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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00231


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Full Text









i. VUL. IA aunluAi, tarKIL ztitn. 1959 No. 30- PORT-AU.PRINCE, HAITI


POLICE UNCOVER GRENADE MAKER

WITH HIDDEN STOCK OF 143 EMPTIES
obert Deschamps Alleged Customer For Large Order


W: Inwhat is believed by Police
.ibhe the makings of a second.
~ioutive May Day bomb plot.
-'4o& of 143 grenades wa4. un-
overed here, Friday at a small
ieal ,phop near Portail Leo-

iSafurday police displayed se-
yeral of the stock of home made
ivrenades fabricated of iron pipe
'aind aluminium found at the
ynaIll iron foundry shop of ihir-
i.-Afbryear old Savinin Simon,
-anii.employee at the Henri Des-
ih-amosa Priniing Plant. The gre
xiiads' of porcupine design were
46oind empty 'with no explo
-i;i:-onthe pYmttises lof the
Sfi shop located -at Portail

SA. spokesman for the Police
r,. /'..


Department said they had re-
ceived a tip and information
which led to the discovery of
jie grenade carhetle.
Simon', testin.ony incruiina-
ted the printshop owner Robert
)eechamps his employer whom
lie declared had ordered him to
make the grenades for wliich he
was to receive $300.
Robert Deschamps has been
in the United States for the pa t
month on a combined health
and business trip.
Jackie Deschamps, Store Ma-
nager, in his brother's absence
was taken into custody .by the
Police, Friday, pending an in-
vestigation.
The Police spokesman descri-"
bed the Deschamps print' shop


employee and grenade maker as
being a partisan of exiled ex-
Provisional President Daniel
Fignole, and Dasohamps as a
partisan of opposition leader,
Louis Dejoie.
Last April 29th. a homemade
bomb makihjg plant exploded
on the outskirts of the Capital
and revealed a plot against the
Duvalier Government which was
reportedly scheduled to break
during the May Day celebra-
tions.
Ex-Lieuteiant Raymond Cha-
(Continued on .page 16)


PRESIDENT TAKES SALUTE BEFORE CONGRESS


CHIEF OF STATE, Dr. Francois Duvalier, (center) stands before Le-
gislative Palace to receive Military Honors as he attends solemn opening
of Parliament where he delivered Message from the Executive Power.
rFlanking President are the senator Marthold and Deputy Estime, President
and Vice-President of the National Assembly.

Antigone, Creole Players Off
To Paris, London, -1-nin' May 6
F. Morriseau Leroy, .poet- adaption of the Greek tragedy
playwright and 10 members of to the local scene has met with.
.he Creole classic cAntigone> crowning success in Haiti over
are scheduled to leave for Eu- i the past two years, where he
rape on May 6th.
Mr. Leroy's translation' and (Continued on page 15)


The very serious lack of
food in the North-Western area
of the country has created a
broad unified movement which
is working towards the allevia-
tion of distressed conditions.
The Haitian Government, Ca-
tholic and Protestant Welfare
Groups, USOM (Point Four),
Haitian and., foreign -business
firms, and.the aFriend of Hai-
tin have come together in one
large charitable movement in a
f;n necturea nf hn m'anni ranarn


Degur human gero.-
sity.

Friday morning one witnes-.
sed the loading of the ship, rAl-
., batrossi (owned by the Bonne
S. il brothers) with large quan-
... titles of rice, corn and flour.
.I A truck which was generously
furnished .by the Texaco Com.-
Aiany also'loaded provisions
which were destined for the
affected areas in the North.-
'Vest. The ship is carrying 118
tons of food-stuffs sent by the
Catholic Welfare Group, among
'which were 45 tons of flour
Cordial Conversation.-During a recent Washington u ception Haiti's Envoy, Ambassador and Mrs Ernest Bon-c contributed by the Protestant
. homme with Vice-President of United States and Mirs. '-hard Nixon. (-I'"h6 SID) Mjission grodp. The food origi-


SVENEZUELAI

Senor Enrique Jqse6 MMiani,
S'dapper Charg6 d'Affaires of
Sthe Republic of Venezuela was
declared sPersona Non GrataW,
.this past week, by the Haitian
Government.
The Foreign Office deoli' ed
to give the reason for this ac-
tion, and refuted the* state-
ment from another Govern-
ment source that the diplomat
-" had twenty-four hours in
wh,. ch +n le-ve the country.
.i-Thb" t-r-crn Office .si-res-
... man ci-1 tt Senor 1 ATian.i
Is: zr


(Ii*:


CHARGE D'AFFAIRES ENRIQUE JOSE MILIANI (left) shown ushe-
ring 1 asylees of *th Venezuelan Embassy out of Haiti last month.


wVas alone in the Embassy here
and as there was nobody to
?ake. his. place, he would re-
main until he was replaced. It
was pointed out that the new
Venezuelan Ambassad6r, Se-
nor Vicente Gerbasi, was ex-
pected to arrive here this week
and take up the post left va-
cant, last December, when Am-
bassador Raerez Soca died of
a heart attack here.

Venezuela's newspaper, 1El
Nacional said Friday quoting


nally comes from U. S. Depart
ment of Agriculture surplus-
stocks.
' Saturday an American ship
arrived in Gonaives carrying
50 tons of powdered milk for
distribution by the Catholic
Welfare Group. In the view of ;
the emergency situation in the
North-West this shipment will
be sent in its entirety to the
stricken areas.
One of the most striking cha-
racteristics of this' common ef-
fort to relieve the distress of
our fellow-cuiizens in Lite North-
West is the total sense of coo-
peration which has been de-
monstrated. Private interests
have been set aside; persons of
all religious faiths are working
together for a common- goalj
resources of business, the Hal-
tian and Americas govern-
ments, catholic and protestant
religious groups have been cor
ined to distribute basic neces-
sities to all families in need.
The Haitian Government
has placed civilian and milita-

(Continued on page 10)


,France Press, dispatched from
Plort-au-Prince:
A Foreign Office spokesman
had given the reason for de-
claring the Venezuelan Charge
d'Affaires -Persona Non Grata,
as bad comportment on the di-
plomat's pa.;.and also his grant
ing political 'asylum.
The leading daily newspaper,
quoted a Venezuelan Foreign
Office source as declaring these:
incidents would not affect the

(Continued on page 16)


VAST COOPERATIVE MOVEMENT COMES TO THE
AID OF NORTH-WESTERN


N DIPLOMAT. DECL UD "PERSONA NON GRATA))


rr;
r


I_







PKSr.I5UFn utVALI

Of FULL rOWeRS I

OPENING OF. 38TH
'n his address before the general security
National Assembly, Monday, had used the
on the occasion of the solemn cally.
opening of the second-session Through Pr
Sof the 38th Legislature, Presi- crees, he state
". dent Doctor Francois Tuvalier seen that his
.- -justified his sik month.; rule touched the cad
-' under full powers voted him in its diverse se
last year by Haiti's Congress. ment of the nati
e President had been ves- return of the 1;
t; ed with absolute powers on ants who were
: August 1, 1958, following the spoil system; tl
Sabortive invasion of July 24th or reestabliskn
.when three ex-Army Officers taxes to imprc
and five American mercenaries the county's
seized the Casernes Dessalines protection of t
at midnighit.and opened fire family, the. pri
on the National Palace, By institution of at
;,- dawn the invaders had been of assuring thi
wiped out by a counter-attack major product
from the Palace where the Pre- products of thE
sident, loyalists and army of- The Presidei
ficers had set 'up a successful that he had crn
defense. ganisms for th
P:' resident Duvalier, seated and improvemr
.. at the tribune of the National for the control
-Assembly read the Executive's tions and tran
'' Message before a crowded au- vel agencies a
ditorium which included re- vice.
presentatives of the foreign Di-
: plomatie Missions of Port-au- He said thai
SPrinice and members of the these things tl
S Clergy. involved,was 1
of order and I
SStating that his conscience first condition
was clear before the tribunal of which had beer
impartial history, the President r-y long before
"' thanked the Senators and De- July 28-29 of. 1
puties for the confidence they
S had manifested by voting the Stating that
measure of fuR powers. He sible for the a(
..said.he had used these special forms to guar
..' powers to guarantee -internal order, he had
S. : security and to safeguard the use the axe o
:i ::country's international prestige Haiti, an edi
j, 'at a time-when placed between with caving ii
:-:anaichy and the safeguarding institution ha<
of the conquests of the Revo- of its -mission
I ,,utiois he had chosen the way Haiti, he said,
of order and peace. of a Young Ar
composed d in
Referring to the epoc when elements of a ]
under the presidency of Gene-career chosen
S ral Lysius Felicit& Salomon with the missic
-. June, the Nation had ,the pain- magniicently
S fil shame of seeing itself attac- educated in thi
ked by its own sons allied to a the Fatherlanc
few foreign mercenaries, he elements of di
said that the present legislators eminent cult o
with wisdom and foresighted- of the people
ness hadmade a historic' act and institutional a
S.decided to impose the sacrifices order of the N
of self respect-in order to save
the peace of the country and to 'cI had alwa
hand over the general powers this Young '/
into the hands of the Chief presently at tl
of the Nation called upon to Governments,
exercise the powers in their declared, tit is
place, at a time when all the be the suppc
institutions of the Nation were acts and corru'
: threatened. Army is at the
SThe President stated that peace, honor a
S he would dispense with enum- center of a yc
rating the details of measures and occupies i
taken from August 1, 1958 in the revolut
through January 30, 1959 dur- ght us into ]
ing six months of full powers, people. This /
but 'wished to remind only that -n issue of th,
they were madrl to assure the -not cease its i


