Hotel Riviera 30.00
Ch. Bigio 30.00
Victor Assali 20.00
Dan Allen 30.00
La Belle Creole 100.00
Hotel El Rancho 60.00
Hotel Choucoune 25.00
Au Sabot d'Oor 25.00
Hotel Marabou 10.00
Harry Yoe 10.00


AWAY OR AT HOME


A CARE OF YOUR OWN


-., %S C
. American Express nd Diners Club Credit Card Honored.,

American Express And Diners Club Credit Card Honored


AD mi t *-Pie'.l~


O .RY LBA K-.- kN. 3 _
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Road maps,
information
Pick-up and
from hotels,
ind pier
ffl-


FEATURING HILLMAN HIGH STYLE
AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING HOTELS
For Reservations, Road Maps,
P. 0. BOX 662
Write or Cable:
and Suggested Itineraries
AVIS CAR RENTALS


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airport,


UEKLY RATE

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QRSI.OS.L I#4$URRMCE1


Tourist Launches
Put up For Sale

The motor launches Quis-
queya), and cAnacaonavb bel-
onging to the National Com-
missariat of Tourism were put
up for sale at public auction,
yesterday. The sale took place
at 9:00 A. M. at the Coast
Guard station at Bizoton, with
the lSidding set at $ 1,500 for
the for the eAnacaor.p The sale
authorized by representatives
of the High Court of Accounts.


it's ol wailing for you at...





12 TO 2P.M.
.BUSINESS LUNCH
NIGHTLY: DINNER BY
CANDLELIGHT AND
DANCE TO THE MUSIC
OF THE CASTELCOMBO
SUNDAY;
730 FILET MIGNON
DINNER
TUESDAY:
730 POOLSIDE BAR-B-fI
FRIDAY: *
730 SEA FOOD DINNER
See C. d la FUENTE
.- For Reservation


.1


Port-au-Prince, Haiti


-------


kY, MAY 10th, and 17th. 1959


PAIGE 11




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PAGE 12

Rend Victor
Decorated And Cited
For Contribution To
Labor Organizations
Assistant Tourism Director
Rene Victor was among the
personalities decorated
with the Ordre National
du Travail, by the Haitian Go-
vermnent on Labor Day, May
;Ist.
In conferring the diploma
-and insignias of tois National
Order of Chivalry, with the
rank of ,Knightb Minister of
Labor Lucien B6lizaire gave
the following citation on behalf
of the President of the Repu-
blic:
...For having, during the
Revolution of january 1946,
substantially improved, by
your action as a militant intel-
lectual and leader, the general
conditions of workers in homes,
hotels, laundry workers, and
for having largely contributed
to awakening the social and
economic consciousness of the
workers throughout the coun-
try, by means of the KChaine
"yndicale>, spiritual organiza-
tion which serves as a link be-
tween all the workers no mater
to which group they may be
*long.
Rene Victor, outstanding so-
* ciologist, took advanced studies
at New York's Columbia Un-i-
versity where he majored in





S.. .













/ 'IT!


HAITI SIUN,


SHaiti Represented
At Tourism Confab
In Bogota
At the Caribbean Touristic
Association Congress which
opened May 4th in Bogota, Co-
lombia, Haiti was represented
by Mr Raymond Roy, Presi-
dent of the National Tourist
Board, and Mr Jacques Hono-
rat, Director General of the
National Commissariat of Tou-
rism.
The Congress was held from
May 4th to May 8th. The dele-
gates are expected back in the
Capital early this coming week.

GERMAN PUBLICATION
DISTRIBUTED
, and
aBerlin, Crossroads o.f Lnter-
national Politicso were distri-
buted thi% week through the
courtesy of the German Lega-
tion here. -o-
Dr. SANSEIGNE
PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL
Dr Alain Sanseigne, a lead-
ing Psychiatrist from Rockland
State Hospital has been
here since April 1st setting up
and putting the new psychiatric
Hospital in running order.
Dr Sanseigne and his wife
have taken up residence in
Gros Morne.
economic, housing and labor
organization. He is also a wri-
ter and journalist.


DRVID


Successful Haitian

Doctor Down on visit

.From Chicago

Dr. Paul Bourelly classmate
of President Doctor Francois
Duvalier and Dr. Rindal Assad
at the medical faculty here is
down from his Chicago practice
with his wife visiting .is ho-
meland.
Dr. Bourelly who has prati-
ced rmedicene in Chicago 'for
nearly two decades was at Pro-
vidence Hospital in Chicago
with Dr Georges Hudicpurt
during the last war. Dr. and
Mrs Bourelly were g-iests at
the Villa Creole.
-- .__.


