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 Material Information
Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."
 Record Information
Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00232

Full Text



.2S


A. MA 3rd. 1959No. 31u n

."" I OL. 1 bShDLAY. MAY 3rd. 1959 No. 31 PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI


WQRSE FLASH FLOOD IN

CAUSES LOSS OF LIFE, DA
The worse flash flood to hit c
"the Capital in more than a de-
SSpanish Speaking cade ,took seven lives, injured

:: '.Stranger Hands a hundred persons and caused
l-"amages to' private property
SaBian Ambassador and streets estimated any-
Ig^nited Grenade where from a quarter to half a
Million dollars. Although ra-
-- Cuban Ambassador Antonio dios stations and at least one 1
Ji odriguez credited his reflexes newspaper listed the death toll
i'thsaving his family and self as from twenty-i\ve to fifty
mn serious injury a few mi, persons, this newspaper found
tes aftei Nine Friday night only seven.
vbhen aSpanish-speaking stran- ithe toreretia1 rains that la-
-gger dropped an ignited grenade he: the mountains and city,
1rfio his parked automobile. \Wed.nesday night, took on the
gAcoo npanied by members of aspect of a dam bursting, or a
hifamily, one of whom was tital wave, when flood waters
iregrianrt daughter, the Am- overflowed the ravines and
a ssador was in the act of --
aying waiter Philip Eugene
eor Tcurb service before the Food For Flood-
Nobb -Bondel restaurant when
i'rman-he described as.a nio6n- Victims To Be
-Waitian stepped forward, say-
Baienos noches Erbajador, Distributed Today
.an-d dropping an objec. into
the tront sept of hlu car. BELEIVE THOUSAND
VICTIMS
The quickthinking AmbaV.a-
i.tatr stated that he instantly
dr s d tt he n y The recently-organized As-
coopped up. the ock-like ob-
sociation Haitienne de Se.
:]etand tossed it from the car
course et D'Assistance swung
ii the direction of a pile of cors et D stance swun
Into. action over the week
ble on the street corne- end to help the victims of
;The objet appears to have ex- last Wednesday night's. flash
ploded in the air the loud de- flood.
"tonation was heard around the
e only damage the-gre- At least seven persons
-ider.j~ used besides shocking were killed by the flood .but
~- t~e. d Point restaurant pa- dozens of homes possibly.
._ 1frons was to shAtter the glass- hundreds when the final
Count is known -- Ivere da-
Fi-areoan waiters Eugen-'s tray. count is non ere da-
maged or destroyed by the
S.Ambassador Rodriguez stated cascading waters. Otto Mad-
.' at the scene that he saw the sen, president of the Associa
f",man-make a getaway in a light- tion, says the government has
i-i'colored jeep stationed a block not provided statistics on the
i- veay. ,
(Cooinued on Dag.- 16) (Continued on page 2) .
f.,
,;*.'..,..


DECADE

MAGE
other water. courses and raced
o the sea through homes, gar-
,eins and streets, leaving de-
,, station in its wake.
The torrential rain that
brought on the flood points up
.he Tack of adequate drainage
,nd too small culverts which
bottle up the raging waters
New constructions around the
foothills altered the course of
the waters, and combined with
the continued deforestation of
(Continued on page 16)


NEW


VILLAGE


REPLACES
BORDER SLUM
40 wooden Houses Built By
Govt. Opened By President.
An entire village was trans-
p'anted, Friday, from squalid
mujd hovels on the Haitian-
Dominiican frontier's Land.> to high grounL rverloo-
king Lake Sauniatre, four
miles from the border. The
villiagers were moved into new
%wocden homes at Fonds Pari-
.iens built by the Haitian Go-
vernment with electric power,
'vater and adjacent gardens.
Friday's inauguration of the
(Continued on page 14)


FLASH FLOOD VICTIMS


Daniel Apollon Jr. -
Recovering From.
Beord Incident ((Top) Ove...rinut. taxi in which driver lost his life when raging floo4
Former Beaux Arts Paris waters caught him on the Rue Capois shortly after taking gasoline at lh
stud t a Shell Station. The Bois-de-Chine normally runs under the road through ]
dent an architecture e-a large, culvert. The automobile is almost in front of the literally demo
thusiast Daniel Apollon is re- lished home of .Maman. Defly.
coveringg at home from an uln Another taxi casualty was this Ford. in rlurgeau, that almost disappea
happy experience and. no red dow-n a hole in the asphalt caused by. the flood ,waters that turned
longer Isporting his .familiar theroad into rapids.
full beard. ''he bridge to Frkrcs is down and the road sliced hi half by the water!
S. The recently inaugurated Dog Track on the Champ-de-Mars, comp
c'r 'ed on page 15) letely devastated.


PRESIDENT DUVALIER CALLS'NATION TO ENTER
FIGHT AGAINST EROSION TREE-CUTTING


d
e
h


d
s.
I-


SO THAT MIVAY 1ST 1MAY
.BECOME AND REMAIN
THE FIESTA OF FLOWERS,
FRUITS, ABUNDANCE '
AND PROSPERITY


*. The raising up of a People
t not at all a favor simply of-
l ered by destiny, President
-)auvalier told the Nation in his
message on May 1st during the
celebrations of Agriculture
mnd Labor Day Conquered by an interior corn
)at. Everything must be con-
I uiered' by a painful strug-
glea.
F':O. ilGK, o"A d TO U. S. enjoy last flutter at Penion TourChief of State dot
: M.it Ile. Sylvie Tourdot Professor Philip Humphrey and Sarita Van The Chief of State aid
-.... who took six cases of deceased birds, reptiles and Amphibians back further that no matter what
i. Tele last/week. The Haitian parrots flew to the US by PAA clippertype of activity he exercises,
*d dead relatives went by Panama Liner. (See Story page 2).-
J.. '



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a citizennmust not forget that
his .compatriot, no matter
either what the domain of his
activity may be is indispen
sable from the momentthat
he fulfils his duty.
cThle Nation does not exist
by the work of a Government,
by the work of a determined
class, by the work of an in-
tellectual class, but it lives
only by the common and har-
monious work of all,> he stat
ed, saying that this response
ability is before the national
conscience.
In his Message, President
Duvalier declared .that May
1st was the herlad of the
time of harvesting, and the


victory of man over matter,
and that it is the association,
the combination for solving
by method, a' d technique,
the'problem of happiness and
collective well-being.
This year he said, the fies
ta of May 1st was saddened
by the devastation of the 29
(Continur_. o0 1 7E )

Brasserie ViTs Here
For D-ep Freezer
Opening
The quarterly visit of Bras
series de la Couronne Presi-
dent James Stewart coincided
with the opening of the com
pany's new 1800 Cubic Ft.
(continued on page 12)









PAGE2 HITI U~sSUNDY, AY 3d.


UNIQUE SPECIES OF HAITIAN,
BIRDS REPTILES AND
AMPHIBIANS OFF TO YALE
DR. PHILIP HUMPHREY AND SARITA VAN VLECK
COLLECTED RARE SPECIMENS HERE
FOR NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUMS
OF YALE AND UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


To Publish Observations
In English, French, Cr6ole
Six cases listed as birds
reptiles and amphibians were
followed to'New York, Tues
day, by their- collectors, D:
Philip S. Humphrey and Mis
Sarita Van Vleck who spen
three months hunting,'searcl
ing and bird-watching undel
the combined auspices o
Yale University, the Univers
ty of Florida and the Pal
American Section of the In.
international Committee foi
Bird Preservation.
Both Professor Hinmphrey
and Miss Van Vieck endeared
themselves to the Haitian pe<
pie, especially in the rura
districts with their quick mas
tery of Creole, good humor
and 'friendliness.
One of the few visitors to
pack a shot gun here (for col
electing birds on the wing),
Professor Humphrey and Miss
Van Vleck who spent four
weeks working in the For6t
des Pins, three weeks on La
Gonave and several days in
the Cul-de-Sac Plain and D'


Food For Flood
Victims...
(continued from page 1)

number of flood victims but
:he feels they may run as high
as one thousand.
if is to these victims that
the Associaiton is distribut-
ing food and clothing.
Madsen says the Associa-
tion, which was founded De-
cember 1st, 1958 for just
such emergencies as this, has
collected some five thousand
dollars worth of food and
clothing. Over the week end
girl scouts helped package
the corn, rice, sugar, lard,
ied beans bloaters and Mad-
son said he hoped to' start
distribution by Sunday.
He said the gift packages
would be distributed in the
Port au Prince and Petion-
ville areas. He estimated the
flood relief task would take
about one week after which
the Association intends to
send assistance teams into
the starving northwest.


Leau Guillee in an interview
said:
<(Hispaniola is very interest
ing to zoologists because of
the greAt many different
kinds of animals which live
here and nowhere else in the
world. There are more differ
ent birds, reptiles, and amphi
bia4as peculiar to Hispaniola
than to any of the other Ca-
ribbean islands. About 50 dif
ferent birds, and 120 differ-
ent reptiles -and amphibians
occur in Hispaniola and now-
here else. -
Dr Humphrey than referred
to their discovery in Haiti,
saying: <,Because Haiti is so
mountainous, it has many
more of these unique animals
than does the rest of the is.
land.,
While here, Mr Humphrey,
in connection with his posi-
tion' as an officer of the Pan
American Section of the In-
ternational Committee for
Bird Preservation, has beep
studying the problems of de-
forestation in Haiti.
* of forests in Haiti*, he said,
undoubtedly has be6n res-
ponsible for a gradual decli-
ne in the amount of rainfall
over the past several decades.
This, ,and the additctial ef-
fects of erosion, has had a
orofound effect on the land-
.scape in many areas. What
were once verdant forested
hillsides have become barren
wastelands on which few
plants can gain a foothold.
As the forests have disappear


Noted Woman Er


Among the arrivals aboard
this niorning's PAA flight from
Ciudad Trujillo were the beau-
tious Priscilla Winslow Wood
and her son, Winslow, Wood,
of Washington, D. C. En route
toAHaiti these travellers stop-
ped at Puerto Rico and in the
Dominican Republic, and from
Port-au-Prince they will visit
Jamaica and Nassau. The grea-
i ter portion of their -West In-


BEST IN CAP-HAITIEN
HOSTELLERIE DU ROI CHRISTOPHE

New York Times
The only hotel in town with:
Air Conditioned Rooms. Swimming pool
-'Topical park Magnificent verandas -
Tennis court.
-THE BEST FOOD OF HATTT


ed, many of the unique Hai-
tian birds and other animals
have become reduced in num
bers. Although this is perhaps
a minor matter compared to
the total effect of deforesta-
tion on the Haitian lands-
cape, it is an important symp-
tom on what may well become
a national disaster.s
Humphrey said that he is
very pleased by the interest
the Government of Haiti has
taken in his studies and that
he is particularly gratified by
the cooperation he has receive
ed from Mr Henri Marc-Char-
les, former Minister of Agricul
ture and Natural Resources,
Mr LUonce Bonnefil, Zoologist,
and Mr iBi.Bi Chandler.
He plans to make a report
of his observations available to
the Department of Agriculture
in the hope that it will be of
assistance in the Government's
conservation program.
In addition, Dr Humphrey
stated he and Mr Bonnefil will
be translated into French and
or Cr6ole and distributed to
the Haitian schools by the Hai
tian Section of the Internatio-
nal Committee for Bird Preser
ovation.