-: -HAITI SU M: n .':


.SUNDA-Y'


JUsTIFIES SIX MONTHS

MESAGUl Tu SULtLM


LEGISLATURE'S 2nd
,, and that he ne Government within the
power patrioti- Jhree Powers of the entire na-
cion, by its rectitude, its loyal-
residential. De- ty, its discipline and its fero-
1, it could be 'nious determination to maint-
measures had ain order and defend the integ-
res of the Army rity of the territory, and shall
actions; readjust- never be a support for a per-
onal budget; the sonal dictatorship or dictator-
man to the peas- ship of casts.
L victims -of the
re establishment The President continued sa-
ient of certain ying that the Army's adhesion
)ve and adjust to the new political philosophy
finances; the of his Government is manifes-
he unity of the ted by the enthusiasm with
separation of the which it met the hard hours:
autonomy in view which the enemies of order,
e increase and peace and liberty imposed1
ion of the basic upon it.


cAnd order reigns by the Ar-
my and' with the Army, throu-
ghout the territory of the Re-
public, lie declared. -
President Duvalier then said
that the conception of the se-
curity of the nation in the new
scale of democratic political
values, in his opinion, is rather
of the dimension of the Haitian
man," liked to the internal
conditions -of a democracy in
the -times in which we are liv-
ing. Security embraces as much
the integrity of the territory to
be defended first of all, as to
the guarantee of economic and
social security for each mem-
ber of the national connnunity
and the obligation to adapt the
nation to a state of internatio-
nal interdependence.

xThe interior conditions of a
democracy where order and
peace reigns in the new philo-
sophy of the exercise of the
Power at first escapes, unfodrt-
unately, the thinking of the po-
hticiens of the past liberal
school, politicians of limited ho-
rizons, even in principle).
S...In the present concept of
interior, conditions of n de-
mocracy like ours, the man of
politics has not the right to
limit his action to the national
plane only. He has not the
right to limit national security
only to military measures for
the defense 'of the integrity of
Qhe territory.
The resistance we are en-
countering and which is oppo-
sed to our broad conception, ir
our new philosophy of the in-
ternal conditions of our young
democracy are the normal out-
come of an egocentric mode of
life. of an anacirronic system
of social and economic relat-
ions centered at times on a
mortal personal sm, sometimes
and more ferociously upon the
egoistical detention of privi-
leye and facilities.
This resistance forms an in-
tegral part of the accumulation


SESSION
or the plurality' of the count-
ie.s ills that, fatally, gave us
a society where inequalities
.eign and persist, where sham-
eful exploitation of the igno-
rance of the greatest number
of our citizens have remaine.-
the soverign rule. Privileges.
Facilities. Egotistical. Inequali-
ties: Exploitation. Such are the
Lntransic factors of habitudes
practices for more than a cen-
tury and a half of a mode of
live which the Duvalierist Re-
volution. your Revolution, in-
tends to change. to over'.:'--:.v'
and to destroy.
To succeed in this remains as
much my reason for being in
Power as your reason for being
at my side. There are those
-who prefer conflict to coope-
ration, power to peace; there
is still time for them to choose.
Placed under the obligation
in a limit of time to recons-
truct even the foundation of
our society, I had to decide
upon which basis to erect the
new foundations, and I have
thus built up the hope of imp-
roving the human condition of
niilions of our community on
the basis cf social justice aI_!
general security. I have und-
erstood that my duty :was to
push back the disillusionment
accuTiulated over decades.an3
decades of injustices, inequali
ties and of false promises in
the hearts of the Haitian
masses so that I could succeed
in eliminating their hate and
their wrath born of immense
hunger, and of generalized
unemployment, in order to
safeguard .the.interior security
of the State.
It is in a climate of genera-
lized unemployment and hc:r-
ger that the ( les coups de force. orgarriss,
and maintained with rare fer-
vor by those who fight for
their wellbeing, their secular
privileges and. who exploiting
the misery and ignorance of
the masses and a situation of
fact, are attempting to seize
the power, still to the -detrim-
ent of these masses.
It was tie wish to implant
security by general prosperity
which caused my enthusiasm
in calling for capital, the signa-
ture of contracts, establishing


I


BEST IN CAP-HAITIEN.I
HOSTELLERIE DU ROJ CHRIS
(The Most Wonderful Hotel in
New York Times
The only hotel in town with
Air Conditioned Rooms. Swimmi
Tropical park Magnificent vera'
Tennis court'.
THE BEST FOOD OF HAIT


'
aii


- i


iniustiies
. power'i .'.
For there. -.'
,curity wherie-,lg
nufgry. *
Gentlemen oa-
ment, only one& ;
of the enseme
ani will continue,
No objectives. i'n
jucuces cannot
serve us as guid.
general welfare.-..
only in this is t "
essential thera
good political m
macratic society'
If today th"
a new scale.
to the dimens
conception ;o.
between the peo,
efforts in this d.ri
the time of full.i
have deserved .
aid Rcf our GreatR
United States o('"
-because I have
the contradiction:s j
lutely negative aii
tive political ria
"It is why, in t
the.actual questgany
nomical, potiCi'
tuation, I have ie6
language of the'
phasizing that In oai
maximum unity
nations of this U'Si
maintenaind. tow.
for the defense
the safeguard f
need political and
rity things that.
depend upon- e
rity.
In a world wher
dependence of thei
become an'i.ct
it is even n ecnsusa
reach the point
.of national i ter+`i
the superior intei
Pan .Americanzi
SAnd in these hours
bled world, in the -
new order of g
problems of r~elae
the .peoples, I doi;-
to affirm the cb'
people and of th&i
vernma-nt ini arm .
to shoulder with"li
Frietdos of the.
of Arherica fori'
worse.
Where an ideal
Sthe people perisW-
live'in the glorious
liberty, independei~
dignity- of our a.,6i
(Continued -on


U6






l, APRIL 26th. 1959 HAfTI SUNS PAGE 3


" CUBA NABS
,: ;HAITIAN
INSURGENTS

.SANTIAGO, Cuba-The Cu
j6n coast guard thwarted an
'empt! by a 30-man expedi-
oinary force to invade Haiti
roma port near here, it was
r ed Sunday.-
t'.ba ,au~thortties Uet'ained
1ieiarimed party at dawn Fri-
9,as it was putting to sea
- 20-foot boat from thp port
-Sigua, 12 miles from here.
tlhe expedition was headed
~y-Haitipns Fritz Thebaud
ind :ex-mechanic Max Munro,
df included two other Hai-
as and 26 Cuban volunteers.
"The expedition carried auto
atic weapons and 140 thou-
:.d rounds of ammunition.
6baud and Munro were re-
-Ae after CQban Commandr
lt'.Manuel Pineiro reportedly
i ~c ed them on.abusing the
i.oOitality o? Cuba.