MRS VVE MORIUS
APOLLON DIES


The sad news of the death
Mrs Vve Morius Apollon, the
former Lucienne 'Begond, was
announced here this week. Fu-
neral services took plade at the
Cathedrale here on Saturday
afternoon.
-The deceased a member of
one of the Capital's oldest fa-
milies, is survived by a large
family, including her sons
Franck and Osner Apollon, M1V
and Mrs Andr6 Begond and Mr
and Mrs Anthony Apollon to
whom the ,Sun> presents its
,sympathies and condoleances.


Text of Cusick's
Address
(Continued from page 8)

one of Haiti's greatest assets.
A large -part of tourist income
comes 'from the many cruise
ships which anchor in our har-
bor and send passengers ashore
in launches. I believe that
about 60 of these ships per
year arrive here.
The transfer of passengers to
a launch is somewhat of an
ordeal, no matter how large
and beautiful the launch may-
be. This is especially true of
elderly persons. There is always
waiting both on the ship and
ashore for the return and there
is frequently rain. Transfer
by launch is time consuming
and this time should be spent
ashore buying things from our
merchants or -patronizing our
restaurants and taxis. In other
words spending money. In ad-
dition, launch service is expen-
sive and I am told it costs some
of the larger cruise ship from
500.00 to 1000.00 per day when
they visit this port.
The new pier'would be desi-
gned so that its North side
could receive the largest cruise
ships. Passengers would disem-
bark to a section of the upper


'.ALX AA A


deck of the warehouse and
descend by a wide staircase. to
the main level. The northerly


WRLLY


L4itib most citing9 FRE PORT STORE




$0^itiS mostfamous MRAIOIARNl TRCTOR4


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o% enck CJerfumes


-Watfches


* headed


c~ais


* CcJtlhmn. gloees
* Ca5shmere StOealters


* rene.k


L-quO.Vs


.Dimagg 5



*. italdn rt -.eely

* ALtomrnmers


4fT FREE PORT PRICES.
e No. 342. PORT-AU-PRINCE
HAITI


SUNDAY, MAY 1Ot1i


DRVID WRLLY TALRMRS

vould be happy to be

honored by joup

Oisit at

'lom ofAt OTA.


Grand'Rue


corner of the
be cut off to provide,?
area for taxis and a
place for the passeng
bari .and disembark
taxis. The upper
warehouse could ha4
Port, shopping-centei.,
passenger area arid;.
local tourist shops cffi
represented. The wrEit.
fident that with such i
lity in Port-au-Prineife
tourist cruise ship .lea.ii
York would call atti
and instead of 60 wel
have 150 Cruise ship _
Of course, these shiip
be charged a rental' -e..
called at the pief but I am.S
wju)ld ,be thrilled to p
the providing of such'
facilities for their padO
I now close. The e.n
and fiscal problems I lea
wiser heads, althouglh.I;
see any great impedii.i
construction and I beiiev
a wharf such as Iesi
would be self-litidatin,
profitable. "
Thaniryc
--- ~- AM
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.. Swiss




'a. ... .- -.
-a


[DAF MAY, 10th. and 17th. 1939


aHAITI SUN*


NEWS IN PORT
By Aublain JOLICOEUR
if ated -him so often that he felt obligated, and married me>.
would believe her words if Arlene Coulter were not so.
lel. Doug certainly married her for her charms and intel-