Seasonal Rain Slows
Up Social Activities
Seasonal rains and Wednes
day night's flash flood have
contributed to the slowing up
of social activities in the Ca-
'pital. :


Tourist Heads Off
To Colombia
President of the Tourist
.,,ard Raymond Roy and Di-
rector Jacques Honorat left Sa-
turday to Atend the Caribbean
Tourist Association meeting
scheduled in Bogota this com-
iqg week.-


igineer And Son


dies tour, however, will be
spent here in Haiti, where they
will stay in Petionville with
her sister, Vaughan, whose
husband is Assistant Manager
for. TEXACO in Haiti, Le Roi
L. Elliott.
In addition' to her strenuous
social activities in the United
States capital, Mrs. Wood finds
tine to.be one of that capital's
leading engineers.
Mrs Wood and her sister V.
Elliott, are the daughters of
Lorenze S. Winslow, architect
of the White House in Wa-
shington, D. C., for some twen-
ty years and now the director
an architectural firm in that
city.
Mrs. Wood and her son plan
to spend at least two weeks
exploring the beauties of Haiti
before continuing their air tour
of the Caribbean.


4 COASTGUARDSMEN ARREST i
GIVEN ROUTINE TRANSFER
'The Government has not yet some essence. of truth in the
completed its investigation in- \t'ld reports, we set about i-
to th.e so-called coast guard checking. The facts finallywee
aplot- which all Port-au-Prince made known by a governij
was talking about last week. spokesman 4ho said that
The government denies there four' h'ail been arre7e,d, noi-]'
was any formal -plot' against He denied existence of ai
it, but admits. the arrest of four to overthrow the govern
coast guardsmen and says they but said tle four belong
were connected with organiza- anti-government organiati
tions responsible for the series He said lJeir case was be
of harassing incidents of the vestigated and woIuld give."
past few weeks. further details until the ia e
First word that this newspa- Iigation is completed.
per received of the 'plot- was .
via the country's amazing tele- A few days later the go~
diol. The telediol stories were rent made known that 50:
fantastic. Spread rapidly by guardsmen had been train
word of mouth, they said the red from their Port-awP
following: that 150 coast guards posts to other areas in;.
men has been arrested; that and that they had been rept
they had planned a revolt:, had with arecruils, who had
planned to make off with one training in the National P
of the coastguard boats and had The Govenament denied' .
planned to attack the Caserne ce more that the Iransfer4!
Dessalines and even the Presi- any connection with the
dential Palace itself. called -plot' It said the-a
i"-owine how orone the te- fer was a normal, route 0
lediol is to exaggeration, but such as is made almost
also aware that there must he day in military organizaio.i

PRESIDENT DUVALIER MAY DAYi
continued from. page 1)
secrated to agriculture: ^--
th of April and the spectacle to labor, to see the H
of destruction caused by the people recall the value"of
shortsightedness of past Gov ting-Jon wilh he woik
ernnient which have never construction and- see them
wanted to go. after the caus- main equal to the task,.
es. It is proof that certain as ing that each examined
nects of the problem of ero. conscience for himse
sion and tree-cutting have for the nation -wili
always been eluded 'and that bushes ahead and
the social and hunan effects 'the obstacles.
of agriculture have never (bI would love to
been analyzed or studied. penetrate the sterility
e'Agriculture 'is no longer featism or of negati[
enclosed in idyllic descrio- cism and have' .i
tions of eclogues.It is a pre. is the joy of workrAi
nnnderant activity which attach himsel-- to t
from the plant to the .tree, myths 'which have&".
traverses the stages of raw about the decadence
'materjsls to products trans- tnre or civilization. T'
formed to furnish man with like that each one accet
food, cloth, forestry essences, challenge that tr
precious wood, construction and erosion threw at,
materials.* t h e President tragic nisht of Arili
pointed out, saying was it not and the lesson of enek.
trie that food. dress, and lod will nower which is.r
uings defined the degree of .would like the 1st
organization of a community. +n be not only an oc
He said further that today -liht heartedness, but .
Science has Dushed oroducti of departure, a' new
vity so far that it eleminates standing of the difficu
the fatalism of geogranhv, of be vanauished in or
hunger and creates for the again the battle of vr
,nr-ant or the average Dro- the battle of cons
ducer a satisfactory individual and augmentation of.
revenue- sources and to- ase
ture of the new methods that more enuitable and-ti
implicatee the pacific utiliza- distribution of wealti ;
tion of nuclear energy gives The Government}i
the lie to certain natural laws fronting the drama t '
and offers thus to the under, hbtween indi.cinline'.-
develoned peonies more clear cities in raising uo- ,
and nrpeise contours to their rlard of the people.
DersDertives. It also eliminate nDvalipr conclOldI
es agriiultural calamities in that adjustment in,'.
submitting nature to the lo- es ,would be PI-'
crial action of reason. It au- the 1st of May b
theories us to have hones. remains ethe fete..f.
The President said he and fruit and. al 9
would like. on this day, con dance and urosoe


On Visit Here


1


SUNDAY, MAY 3rd. i


PAGE 2


aHAITI SUNa






S SUNDAY, MAY 3rd. 1959


SHAITI'S TOURISM BORN OF AIR

SAGE: PAA SERVING HAITI MORE

S' THAN 30 YEARS

SHaiti, once a sleepV corner of the Caribbean, today bustles
with tourists who now rival coffee as the nation's number
S-one revenue producer.
i.-. 'Contributing in a major %ay to Haiti's brightening econo.
my is Pan American World Airways, which ended theg island
i country's semiisolation with the first commercial flight link-
l ing Haiti-to the spreading air lanes of the world, and which
: has been serving the Relublic continuously for more than
..30.ygars.
S With a history-making Clip hour sky quedns which can
Super flight down the <(stepping carry up.to 165 passengers.
'stones of the Antilles* in y
-1929, Haiti wasbrought ito In the early years, Clippers
1929, Haiti was brought into touched down at Port-au-Prin
air contact with the rest of touched down at Pt
the world, ce about six timns weekly.
the world >Currently, an average of 35
The first Clippers were ti- Currently, an average of 35
.ny Fokker F--10 tri-motor Pan' Am flights a week call
ny Fokker F-0 -motor at Bowen field.
planes, which carried 10 pas- Last year nea .000
l'- Last year, nearly 54,000
sengers at 105 miles an hour.
S. Clipper passengers arrived or
.Th those, 'early days, Port-au- Bown field
SPrince was reached on the departed at i
\ more than double the number.
second ayof the journey handled through the terminal
from Miami to San Juan,
frito San Jan only four years previously.
SPuerto Rico, after an over-
Snight stop at Camaguey, Cu- In addition. Pan American
p ba- airlifted som e 2,3000,000
SToday, Port-au-Prince is pounds of cargo and 128,000
less than 3 hours from Mia- pounds of airmail for Haiti.
f, ml and little more thari 6 The air cargo service has aid
Hours from New York by ed the steady expansion of
: huge Super-6 and DC.7B Clip Haiti's commerce and indus-
pers, carrying up to 66 pas- try, providing fast Clipper
S.-sengers at 300 to 350 miles delivery for such products as
an hour. sisal shoes and handbags,
And on the way Pan Am's foods and essential oils.
Snew Jet Cilppers, 575.mile-an Progress made by air trans



. .-.,., /

-- -.

O-O.: :
S,.i.:-.. ,"_


.. EN IER SERVICE
FIRST CLASS PASSING
afl amuDUNCI_


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ORTmAU ""--- --
To

gEW YORK
WEST 24th STREET
Only 31 Days direct to the center of New York
city modern American Flag Cise Ships.
ANCON CRISTOBAL
Saibngs Mondays and FridaYs
EVERY CABIN OUTSIDE WITH PRIVATE BATH
,RCoNDjOrlNE 1D 4 lN0 S|LO4G
OUTDOR TnLED SWNIMMvO POOL
250 LBS. BAGOGE ALLOWANCE"

Ask about round4riP sea-air tickets.
Complete accurate information only fron
PANAMA STEAMSHIPSLIP E W
Rue Abraham Lincoln" TelephOn


=


-' ^" t2 i r -
A far 'cry from the tiny Clippers of 1929 are he iPan American World-
Airways skyliners serving Port-au-Prince today. These IDC-7B Clippers
carry 66 passengers ,at 350 pliles pn hour, bring Port-au-Prince within
GO flyinghours of any spot Ln the world.
Here is the Fokker F-10 tri-motor Clipper, with which)PAA inaugurated
international air service to Haiti 30 years ago. It carried '0 -passengers
and Irrised 'at 105 miles an hour.
Here's a view of 'Buwen field, Port-au-Prince, in 1942, shortly Jflter Pan
American World Airways began shifting back to land. plane operations
on its Caribbean routes, replacing flying boat Clippers.
One of Pan American World -Airways' (famed flying boats, -a Sikorsky
S-13 amphibian, lands "in 'the herbor 0at Port-au-Prince fin 1'937. This
twin-engine Clipper carried 14 passengers at 160 'miles -an hour.


donation over the past three
decades is reflected equally
by the modern facilities and
runways in use today at Port
au Prince's Bowen field.
They are a far cry from
the early days. Then, arriv-
ing in Port au Prince, the
Clipper pilot had to circle the
landing field until it was
made ready. The was the U. S. Marines' golf
course, and boys were sent
scurrying out to clear four-
somes from the fairways.
\hen the plane was late and
an important golf macth was
interrupted, therewas a de-
cided strain in public rela-
tions.
It is estimated that air tour
ism currently is producing
about a $3,000,000 a year re
venue for Haiti. And the tour
ist dollar is the most prized


of all, since it is spent direct
ly with the innkeepers, res.
taurateurs, merchants, taxi
drivers and others who bene-
fit from visitors.
In addition to bringing dol
lars into Haiti, Pan American
has developed an entire new
industry and vocation -'air
transport by training-me-
chanics, airport control opera
tors, reservations agents and
others necessary to the smoo-
th functioning of the airline
in Haiti. The training include.
ed such courses as English,
radiophone procedure, tower
operation and other skills.
Pan American spends more
than $200,000 a year in Haiti
for payrolls, maintenance of
airport and runways facilities,
utilities rentals and other ne-
cessities. It spends about the
same amount to fuel the Clip


American Institute
Of Decorators Here
On Weekend Visit
32 Mcmbers of the American
Institute of Decoratord arrived
direct from New York Saturday
and were welcomed .t Bowen
Field by members of the Ton-
ris-t Office headed by Clement
Joseph Cha'rles, Southerland
Tour. and Pan American World
Airways officials.
The group is led by Inlt'tute
Director Mlr. Harold M. Grieve
who arranged the trip th-rogh
Clara Laughlin Travel Service
of New York City.
Wecome cocktails were held
for the 'guests last evening at
El Rancho where they are lod-
ged during their stay.
The Americans will meet with
local, decorators, artists and
chlics during a series of en-
fetes organized in their honor.
honor.


Desc hinmns Still
Held By Police
Jacques Deschamps, prominent
Port-au-Prince businessman, is
still held by Police pending cor
pletion of investigation of an
alleged bomB plot. Deechamps
wai arrested last week after-po-
lice found 143 bomb-casings in
the shop of Savinin Simon, an
employee in the Deschamp
brotliers printing plant,
Simon said he had been hired
to fabricate the bombs by Ro-
bert Deschamps, brother and
partner _f Jacques. Robert has
been in the United States on
busine ss sincee March. Police
arrested his 'brot'bhr and have
been holding hli for investiga,
tion since Friday, April 24.


New Ap Man
Appointed To
Caribbean From
Moscow


Heinie Milke wellknown
Associated Press staff writer
has ended his assignment in
Russia and has been appoint
ed to the Caribbean. Mr
Milke who is expected to ar-
rive H a v a n a shortly
will- visit Haiti on his first
tour of this area.