I:-.Ahigh Cuban army officer
ed Saturday that a train
camp for Nicaraguan revo-
oaes and their Cuban
rters was broken up ir
del Rio, Cuba's western-
ot province.
j. in eiro said expeditions or-
ganzed by political refugees-
ven! asylum by Cuba could
,.create problems for Cuba.

-0-
: .
.: .:: -'. o--

INVASION INTENT

i DENIED
-6
S HAITIAN
REVOLUTIONARY
UNIT DISCLAIMS ARMED
EXPEDITION
-.(Speial to The New York
STimes.)

i. HAVANA, April 20-The
.aitian revolutionary front
Shi'edenied Monday any con-
: section with a small armed ex
edition that nad attempted to
.leave'Oriente Province for Hai
ti and was arrested yesterday
',by the Cuban Navy.
Jacques Riche, a member of
te executive committee of the
Haitian revolutionary ,front,
aid his organization had no
intentionn of abusing the hospi-
ality of Premier Fidel Castro
the Cuban Goveinment by
sending armed expeditions
from Cuba.
The two Haitians, Fritz The-
baud and Max Manroe, who
headed the expedition have
bee been --freed, but the twenty-
-'- eight Cubans who were also in
' the. expedition are still held
in jail, according to reports.


((NEWSMEN P

KNOCKING ...
Haiti". new Minister of Na-
tional Education Father Hubert


Atuy
Qts
amqes


4!c(.


." C/ie, desDt./es-


RENT A


lAY ENTER MY OFFICE WITHOUT

>SAYS NEW MINISTER OF EDUCATION
ed three vo'umes of poems: der a former Government left led in his new post at the Mi-
,,Paille'tes d'Ecumen, uCoup his native land. He spent four nistry of National Education
d'Ailesn, ,Gerbes d'Etoiles,, vears in Canada during wh;ch on Wednesday morning by his
His novel, -Les Laboureurs de he held the chair of Rhetoric predecessor, the Reverend Fat
la Mern, on the Haitian social at the University of Montreal her Jean-Baptiste. Georges in
question is .soon to be publish- During his sojourn abroad, he the presence of Director Ge-
ed. also obtained his licentiate's neral of National Education
Controversial, brilliant cou- degree in Literature. Mr Antoine Guerrier, and As-
rageous, the young Priest un- Father Papailler was instal- sistant Director ,of Secondary
-Education, Mr Ernest Barbot.
'L


Papailler, endeared himself to
members of the Press, by the
statement: "The journalist
may enter my office without
knocking on the doors.

He made the declaration du"r
ing an exchange of views on
the problems of the press in a
community. which is working
for progress, during a courtesy
call to the offices of a local
daily Thursday morning.
,In my intellectual and hu-
manistic conception,, the Mi-
nister-Priest said, (,the journal-
ist must be considered as the ba
sic ,levier, in the evolution of
a country in his task as promo
tor of public opinion, on a na-
tional scale.
Father' Papailler called jour
nalism a real usacerdoce and
said the newsman showing his
press card would always be giv
en a cordnal welcome at his
office. uYou can enter without
knocking,, he said, wand even
if I am in the company of some
important personality, I will
receive you. immediately..
Speaking of the general poli
cy he plans to follow to pro-
mote national art, tle Minister
said that even if he must pass
only a short time in the Dept.
of National Education, the art
of the country must be advan
ced at least a half-step.
Born in Gonaives, the City
of the Independance. Father
Papailler is now'42 years of
age. He attended primary
school at the Ecole des Freres
of his native town, then enter-
ed Port-au-Prince to attend the
Petit Seminaire -College St.
Martial.
He graduated from the
School of Theology in 1941 as
a Priest. He held the posts of
Vicar 'at Hinche, Cur6 at Pe-
'ite Riviere de l'Artibonite and
Cur6 of Ferrier, a Northern
town.
Father Papailler has publish
'*-. >


DRIVE


From SOUTHERLAND

S.FREE AIRPORT HOTEL DELIVERY AND PICK-UP


Ex-World Champ
Visits Haiti
Wrestling To Return
Wrestling is to return to Port
by September, according to Io-.
cal promoter Pierre Gabriel'
and Ed. Don George, World
Champion 1930-35 who held:
discussions hera this past week.
The Burly Buffalo, New
York wrestler, turned promot-
er Don George stated he in-
tends to include Haiti on the
Caribbean tour of famous wrest
lers.
Weekly bouts will be held
here with name fighters ,enter-
ing the ring, according to Pro-
moter Gabriel who put on box-
ing and wrestling at the Stad-
ium several years ago and is
now wbrkihg on plans for a
gymnasium at the end 'of the
Harry S. Trumani Boulevard.,


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45 AVE. Marie-Jeanne
Tel: 3591


NEW CABINET MEMBERS
Mr. Jean A. MAGLOIRE Minister of the Interior
and National Defense:
Mr.. Paid BLANCHET Minister of Coordination and
Information:
Dr. Louis MARS Minister of Foreign Affairs and
Cults;
Mr. Andre THEARD Minister of Finances;
Mr. Clovis M. DESINOR Minister of Commerce and
Industry; ,
Mr. M. Lamartinibre HONORAT Minister of Public
Works, Transuortation and Communications; I
Mr. Lucien RELIZAIRE Minister of Jusitce, Labor
and Social Welfare:
Mr. Ernest ELYSEE Minister of Public Health and
PoDulation;
Rev. Father Hubert PAPAILLER Minister of Na-
tional Education:
Mr. Gerard PHILLIPPEAUX Minister of Agricul-
ture. Natural Ressources and Rural Development;
Under-Secretaries of State.-
Dr. Aurele A. JOSEPH Under-Secretary of the In-
terior and National Defense; -
Mr. ,Georges J. FIG'ARO Under-Secretary of Infor.
mation;
Mr Herve BOYER -.Under.Secretary of Finandes.


- YOURSELF VOLKSWAGEN


-------


A


-e


New School For
Children Of
Chauffeur-Guides .
During the May Day Par-'
de, Thursday, Presidbnt Fran-
cois Duvalier is to lay the corn
erstone for a new school on
the building site in the Expo-
sition City. opposite Hotel
Beau Rivage.
The school will be built for
the children of the Chauffeur.
Guides here whose parents are
unable to furnish schooling for
them, now, a spokesman for
the Syndicate stated this week.
Funds of the Syndicate and
contributions will defray the
costs of the construction.
The building will be erected
on a piece of ground donated
by the State, situated on the
water front overlooking the
Port-au-Prince bay.
Specialized courses will also
be given at this new school in
History, Geography, English
and Savoir-Faire for the mem-
bers of the Chauffeur-Guides
Syndicate.
The Association has also en-
visaged the prospects of having
American teachers spend the
Summer months here teaching
at their establishmenT.