louglas and Arlene Coulter were married in New York on
Sunday, May 3 and arrived here Tuesday May 5 for a nine day
honeymoon at the Oloffsoh.
Douglas is TV Stage Manager fbr National Broadcasting
(NBC) and Arlene is a Scheduler for the same di-
ion of the NBC.
:Recuperating in Haiti from all the trouble he went through.
ext door where he was searched because he simply had a
Ine sage for the American girl friend of the
or .Ramfisv, is M. Morris J. Friedman, President of man-Langsam Inc.> General Insurance Brokers, New York,'
Representative of the SUnited States, the third largest (3 billions assets) in the U. S.
M. Friedman is also a Member of the Million Dollar Club.
M. Friedman was recommended to the author of this column
by his children, Eugene and Selma, who spent two weeks here
two-months ago.
Gene is the Executive of a successful Advertising Agency
i-.and his wife Selma is talented jewelry manufacturer. Gene and
SSelma were here with writer Fritz Jacobi and his wife Jeanne.
M. Friedman is traveling alone for the first time, his beloved
w-: ife passed away April 18 last year. Most personable and dis-
pi tinguished, he has the secret of making friends.
... Before arriving here, he met in the Islands Oil Tycoon of
Houston Texas, Mr. Leonard R. Frankel and his'charming wife
Former actress Marjorie, who just spent a week in Port and
got' bgt him ready for the visit.
7 M. Friedman has shown a great interest in this country. He
0".attended Wednesday, the weekly luncheon of the International
1i' G~lub of Commerce held at .the Hotel Sans-Souci and during
h ich M. John- Cusick, Manager of the Panama Line was the
Speaker,
5, .He found nice company in Dr. and Mrs. John Ross-Duggan
Sfrom Long Beach, California and honeymooners Douglas and
SArlene Coulter of the NBC, New York with whom he went
io Kyona Beach Thursdays morning.
S Mr. Roger Wolin, Public Relations Manager of the Latin
Amierican Division of Pan Am announced the-anticipated visit
of-MIr. and Mrs. John Shelby irn-the Caribbean area. They'll
be.here from Ciudad Trujillo, May 9 till 12. Mrs. Shelby is
important in the television broadcasting field on the West Coast.
A well known. TV broadcaster in the Sacramento and San
'Francisco a~ea. "She is making this, Caribbean trip with her
S'husband following'the New York Convention of the American
Wqtmen in Radio and Television.
They will ldge at Ibo-Il, Hotel.
S Bs Frances L. Wheeler got the marvelous result she should
-expct from her dedication to the promotion mss Wheeler Coordinator-Women's Services of the Delia
ai lines in Atlanta came here three months ago to prepare the
pprbmotion cHaiti Cherie>. A very successful party was held at
the Riviera and was attended by all the tourist interests. She
s- tressed the advantages of that initiative of the Delta to pro-
Smote Haiti in cities all over the Delta System through- the
Fashions and native craftwork and handicrafts. : tiori Haiti Cherieo, reports Miss Wheeler is still being enthu-
siastically received by American audiences in cities all over the
: Delta System. In the last three months, presentations have been
.made in Montgomery, Alabama; Detroit, Michigan, Georgia,
Louisville, Kentucky, Cincinnati, Ohio and Miami, Florida.
In presenting a format to the varied audiences, said Miss
Wheeler, in a letter to the Tourist Board, we have tried to--cap-
ture the beauty of Haiti' as well as the charm of its people.
The lovely fashions, native craftwork and mahogany are dis-
played to show what can be purchased by American women
in Haiti. Colorful slides are used to dramatize the beauty of
Port-au-Prince, the view from Petionville and the lovely moun-
tains of Kenscoffb Excellent publicity has been made about
the iPromotion Haiti Cherie in the Newspapers television and
group.presentations all over the cities covered by the Delta
System. In Cincinnati, Ohio, Kenwood Country Club was the
setting for an hour program featuring the fashions of Haiti.
Delta personnel mc'eled the dresses before an audience of
275 members. Mrs. R. Nelson SHAW, the entertainment Chair-
:man, reported that she had to turn down over 100 requests
for reservations. After a set of eight designs had been shown
a'break was taken, and over/30 colorful slides of Haiti were
,.'; viewed. Another set of eight fashion's was shown and this time
.-each model carried same art work or native craftwork. In this


manner, each lady present was given an opportunity to see the
fashions and art at close hand.
In Detroit, Michigan, one of the largest and most influential
clubs is th6 General Ford Motor Company Girls Club. The
very lovely and plush Ford Conference Auditorium was a per-
fect setting for an hour program. Over 400 members attended
the presentation and were so anxious for additional infbrma-
tion that they kept Delta personnel busy answering questions
about an hour after the show.
In Montgomery, Alabama, Miss Adele Brooks of TV- Station
WSFA devoted her entire thirty minute TV program to Haiti
Cherie. Local girls and Members of the Delta acted as models.
Miss Wheeler and her party showed twelve lovely fashions,
ten slides, eight selective pieces of native craftwork and even
gave the recipe for one of Haiti's famous dishes cLobster Cre-
ole.>. The WSFA TV Station has reported that they have had
many favorable comments from the people of Montgomery
on the program.
In Atlanta, Georgia, the Junior Women's Club gave a spe-
cial evening performance featuring . Members
of the Club modeled the Fashions before a very enthusiastic
audience. Delta's Atlanta office has received many inquiries
as a result of the program.
In Louisville, Kentucky, the National Secretaries Associa-
tion gave the promotion Haiti Cherie tremendous advance pu-
blicity.
In Miami, Florida, Delta's Information Services Department
sent out a news release which was printed in the Aero News
South.
We must credit Miss Wheeler, Representative of Delta Air-I
lines for traveling to all these cities to arrange for those suc-
cessful presentations. Everywhere she got an enthusiastic co-
operation and the audiences were as warm as enthusiastic.
She deserved the gratitude of the haitian tourist interests
for trailing with 140 pounds of luggage, not to mention the
drums, straw baskets and display material. So far her sole sa-
tisfaction has been the wonderful success of all the presenta-
tions


DISCOVER THE FASCINATION

OF HAITI

Through Its Postage Stamps

For complete information in Haiti
Stamps and other details which will be
furnished you free of charge, write to

D.O. Rox 723 Port-au-Port-au-Prince


ISi

















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s,

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Lii1.