From SOUTHERLAND

FREE AIRPORT HOTEL DELIVERY AND PICK-UP
'


TOURS
45 AVE. Marie-Jeanne
Tel: 3591


RENT A


DRIVE- YOURSELF VOLKSWAGEN


aHA!TI SUNP

pers which land at Port au
That's not all. Pan Ameri-
can annually spends about
$1,000,000 a year to promote
travel Io Haiti through ma-
gazine and newspaper adverts
.ing, publicity, displays, mov.
ies, booklets, posters, televi-
S..sion pragranis and other pro
n. option.


- --~-~




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A.rlS'UI TTN


L'AtiL 4 .a... ..- _


N ANA OF DUVERGET

MARKET WOMAN OF HAITI
Written For The ( by Prof. Sidney Mintz
Part-au-Prince downtown goes to sleep early. By evening, the Thus her youngest child, a boy bled in the house of a conpere
shutters and steel gates have swung to, the peddlers, beggars, received nine years of schooling who lives on the main road. Na-
iusiness men and tourists have disappeared from sight, and the while Nana paid for bis board- na is a substantial dealer, a
street are empty. The city's great Iron Market is swept and ing expenses over five years of .komerzan-. She may carry to
closed, and the business section has an almost desolate quality, this time. Unlike his older bro- Port-au-Prince as much as twcn
But .down along the Rue du Quai, near where the market of their and sisters, or his father ty sacks of millet, peanuts, gin-
Croix des Bossales 'ptls over on to the street, along the four and mother, Gustave speaks ger and other products; as ma-
sides of the Iron Market, and under the canopies of all the sur. French, and can read and write ny as 25 gallon jugs for the pur-
rounding streets, here is no desolation on Friday nidlt. That it as well. Naturally, his aspi- chase of clairin; and many
is the night the women of Haiti move into the capital, preparing rations exceed his mother's, and otlier odd items. Chickens and


for the next day's corhmerce.

"Every other Friday, one of
..the bright orange camionettes
-1ieir Creole name is karostri
-from the southern village of
Fond-des-Negres stops on the
Rue Courbe to discharge a pas-
senger before the Depot Ro-
chambeau.- She is but one mar-
ket woman of many, and her
load of. produce, though very
considerable, is not unusual:
millet both husked and unhus-
ked, ginger, peanuts, pumpkins,
fowls, eggs, and the like. She is
the widow of Gomara Aadrien,
peasant and landholder of Habi
taeion Duverget, in the Fifth
Rural Section of Anse-i-Veau;
her name is Anais Charles. But
her friends call her-sNanam.
-In Nana's story, which is no
more unique than that of any
other humar being, one can
find an opening into the study
.of the markets-and market wo-
men of Haiti. For-Nana does as
do thousands of Ha;tian--women.
Sand it is through the incredible
effort of these women that the
food and crafts of Haiti, and
most of the imports the Hai-
tian habitant needs in order to
live, are carried throughout the
country.
Nana was born 56 years ago
in Ilabitacion Duverget, and
marketing has been part of her
life -as long as she can remem-
ber. One of her earliest memo-
ries is being taken to the mar-
ket at Aquin, where she was gi
ven money to buy sugar for one
centime per packet. When she
and her mother returned home,
it was Nana who resold the su-
gar, for two centimes per pac-
ket. Nana's mother made regu-
lar trips to Port-au-Prince, and
this was long before the Anme-
ricans came, long before there
was motor transport in Haiti.
Those trips took nearly four
days' travel each way, by mule.
Sometimes Nana would be ta-
ken along, for a girl child is
taught to carry on marketing
operations in Nana's class as
matter-of-factly as young girls
learn to speak French or to
paint, in other clasess. As a
young girl Nana continued to
market, arid changed her ope-
rations at various times to seek
new sources of income. She lear.
ned io buy clairin wholesale.
and to resell it retail. She
leaned to market oils, and all


of the necessary measuring de-
vices ths entait. he became
expert at juagmg the quality
and- condition, of various sorts
ot fruit, grains, legumes, and
roots. With time, her knowledge
of the. markets near her home
- their seasonal variation, the
products which could be pur-
chased at each most cheaply for
resale at a profit, her contacts
with particular buyers and sel-
lers along the roads to the mar-


it is hard to tell if he will ever
realize them. But it was Nana's
marketing that made it possible
Tor him to receive a better than
average education. Some' of the
money could be used for land,
which Nana arranged to be wor-
ked on shares. And" yet most
of what she earned simply
went into the maintenance of
her life and business. The pro-
fits of marketing, at least for
country women, arefar, far less
on the average than what the
bourgeois would have one be-


eggs are almost always a de-
pendable source of profit. She
may carry as many as 200 .pil'
- that is, 600 eggs on a sin-
gle trip. As late as eight o'clock
on- Friday morning, Nana may
still be buying from people
along the road at Virgile. the
village where her compare lves.
The millet sacks must be care-
filly sewed ulp, the chickens
properly tied, or put into has.
kets. The clairin bottles are
counted, the eggs put in stiff
containers. As the trucks from


kets, and in them grew con- lieve. Fond-des-Negres, Aquin and
titiuously. By the time Nana Les Cayes come by, Nana enters
married, she was an expert mar. By now, the marketing pat- into discussion with the drivers
keter. tern is the main thread of ac- as to the transport costs for
tivity in Nana's life. It.is around her produce. These costs, though
The children --there are five the demands of her business t
of them, all now grown up that she shapes the things she
,hat ,.e ,hapes .. 't . ato an observer, are very impor-
and her domestic obligations does. Her schedule is as serious to an observer, are veryimpor-
tant in Nana's calculations. Af-
kept Nana from continuing to a that of any other business a
ter all, she cannot know at
market regularly during the person', and it requires great wt pre. s her produce will
first years of marriage. But as zest for commerce and coidc- h e hr rod
sell. She buys according to the
the children grew older, and' able acumen. It is not, as-so mr. ket icc in fo e
hen he was' le to leave the marketing intelligence inor-
when she was able to leave the! many observers. both Haitian tion brought to r
younger in the care of the older and foreign are ready to decide main brought to b
or with her sisters, she kept up without study, a something the friends when they return fron
hermarketiu sy s. the capital. But in several day,
her marketing activities. It was women do for entertainment. the capital. But in several day'
time or even in a few ho6rs
the main way in which, she Were one to accept this bland -re
Prices may plummet, and
could contribute financially to Iopinion, it would mean that the pries may pl et, and
the needs of her husband and guiding force which sends thou- potential profits can be wiped
S __.i ci i i r out. Not are transport co-ts the
family. She was only 35 years sands of w6men away from their out. Not are transport co he
old, her youngest child but two homes and families every week only ones to be figured in
There is the fee for storage and
when her husband died. Though for days at a time, to live and ere the ortageand
Nana arranged to keep her has- work under the worst possible porterage at the Port-au-Prince
band's land, and the land she physical conditions. is the love
inherited from her father, in ;of gossip. Indeed market wo-
cultivation, her main interest 'men often enjoy what they do,
was in expanding her marketing in the same way that anyone '
And nine years ago. she made who does his work well en joyv
a definite break with the older his mastery. The accompanying
pattern of marketing in and rewards, however pride in
around the markets near her' one w4rk, contact with the

to the capital. This represented sealing of personal relationships '
a really big change for Nana. are just that: accoupani-
It is one thing to vend a few ments. A


minor articles, worth very little
altogether, at a market two or
three hours' burro ride from


Nana's schedule makes this
clear. Every other Wedn, sday


home. It is quite another to morning, she sets out from her
board a truck with several hun- b',me on mule back to g, to]
dred gourdes worth of produce, the weekly market at I.'4,ile,
to enter into the competition qf which gets under way on Thlurs-
city marketing. Over the years, day. On Wednesday night and
however, Nana learned how to Thursday morning, she buys
build a clientele in the capital, chickens, eggs, peanuts, pump-
*nd how 'to find and secure re- kings, and a few other major
liable sources of supply in the .staples. By Thursday night she
countn'-s.de. is back home, and busily pre-
W-'en business went welL she paring her stock for th.e Friday
was able to use part of her pro- trip to the capital. All of her
fits for household needs, and wares must be transnorterl to
to eatisfy some of the admirable the main roid by mule and bur-
a-isirations of Haitian country ro. This is done at dawn on
folk. Friday, and the stock is assem-


(Continuedl


on page


that's why every

ROLLED shot

hits the mark




OF HRITI S.R.


. I A a, lF.% A


.:1


L-


----- --


i


SUNDAY, MA i ..-.jZ .








depot. There are thetit
na must pay; the coistwi -
licence to deal 'in a'.41
the cost of her own tia
her food costs; and al.
dangers of breakage,--. si
and theft.

Once the transport f
been settled, and the-.'
loaded on the truck, 1-na
take her seat. She trnaj
ries several ripe banana4'e
ral pieces of bread, water.i
a bottle of clairin. Thes
the daily plate of-yam eoI
let, or rice and beast 'Wll
she will buy hot in the' .st
while she is in the capital ,vi
keep her nourished till sh
turns home. Before' the.."
leaves, Nana settles othereiij
terms. She is to buy three$
galloi'tins'of lard for lierdAl
terms to resell at -Fo d
,NJgres; two bhoes of soapi7
a sister to resell at the ~
markets of Virgile- and
someone wants two -d &S
blue deninm cloth; there sit
verbal message to be'-rirmu
to a marketer from Saintb i
who will carry it backwitik
and so on. The trip to' PoIrei
Prince is a long one. .
-
though only 75 milesof -o
interverqe, it will be late Fi
night before the trum aia*.
The stay in Port-a-P _
demanding. -A market
from the country rMust
wits about her.- There ..'
*gistei (gangsters),
make the money telie j
country marketer.i


,







SUNDAY, MAY 3rd. 1959


HAITI SUN
THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
SEDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
OERANT-RESPONSABLE PAUL. E. NAJAC
ESTABLISHED IN 1950

TIMELY PLEA-
SPresident Dr. Francois DUV.ALIER, in his May Day speech coming on
S.the heels of the disastrous floods which took seven known lives last
Wednesday, made a timely plea for reforestation to prevent repetition of
Ssuch catastrophes. It is hoped that this plea will be translated into action
.. by the entire Haitian community.

S" NEED
SFOR AN AVAILABLE SPOKESMAN
One of the most difficult countries on the globe to cover
: news-wise, according to foreign correspondents, is Haiti.
-' The From sleeping soundly or even daring to go to- bed.
SVeteran newsmen must return to the leg-work of their youth
as the telephone is truly c.' Fragile and non-coo-
'K perative its only sound is a deep gargling noise like-a drown-
ing person, and would delight the Madison Avenue promoters
-'-of Listerine.
:, The million draw-backs are nothing compared to the pro-
i':bleme essentielb the finding of a quotable source on either
..side of the tracks.
.It should be pointed out here that a Spokesman is about the
--most important person orrhand as far as a Government or a
!." Nation is concerned. He must be ordained with certain, almost
Sacred, attributes or qualities: intelligent, honest, reliability,
Sobriety and know just what he is talking about. There are
several spokesmen for the Government, at present, who are
-very capable people but-are not officially assigned to the job,
nor are they easily reached to check news stories. Their talent
is wasted, insofar as newsmen are concerned.
SThis week newsmen from three of the world's largest news
agencies called on the recently named Information and Coor-
dination Minister Paul Blanchet and outlined their problems
- basically, a Government spokesman who could centralize
news and be vested with the authority to talk with corres-
pondents.
-.During the visit to Minister Blanchet, the newsmen pointed
out at the same time that they were all working against dead-
lines and that news is the fastest thing in the world to turn
stale. A speech handed out to reporters at the same time it
is delivered, or immediately afterwards, finds its way into
-:newspapers throughout the world. But issued a day late makes
it fit only for history books.