------------------~~~~ .~--------~~-~-- -- .-~~~I


LGE- HAAII SUN

f: THERE came to me, several
.i years ago, when I was regularly
r. -reviewing books, the translation
lof a movel called Canap6-Vert, By Edmund W
w' which in 1943, had won the In this essay, written originally as an introdu
Prize in a Latin-American fic- The Pencil of God, Mr. Wilson views n
tion contest..This book was the
work of two Haitians, tbl. bro- common with any to be found selves to the -prei
otherss Philippe Thoby-Marcelin in France. They were boldly Haitian life in all
".";-and Pierre Marcelin, and it because naturally Haitian. The year'efore,
: ,dealt with contemporary Hai- It had, however, been more had been founded,
Stan life. I had always had a or les.s,true up almost to the digne, y a go
S.sympathetic interest in Haiti end of the nineteenth century wr r
dnien who were preE
ever since I had first read in 'i,at Haitian literature" leaned dertake this ask a
S :-, Adams' history of the heavily on .France. Even when cluded three indivi
career of Toussaint Louverture, Haitian poets wrote patriotic pional courage
d. the great ex-slave Negro leader, invocations, they declaimri in Roner J. Roum
i who ranks beside Bolivar and old-fashioned French rhetoric: Tov-r
` Washington among the libera- even when they turned off little ippc Tho abroad
been liui-ng abroad
tors of the eighteenth century; pictures those of Oswald Du- come ak t Hai
: and I looked into Canap&-Vert rand were charming of na- tt t d ha
primarily out of curiosity to tive' girls in native landscapes, ht t da
know what kind of lives were they would fall back on the in- their cnt e
rature that correct
;-.being lived and what' kind of tricate stanzas of Hugo's Sara
0 0 ted |its sooidty. In
S" literature was being produced la Baigneuse. The Haitians had t its soiy. I
by."thatpeople of mixed French [teir classicism, their romanti- field al three t
field, all three of t
anid Negro blood who ha, sue- cism, "theiq parnassianism, their e ee o
d- v "ae produced wo
ceasfnlly stood up to the explo*- naturalism and their symibo- tr d d H
tersof what was once the ri- lism.
chest West Indian colony and, The chief -rnovelist of the Ro the
after, Toussaint himself had nineteenth century, D. Delorme, oi. th
original poet that H
b. een trapped and imprisoned by did not write about Haiti at d, ha recently b
': n a p o l e o n h a d e f f e c t e d i h e c o m a ~lh b )u t m a d e h i (s a t o r i e s a l l a n t
plete expulsion of an invading take place in Italy, France or Ibrliaetsof versen
thologies of verse. R
F: rench army under Rocham-- Turkey. Haitian authors were died in 19,. w
died in 1944,- was
-P:. bean. published in Paris, and they on West Indian ci
I was astonished by what I were sometimes crowned by the the pre-Co ian
found. The material of the book Academy. It was not till the late .
wrote *on archaeo
'was quite. primitive and at the nineties that Frederic Marcelin antbropologcal sn
Same time fantastically- elabo- (a cousin of the authors of Ca-
; founded the Bureat
rate :a society so unfamiliar, a nape-Vert'I began to write no-
.. logy of Haiti. He f
s. t of beliefs so outlandish, that vels of native life, and it was t
in 1934. the Haitian
at first it was difficult for the not till the late nineteen-twen-
Party and published
foreigner to grasp the situations ties tlat this life was comple-
poems that embodi
at all; ,but-lis subject had been telj- explored without literary c t o iew. H
cal point of view. H
,-. 'handled by Ithe authors- with. or social inhibitions. cGo terneurs ide la
T Godeneure ide la
San, initieligence so sophisticated The educated classes in Haiti
-: been translated as
in- both a literary and anthro- mulattoes brought up in thehe Dew. Philippe
-he Dew. Philippe
,.".pological way that the book it- French tradition-and sometimes
celin, who had beg
3:. self seemed Ito imply a very educated in France comprise ein, who had beg
high level of .culture. only about ten per cent of the
T is led me to read the ar total population. There multi- i MODER
-1 -. '. This led me to read the Mar-
S ins' other books and books plies below their level there
-*:.. cemin other books and books .
by other Haitin write. an stretches beyond their towns, a DIN
; ,by other Haitian writers,. anil
-eventually to visit Haiti. There peoplee of black peasants, who
learned 'with surprise from live in huts of mud and lath,
Sljrned with sprise front thatched ith banaa-leave s.
the librarian of the 'Biblioth- hed it banana-eaves
~ que Nationale (founded in 1812 practice the Voodoo religoin.
.and supposed to ae been th which the Negroes brought with
And supposed to have been the
"first in the Americas), that Ha- them from Africa, and speak
iti since its liberation in 1803- Creole, a rudimentary manage A D
1804, had produced a greater compounded of African and
number of books about five French. Cc
thousand in proportion to. 'The cultivated people of Hai-
the population tlian any other ti were ashamed of this primi- All A
American country, with tb.e ex- tive race, and the writers as a
ception of the United States rule ignored it. But in 1928 a
more even than Brazil or Ar. Haitian scientist, Dr. Jean Price
S'gentiu-,. That thi, literature Mars, published a book called
Swas npi merel' cnlornial, not Ainsi Parla l'Oncle: Essais d'Eth
S merey .i remote initation of nographie (ite uncle of the ti-
':".. Freneh,, hald disco-vered anrea- tie, a traditional story-teller, is
^:''dy from.the Marceli,i. Their closely related to Uncle Remus).
W"ostandards of tood writing were which proved to be a literary
'.- French, hut their language was landmark. Dr. Price-Mars urged
partly arhaic- they wrote, upon Haitians the importance T t
for example au mitan de instead of coming to terms with the Inth
of an milieu de --and partly culture of tlIK black lower olas.
exotic: full of words and things ses. pointing out that its super- ;
peculiar to the West Indies. stations .played a much more con Ch
Their irony might partly de. siderable role in the psvreholo Cockti
riTve fromn Maupassant and Ana-of the educated people than
tole France, but their point of they were generally wri"in" t
View was quite their own, and admit, amn made a plea for the Make '
..' their material had nothing in native- writers to address them- -
a ma m..m mm m


SUNDAY-,


snobbisb, that ;
LITERATURE "
a[TEIATU Yankee with-
ILSON it is trie that:.'l:
action to the' Marcelin novel somethingg in thba-'
modern Haitian fiction, the impulse whi. h
ke Synge and :
sentation of ying law and who had served nourishment to-.
its aspects. as a .public official in th.e Mi- of Ireland in order,
nistry of Publio Works, was in from the English
a magazine the days of La Revue Indigene But the resistance'
SRue mainly a poet and literary jour- ying Yankee ha
Sof yo nalist. special instance of
pared to un-cion n o
and who in- The Marcelin family were reaction in ouritin
.an of capitalism c
dual. of ex- Catholics ,like most educated the privileges ani
and talent: people in Haiti, and they hadl .he ourgeoisie
lain and Phi- lived a good deal abroad. The .
lin. All had father of Philippe and Pierre No, in Haiti
and all had had for many years been con- leuaNow, in Haiti
ti convinced sul in New Orleans.. cntalt witho .thet
eqntar't with .the".
arrived or The young men at this time ees is confronted wtii
given a lie- knew little of the native religion situation not. roi
ly represen- and folk-lore, and were startled Marxist theory. He
thus culti- and fascinated when, in 1929, who are not only h"i"
he national there came into their-hands a mitive in their eco
these writer- new hook from the United Sta- bIt who are living-,ii
rk that has c The MN.gic Island hy of omnipresent miy
[atl. W.Aliam Scabrook which was these people as a.
full of amazing tales of zombies tariat, as Jlacques 1
t gifted ad and Voodoo rites that the au- to do, is to 'forceToe 6
aiti has ever thor had picked up in Haiti. a hlse part. The hero
een figuring The young Martelns Phi- of the Dew is suppose
national au- lippc, Pierre and a third bro- learned class soid84
:oumain who other, Milo, who had been com- comrade on a plantai
an authority piling a valuable work on the ba, and, returning t
vilization of .mythology of Voodoo set out tian village, he isio'
ages. He to investigate the .popular cults as a marryr to '
logical and and they have made themsel- scientific'irigation.
objects and ves authorities on the subject evolves a discussionri'
u of Ethno- This return to the people of and an eloquence of.
wounded also, the Haitian v4riters has been ism that would
Communist described by the poet Leon La- been possible in C
Stories and lean as a reaction to the Ame- has no words for a
ed his radi- rican occupation of 1915-1933: in a community di
[is last novel TThie young writers of my ge- Voodoo. Roumain, 'i
Rosdee, has neration, he says *with an un- of the Dew. -:mui
Masters. of yieldin'g passion o'f nationalism in interest to his e
Thoby-Mar- boiling in their hears, have j



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Y A I -
APY, APRIL 26th. 1959


has simply written the ine-
vitable Communist novel that,
i'.he. product of an exportable
formula, has appeared in so ma-
,y countries.
The Haitian who -goes to the
people has to see them as they N
iactlly are and to grapple with 1
Pheir real institutions. This the c
Maelins have tried to do. In a
eI. first novel, Canap6-Vert, "
ey took'one'straiglit into the "
o6 world and made one ac- t
-Y-its assumptions. This world c
oione is first introduced to r
f may be difficult to get the 1
ofang 'o 'and even- when the
'foreign reader has come to un P
'ersand what i; going on, lie c
iay be inclined to assume that
e authors have brought toge-
er collection of exceptional l
ses-'and exploited them for a
kamatic effect. A little -further
quaintance with Haiti, even
Iway of books, will, however,-
el these doubts. The strange
i~gns-described by the Marce-
.aie matters of common oc-
rrnee.
..-,was once told by the Epis-
BkplBishiop of Haiti and the
om-ifican Republic (a white
iie of the United States),
b :'had seen a good deal of
'ik cowfntry, that, in dealing
the people of those regions
Si had had to readjust himself
a- conception of human life
-t turned our own upside
M :with us, it was the real
ord 'that seemed the imme.-
atqChing and the srpernatu-
.i wold something above and
yod, but in Haiti the imme-
t thing was the supernata-
Ft





F."