For all kinds of French perfumes
visit Haiti's Smartest Indian storE
Select your favourite perfume
from our large collection

JEAN PATOU
CHRISTIAN DIOR
We offer you the world's famous
brands at free port prices
LE GA LION
i ARVEN
L.4NVIN NINA RICC1
CARON
CHA NEL

RAPHAEL
MILOT
etc... etc..


IUltwrEr. THE LOiGT PRICE, IS'


U. S. Vice-Consul
Depart for
Guadalajara

Miss Sue Harlow, efficient
and well-liked Vice Consul at
the American Embassy left
Tuesdayy, May 5th, for Miami.
Her new'post will be in Gu'a-
dalajara, Mexico.
Miss Harlow was in Haiti for
more than three years.

Famous Mexican
Journalist Visits
Port

Aldo Baroni, dean of the
Mexican newspapers and edito
rialiste of the newspaper Excel
sior spent a week here a hotel
Riviera and was shown the
sights by Senator Victor Ne-
ver Constant and loussan Ca-
mille.
Senor Baroni is a veteran of
the Mexican revolution.

Agronomists To Meet
The National Association of
Haitian Agronomists will hold
their General Assembly this
year on from May 16th to 18th
inclusive, at the French Insti--
tute.

To Buy Hotels
And Open Casino?
A confrere reports that the
gambling promoters' group re-
presented by 'American attor-
ney James Burhoes, is said to
be negotiating for the acquis.i-
tion of Hotel Simbie, and Ho-
tel Riviera. They are asking for
i contract .with 'he State to
operatee gambling casinos in
" -;" lIr.rp I., t]Pls.
'~ -' '* -. *A -


im0


JOSEPH NADAL & Co.


. .. ..,-


PAGE 13





6.mdmLmmlj




HAIT SUN. -SUNDAY, MAY 10o
(lAITI SUND


PAGE 14


JONAHED SHIP SUNK BY DISILLUSIONED ITALIAN BUILDER

PETION-VILLE BUILT SHIP GETS TORCHAND WATERY GRAVE:
WILL NOT SAIL BAKER BUILDER TO ITALY HOME ___


The unchristened, unnam-
de, unsailed 40.foot Yacht
built by Signor Joseph Deju-
re in his. Petion-Ville Bakery
for the express purpose of
sailing across the Atlantic car
trying him to see the family
ip his native Italy is no more.
The ship ended its ill-fated
voyage this past month at the
bottom of the Port au Prince
Bay. Baker Dejure committed
the act of plying the torch sending the
unsung vessel down to Davy
Jones' locker.
Why?
The passage of the Yacht
from the improvised ship.
building yard behind the Ba-
kery to the capotage Pier in
Port 'au Prince, a distance of
some seven miles took ahnost
as many days, and a tenth of
the cost of building the large,
sturdy craft.
Swinging out of the Bake-
ry, it decapitated a barber-
shop and shocked residents of
the mountain resort who had
no idea their town was so
near the sea.
A power-drunk Chef de
Sections, twirling a baton.
somehow managed to gesticu
late his .way to death under
the wheels of the giant trail-
er where the boat reclined
like a sick whale out of the
water-
The actual launching of.the
ship tried the dapper Bari-
born (town of Italy's Adriatic
coast) baker's patience to the
point he declared his vessel
no longer a boat but a mere
chiffonn.
With two well-muscled Hai


he


Handicapped Children's Week
To Close With Ball At Hotel
Riviera May 30th.


A grande soiree at Hotel Ri-
viera, on Saturday night, May
30th., will close the 7-Day Drive
for funds in favor of the Han-
dicapped Children.
The public is invited to visit
Rue de la Revolution .to see the
the ToFoyer iles Handicapehs, at
work that is being accomplished
there to train and educate the
children handicapped by infir-
mities .towards a full and useful
life.
SThe work being done in 'fa-
Ecole St. Vincent a center esta-
ror of lie little cripples at tht
IliIhlcd by thli; Episcopalian Mis
sion here, undlcr th.e su-pervision
the faithful devotion being of


tian helpers he had construct
ed the vessel from plans in a
book, and at a cost of nearly
$5,000 with the intention of
sailing the Columbus trail
back to Italy and home.
Afloat, the vessel, listed
badly and ballist, refused to
right it.
Then came red t a p e,
enough to fig the sails of a
full-masted ship.
Convinced I that the ship
was dJonaheds, the little
Italian, in frustration, set fire
to the fruits of his sweat and
toil. He watched it sink be-
low the waves sfinito,.
Alas, Signor Dejure's pro.
blems still were far from 4fi
nito., He had to answer offi
cial questioners on why and
what right did he have to
burn the boat. Sabotage!>
That's what it was!
SHe plans' to visit Italy any
way- but he will fly. Only