Argentine Foreign Minister Declares
America) To Organization American
States. Delegates


*The Battle of Argentina is
$he battle of America, Argen-
tina's Foreign Minister Doctor
Florit told delegates to the 2nd
Congress of the Committee of
the 21 American States, held in
Buenos Aires.
Dr. Florit declared that Ar-
gentina gives an exceptional im.
portance to this Congress be-
cause it has the conviction that
the hour of concrete realizations
has sounded for America. Re
said it was not by simple coin-
cidence tKat the meetings had
begun at Buenos Aires.
-This meeting, the first held
by an organism of die Organi-
zation of American States out-
side of 'the seat of hlle Pan Ame-
rican Union in Washington.,
he. aid, cis the expression of
a attitude which, for some time
has given a new and efficacious
impulsion to the policy of co-
operation between the countries
of tliis Continent.
This great effort of national
'' recuperation to which Argenti-
:'.JI subscribes, the Argentina
l :. iancelor said, is developed

A '

. ....


under the evident sign of its in.
ternational policy, adding that
his country is decided more
than ever to affilim its condi-
tion of an American country.-
-The Argentine Republic,.,
he continued during his address
shares in i.t fundamental pant.
the Ieconomico4ocial situation
of the Latin-American coun-
tries. Amnon4 these countries.
however. there exists differen-
ces of every sort. in the struc-
tural order and-in that of de-
velopmen.t: ut these differen-
CPs affect only the quantity and
do not prevent appreciation of
the Aimilitnude of the basic pro-
hlems.
Dr. Florit also said that Ar-
gentina' is giving special atten-
tion to the problems of techni-
oal cooperation: and that if
there is a task which must not
he postponed is that which con-
-issi of indicating in a precise
manner the assets of the Ame-
rican countries, that is to say
.that their natural resources
must be indicated with the pre-


(cHAITI SUNs


Port-au-Prince, April 28, 1953
Dear Mr. Diederilch:
We take this c.dasjiu ul
bring to your attention that
Lhe Associaiion known as ,'"-
mit6 de Secours du Service de

erion which modern technique
perelnits.


flAdf f- x


rznzm ii


lMeaecme de l'H6pital G6n6-
ai,, was formed here on Fe-
bruary 28th last.
The officers L-ected are as
follows: Dr. Marie-Therese C.
Dutlessy. President: Dr. Gil-
bert J. Elie, Secreltary: Sister
Rcse Elizabeth of the Congre-
gation of the gesses, Treasurer; Counsellors
nrcmclute:. es.:J'a,- Pierre Mer-
ceron, L6on Bor-les, Lovinski
;. t :icr. Noe Foucreand, rzantz
\I'.Jari, Roger Rousseau and
Claude Blanchard, Miss Pau-
l_ _ A r- A '-


Committee has benefitted from
numerous donations in money
as well as in other things and
thanks to the se prompt con-
Lr.lbutions, it was able to im-
prove in a notable way, the
condition of the patients of the
Medical Service. But it hopes
to do better and give this ser-
vice all the facilities and com-
modities which are the pride
of the larae hcsfital centers.
Also, presuming that a pu-
blic gathering would better
place emphasis on the inmpor-


He closed J'.i4 adl'resIy by. s)N- lerte Clauoe, messieurs noc tance o) its work, the Associa-
ing: -The great national effort Rayi-nond, Lucien Daumac, t.ion will give a supper at Hotel
on which our future will de- and Andr6 Georges. Beau Rivage on Saturday eve-
pend and the future of our chil- Ti'e C.-nimittce i: charge to ning, May 9th, from 7:00 to
dren iimui1 extend beyond our c:or hinale the efforts .f all 9:00 P. M. Hoping to have the
country and muit harmoniFe those who i.mbuel with their pleasure of your presence
with that of the Continent. The responsibilities in the Ha'tian which will manifest the inter-
-truggle of Argentina is today community, are disposed. ac- est you are taking in its initia-
the struggle of America,. cording to their possibilities, to tive. we remain.
The above report on Argen- collaborate for the advance-
tina's Foreign Mini-ter's speech ment of Haitian medicine and Sincerely yours,
at Buenos Aire was furnished the better condition of our
-by )te Embassy of A.renlina at needy patients. Dr. Marie-Therese C. Duplessy
Pdrt-au-Prince. From its ol-ganization, the For the Committee.


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Ask also for a demonstration of the Pick-Up and Trucks their saving of
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HRWA T SUNs


a5 f .


M ML .


is IRMO


Mile. Brisson had a narrow escape from her SS Volkswagon
as it steamed down towards the St. Louis de Turgeau ravine
with'the tidal wave Wednesday night... Freddy Martin has
uncovered his lost consul in a ravine . Commonwealth is
'mnoing its drilling derricks from Ganthier which yeilded no-
thing but dust to St. Michel in the North . .


Mr. Clement Barbot
Bedded By Maleria
Mr. Clement Barbot, Secre-
tary to Prresidert Dr. Franco's
Duva'ilr was confined to his
bed over the weekend with
an attack of Maleria.
Mr. Barbot is expected to
return to his duties by mid-
week. xxx
USAF MISSION CHEIF
HANDS OUT DIPLOMAS
Colon-l Oscar G. Johnson,
Mission Chief in Haiti, presen-
ted the graduates of the aviat-
ion inr-ehalni training course


George Kenn is attending the Asta meet in Nassau. The Ge- .itl.r their d s o. Wed
neral manager of Hotels Choucoune and Montana is expected wit- teir dip as on W -
neday morning. The Comman-
home this week . Gros Morne is anxiously awaiting the ding Offer of aiti's Aviation
second visit of Blanche Bzrzenski who is coming down from n O s
Manhattan with two friends for a two week sojourn . : Paul Corpy was pren student s re-
Verna was the first Post flood victim on the badly bent Tur- ceived their diplomas ater
geau road. He drove his hillman into a gaping flood crater ... cmetin their course on athe
Danny Malbranche family is scouting for a new home above T-6G planes mechanics, after
sea-level'and out of sight of ravines. Danny lost his car to which they were honed at a
the FF . The Publisher of the chain of Leader Papers isreception.
in town at the Ibo Lele . Luc B. Innocent has popped up Those who took and passed,
as guest at the Mexican Embassy . Swiss Millionaire Coffee- the test sudcessfully were:
man Walter Matter is in town at the Montana conferring with Ernst Tardieu, Almand Belle-
his people-- Reinbold and Co. largest exports of Black gold garden G6rard Jean-Louis, An-
Robert Baussan is off to New York Tuesday to see investors tonio Simeon, Wilfred Com-
about his *Caciques Island Beach Club project. The plans of pere, Jean-Murat Casseus,
Goat Island are now complete . Alan Benson is rumored Yvon Guillaume, Abner Geor-
.returging to reopen" his weekly tPort-au-Prince Times> ... ges and Gerard Auguste..
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E .,t:
_


OFF THE RECORD

We were sitting in a restau-
rant when a likeable non-com-
mission officer of the U. S. Ar-
med Forcel joined in the con-
versation.

It seems that he had just re-
turnea fhom Guantanamo and
the mentioned' it in passing.
But the pay-off was this one:
He asked some of the Cuban
laboring men where the re-
cruits that are training to in-


vade Haiti.
The seemed surprised". :',
word that they had was-' f
effect that 100.000 Hiti
armed with machettes,,.e.
training to cross the ca-.
and invade Cuba.

cActually they showed, 'b
siderable relief, the non -co
missioned officer said,
I told them that there was
hing to it that- no Hiai
were training any.-plae "oa i
vade anywhere." --


SUNDAY, MAY 3


I


pPANr


APIM1






U A. .:
;gSUNDAY, MAY 3rd. 1959


aHAITI SUN.


Do Your.



Shopping

in Haiti

It is getting so that people are
taking vacations as much to
shop as to play golf, lounge in
the sun or just relax. And, no
Wonder when you consider the
savings to be had through Free
Poet-S-hopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts finds they can
b.uy'the same gifts, in free-port
shops, at savings up to 60% of
U. S. prices. So, for the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
wonderful vacation in Haiti.
Perhaps the most famous free-
port shop in the world is La
Belle Creole. located in the
heart-of fascinating Port-au-
Prince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable wonderland
full of the world's most de-
sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
ches, Cashmeres, Handmade
bags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
meras, Liquours and a seem-
ingly endless array of native
handicraft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
sider that one can buy the
world's most famous Swiss
-watches Patek Plilippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
guet-at discounts of 50% of
the U. S. advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
Belle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be well worth your time to
consider a trip to Hatti.

Al Noustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Haiti's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhaps another reason for
the surge in popularity of
-free-port shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
licy of cooperating with tra-
vel agents in.' their various
promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tle of free champagne to any
visitor to Haiti who happens
to be celebrating a wedding
; anniversary or to be on a
honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
riversary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts to make
the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
mous brand merchandise.
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
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come home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
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1


PAGE


GUERLAIN, LANVDIN
CARON, CHAMNEr
EAPIAEL, PATOU,
BALMAIN,WORMN,
REVILLON, VIGNT,
CARVEN, LB GAZIMO,.
FABERGE OF PAMI3,
JEAN D'ALBERT,
JACQUES GRFFE
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SUNDAY, MAY 3rd.


aHAITI SUN,


PAGE 8.


STORMY CONGRESS DEBATE On REESTABLISHING

CONSTITUTIONAL GUARANTEES


The guarantees provided for
in articles' 68 and 70 of Haiti's
Constitution of 1957 are ex-
pected to be re-established
after alnost a year. Parliimen-
tary immunity also suspended
for members of the Legislative
Corps are expected to be reins-
tated.
The Constitutional guaran-
tees were suspended last May
following the Mahotieres Bomb
plot in which-Deputy Franck
J. Seraphin was implicated
and, disrobed of his parlia-
mentary immunity, stood trial
and was later convicted of
plotting against the State. His
Attorneys appealed the case.
He had served six days of his
five-year prison term when, in
January of this year, he bene-
fitted from Presidential am-
pesty measures and was gran-
ted full pardon.
At the opening of Congress
last month, the members of
-the Lower House refused to
resume contact with their for-
mer colleague until his appeal
to the Supreme Court has been
heard fnd a decision rendered,
which will determine his legal
stSus.
On Tuesday, with the Cabi-
net members attending the
session, Minister of the Inte-
rior Jean A. Magloire presen-
ted progressive a .proposed
Law to the Senate reestabli-
shing the guarantees saying :
min the favor of the normali-
zation of the iiiternal situation,
it 'is -proper in confomnity
with democratic normes to
reestablish the guarantees sti-
pulated in articles 68 and 740
of the Constitution.> The Mi-
nister asked tha the Law be
considered urgentt).
Article 68 provides: <'Mem-
bets of the Legislative Corps'
are inviolable and immovable
frem the day of their taking
the oath of office to the expi-
ration of their term.
Article 70 states: ,No mem-


ber of the Legislative Corps
may, during his term of office,
be pursued nor arrested in
criminal, correctional or sim-
ple police offesnes nor even
far political offense, unless it
is done with the authorization
of the Assembly, except in
cases of being caught in the
act in matters of breaking the
law. which is punished by aff-
lictive and infamous penal
ties*.
Following Minister Magloire
recommendation that the pro-
ject be given the benefit of ur-
gency and an immediate vote,
lively discussions and debates
got under way between the
Senators. Senator Jean Beli-
zaire, oldest in age, proposed
that the law submitted be stu-
died, and his suggestion was
supported by Senator Luc
Stephen.
Senator Victor Nevers Cons-
tant and Ulrick St Louis, how-
ever, criticized the idea, end.
a debate between Senator Be-
lizaire and other members of
the House followed.
At any rate the Assembly
votedurgency for the case and
the proposed law was turned
over to the House Committee
for Interior Affairs, for exami-
nation.
SDuring the stormy debates
between the members of the
Upper House, as to whether
the proposed law should be
sent before the special com-
mittee instead' et being given
an immedlaite vote, Senator
Belizaire declared it was ak-
ways prudent to examine a
proposed law before putting it
up for an immediate vote.
Senator Luc Stephen rose to
say that he shared the ',hesi-
tations of the Dean for liamentary immunities consti-
tute constitutional privileges*.
A chorus of protests arose
among the members and Se-
nator Victor Nevers Constant
shouted angrily: el want to be
rehabilitated with my rights...