SLd.' ci
;j^ ~ (1 '*d Ci w t


r-

'K
-; -


cHAIT SUND


VOODOO IN LITERATURE
c
tContin-ued from page'4)1

al world (for which, of course, and p.ypitiate the god of death: t
supernatural would be an iuap- they must go to bed with the s
iropriate trm I and what we goddess of love (there has ac- t
all the real world no more than tually been preserved a contract
symbolization of events in the drawn up for a marriage bet- s
World of religious myti.. Thus ween this goddess and one of
ve find in Canap-Vert that a her preferred' lovers); the y
ree blown down on a drunkard must stand for the violence of
>r the bite of a mad dog-is not a spirit who is given to terrible
ubnsidered a n4rural accident rage,.
mt appears as a deliberate move They attribute to the posses-
n a game of transgression and sed individual all the deity's
punishment, of revenge and indomitable power, and he him-
ounter-revenge. self feels and wields this power.
I A miserable servant-girl, as in
It is not merely that tle Hai- the Marcelins' La B6te de Mua-
ians, like the ancient Greeke, .eau. may even make herself a
ire in the habit of explaining master who is free to command
everything in terms of the dis- her ownu master by emerging
pleasure or friendliness of one from an hysterical seizure in
or other of their divinities, or the character of a formidable
that they act out a moral drama divinity known as Baron Same-
as tlie pueblo Indians do, only di, talking in the deep voice
partially identifying themselves which is recognizable at once as
with the spirits whose roles they his and demanding the cigars
are playing. The central feature and liquor with which he must
of the Voodoo religion is the always be supplied. An old wo-
possession of the worshipper by man, in Canap6-Vert, who
the spirit. He assumes the divi- thinks it necessary to scold-her
nity'e character; takes on its ap- children, arranges to augment
pearance and speaks with its 4r authority with that of a
voice, must gratify its favorite goodness called Grande Erzilie,
appetites, is swept by its pecu- and a man works himself up
liar passions. Forhis neighbors to murder by inducing in him-
and even for his family, be man self the delusion that he is rid-
or woman, who, as they say, is den by a bloodthirsty spirit
a mounted by one of the lIoap called General Anglessou. These
becomes the god or the goddess. transformations are often pre-
Whether or not they have loved ceded by paroxysms like epilep-
or respected the person whom tic fits, and in the more serious
thic deity has superseded, they cases these mediums, appear
must now bring to this deity to have retained no memory of
their tribute of whatever it is what happenedd during their
known to like: ornaments or states of possession.
food and drink. They must fear Dr. J. C. Dorsainvil, a Port-


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u-Prince psychologist and the
author of an interesting study
ailed Vaudou et Nevrose, be-
ieves that these are forms of
hysteria. He says hat the ex-
ent to which the Voodoo pos-
essed succeed in transforming
heir features and voice and the
consistency with which the per-
sonality of any given loa may
be reproduced by different per
sons is incredible unless one
has seen it. Another Haitian
psychologist is reported to have
said that it was a pity that the.
upper classes of Haiti did not
have possession, too, to relieve
their neuroses from time to
time since by means of it
the weak may assert themsel-
vea, the neglected may claim
attention, and the woman who
has been dropped by her lover
may terrify him into submis-
sion.
The peasants' life is further
complicated by a general belief
in witchcraft, which is not fie-
cessarily a part of the Voodoo
religion proper. This is one .f
the most important elements in
the Mlarcelins',second novel, as
it is in The Pencil of God. La
Bete de Mussean (translated as
The Beast of the Haitian Hills)
is a much better story than Ca-
napi-Vert, for it creates the sus-
.pense of a thriller that hangs
on a crisis of conscience. A
bourgeois o f Port-au-Prince.
whose wife has just died, de-
cides to satisfy a lifelong ,am-
bition by moving to the coun-
try and becoming a planter..Ne-
ver having had to deal with tbhe
peasants, he makes the fatal mis
take of antagonizing the local
people by trying to fence off a
spring on his property,-and he
incurs the illwill of the local
boss (a figure quite distinct
from the Voodoo priest), who
is supposed to practice black
magic and has succeeded in re-
ducing the community to such
a state of intimidation that he
can murder and rape with im-
punity. Eventually he breaks
the morale of the mulatto from-
Port-au-Prince .and drives him
back to the city by arousing
his African atavism and playing
on his superstition.
It might be supposed, from
my accounts of these books, that
they could only be of special
interest as glimpses of an odd
civilization. But the distinguis-
hed achievement of the Marce-
lins has been to make them
something more. Both these sto-
ries have a larger significance.
The situation of the inhabitants


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PAGE 5

of Canap&Vert, confused bet-
ween the working of Nature, the
mythology they have been
taught, and the instincts about
good and bad that seem more
or less to be felt by human be-
ings everywhere, is made to
throw a good deal of light on
the situation of any social group
in relation of its religion. In
tracing the contagion of myth
and the real motivations it
masks through the whole life of
this little community, the Mar-
celins stimulate us to think of
the role of myth in any coie-
munity. It is not really very
much more fantastic to screw
oneself up for a speech or a
crime by imagining oneself
Grande Erzilie or Generql An-
glessou than "by managing to
identify oneself with the Will
.of the German People or the
Sword of the Proletariat.
So, in La B&re de Mussean,
the beast is something more
than a bugaboo with which the
witchdoctor scares the planter:
it is the bad conscience of the
man he scares. This ex-grocer
bas been worried by a- feeling
of guilt in connection 'with ihe
death of his wife. She had died
giving birth to a child which
b6 had known she was incapable
of having, murmuring -in her
last moments that she had loved
him very much, and she had
appeared to him 4a nighk in
dreams telling him that be had
killed her. But he cannot es-
cape from this guilt by leaving
Port-au-Prince: a retribution
from the African forests awaits
at Musseau the freethinker in
whom has been inculcated in
childhood the Catholic doctrine
of sin. When he comes back to
Port-au-Prince, he learns from
a friend of his wife's that she
had felt he n'o longer-loved her
and that she had wanted to win
him back by giving hi'm, at last,
a child. This ii th;e real beast,
anrd in the end it will track him
down.
The Marcelin's third. novel,
The Pencil of God, appears in
this translation, for the first
time. I shall not comment-'n
it here, for to do so would be
to forestall the story; but it has,
I believe, been worthwhile to
point out the serious'-basis, in
anthropology and in moral in-
sight, of the Martelins' work in
fiction and to explain that the
queer tale of African spells play
ing havoc among the petty bour-
geoisie- of a modern Haitian
town is merely one of a series
of novels in which a variety of
milieux are studied.


i sl I





I." .: I I
;'PAGE- 6 -HAITI SUN

Another Book On Haiti By Hugh B. Cave. -


:*.. .' -----<------L
I* THE MISSIONARY AND THE HOUNGAN

REVIEWED BY SELDEN, RODMAN


Novels about Haiti, and spe-'
i';.- cifically. vodun (voodoo) jn
Ijaiti, are no longer a rarity;
Sbut -The Cross on the Drum,,
, is the first to my knowledge
That treats both the country
and its African religious cult
with profound sympathy. It is
a sympathy born of understand
ing. Even were one not fami-
liar with the author's delight-
ful account of living among the
Haitians (,Haiti: Highroad to
advetituren) one would be cer-
tain from the novel that he had
entered into native life wife
much more than a tourist's cu-
- riosity -or a novelist's deter-
mination to mine a rich vein.
The plot opens with Barry
Clinton, a young Episcopal mis
f sibnary on his way to Ile du