Crepsac Decorated On 25th. Anniversary
As Consul Of Guatemala.
Mr. Fernand Crepsac, for- Chocano at Marlich (Petion-
mer Mayor of Portau-Prince Ville) Sunday, Mr. Crepsac re-
who is celebrating th(e silver ceived the decoration of the Or-
annfversary of bis appointment ler of OQuetzah with the rank
as Consul General of Guatema- if fKnight'.
la, received ta special distinoe
tion from the ,Government of Minister Chooano, is present-
the Central American State ing the insignia and diploma of
this. week. Mrs. Creipac shared the National Order of Guate-
honors with the Consul. mala made .the citation, on be-
During a -reception and spe- half of lis Government, -for
cial ceremonies at the home of "1 quarter of a century of devo-
Guatemala Mlnii-er and Mrs. 'ion to promoting and maintain
:nr the tics of friendship that
At The Telephone link the peoples of the two
Central countries.
The scaffod which has metQutza ybolic of
The scafld which s. the bird who refused to be put
.the eyes of residents and vis n a cage nod when captures
tors on the corner of Grand' and caged drive i be ;,
and caged drivres its bpeak intn


Rue and Rues Pav6e, over the its own heart, is Guatemala's
past three years at the tele- one and ouly National Order.
phone company building, has Tt ~ money also carries the em-
been removed. The wooden blem of the Quetzal.
skeleton of the scaffold had Consul Cresac. highly es-
been set up in view of adding teemed in local social and di-
a new storey to the building lnomatic circles 'here, and was
'but the sun and rain had just rnr several year_, President of
about made it a menace to pas- 'h- exclusive Cercle Port-au-
sersby and motorists. Princien.


his baggage will cross t
Atlantic by sea.


* Job-proved Cat Turbocharged Diesel
Engine develops 225 horsepower.
Common lubrication for transmission;
bevel gear and steering clutches.
Lifetime lubricated rollers and idlers,
proved by more than 2\' million hours
of field service, require no further lubri-
cation until rebuilding.
Dry-type air cleaner removes 99.q% of
airborne dirt... efficient at all engine
speeds and temperatures... easy to clean
and service.
Six speed forward-reverse transmission
with high forward speed of 6.3 MPH.


i
Bit U


Cat D8 Tractor

H225


.4, '1:
- -.
* jt-,
4
It


* Choice of torque converter or diredt
drive with exclusive oil clutch.
* Heavy-duty undercarriage.
* Dash-mounted controls. ;
* Comfortable seat... excellent visibility."
* A wide range of matched equipment-t1
fit your needs... dozers, rippers, scral
ers, winches, cable and hydraulic cQntrol0
and many others. -
* We'll gladly give you complete details

CATERPILLAR
C.lph.ar and Ei mulRg. ndm. b a .(d'n


Haytian Tractor- Co. Maurice Bonnefil, Manager -


He (Baker Dejure) built it, bathed it and burnt it.
Above he observes launching.


'S


A


'.rr: ;:

-t


SERIES H

bigger more, powerful

stronger than ever


of Sister Joan is te
this organization tot.i
capped children hoie k, -
The Handicapped 3
Week has given th
opportunity to mnaklie-
contribution to thii.i
those who are lateoec
it up by Iparticipai
turday night's closmg
the Riviera.

Arriving By S.
Anconsia'
The SS ANCONaf o.
nama Steamship Line,
rive from New York a:t
M. May 12 1959 on
a total o f 74 pa
which the following .9.
embark at Port au Pri
Miss Olga Azael
Mr Habib A. El Ceitait#
Mr Edward Latof;:j
Mr and Mrs George:Sh'a
Mr Alphonse Simon' '.,:
Mr and Mrs Arnold y8j
Mrs Lucienne Vaast. '
**' *iw.'yS


" -i":
'''






4iz" MAY. lO. and 17tl. 1959
~- I)