and as quickly as possible!*
When Senator Stephen pro-
posed permanence> and esus-
pension, of the session his col-
leages, Senator St. Louis, raff-
led, informed: There is no
question of it!h
My constitutional privile-
ges,, stated Senator Stephen,
care intact. You say that yours
have been suspended&.
The President was forced to
keep his finger pressed for se-
veral minutes on the electric
bell button as the storm of
dialogue burst between Sena-
tor Stephen and his neighbors,
Senators St. Louis, Constant
and Yvan Moreau.
eThey are the privileges
which belong to rou>, Senator
Constant said furiously, aDo
not forget that you had voted
for the full powers.
you granted them, Senator
Stephen replied, smiling.
Senator Moreau made a
point here: Executive Power is returning
to us something which they
tore away from us. As a par-
liamenEary member, I have
never been robbed of my im-
,munities>.
Senator Belizaire said: should like to request the Mi-
nister of the Interior to esta-
blish the distinction between
<'privileges> and guaranteess.
He added that it was a ques-
tion of working for the future
as privileges are MlVr. Presidents, said Sena-
tor Constant, "We know very
well what happens to proposed
laws sent to the Commuissions
'Tor study. If urgency- is not
given on this subject we are
debating, we will be obliged
to wait several days before vo-
ting the law,.
-I shall vote against the ur-
gency>, Senator Stephen in-
sisted.
Senator Bow-jolly expressed
his opinion that the Senate
should send the law before the


competent Committee for stu-
dy.
Senators Constant and Ste-
phen both rose to take floor
but the latter obtained permis-
sion to speak.
The good faith of the mem-
bers of parliament was taken
by surprise at the time of the
suspension of constitutional
guarantees, for they could ne-
ver suspend my parliamentary
immunities. We don't intend
that such grotesque mistakes
be renewed. I vote here and
now against the cu.rgency*>
The Minister of Public
Heath.
Mr Ernust Elysee asked
permission to speak and lea-
ving the bench where members
of the Cabinet were seated
around a table, he crossed the
auditorum and mounted to the
tribune. Minister Elys6e refei-
red to a remark he had made
a few days before to Foreign
Minister Doctor Louis Mars.
himself and me, the dialogue
was possible, for our great-
great grandfathers had been
imported from Africa and shut
up in the cage of the slavers.
I see here men decided to
fight to efface, today, the
stigna of slavery. I see all
about me the revolutionary
flame of the congressmen de-
cided to remake 1946.
The dialogue goes on. We,
the young men of this Cabinet,
thank the redoubtable .tribu-
nes, but there must not be a
division iri the bosori of oui
faZly ._
Addressing hTs next words
to Senator Bonhomme, Minis-
ter Elysde continued: blical transplantation: let u:;
make sacrifices for celebrating
the return of the prodigal son.
I have remained faithful to
that heritage of never having
betrayed*.
eGentlemen, the' revolution
is going on*, he continue -
I

Cquarattoe


NEED ANY


perence to ardor, ,therwise
it means the failure of the r
evolution. If the elements of. h
elite do not understand it, d'
not group themselves together
then it means failure.
This is a discreet message
in the Executive is cai
ring upon each one of us W.-i
have come to present a prop',
sed law reestablishing oei.eti
constitutional guarantees. 'TheJ
hour has sounded for the EFjx
cutive to return to you ha
which had been take away.
You are free to accept its. .
Minister Elysee left the trfi'
bune after this speech and e
turned to his place. -
The President of the Ass b
bly placed the matter before
the House asking for a vote
Senator Stephen intervened
brusquely to say that the Be.
lizaire counter propostion
gets priority.
Someone affirmed first!> It cannot be denied..Pui
it to a vote!>
National Assembly Presiden
Senator Antoine Martholdias
ked that those accepting th
proposed law in its entirety
remain seated those, oppo
sed to stand up.
<, cried Senator .te4
phen joyously even before "he
vote had been taken. .i
is reigning here!> Senatol,
Constant snapped. '
When the majority carriedl
the motion'aocepting the prihl;
-iple of urgency, Senator Consl
tant said he only hoped- '
the study of the law by-th
Commission would not excee
cone months.
Belizaire. You well voted,..d
the law of May 2nd, (Tf
bell sounded, and. the session
was suspended.)







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PAGE 9


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It


1%








PAG 16sAT UsSNAMY3d


MORISSEAU-LEROY'S ANTIGONE

IN CREOLE SELL OUT IN PARIS


Three years ago The French New-York to evaluate the peo-
Institute of Haiti refused poet -ple's theatre.
F. Morisseau-Leroy permission He has built is own Greek-
to perform his Creole version type amphitheatre and started
of tAntigone at its audito- a movement called Theatre
rium. The Institute said that d'Haiti. He has given up a
as a French cultural mission, good job at Point IV. as well,
it could not lend' itself to the .s a newspaper job to dedicate
promotion of Creole. -J his time to literature. He
Next week Morisseau Le- has trained a group of peasant
roy's adaptation of the Greek players to do his Anatole*.
tragedy will be played onf a far The prologue to cAntigone.,
bigger stage and in France says: itself. The Haitian playwright been told a long, long time
has been invited to give his ago.
Anatigone at the Sarah Ber- ,We put in the sun of Haiti...
nhardt Theatre of the Nations ihe gods of the voodoo leli-
on May 11, 12, and 13. gion... the certain way Haitians
News from Paris says that have to understand life and
all three performances have al- death, courage and pain, foi-
ready been sold out and that tune and misfortune...
the run has been extended for Creon has become the chief
two more days, the 14 and 15. of rural police. He killed his
Port-au-Prince theatre-ga rs Antigone in a glass of water.
are familiar with the Moris- His son, who was in love with
seau-Leroy work. It was firsj the girl, died mysteriously.
performed here in August, The two lovers climbed into
1953, at, the Rex Theatre, the voodoo pantheon as t'.%o
where it was a big hit. rainbows.
MorisseauriLeroy, a Colum- But the great god Legba, the
bia University graduate, is de- goddess of love, Erzulie and
voted to..the promotion of the the voodoo priest Tirereias had
cre language. He has writ- warned Creon who did not
ten in and about it-and lectu- want to near advice. He lost
red about it throughout the the same day his niece, son and
world. He was invited to dis- wife because he refused :he
cuss Creole and modern drama proper burial to Polini6e, an
at Harvard while UNESCO enemy.
sent. him to Europe, africa and The Sqpnocles masterpiece


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inrpolitics as well as invery as-
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LIBERIAN AMBASSADOR
ENTERTAINS

Mr. and Mrs Claude Robin
son who returned on Surrday
from Kingston were dinner
guests, Tuesday evening, of
Liberian Ambassador and Mrs
John Francis Marshall at the
Embassy in Canape Vert.
xxx
DR ROGER VILL
SPEAKER AT ICC DINNER

The subject: uHaitian Medi
cine in a modern economic and
touristic perspective, was trea.
:ed with ,amaitrise, by Dr Ro-
ger Vill, guest speaker at thp
Wednesday night dinner of
the International Club of Com-
merce.
xxx
DOCTORS ORDER REST
FOR.-CLESCA
Young industrialist Philippe
C!esca has been ordered by his
doctors tc rest for several
months before resuming his
active occupation of making
metal furniture.
__ -


pensive homes built in the Re-
public todate, they consist of a
single room with veranda and
cooking facilities i the back
yard.
The new dome-shaped
church edifice also serves as
the school. A large cockfight
arena has central position per-
mitting the farmers to enjoy
their favorite sport.


The Port-au-Prince Fire Bi
gade destroyed the old .
Man's Land, village which w".
an eye-sore in view of the Do
minican frontier.
Construction of the new-:
:age at Fonds Parisien
early in December, prior to:i
Duvaller-Trujillo border tei
ting at nearby Malpisse.


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overnment-built entire new Gardens and livestock fu:
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PAGE 11






JAY, MAY 3.1


NEWS AS IT HAPPENS Arriving This
.. weekend On
S((CRISTOBAL))
by Aubelin JOLICCEUR The SS CRSTABAL of
"- the Panama steamship Line
Sgromineiat Amerilcan journalist, who quickly took to Hai- will arrive from New York at
tways, is Cyrily Abels, managing editor of Mademoiselle 7:00 A. M., May 2nd, 1959. on
ne who-shunned private transportation to take the cCa- board are a total of 73 passen.
Y ai-oai a trip from Port-au-Prince to Cap Haitiqn last Friday. gers of which the following 32
tir, Abels, along with her husband, New-York attorney Je- will disembark at Port au Prin
efi e Weinstein, is on her first visit to this country. They spent ce:
t p ays at the Oloffson and two days a tthe Montana last Mr Antoine Batrony
Before taking off, Haitian-style, for the Cap. Mr and Mrs John Booth
:l -i.awrence Harmnond of Cincinnati, Ohio, arrived Wednesday Mr Lindsay Bradford
'ig a contract with the government regarding the building Mr Daniel Brun
-f a new telephone system. With him are two communications Mrs Gathine Calixte
.e!~jles, Jacob H. Knol and Edward H. Davernman, both of AGY/Sgt. and Mrs Robert
..Grand Rapids, Mich. C. Davis and 2 children 6/3
Yrs. (USMC)
;.Fouteen Capitals Airlines sales agents arrived Thursday Mr and Mrs Gunther A. Dzi
-:.fora one-day stay as part of their educational tour of the Ca- allas and daughter 2 Yrs.
lxiibean area. They were whisked into the mountains for a brief Mr and Mrs Joseph Elder.
eni tour, kuohed, at the' Montana, did the sho. in the af- Miss Lillian Gamsey.
-ternwoa, anl dined and danced at the Choucoune.in the eve-, Miss Dora Gamsey
'. ing. Nicest cormpliment came from beauteous Pat Jckson, of Mr and Mrs Herbert Hart-
";.BWfalo, N. Y.; who sa;d: -'.ias ajoie e vivre whichh sets it apart from most other coun- Mrs Georgette Mathon
.es. Capt and Mrs Will A. Mer.
rill and 2 children 2/1 Yrs. (U
In;' .addition to Miss Jackson ,the other members of the party and 2 children 2/1 Yrs. (U
cbiuded: Jean Cavalluch, Lois Giffen, Nellie Palawski, MiMred SMC)
Miss Marie Michel
Sjones,Maureen Nolan, Betty Liszewski, Donna Dixon, Harper M icl
Mr Eugel Nicoleau
?iTullard, Robert Filmore, George CGrdes, Jack Burge, Edward r Constant Poitevien
Jemi.s, and George Cammann. Cammann headed the tour. Mr Merceide Pierre Louis
1e capital personnel came from four states Michigan, Ohio, Mr Maurice A. Sixto
'.peiinsivania, New-YoLk and from the nation's capital, Wa- Capt. and Mrs Frank K. Jr.
s ti, D. C. and daughter 5 Yrs. (USMC).