The Cross on the Drum
By Hugh B. Cave 333
pp. New York: Double-
day & Co. $3.95.
-0-
verty in these troubled regions.
Quite deliberately, he had chos
en the church as his instrument;
what it stood for was inciden-
tal".
Unfortunately for Barry. he
is surrounded by enemies, and
they are resourceful. They play
on his innocence, the legacy of
his predecessor, the cupidity
of a corrupt magistrate, tie
brutishness of an American
planter, the lust of 'the 'houn-
gan's sister, the-ignorance and
fear of the peasants. Barry,
who had just begun to convin-
ce the all powerful houngarrthat


Vent,. an offshore island where Christianity could be interpret
a predecessor has already run ec as a workable application
head -on into voduh and suf- .f the doctrine of brotherly
feared bitter defeat. Barry is a love, finds himself in a hornet's
courageous man and a good nest of. terrible accusations.
one. Despite his superior's in- And at this very moment the
junction to make no comprom- old Bishop visits the island and
ise with superstition, he has with his narrow orthodoxy alie-
come to learn as well as to nafes one and all of Barry's
.teach; and he senses at once near-converts by' threatening
that the local houngan shares them with hell-fire.
his own inquiring spirit. The denouement is not alto-
aUnlike most missionaries, gether convincing. To be sure,
who came to the islands to happy endings are possible, and
save souls., the author notes, in the murky climate of today's
aBarry had corrie with a bel- novels they can be refreshing.
lig6rent skepticism of accepted But the author in this particu-
missionary methods and a lar csse has unraveled sb many
driving determination to battle complexities so easily and so
sickness and starvation. Being quickly that the reader's cre-
masteir of his own island, a king dence is strained. Being convin
with four thousand barefoot ced of the existence and effica-
subjects, undoubtedly appealed cy of goodness is more sensible
to him even if the island was than expecting the inevitabili-
the last knot at the end of the ty of its triumph. Not only does
rope. ...But he had become in- Barry manage to expose his
fected with a genuine obsession enemies and convince his fair-
to 4o something about the po- weather friends, he -gets rid of


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the wrong girl and wins the
right one-and even the bad
old Bishop is replaced by a li
beral, new one.
For all that, it is an exciting
tale, told with chilling suspense.


SUNDAY, APRILi
.J


The characters will not easily
be forgotten. And the picture
of semi-primitive Haiti, in its
richness, misery and beauty, is
conveyed with such love and
understanding as to provide
the perfect traveling compan-
ion. Readers who haven't been
to Haiti will be as c.ose to that
astonishing experience as a no-
vel and an armchair will ever
-get to them.
SELDEN RODMAN.


Selden Rodman who wrote the above review, on Hugh Caves new book
is seen above inspection the Jdrcmie road on one ol his frequent
trips into rural Haiti.
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M O R En- (LSID
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SMexicans Hi
Lost Citizc
MIEXL~ CITY--'A
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The paper said Alf
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;.SUNDAY, APRIL 26th. 1959


iHAITI SUN.


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S -Boorel, Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
Sguet--at discounts of 50% of
the U. S. advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
'BeBe Creole is famous. The
,asame'applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
S -an-expensive watch it might
be -weTl worth your time to
Consider a trip to Halti.

A Nt oustas, President of La
.Belle' Creole and Haiti's most
Vigorous promoter of tourism,
is perhapss another.reason for
the surge in popularity of
free-port shopping.. His ad-
S'vrtising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
S:. licy of cooperating with tra-
S el agents, in their various
promotions to increase tou-
rism. Among the most popular
innovations he-has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tie of free champagne to any
-visitor to Haiti who happens
S -to be celebrating a'wedding
anniversary or to be or a
honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niversary and Al Noustas has
doubled his efforts to make
S. the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
rmous brand -merchandise.'
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
*uands of tourists this year will
'come home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
.. ,'when they went away.
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PAGE 7


GUIERAIN, LANVN,
CARON, CHANEL,
RAPHAEL, PATOU,
BALMAIN, WORTH,,
REVILLON, VIGlT,
CARVEN, B. GALLONN.
FABERGE'Ok PARIS.
JEAN D'ALBERT,
'JACQUES GRI FE
FATH, PIGUET.
.CORDAY,

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ROYAL COPENBAGEBI
ROYAL boULTON,
HUL LARVE STOLE


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CREAM All FRENCH.
DANISH and
SPANISH UQUIEURS.




RAFFIA BAGS
& SHOES




HAITIAN MUSIC
- Collector's Items


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HII SU


HAITI SUN
'THE HAFrIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
S.'EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
GE SANT-RESPONSABLE AUL E. NAJAC
ESTABLISHED IN 1950


NECESSITY 6F A COORDINATION
BETWEEN THE SERVICES OF THE
POLICE .AND THE HOSPITAL

SA Letter from Attorney Georges Leger, Jr.
(Translated from aLe Nouveliste>:, April 22, 1959)
: Mr. Max Chauvet,
SDirector cLe Nouvellliste,
,..Port-.au-Prince
; '- -
-Mister Director:
-Upon my return from a short trap' o the country I learned
from a newspaper of Port-au-Prince reporting the accident'of
which Mr. Etzer Racine was the victim on April 15th last
.. about 7:30 P. M. I't reported that the victim had remained more
.::. than an hdur without any help being given him.
This ac cdent occured in my .presence \lhile I was driving to
.:. town. The driver of the car having evidently lost control of the
v ehicle prossed the highway-and struck the side of the road,
S ailing down the embankment. which caused the car to land on
*. :. its left ide.,
; 'The accident occurred just at the entrance'to a small road
.. which is being opened giving access to the Delrmas highway.
; Thie position of the -car at the time of the accident was of such
that in the obscurity it was almost impossible' to see. The fact
is that several cars going towards town, .did not know that there
had just been an accident- and did not stop.
S. Nevertheless having been a witness to this accident, I stopped
'" im immediately to see what aid I could offer is the victim. I found
him i~nost unconscious, pinned betweerr the steering wheel
and the front seat which had been torn up, andi supported by
tile left door, of the vehicle which at this time was overturned
on the ground.
S My first thought was to set the' ar upright' on its four wheels
and I tried afterwards to open the left door which was blocked
by a mound' of earth.
S Meanwhile, my wife alerted other passersby who came to
give a hand. The victim, a man of great corpulence, had suffered
superficial injuries of the head, but from ali exi.dence he had
.suffered a fracture of the leaf leg. With the aid of a passerby
-. who had stopped his oar we were able to lift him from.the car.,
: Another driver who had stopped.agreed t.o remain with the
victim while I went to notify the police in, order t6 obtain an
"- ambulance.
Having arrived at the Police Post across from the Pan Ame-
rican, I made a report to the Sergent ih service and immiediate-l$
a motorcycle, cop rushed to the place of the accident while b3
radio the Police Department was notified to send the ambu-
Srnce.
After having dropped my wife off at Colirmbus Quai, just to
'be sure, I went to the central bureau of the Police \v here the of-
Sficer in charge infonned me that ambulance had already been
dispatcher. I am therefore able to affirm that in less than a
S quarter of an'heur after the accident, the necessary things had
been done by wLtrnesses to the accident as well as by the Police.
It is without doubt possible that the ambulance- may have
arrived'only a long time afterwards, for according to what was
reported, the victim was transported by some one in his car.
S This typically demonstrates the absolute necessity of a better
coordination between the Servicesb o the Police and those of
the General, Hospital. In fact, in most of the other centers, there
,exists an emergency service for such case', and'it is difficult
S to comprehend that such a lapse of time could pass before the
ambulance arrived.
Besides, in most of the Regulatioris of the Police or Road
Codes, it is recommended that witness fo suoh an accident
should not move a victim without the aid or in the presence of
a doctor. Aid given in this way to a victimnbon be prejudiciable
to his case. Evidently, if the victim has suffered nothing more
than slight contusions and can walk alone, his being carried to
get first aid would be possible. But in case of a fracture so
easily verified, and after such a violent shock as in this case,
only a doctor is able to give the necessary advise.
Moreover, unaware of the identity of the victim, the passers-
by who might have been able to take charge of him would
automatically have had to take him to the General Hospital
which might have been against the desire of the victim.
I, was only afterwards that I learned the victim was Mr.