I p


,-' .t.. '
s -. ,


.h .Bigio of Port au Prince ..ft last weekend on the Paha
'wed to Mile Henrietta ma line for Newv York and fhe
4itesh in. Buenoes Aires Argen .hist leg. of their long 'acgtiopn
Sthis past,week. They were through North Africa and: Eu-
:i-arriea the Jewish faith. rope. The. Abitbols accompani-
'. TTlii ,'bride is ithe sister of ed by, sons Jimmy and Philip
SMrs David .1igip, Ben's' brot- 'will nsi t relatives in Morocco
S.her. They will, honeymoon 'in before.touring France in a new
'South America:, Ranch station-wagon., which
; --o-- they 'ill pick-up in the States.,
The Roger' Gardeie's son The wellknown textiler and
;bQrn May 3rd in New .Yqrk his wife were guests "of- honor,
Shas been christened Jefrey.: at numerous parties prior to
.- -o-.: -. their departure. Rare roast-
S' visiting Port after, an abs beef eapt, at the Cusicks and
S* enge of five years is John R. dinner at the Cichowiskis were
'Churchil who spent two years memorable.
','here a scholarship His fat- -o-
her.in-aw Mr Smith' was direc Dr, Odette Lafontant Tenm
f):'of Point .Four here at the ed recently from several years
time ;' John is now a newsmaanl specialized studies and'internd-
repoting on Agribultuiral pro, ship in European medical cen-
..ess thrtghiout this hemisphe ters.. Specialist in Gynecology-
'e A:.d left. for the Siera Maes- and Obstetrics, she worked in
d t*petiheck on,the agrarian re- the hospital of Hamburg, Ger-
1rhfers: for the Oregon Demo- many, and Paris, France under
Sat .'' thesupervisioi of eminent pro
S".; fessors. -
'af'The Piere Hollants, have ooo.
citened their new' eight- The marriage of Miss Yo.
'pounl baby Dominique Lilian- lande ,Leon andiErick 'Lafond-
ne. Favier, took place last evening
xxx a t theiglse dni SoarCoeur de
Ir. nd ,Mrs Ra4I ili P Tpigih. Thi d y -dung' couple
ave a, baby daughter. Thelr. 'were waited on by frs: Aine- .
-firpt liild arrevd Wednesday W1arie Cllins, Matron-of-Hon6r
May' *MIother is the former. ,nd Agronomist Luc'Hilaire,
M iO eih er.. 'Be4t Man.' '
xx 4' -0-
S,' M an.' Mrs. Felix Khouri idMarie-Norm3na is the name
a.e ."retOrtlihg', from 'Miai 'of the new addition to the Ray-
w ,'. .,i r 6ii-m-.ieir opserreoehod. jTh?'
be 'we'ks' 'ago '' as born MaI 3rd.
.ib.li andha ,6are 'oo .
ddi ? : ,, ,, J'-eqics 'bonel, Biness
; ... .. o o ; .. ., S.G., leats this.
j M and' Mrs Saif4 -Abitbo{Al^ek YO$ tn' ctjded ri jxourn
.. -' -
SS Haiti Merchant in .Cap-Haitien unloaded a cargo of graders
S'oi. .'the Pot Cole6 project .according 'to information from the
i a, itiiOnasis.;. ''.e' .U ,is idie ,l isson .is -said t6 inohide a
S.ieli~dpter unit. Asgociate .Edlitor of, Time, .Magazine George
Dan;els on a trip through the Caribbean was. i.tersted'in the'
vrowh of beards and their political significance,... E. M. John-
;s; Director of Ila-aiing a nd Research of:Delia Airlines was
'h.ere at the IbdLele with a pArty of three.,. Lester Gottlieb of
'USOM food distributicii Coordinator in the Northwest in three
-months time is expected to be the most travelled man in Haiti.
HIe cInmmutes 'between the Northwest and Port weekly ,by
jeep.,.. The Landreths are bidding goodbye in June... A Fo-
ielgn- d0ct9r was mad at an'army, guard who stopped him in,
the do- try -and made him hands-up. The doctor said the sol-
dier walked away anpd failed,to tp him he could let.his hands
down... Mr. Clement Barbot has completely recovered from h1'
:*alartiabout...
Last week Bermingham was left with' only thb clothes he had
'at the Dry-Cleaners when burgulars raided his Petionville home
and literally' removed everything... Jacko Sassine is back from
* -Miami looking chic with a new waist-line...' Casino propreitor
,Jake'Kozloff came to the assistance of 136 young teenagers who
'.:oitldnt find' the cash entry to the -Bal de. petit chapeaux- FTi-
l day night and gave them $500 cash for entry and consuma-
Sion......


AI'I'I SUN


in tie U. S. ie will be joined
in-.New .York this summer by
wif Margot and son Eddie.
000