.i; y.Car1son, Point IV traffic expert, has embarked on a pro-
,o.miake six 12-minute motionpiiotures for the poilce traffic
paftiment. 'The subjects aie: (1) Parking, (2) Signs and Si-
n.l, (3) Proiper turns at intersections (4) Proper lane travel
'5) Pedestrian traffic (6) Rules and regulations.



AWAY OR AT HOM]






American Expres:
'PEION*LL Hoes M). ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^k' *
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U. S. NAVY UNIT
IN PORT
The Office of the Arm
tache, American Em


Port au Prince, Haiti an-
nounces the arrival anticipate.
ed of the USS Kiowa (ATF-
72, U. S. Navy Fleet Ocean
Tug) to Port-au-Prince during
the period 2-3 May 1959.
The USS Kiowa is expect-


ed to arriv eat 800 hours on
May 1959 and will depart at
1700 hours on 3 May 1959.
There will be 5 officers and
65 enlisted men on board the
ship which is commanded by
Lieutenant J. E. Guion.


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visit Haiti's Smartest Indian store
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DAY, MAY 3rd. 1959


PAGE 11


E








PAGE 12 HAITI SUNs ~UNDAY, MAY


DOCTOR AND 3 NURSES
INJURED IN ACCIDENT ON
WAY TO AID FLASH
FLOOD VICTIMS
Doctor Jean Max Beauge,
young General Hospital Interne,
and .three nurses, Miss Desroses,
Mrs. Valin and is. Detouches
received first aid treatment and
were allowed to'go to their ho-
mes Satunlday after the car in
which they were riding struck
the eide of the road, pivoted
against the border of the side-
walk.


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BUSINESS LUNCH
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TUESDAY:
732 POOLSIDE BAR-B-R
FRIDAY:
7 SEA FOOD DINNER

See C.. d la FUENTE
For Reservation


The violence of the shock
caused numerous contusions and
face injuries to the victims, and
they were taken to the hospital
for treatment.
Thie accident occurred at the
corner of Rue Mgr. Guilloux
and Rue Joseph Janvier when
the right rear tire burst,
The Interne who is the Scout
Chief, had driven several squads
of Guides and Scouts to the sec-
tions affected by Wednesday
night's flash flood that struck
the city. Accompanied by the
murse he was returning to the
General Hospital when the ac-
cident occurred.
The victims are recovering sa-
tisfactorily at their respective
homes.
Wall Street Group
Looking Over Invest-
Possibilities Here
Milton Smith, and' Jack Lein
reported to be Wall-Street ca-
pitalists visited Port-au-Prince
late last month to check the
situation.
Queenland. Morales and Mar-
vin Rubin also arrived here in
connection with their needle
industry.
James E. Burhoe, an atto.-
ney, representing his clients of
a large U. S. gambling syndi-
cate, also spent several days
here on a preliminary survey
in view of extending their ac-
tivities to Haiti.


Mr. Burhoe's group which
includes E. Rickenbacker ard
Howard Hughes besides gam-
bling interests, have interests
in several airline companies,
and could easily include Haiti
in their national advertising
campaigns for the airline; so
that hotels would have the
chance of doing a year-round
business. He said that he had
talked with, an' investor .]iho
plans to build an artificial
beach in Haiti which would be
an added' attraction for tou-
rists. He said that .he intended


to make a favorable report on
his findings to his clients back
home.

Doyen's Fete

The Doyen of the Haitian
Press, .:Le Nouvelliste.,. obser-
ved its 63-:d! Anrnversar'.' on
May Ist, and received appro-
priate congratulations from its
hundreds of friends and subs-
cribers, from the Chief of State"
on down.
eLe Nonvelliste, \vas foun-
ded by the Chauvet family
and has held an eminent place
in the local press since its or-
ganization.
Headed today by Max
Chauvet, the evening daily is
reputed to have one of the
best equipped staff of .repor-
ters in the country. Lucien.
Montas is its Editor-in-Chief.


o


EXPOSITION OF PAINTING
AND SCULPTURE
TO STAY OPEN UNTIL MAY 10 th-;

The Commissariat National which 88 painters and 39 scilp-;
)f Tourism announces that the tors competed fdr honors. -':
losing (date for the exposition .
)f the works of art presented Members of the teachiu"M


during the Contest of Paintings
and Sculptute has been post-
poned to Sunday, May 10th.
This decision was reached af-
ter the Commissariat found
that the interest and enthus-
iasm created warranted the
prolonging of the exposition in


Brasserie Vios Here
For Deep Freezer
Opening
(continued from page 1)
Deep Freeze installation.
Mrs 'Stewart, Ithe former
Betty Wanzer, daughter of
the founder of the company,
accompanied her husband on
.the trip here, her first to
-Haiti in six years. Their par-
ty included Commodore and
Mrs Jack White, of the Wash-
ington, N, Y. Yacht Club, and
Mrs Wally Comb.
Mr Stewart said the new
freezer is intended for public
use on a monthly basis by
merchants .who formerly had
been discouraged in bringing
in frozen foods because of


no adequate facilities for pre
serving them.


cors, the university studeKti
schoolchildren and the pubIi.
in general is urged to visit th.i
exposition at the Fren-chi' is'
titute, opened ever ay day
8:00 A. M. to. Noon, and in &:i
afternoon from 2:00 to 6:0t
P. M. -

The new installation,
said; was capable of taln:
3,000 pounds of frozen oo
Rental space will be made .oni
a per pound per month basic
to encourage local dealers
The Deep Freee~s first cus.
tomer was Fritz Mevs, maho
gany dealer and Touri
Board Council member.;: M
Mevs this week stored 106
pounds of turkey at the Bras
series storage rooms. '
The Stewarts and their pat
ty stopped at Hotel El R..h
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PAGE 12


SUNDAY, MAY


((HAITI SUN))


* %enek


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,MA d


NA




-t pockets magically. There
sn-"eak thieves. One must
i7ake. oare with ore's shoes,
i.ice is forbidden to walk
iathe city without them. I hel
Sof each item must be
-firmly in mind, and im-
Sdecisions uwether to
jiat one price or holl out
tiiigher, whether to sell off
i taalbre produce, whether to
'Sp one kind of resalable
Item- or another have to be
Amde. And often they must be
p!n~- decisions, even though
4 li hard anticipatory thought
Gone into them.
T .he depot seems warm and
ty after the trip. Nana wat
-ihee her produce unloaded and
i o.ked, then settles down Ib
cfatr within her friends. Some of
the other women are fipm her
iown neighborhood, and mols of
ithE are from the south, since
L-'the dieots incline to he nsou-
ithern' or 'northern. iin heir
..patrnage. Prices may be dis-
n"euaed, but not at length; thli.
ijreal price situation will not he-
e clear until morning. All
Saturday and Sunday, buy-
qand selling goes on. The
A-e perishable and fragile
'Ritems eggs, chickens, bladtr
r a 'MuBnirooms, pumpkins, etc. -
S'"arme csu.',lv y-old off rapidly,
r*.,sae even being bought up on
(.'_X4Aday night. But the bulk
'..iens such as millet, rice, corn
t:mnd cornmeal, and dried leg."
-bi1n sell throughout Saturday
-'iad Sanday. On Monday mor-
n5: ing, Nana must make her pur-
clasg for 'the return trip, in
-'time for ti.e departure of the
truck whici- will carry her
Some. She- may have decided
4 t to sell some part of her
Stock at the prevailing price,
..: preferring to pay storage and
Sawait any possible rise in price
:b during- the week. In this case.
'-- she will arrange with friend.
:.- 'ho will be in the depot during
;te week to ell off for her
ithould prices reach a certain
i: oint. This can't be done with
|'-rapidly perishable items, of
-'. omxue only with staples
f-which wil not spoil quickly.
"- Nana enjoys the advantage of
leaving more capital than many
eitherr market women. She can
-'libold back on liquidating her
c for a week or so. since
l'the has enough capital to allow
erto buy other goods while
t e waits. Women with' less ca-
i itA of course, are compelled
sell off before returning
SAt the same time, their
... ag off keeps the prices for
items down, which is of
to the consumer.

: It in late in the evening when
truck reaches Fond-des-
-- r Nana must have some


LNA OF DUVERGET

(Continued from page 4)

the market place, the rest at, mics those theoretical gene.
her compere's house. When the ralizations which fill textbooks.
unloadiIg and checking is done, Most educatedv people, if they
she may return to the Fond- know these laws at all. know


-- I -


Itt of her cook unloaded at I grasp ot me laws. oU Lcol


I.


des-Negres market to spend the
night there, particularly if she
plans to do any selling on Tues-
'Jay. That is the big market day
at Fond-des-Ni'res. and thou-
sands of country people will be
in thq market Nana may even
condescend to do some retail
selling, if prices for some pro-
ducts are high: but thi is the
work of tKe revendeuse, and
Nana prefers to wholesale.
If Nana stay in the Fond-
atns--Mgres market,- she does
not reach her house until Tues-
day evening. There is lots to do.
She has been away from home
mor four days. and her depar-
ture is always hurried. She must
check with the neighbor who
iarmui for her on shares, \isit
ner mother, see that her live-
stock has been well cared for.
But for the next few day- at
least, there is no hurry. Neigh-
bors come by to learn how
things were going in the capi-
tal, to pick up price informa-
tion, and to chat about the
weather, the crops. and neigh.
borhood affairs. Nana can en-
joy a night's sleep in her bed,
after four nights spent on bur-
lap hags spread on the ground.
She will he able to cook millet
in her own kitchen. eat off of
her own dishes. Her neighbor-
hood and neighbors are fami-
liar and reassuring, while the
city itself is really foreign and
intimidating. Each trip for Na-
na is in fact an adventure, some
times zestful, but always had
out of pressing need.
Every profession, require-
certain skills, that of the mar-
chande included. When one
spends time with Nana and
helr friends, those skills soon
-become apparent. They range
all the way from being able to
take catnaps with the ground
for a bed and a sack of millet
for a pillow, to making snapl
judgments on the probable sell
ing price of a half a dozen
clickens of various sizes, ages.
and degrees of fatness. Nana's
control of the knowledge on
which her success in business
depends is formidable. One can
fire questions at her for hours
,- ow many ti-glos in a gal-
lon?, VWhat was the price
of machine-husked millet in
Port-au-Prince last Saturday?,
Are shaddock from the
north wholesaled by the sack or
by the lot?. What is the
transport fee per gallon of clai-
rin carried from Port-au-Prince
Fond-de-Nes res? and her
answers are swift and accurate.
But more impressive yet is her


them by rote. But for Nana the
laws are the tools of her trade.
She learned them. in no book,
and she cannot abstract them
from her daily marketing expe-
riences. Yet she knows they
mean far more. intimately than
any undergraduate economics
major. Wlen she was .asked
what she would do if she and
,several friends were selling red
peas at 3.50 goundes the gros
marmite and a new marketer
appeared who was willing to sel"
at 3.00 gourdes, she cocked her
head and chuckled. 'How much
does she have?. she asked, smil
ing. 'For if she has only a little
bit, we can let her sell out -
but if she has a great deal we
may try to buy herout. There
was no need to say more. Na-
',a's answer says a textbook full,
and tells the unimaginative ~b-
server what he should look in-
to next.
But not eveu experience, in-
teligence and courage a re
enough sometimes. When mo-
ney is scarce in Port-au-Prince,
and the supply of Ilocal foods
piles up, no amount of commer-
cial skill can change the situa-
tion. The taxes marchandes
must pay are not scaled to the
general economic situation, and
take as heavy a bite in bad
times as in good. And there are
catastrophes, too gluts in the
market,, spoiled produce, and
worse. In 1957, while Nana was
sleeping in a Port-au-Prince de
pot, she was robbed of the (for
her) incredible sium of 990.00
gourdes. The enormity of thi-
loss literally made her ill and
nearly destroyed her. But, as
she says, there was nothing to
be done. Several week' later
she went back to work, build-
ing up her business again.