Haiti Seeking $83,000,000 From U. S.
(To Build Roads To Spur Tourism
To Swell Nitery-Casino Coffers)
By JOE COHEN I.In Variety)


Etzer acine and in view of the state in which he was found, I Havana, but prr
thought it ifore urgent to have him transported by ambulance Hn but realized b
that .to ask him to recite his titles and qualities. litil upheavals
litjcal upheavals.' it,
I do not wish to start any sort of polemic on this subject but ued successfully ii
I simply would like call the attention of the con:.petant Services d to me
*n.io and to fome e3'
to the case so that in the future such sluw action may be "' nican
Dominican Republhi$
avoided and that medical assistance require] may be given to ,
accident victims. Haiti. too, has bei
Yours truly, I
(S) GEORGES LEGER, Jr. (Continued o.i


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)AY, APRIL 26th 1959


.


cHAITI SUN


:iarc Pierre 'Sales
replies On Criticism
April 21st, 1959
Bernard Diederich,
tor, Haiti Sun,
u-Prince.
MI 4ear Confrere:
Haing read with an amused
surprise the csortien of a letter
-iter in your Sunday edition
x corningg the Exposition of
S-ueintres Figuristes Haitiens,s
Ild at the .office of the-Pan
imerican Union under the aus
ices of this institution, I am
sending you herewith enclose,
a copy-of the argument which
'presents the works exhibited.
T.-This- document, should you
'ppblish it, will permit 'your
orders to judge more clearly
iy motives and reasons for
Xiticizing the movement of
-l aitian painting called -primi

As to the harebrained one
whose epistle threw some sur-
tis' into the minds of persons
ormned of the actual progress
j local pantings,'I believe it
aeless to bother with him.
is e and his slobbering do
,;t-at all prevent the aFir:re-
it6. movement which are sev-
ral among the best Haitian ar
to-. impose themselves to
i amateurs of art in Haiti
abroada, in spite '-o the jea-
opusy and the envy of certain
ierhais without doubt was the
:'This without doubt was the
.N.-


(TRANSLATED
FROM FRENCHI)
From the beginning we are
going to come up against a con
ception imposed by certain pri
vate interests according to
whom Haitian art is supposed
to-be a primitive art.
If it is taken in the historic
sense of the word "primitive",
in painting, we know that it
designates the European schoo-
ls of the post middle-age and
pre-renaissance period, taking
into account the passing through
the years of each country and
the status of evoution. It isi
thus that we shall speak of
Flemish or Italian uprimiti-
ves,,. Broad, aequilac6reen, this
term can be.made to define the
efforts of, the savage or pre-
historic peoples or the form
of art of human groups still
in infancy.
It cannot be seen how it
be connected, for example, to
the initial movement of popu-
lar painting launched and ex-
ploited by the Art Center. Rea
son which brings me to inscribe
conception from the beginning
of an institution of the charac-
ter of the Pan American Un-
ion.
With my confraternal salu-
tations,
(s) Marc Pierre Sales.


myself in major exaggeration,
if not false, against the number
of groups of painters that Sel-
don Rodman would include,
under the-heading primitivee.
(1)-Refuting that the ,Paint
ing of Popular Artists, can be
included under the primitive
paintings or without academic.
education, which encounter
each other in the margin of
the predominating currents of
an advanced society, and this
without taking into account
without taking into account the
particularities of each current,
of the characters of a methodolo
gy non socialized, of the evolu-
tionary tendescies of each one of
the painters who, under the fire
of his experiments and his res-
earch, modifies little by little
the diver-- infuences if noth
ing more than those of compa-
rison all' the possible spon-
taneities.. So much so that
after very little time, as life
offers no "vacuum.. the spon-
taneous become a voluntary
fact, such as it is shown by
the, actual sortileges, of the
gracee larv6en of international
maladresses, of an awkward al-
lure, uncertainty, borrowed by
that which remains fiom tthe
Haitian primitive school, to a
naive popular art, too generous
and easily accessible.
And let u proca first of
And let us' proclaim, first of


all, the failure of that which
has been convenient to entitle
athe Haitian primitive paint-,
ing., This movement inaugurat-
ed at the beginning of 1944.
under the supervision of the
American Dewitt Peters which
makes the f a r m e of the
aCentre d'Art, (first period)
is presently passed over, dead,
destroyed.

It has been deed for more;
than -five years now. with the
splitting of the aCenter. It has
taken this half-dozen years to
raise little by little, the failu-
res, the ridiculousness, the weak
ness of a form of art which has
nonetheless known a blossom-
ing... It is necessary only to.
recJl the canvases exhibited
by Poisson, Dufaut, Obin, Abe-
lard, Bazile, to say nothing of
the great Hyppolite.

Today, it is becoming evident
thrlt only financial interests
still claim from a categorY of
ignorant buyers, undeserving-
ly abuise4 by the propaganda
of these crustsn and this umer-
chandise>> produced by paint-.
ers wihoi have renounceb to
claiming talent.
i "


If in order to form an idea,
ihe works offered to the public
during the period 1944-1952,
one compared them with those


that several artists inclined to
retrograding under -the ecoo-
mic pressure, or other sinular
causes have presented since.
what derision! I will cite only
as example, Poisson and Bi-
gault whose present works are
unworthy of any 'classifying
with their former works.
In having the end of the c>-
ole of oprinitivism'> of Haitian'
painting coincide with the first
secession of the Centre d'Art,
in classifing uAider the heading
those
who beyond this epoc, have
pursued their" research, main-
tained their art in the limits of
criterium (besides, not exactly
determined) of the school,
.what .perspectives would we
expect to contemplate in -the
cadre of a renovated Haitian
pictorial expression, in full dy.
namic evolution?
A response comes from this'
exposition organized by Paul'. "
Blanchet. 'Director of the Pan..-
American Union Office in HaI
ti, oh the occasion of the Day:
of the Americas.--It groups six'
young painters ardent, hard :
brisk, true, .talented.
. .The title of cFigitrists6 und.'
which they have been collect-'
ed does not have the preten-.:4
tilon of launching a new school.

(continued on page 13)


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PAGE S


I. -


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--"
' -
ii




C'
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: I.* ..


PAGE 10


Vast Cooperatvie For Northwest...


(continued from page 1)

ry facilities in the North-West five persons in
at the' disposition. of groups .cards if the f
making the food ditsribution .than five.
The Inter-American Geodetic
Survey has offered trucks for The list of t
the distribution in Mole St Ni- generously doi
cholas, Jean Rabel, and Fort materials for t
Liberte. Sub-distribution- cen- bution includes:
ters outside the .major cities of the organizat
have been created so that'fa- Haiti- The
miles who are suffering from companies, who
malnutrition will not have too soline for the
far to walk to receive food. Ra the food to the
tion cards will be distributed SEDREN has o
to families- one for every and chauffeur; (


a family; two
family is larger


hose who have
nated time and
he food distri-
local members
ion, aFriends of
Esso and Shell
furnished ga-
trucks shipping
Stricken area;
promised a truck
Cafibbean Mills


Loading Coastal Steamer S. S. Albatross
with supplies for Northwest this week.


also provided a truck; and Fir-
estone has donated thousands
of plastic bags which will con-
tain the food packets to be dis
tribute. Promises of assistan-
ce have -also been received
from: International Harvester,
Reynolds Mining Company,
and the Tropical Gas company
in Haiti.

As the list of contributors
grows, it can not but be a sour
ce of hope for those unfortu-
nate people in the North-West.


QUEEN ELIZABETH
AND DUKE OF EDINBURGH
'TO VISIT LIBERIA

The Liberian -Embassy at
Port-au-Prince announced 'this
week that Queen Elizabeth II
of Englind and Prince Philip,
Duke of Edinburghb have accep-
ted the invitation of the Pre-
sident and Government of Libe.
ria to visit, their country in De-
cember 1959.
The 'royal couple arrive in
Liberia on December 1, 1959)
the Embassy stated.