I


PAGE 1
PAGE IS


MODERN OASIS. (FONDS PARISIENS) HAS ITS NEEDS


I -


TQKIO : EMBASSY
.(Confinued from page 1):
February 1958 and that it had
become" indispensable, as a'
courtesy, to establish iliploma- Asi
tic relations with Japan 0oq a
bahis of reciprocity.
l' e pointed ;'ut that Haiti's
jpoArtations to. Japan. anioun-
ed to $ 200,000 yearly before
'.he last' war, including sugar.
He said. that"this Mission 'is a '
.iecessiiy. for raising the- esono-
Tit leIel of .the 'cduntry and
that:it is'imnortant to find new
markets 'for Haitiap products.
: A',Cominission of Senators
and .Deputiqs was named to
study the Aoord enkered into
between Haiti and Japan.,

a T. NIGHT
FIGHT...
(Continued from page 1)
Dave Talamas, a regular vi-
:itor to the Casino,. in a letter
o the .'ia l written to the Attorney Ge-
eral filing a coniplaint against
*llen ,Danzig ahd Tiny Harold,
accusingg the, two Casino' em-
>!oyees of causing him bodily
injuries at 2:00 A. ,M. on the
norning of May 3rd.
The Casino management de-
'iled to comment.
1OR SALE
1-One 1954 Oldmobile 98, 4 door
Sedan, in excellent condition.
2 -One 1954 Studebaker Pick-Up
with special mechanics body.
Offers should be received for
these vehicles at the office of
SEsso Standard Oil, S. A., Post
Office Box .C. on or before'
May the 22nld. Further informa-
tion and arrangements to view
these vehicles should be made
through the office of Esso
Standard Oil, S. A.


fromnpage 1)


I


t. 4t


__


D


I


"c~


Felix Pilorge, accompanied
'by wife Aglae, flew to New
York for a month's vacation
today.
ooo
SThe marriage of Miae Gerda
Dartiiguenave and, Keenel Jack'.
son'will take place Saturday
evening at the VMethodist church
in .Port-ait-Prince
0, 0
ooo
Senator Gehu Garnier retur-
ned this week from lis misioa
tothe U. S.
STAMP '
(Continued from.page 1)
:.rior mail, and ten centimes
?r foreign mail:
'"This additional stamp is also
cEuired on; c5rrespondene :of
ie 'public administration going
broad.
The ,proceeds of the sale of
hese stamps will be deposited
vith the National- Bank of
'Taiti., in the.name of the Hai-
han Government in a non-fis-
,al account, to be utilized by
'he Coinmision of Alphabetiza-
'ion in accordance with the
clauses of the law on the Bud-
get dnd Public Accounting.'
-- .' "- ._ .


S(Continued i
:hc.r favorite sport of cockfight
ing was not neglected in the
Engineers plans. ,
But it needs paternal guidan
ce anid a powerful individual
with Israelian-like leadership,
it would seem, to make the vil-
lage work.
The forty families who wbre
transplanted from iNo-Man's-
Lando on the Dominican-Hai-
tian f ontier 'are, somewhat be-
wildered by it all, and are hav
ing a har.l time,.of it,tq. get,
adjusted to their "rew' isround
ings. .
They do not us&the electric
light because they go straight
to bed at' sundown.. Business'
houses could contribute, to help
ing them in their new way of



U-.


life. A radio is needed. The
village could be the watering-
stop for ac-miopettes and. eca
mions) travelirig to the Pine
Forest, the Border and Saltrou.
The Government has done it
part ahd moved these people
from their slum dwelling op'the -
border to a pleasant village of ,
nedt homes. '
It is now :time for private .ini f:
tiative to steb in. Cottage in-
dustries must be intoJul'ed ..
and encourage. .
The peoplee ar' living there,. ,:
it's truei,but life has nbt yet .:
come to.,the- village. Whent it
does theirs will be a wholesome
.and happy community, anda. a;'
model for the neighboring fanrn',-






.1 '' Y -^ j*












George 'b:it i :s ,i.
Church'-:' ii -. '= :'








S64e i 3 1: .
-_ 'r '





4 I .





PAGE 16


.,


i :

i
I.
1 !

''


The 17-bed hospital operated
by the Government at Jean-
Rabel, since December, has
treated an average of 10 per-
sons per day for malnutrition,
and reported a total of 20
deaths over the past months.
Those receiving care from
the Unevangelized Fields Mis-
sion, near, Port-de-Paix aver-


BIG SHOW TONIGHT AND

ALL WEEK

AT


I

*./


INTERNATIONAL CASINO

OF HAITI

WITH


'
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;


AND
THE TALENTED ARTIST
MADELEINE MARCEL 'DUROSIER
AND THE
INCOMPARABLE
SINGER
ANGUSTE DUROSIER
AN ADDED ATTRACTION IS
GERARD CHA.MIER
THE HUMAN FLUTE AND
INIMITABLE MASTER OF
CEREMONIES
Free Admission During Week
Saturday and Sunday Admission $1.00

GUY DUROSIER


FOOD DISTRIBUTION ...