This, then, is the marehande,
the wily middleman, th, MIa-
dame Sarah who cheats the con-
sumer and robs the peasant.
Though Nana is no more typi-
cal of Haitian marchandes than
a single Haitian lawyer or doc-
tor is typical of the Haitian
legal or medical professions.
she is one of thousands of wo-
men who pursue the same pro-
fession. Since they carry on
their work in order: to make
thFir living., it is easy to for-
get the contribution they make
to Haiti. Their activity pays for
the trucks and buses which tra.
verse the country, and for the
chauffeurs who drive them. E.
very year 'thousands of bottles.
cans, and burlap bhags whicl
might otherwise lost to the
Country are put to use by the
marchandes. Baskets and chic


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ken cages are made by the hun-
dreds and sold to the marchan-
des -to carry their wares. And
the takes paid by these women
are an important part of natio-
nal revenues. The marchande's
capital which she calls -ma-
mi laiji., mother money, -
works all of the time, and works
for Haiti at the same time that
it works for her. It is often said
that the marchandes exploit the
peasant by compelling him to
sell his produce for too little,
then cleat the consumer by
compelling him to pay too
much. This belief is certainly
erroneous in all. or nearly all,
eases. There are so many mar-
chtandes seeking to buy produce
for resale that the peasant can
readily look about for the
)Uycr who will offer the best
price. It is exactly because
there are so many marchandes
that no single such woman can
'squeezes the peasant. And the
same fact protects the consu-
mer. For the marchande to ex-
poit either peasant or city
buyer, she would hava to be
abe to monopolize the situa-
tion. In fact, the great number
of marcKandes is the best gua-
rantee that unfair advantage
cannot be taken of producer- or
consluner by the middleman.
Of course, if an American house
wife in the capital feels that
she simply must have lettuce
one fine day, the marchande
can hardly be blamed for charg-
ing whatever the market will
hear.
Only a little of Nana's story
and of tl; story of Haiti's
markets can be told here.
But perhaps it will suggest the
great complexity which is con-
cealed from view by matter of
factness and by an uncritical
admiration of North American
standards the workings of
thousands of alert minds and
the intense physical efforts of
thousands of human beings,
which help to keep the people
of Haiti supplied with what
they need to live.


About Sidney
W. Mintz
This article was written for the
Haiti Sun by Sidney W. Mintz, the
Creole-speaking Professor of Yale
University who'is studying mar-
kets in Haiti.
An Anthropologist of note, the
Fcl.yglotter Professor conquered


Creole in two months and has been
accepted by the Marchandes, of
.Fonds des Negres. as .un bon
Blanc.. His Academic Background
..,>ers a JPh.D. (anthropology) in
1951 from Columbia University, and
a B. A. (Psychology) from Broo-
klyn College in 1943.
Assistant Professor of 'the Depart-
ment of Anthropology at Yale Uni-
versity, Sidney Mintz has taught at
Wesleyan University, Columbia
University and City College of New
York, in Anthropology and Socio-
logy.
He has done Field Research in
Jamaica, 'Puerto Rico .'-d til ;...
was Research Assistant \..ita the
Columbia ,University Research Pro-
ject on Contemporary Cultyres.
Minta, career includes professional
activities with the American Ethn- "
logical Society as Councillor, Con-
sultant on Caribbean Research at
the University of Puerto Rico.
He is to be Guest co-editor, for the
volume on Caribbean family struc-
tures to be published by the
Institute of Social and Economic
Research of the University College
of the West Indies.
Among the other publications pu-
blished with his aid were .Hand-'
book of Latin American Stndies..
while he was Contributing "Editor
on West Indies Ethnology, and
.American Anthropologist., a spe-
cial Latin America issue.
Mr Mintz has studio under three
Fellowships since 1948, including
theSocial Science Research Coiicil-
Faculty Research Fellow ship, which
extends from 1958 to 1960, and a
Guggenheim Fellowship for 1959-
60. From 1948 to 1949 he was a Re-
search Fellow, Columbia Univer-
sity University of Puerto Rico.
He has taught undergraduate
courses in Introductory Anthro>
logy, Introductory Sociology, Hu-
man Culture and Behavior. Cultu-
ral EvolutIon and Ethnology.
His graduate courses included
Middle American Ethnology, Pen-
pies and Cultures of Latin Ameri-
ca, Caribbean Culture, the NeP.m-
in the New World, Cultural Approa-
ches to the Modern Communit.
Peasant and Plantation Societies
Primitive Economics.
From 1950 to 1958, Mr. Mintz saw
40 of his articles published in, va-.
rious publications in the U. S., Cu-
ba and other Latin -and South Ame-
rican journals and revues, in En-
-glish, and spanish.
His manuscripts have been com-
pleted for seven studies on West
Indian Ethnology, which- include
the history ofl Jamalan in.
marketing, life history of a Puerto
Rican Sugar-cane worker and mar-
keting structure in Haiti.
Already on the press for 1959 are,'
also seven papers on ethnological
studies in the Americas.
.Professor Mintz; born in Dover,
New Jersey and now 36 years old,
is married and the father of two
children. He served with the U. S.
Army Air Forces during World
War H.


6AY, MAY 3rd. 1959


fL-AITI SUNu


PAGE 13




.. ..-..:
= ;~.-


cHAITI SUN,


SUNDAY, MAY 3rd.


HATTIE LEHRMA1
HOUSE

Hattie Lehrman, self-taught
artist from Miami, Florida will
spepd a year in Haiti, she de-
aided this week as she moved
into the Petion Savaip house in
Martissant and settle down to
work, after stopping at the
Beau Rivage Hotel.
Hattie is a ~pleasant person
who over the past several
weeks has made friends with
everyone she has met from the
KenCeoff hills down to Carre-
four. She has a ready smile and
hail fellow well met simplicity
that 'takes you in and make-;
you glad slie came.
She is die former wife of Pro-
fessor Alexander Lehrman and
is the sister of Gertrude Green
the well-known abstract artist
whose works were recently ex-
.hibited at the Whitney Mu-
.,eum and the Bertha Schafer
Gallery in the U. S. Her bro-
ther in law, Balcomb Green is
laa top notch abstract painter
whio has exhibited in the Mu-
seum of Modern Art, the Whit-
-'iey Museum, the Bertha Sha-
fer Gallery as well as the Tate
Gallery of London..
In a courtesy call at ilth
,Si~n. on 1Monday, Hattie de-
4ared that even the language
harder she had expected to
humbug 'he'rvisit had proved
to be no problem.
.1 ,s


q, ARTIST, TAKES
HERE

.dI wish to thank these won-
derful people of Haiti for
their courtesy and good will*,
she said. ciate the may kindnesses
shown m'e even by total stran
gers. Almost everyone has of-
fered to translate my needs-
in the. post office, in the mar-
ket-place, and even on the
mountain road of Kenscoff.>>
She said that she has tra-
velled half-way around the
world, and lived in many
strange lands. < is the most hospitable of
them all. I feel I would wish
to live here in Haiti for a
long, times,.
Hattie likes the simplicity
of the people a] well as their
strong pride and dignity in
their dealings with visitors to
Haiti.
She spends hours reading
Haitian history and visiting
the art galleries and exhibi-
tions of the works of local
painters and sculptors, and
says there is -a mine of talent
here. She also enjoys just walk
ing about admiring the origi-
nality of some of the old build
ings in the residential and
downtown sections of the Ca-
pital..
< year here>, she said, that is niot nearly enough time
to learn all the things I should.


New Study by -
Suzanne Comhaire-
Sylvain Published In
University College
West Indies Review
A study on riage and Plasaj at Kenscoff
Haiti>), by Suzanne Comhaire
Sylvain appears in Social and
Economic Studies, 'quarterly
review of the Institute of So-
cial and Economic Research
of the University College of
the West Indies, Jamaica, De-
cember 1958. Madame Comhai
reSylvain Haitian wife of Bel-
oian Anthropologist and Socio
loeist, Dr Jean Comhaire, visit,
ed Kenscoff in the summer of
1937 with her husband. From
1937 to 1939 while living at
Port au Prince, they spent
their weekends and vacations
at Kenscoff, and from July
1956 until October 1957. they
made a field study of Kens..
coff, living there among the
peasants.

and to absorb some of the coun
try's cultural background.
Her dhufhter who also
naints. is married to Harold
Rubens, concert Dianist who
has Wlaved as soloist with the
London Philharmonic Orches-
tra: The conule are Dre-sntlv
in Cane .Town, South Africa
where Mr Rubens is a Profes-
ior of Music.


Chamber Of Icatrel and V i c e-re: deid
Commerce Bulletin Erich Bondel to the Ministj
Appeared In Press of Finances entitled Let is Ln
This Week courage Production by Protect
The <(Bulletin d'Informa- ing the Leasing of Land)..:.
tion> published by Haiti's Mr Antoine Bervin, SecrtI
Chamber of Commerce came ry at the Chamber oftar
off the press here this week. ce, is Editor of the BulletWbi
The Bulletin appears on 16 -
pages and is well presented, FRENCH AMBASSADORf
containing interesting articles IN DR. VISITING..
on the National Bank, the Co. New Ambassador of Fray
lombo-Haitian Bank and Tech ce in the Dominican Rephbl'i
nical and Commercial Informa M. Roger Manouya is here t
tion. see all the island, accompa
The Bulletin reproduced a ed by his wife. They en
letter signed by Chamber of their week here at the Mo.
Cominerce-President Louis De tana today. .


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PAGE 14


-~.i
--e


.9 i .m omomm







SUNDAY, MAY 3rd. 1959


~~a~rn suU~ PAC'


A boy was born to Mita
Vince in Philadelphia" last
*Tuejsday. Grandpapa Peorge
Naude Belgium Consul in
Port flew to greet his daught-
er's second child Wednesday.
xx-'.
Mr and Mrs Fritz Pierre-
Louis are the proud parents
of a new son, Patrick, born,
on April 28th at the Dr De-
brosse Clinic. Mrs Pierre--
Lquis, the former Jacqueline
.Mathurin-, and her poupon, are reported in fine
form.

Jacques Delmotte of the
French Pharmacuitical firm
left town Wednesday after
business-cum.pleasure trip to
Port. He lodged at the Monta
na.
-0-
Jean Desquiron flew to
New Orleans for four-day bit
siness visit with his chickepr
feed suppliers.
o--
Mrs Frantz Brandt flew to
States Wednesday to place
junior in school in Canada.
-_o _
Atherton Lee returns from
-a short business trip to the
States today. Flower Farmer
lee will be carrying home In.
ternational F 1 o we r-trophy
which his Chatelets des Fleurs
was awarded this year in
New York.
-o-
Saturday Armand Klang re-
tiLi-nell from Paris were he at-
tended elections of Deputie-.
xxx
Gi-ele Gonzalez and Kesnel
Hall were married Saturday
Saturday night in strict intimi-
ty at the Gonzale home in Pr-
tionville and arc, now honey-
mooning in Kenscoff. They plan
to take a week visit to Jamaica
before .settling down to mar-
ried life. ". IW


Mi and Mrs Roger Mallebran-
:he are celebrating the birth
on April 27th of their third
'-ughter, Gina.
xx
Mrs. Annie Holly Cadet re-
turned to the U. S. last Sun-
day. A resident for many years
there, she had rushed to the
be. side of her dying mother.
xxx
A garden party is being or-
ganized by the Association of
former puLpils of the Ste. Rose
de Lima establishment on
turday, May 9the_from 5:30 to-
7:30 P. M. It will take place aw
the school on Lalue.
xxx
On a surprise visit to the
dispensary hospital of Croix
des Bouquets, last Saturday
morning, Dr. Roger Rousseau,
Director General of Public
Health found it empty not
a single employee could be
found on the job. It is repc.
ted tha the active public health
-official intends to rake an
example of this fcase-strong
measures can be expected.