U. S.


Catholic Relief Services
Coming To- Ad


A news report from Washing
ton this week informed -that the
Catholic Relief Services would
re-route the three hunded tons
of foodstuffs formerly designa-
ted for shipment, to other
,-oints, and have ,them sent
direct to Haiti. One hun're',
'hirrty tons of surplus U. S.
food is to be sent weekly,
-under this arrangement, as
well as a stock of medical sup-
plies.
CARE officers in Cap-Hai-
tien prepared to distributed
1,200,000 ponds of rice, corn-
meal and powdered milk which
arrived here on the arrival of
te U. S. S. Fanny_ Scarletbt
expected here shortly.
USOM's Lesster Gottlieb
who is coordinating the Catho-
lic Relief, Church World Ser-
vice and CARE distribution of
food, says the program will
continue at least three months,
or until the first crop is har-
vested by the people in the
stricken areas, and rainfall has
been generous over the past
several weeks.
Agricultural experts say that
the area is always on the "edge
of emergency ; and that it. must'
be made more productive a
long term project to take
it out of emergency status.
Meanwhile the people are
enjoying regular meals once
again.


THE WORLD


FAMOUS


(Contenuel from page 1)


I I


AMSTE .
,AMSTE.


-






Imported rom

A :otand
Agents:
USINE A GLACE NATIONAL, S.A.
PORT-AU.PRINCE
S HAITI, W.I.


SHOES I


4,'


FOR EVERY OCCASI


dren far over the normal rate,
and an increased number of. tu-
Pberubesi cases both in chil-
dr e and adult. The number
who died from starvation, they
'siid, could not be determined
accurately dun to a lack of sta-
tistics, but it was safe to say in
the hundreds, and when a fi-
nal count is taken it might very
well reach into the thousands.


).


,...
PI ~k


SUNDAY, MAY.10th.,


aged 25 cases of malnutrition
per week for the past year, of
wn.ch officials of the hospital
report 10% have died, totalling
oau deaths over the past 12
months.
Father Jean Quentric, the
Catholic Cur6 in Jean Rabel
reports he has seen at least 60
new children's graves in two
cemeteries there within the
past two months.
Twelve starvation cases of
which eight were children were
found in the Government hos-
pital at Port-de-Paix, one of
whom .was doomed to die.
* Dr. Boulos who is familiar
with his countrymen and their
habits stated the figures given
could not be taken as any ma-
thematical yardstick, pointing
out that .for every family that
comes to a hospital for help,
from three to five times as
many remain in the mountains
to die.
In Jean Rabel, both Catholic
and Protestapt ministers said
manyn, families were burying
their dead on their own lands'
because they 'didn 't have
.money for a funeral or a cas-
ket.


MC-INTOSH LETS FACTS SPEAK
THEMSELVES AS REPLY TO FOo"'
MANAGEMENT CRITICS -
On .the subject of the debate Nouvelliste and on HiA
of the Chamber of Deputies of the resignation of -t
with regard to the Tragic Si bers of. the Cont
tuation of Haitian Football*, I which .I had the ho9a
desire to'bring to the attention ve, I am extracting $
of the public the following: entitled: .llustratiop
from the Nouvelliste, No. 23,- ful administration: :
117, of October 21, 1953c On the occasion of
oCertain dissatisfied persons signation of the Conm
have' chosen the scandalous the Haitian Federatioit
way of public vituperation ball we have judged .it
against the directors who in the information of o .
spite-of certain errors mare, to cast an eye on-the.'
have worked uncontestably for presented by The Adis
the grandeur and the exfen- tion Of The St;diuin.
jn and evolution of Football Bank Of The Republic.
vith tangible results..., ti). This Staterpent.ofQ
This an extract from the re lizations of the Ct'
ort of the.Investigating Corn- goes up to July 19, 1I
mission of the Government. is signed by Messi-urfl
'his 'Commission was composed rescher and Albert.'
4f Messieurs .Felix Diambois, of the National Barnk.
kndr6 Thbard and Edouard I have nothing hif
Baker. add.
From the same edition of the (s) William Mclntoshb


AT CHATELET
(Continued from page 1)
irony of the deal was that some
of the flowers which gained the
International Trophy were pro
duced on the lands where this
wanton destruction took place.
President Duvalier, appreciate
ing that such an act of vandal-
ism on investments of a for-
eign enterprise will kill off such.
foreign investment, payrolls and
employment for years to come,
has directed that the lands be
restored to: the- lease-holder of
Chatelet des Fleurs '-according
to contract, and quick indemni
fiction is expected in Govern-
ment bonds for the vandalism
by public officials.


DES FLEUR&rI
Chateles des Fleura
investment of $125,000 .
and its .gadens and i
latively short life of,
pany has brought re
more than $500,000,
million dollars, to .t
town of Kenscoff. \
Employment which
pended immediately fol
the vandalism by Govi
employees will be.resm
completion of the in
tion-negotiations. ,
The Haiti Sun won
punishment will be
to the men who ,are
se, using the c6ver .
functions to Perpetrarl
an atrocity.


H AITI S UNo


SHOES




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