DANIEL APOLLON
(Continued from page 1)

Daniel who was arrested
recently and interrogated, re
fused to discuss the incident
of the arrest over his beard.
He termed the incident id> and said only that he was
humiliated for himself and
for his country.,
Released from 24 hours de
tdntion at Fort Dimanche,
Apollon whose beard was
singed removed it and is now
appearing clean-shav.e He is
recovering arid a spokesman
for the Government deplored
the incident, stating measur-
es were being taken so that
such an incident would not
be repeated.


New Venezuelan
Ambassador
Presents Letters Of,
Credence


EMBASSY TO BE
FULL-STAFFED
Mr Vicente Gerbasi, the
new Venezuelan Ambassador
to Port-au.Prince presented
his Letters of Credence to
President Doctor Francois
Duvalier this past week. The
ceremony took place Satur-
day morning in the Yellow
Room of the National Palace
at 10:00 A. M.
Accompanied to the Palace
by two officials of the Depart
ment of Foreign Affairs, with
a-motorcyle escort of the Ar-
my, Ambassador Gerbasi was
given Military Honors by a
bataillion of the Armed Forc-
es of Haiti upon his arrival.
He was received by the Pre-
sident and members of his
Ministerial 'Cabinet, the Ar.-
my Chief of Staf and the
Chiefs of the Grand Corps of
the State.
Following the. ceremony at
the Palace, the Venezuelan
Ambassador. accompanied by
a member of the Protocol
Service, went to place a
wreath at the Mausol6e de
Dessalines et de P6tion.
The Embassy of Venezuela
which was left almost unstaf-
fed will now be built up, the
Ambassador stated.
The Embassy Secretary
Senor Russian arrived with
his wife and two daughters
on Saturday.

Miss Madeleine Moreau and
Emile Marcelin were married
on April 21st at figlise St.
Gerard. Mrs. Marc Gouny, sis-
ter of the bride was Matron-of-
Honor, and Mr. Joseph Gui-
chard, Best Man.


Eddie Khouri, Jr noon, and later when the fat,
Turns 2 hers of the small fry showed
By OUR RUE FAUBERT up for eats and drinks stay.
By Our Rue Faubert ing on late into the evening
Correspondent carter the kiddies had been
Fifty tiny tots flowed over packed off with their nurses
the lawn a tthe Edmond to be taken home to bed.
Khouri vill-a in Petion-Ville,. When guests learned that
Sunday afternoon, to celebra- is was also the 17th birthday
te Eddie, Junior's second of Eddie's cousin Jimmy
birthday. Khawly, son of Mr and Mrs
The -Kiddies were filmed Jacques Khawly, the honors
doing their caperings and of the day were shared by the
gave their mothers who hao two in a double celebration
accompanied them a tough when Jimmy's own giant
time when the shower of rain birthday cake was brought
drove everybody indoors. Nu down, and he was given the
merous friends of the family were on hand to join in the
fiesta. -The Montmarte Night Club
Eddie puffed out his two was the gay scene of a fete or-
candles midst clapping and ganized, Saturday night, by a
cute tricks executed by the group of young people where
youngsters to the tune of
Y t appeared that the entire
'' jeunesse>. of Port-au-Prince
and held tightly to the knife part icip
when cutting into the huge participate
birthday cake made by his
grandmother, Mrs Richards. Jennifer Dupont at Dorset,
Eddie was then toasted in England is the house guest of
champagne. Argentina Chai'g -d'Affaires
The elongated buffet table, and Mrs. Frederico Massot in
decorated with flowers and Morne Hercule. The young En-
goodies, of every color in the I .!ishwoman ;s a world travel-
rainbow, stood the assault of ler with an appreciation of
the guests through the after- water sports.
-- -


0-

Miss Gerda Dartiguenave IMELESKY AND BUSMAN. Familiar sigiht ao;uid ti;le tLhy i this
and Kenol Jackson are to be retic f'old pre-auto Port-au-Prince.
n The licensed buggy escapes the 3-monthly vehicle inspection b to be
married here onl May 17th at awarded the .Sun. prize for noiseless driving Thle remaining ..buss-man.
Eglise St. Pierre -in Petion- as he is called, locally has a steady, daily customer L)ttery Agent
Ville. Melesky.


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Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD
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l nA


Amsss


-HAITI SUN,


PArGE 15







PAGE 16 ~HA1TI lUND SUNDAY, MAY 3rd.


MI
held
the
the


New Municipal Commission For
Capital
ayor Antoine'Herard was ocLors Carlo Mevs and I.
at his.post this week when vain who served on the
Mumicipal Commission of Commission with Mayor
City of Port-au-Prince was rard the past year. Member


renewed. His two assistants
are Dr. Frank Basile and Miss
Marie Lacombe, members of
the Commission. They replace


Syl-
City
He-
rs of


the Commission took the oath
of Office at the Civil Tribunal
on Tuesday morning before
the Dean Boisvert.


BIG SHOW TONIHT AND

ALL WEEK

AT

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WITH


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THE TALENTED ARTIST

MADELEINE MARCEL DUROSIER
AIWD THE
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ANGUSTE DUROSIER'
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GERARD CHAMBER
THE HUMAN FLUTE AND.
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Free Admission During Week
Saturday and Sundav Adminaion $1.00
I,-- --- -- ____________________

THE WORLD


FAMOUS


WORSE FLASH FLOOD

CAUSES LOSS OF


(Continued from page 1) .

the mountains served as the
principal cause of the disaster.

Tons-of silt, up-rooted trees,
over-turned, automobiles and
skeleton homes traced the pas-
sage of the flood waters, Thurs-
day. Areas bordering the Bois-
.e-Chene (ravine crossing area
from peaks of Morne La Selle)
ind the Ravine Pintade, suf-
ered the most damage..

The Greyhound Dog-Track,
,n the Chaimp-de-Mars ofifcial-
.y opened last Friday night, its
inauguration flags still flutte-
ring, was wrecked by the wa-
iers and Manager E.. Royce
-'erry, of the Haitian Dog-Ra-
aing Association, listed eleven
-f his greyhounds as missing.
The track, the dozen electric
',g-ht posts and the cable casing
for the electric rabbit were
entirely destroyed.

The Watchman, G6rard when
the waters burst into the dog
park and started its destruc-
tion, bravely tried to herded
.is flock of 89 up 'the steps to
the terrace and press bo over
he office building. Several of
hem stampeded and were car-
-ied away in the rush of the
-vater. Many were wounded
>ut& he managed somehow t
save most of the colony.

A half-block away on Rue
Capois, well-known modiste
-mnd shop owner, Madame Ma-
ria () Defly sat tal-
king in her diningroom with
a visitor Dr. F6lix D6vieuy
when the waters burst into the
room. She was swept out into
'he night from her small greer
painted wooden house along-
side the Bois-de-Chene M.F
Defly was stopped on her
course to the sea by an over-
turned automobile that bloc-
ked her passage where she
,uing on for -deair Me ur
rescuers found her and rushed
her. to the Hospital where, she
is still in a critical condition.
Her visitor Doctor Felix De.
vieux was similar taken away
on the crest of the flood wa-
dler. He rrealli, thr:t he was
about to give up in the racing
waters that carried him four
blocks from the Defly housee,
opposite Dr. Salomon's gasoline
station to Rue Magloire Am-
broise where a car churning in
the waters stopped and the
driver and passengers pulled
him into thp car.


More than 20 some-odd auto-
mobiles were overturned, many
upside down ahd were carried
distances away.
A -taxi driver had just put in
gasoline at the Station, near
the Port-au-Prince Clulb on Rue
Capois when his car was over-
turned, in the rushing water
and he was drowned.
The installation and furnish-
ings of the Cercle Port-an-Prin-
cien on the Champ-de-Mars
were literally swept from the
premises when the flood ban-
ked up and overflowed into the
edifice. Chairs, sofas, tables,
dishes, and bottles went float-
ing down to the sea, many of
which were washed into the
yands of houses along the wa-
ter course and others snatched
iup by people along the way.
The body of an unidentified
woman was found in the club.
At Petion-Ville, the sbacks
of' the squatters who build in
ravines because this land be-
longs to the State and they do
not have to pay anything for
living on the land, were carried
off downstream. making all of
their poor belongings. The
same was true of the shacks in
the ravine in Port-au-Prince.
At the Edmond Mangones e-.
tate wlbich borders the ravine
leading to Place Boyer, one of
the smaller buildings occupied
by several members of the fa-
mily io reported tquasi-de-
lruites.
Most of the roads and high-
ways were blocked by landside
by Thursday morning, and the
electric lights\were out.
At Petion-Ville on .the high-
way down two corners front
Choucoune, the heavy rain
broke the electric cables which
hung burning and spurting de-
tonations for two hours, while
frantic neighbors pulled their
switches in fear that the short
circuit, fanned by the rain.
would set fire to the neighbor-
ing buildings. Telephone calls
attempted to summon the Elec-
trie light Company and the
Pompiers were of no avail, and
the wires burned on to an end
when the wires finally short-
circuited to the lamp post.
The Bois de Chene river bed
was clattered with broken fur-
niture and a variety of unuti-
lizable household objects the
morning after the fond.


to
ta
th
fl


Contractor Eugene Carrie
'ed-his bulldozers and graders
open up roads in the Capi-
il and surrounding districts
hat lad been blocked by the
ood.
Bull-dozers opened the Frc-


I DECADE..

.IFE ...* p
res road in Petion-Ville o's.''
ble Presidemn Doctor .lrantiam
Duvalier to attend the Grada'
tion exercises of fifty cadela':
the Military Academn.. A-Eid
on. this road had been
away leaving a- large,
hole.
The Department of Pi Ah i
Health and Population m d
an urgent appeal on Fridai
noon for aid to carry out "'
necessary protective and -'
ventive measures. The a."i l.
was directed to Governme!t e(V
partrnents, international1
nizations in Haiti and thogei
neral public. :
Mutilated bodies 'were'du
from under the mud and trasdJ
while families reported the 'ir
appearance of some of the
members washed away befqir.
their eyes. / '
At Lalue, it was the body o
a woman in an upright position
was found, her clothing Wrap'i
ped aroinaa post, and'th
a baby on Rue Maglolir an
broise was unearthed. ..'A
The President of the Rp
blic on Thursday moarng'-f
sited the sections of the CG.
Stal Taking aid to the flood y
times. He was accompanied
golarnimental a'u'tholritis w
immediately went to' work l-
making urgent solutions to'-t
situation'. .
On Thiur day an official '
unique from the Dep
of Public Works announced
one engineer, one truck an
team of 30 laborers ha&
assigned to the- numerou'a
tions where the flood hiail
damage to make urgent a~Ad
mediate repairs. ""i'


Cuban Ambassadj

Given Live Greni*

(Continued from pa '1

Police investigators:..f
traces and received co
tion from residents that
after the detonation a '
veiling at high-speed ha i.'
sed through the muddy-si
end of Rue Ameriain'e-
block from the inciden.t:..
Police Chief Coloneil D
Beauvoir visited the
heard the details and off
An-ibassador Rodrigiez
protection.
The following morning -
holed restaurant wal was.
only evltence of the exo


SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCASIE



--. ,t
i' 'J


-h


PAGE 16


SUNDAY, MAY 3jiL&


dHAITI SU NM