-
irs. Homere Hyppolite of Co-
teaux left this week on a health
trip to the U.'S. She was accom
panied by her daughters Octave
and Raymonde.


/ SUNDAY, APRIL 2a

Haiti Seeking 85 Millions..,.:
(continued from page 8)

tical hot water for some time, opening a casimoiin
there having been several chan- June and will operS
ges in government since the loig ranquitas,' Puerto R
tenure of deposed President is part of the Condi
Magloire. This had had the net chain.
effect of reducing tourism, still BID FROM OT
one of the major forms of in- COUNTRIE
come to this country, and a Jones said that b
result 'the economy has been his activities in this
hard it. h1,", inittor hr
s .ah been invited b.


The government has already
-appropriated 1,500,000 gourds
($300,000' for the promotion
of tourism, and a committee of
the island's businessmen and
hoteliers has been formed to
plot the course of the 'expen-
ditures. However, dissension is
reported among the committee-
men on the direction these in-
vestments should take.
/ .
The International Casino is
the second Caribbean opera-
tion by Jones, who says he will
continue his interest in the Ha
vana Hilton, despite the edict
by the Nevada State Gaming
Commission that operators of
Nevada steer clear of Cuban


8
it'
Ic
a'
:.j


HI

iec
re
t&x


governments to open
their countries, thus:
up the importance of
bling to the econoni
small countries, becatii
attraction to. tourists.-',
Kozolff stated that.g
is an important lurj- o
populated areas, but :.
doesn't approve of cq
heavily populated arW
it tends to bring in ped
cannot afford the spol
-The Jones-Kozioff e#i
organized into a Liber
portion called the :
American Investment
takes the view that"
isn't for the masses..T:
in Haiti and elsewhe,


counterparts. (Wilbur Clark of need only a small !:p
the Desert Inn, Las Vegas, has the tourists. They coi,
sold out'his interest in the ca- commodate more than
sino at the Hotel Nacional, Ha those visiting herd-.Tl
vana.) The Haiti corporation they can be select
is only one link in a casino em from among those who-
pire that will encompass seve- they can afford to tal
ral stops in this area. He is at the tables.


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iNDAY, APRIL 26th. 1959


(

AYES JOURNAL GIVES NEW ASPECTS OF PLANE NAPPING


T ,e newspaper 'La Garde des
y'a s recently published an
~ nt of the'dramatic g. "!f the COHATA DC-3
e by six rebels earlier this
ithj giving the story piece-
ialas told by various of the
aBgers who -boarded the
ae in Cayes and landed in
a de Cuba.
i-he version of these passen-
ffills in certain details which
'1r ports did not reveal.
eA half hour after they took
f.athe plane was flying over
ihe region, of Miragoane. Daniel
'Gores and a companion occu-
ied the first row of seats and
t e. three accomplices were on
last row.
,iamielCeorges went into-tl;he
-to talk with Pilot- Guil-
d. Wat was said no one
Meard. Then he returns to his
&eat, tranquilly. Looking down
t Bhe sea. Probably to see whe-
Iethe plane which was going
I'the direction of Port-au-
inee had changed its course.
i uJhatsad closed the door to the
b in. *
-At this 'moment, Daniel Geor-
es and his colleague ot up
'and .took out their, revolvers,
id with their feet kicked down
Ahe door, while during -the sur,
rise of everybody, the mem-
.. .
: ~ ~ AI. ...:::.: .k::-


bers of the MRI who were in
lle rear disarmed the Lieute-
nant who appeared to be ill and
also took the pistol of Deputy
St.-Cloud.
The door of the cabin now
broken in, a pistol shot rang
out. Guilbaud tumbled over and'
Daniel Georges took command
of the controls.
The Co-Pilot. the Sergeant;
the Guard, thli- Stewardess were
ordered to the rear at the point
of revolvers, but Daniel Georges
resigned from the aviation ser-
rice -ince 1957, they say, cithier
had lost the habit of piloting or
had never-piloted an apparatus
of this class, and the plane floa-
ted on, then lost altitude to 21
or 30 meters above the sea.
Think of the emotion of every
body on board, death was star-
ing-eacl in the face. Then the
Stewardess inspired by Provi-
dence, cried out: hut don't you
see tlen that we are all going
to die? And you, gentlemen.
Why not call on the Co-pilot
to aid you?.
One of the rebels responded
brutally: .So? You are afraid
to die!"
A passenger dared to ask the
question: uWhere do you want
to take us?,
The rebel who guarded the


DRVID


entrance to the cabin respon-' Consuls. The nun, Directress of


ded martially: cWe don't know
either. Only the pilot will de-
cide". At any rate the-co-pilot
was brought to the cabin and
took tlie controls.
The plane resumed altitude
and flew more or less normally
with its cargo in religious si-
lence. At about five minutes
before reaching Cuba, the re-
belh put on their arms band-
with the letters MA. R. Then
they -landed at Santiago.
It was 4:00 P. AM. The police
arrived. The rebels disembarkdd
as if they bad just accomplished
a great victory, shouting: cLong
live the Revolution! Long live
Castro! -
The passengers and crew fol-
lowed suit. -
-The stewardess who had lost
conscioutlrness was transported
on a stretcher fo the ambulance
which took her to a hospital.
And the body of pilot Guil-
baud was sent to a morgne.
The plane was immediately
confiscated. None was allowed
,to claim his luggage.
STKc Haitian Con'ul did his
duty. He took. care of his rim-
proviseda- co-oitizens the best he,
could.
The foreign passengers were
turned over to their respective


the Nursing School was taken
by the Bishop to a Convent.
The second day tli.e U. S.
plane arrived in Santiago with'
an American Major and a Me-
chanic and Lieutenant-Colonel
Nicolas. The kidnapped plane
was examined thoroughly.
Having submitted to no da-


mage what-oever, it took off for:
Port-au-Prince, piloted by Ni-
colas, with the passengers on-


DAVID WRLLYhTRLRMRS-

Svould be happy to be.

honored by your
isit at



ali ape CYert


Sunday.' And the U. S. plane
brought back the body of the
regretted pilot, GuilLaud, follow
ing the plane closely.
Although deceived by, the
sphinx-like attitude of the ex-
kidnap victims, we share the
joy of their families and of all
the town in seeing them safe
and sain, and renew our sym-
pathies to them.
Translated from aLa Gardes,
-April 19th., 1959.


I1



SCOTCH WHISK.

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TRADE
MRRK


FT FREE PORT PRICES PORT
Grnu N. PORT-AU-PRINCE
Grand'Rue No. 342 .
HALTI


PAGE 11
PAGE 11


- I -e


-1


r


P7




!Z7 ;4 77 W, .*. .- ... .. .3


PAGE 12 .' C HAITI SUNI


HAITI'S PRIMITIVE ART TAKES TO THE WATER


-PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti.- A
plan -to have local artists deco-
rate the wooden sailng ships
that ferry cargo up and down
Haii's coastline has not only.
provided another outlet for the
nativeprnimitives here, but also
helped to brighten the tourist
scene. Few visitors to Haiti
fail to become aware of the
island's industrious artists .and
it is felt that more artists will
be discovered and .encouraged
under this new plan. In addit-
ion, the ports of origin of these
weather-beaten, little vessels
wil be all the brighter when
-the ships have been painted
and sculptured figureheads a-
deb. -
To date the decoration of one
ship has been completed. This
is the forty-foot Enfant Dieu
out of Miragoane. The prelim-
i- nary painting has been done
' .by Sisson Blanchard, one of
Haiti's best-known primitive
painters, under the direction of
the Centre'd'Art.'The cost has
been underwritten by Rey-
nolds Haitian Mining, Inc.
Bohemian Spot
or those visitors whose in-
terest in the local artists ex-
tends to more than occasional
gjliapses of their work, a visit
to the, newly established art
colony at Carrefour, four miles
from here, is recommended.
There, in a atmos-
-here, folklore dances are sta-
..ged on Saturday nights and
-':guests can sample spicy, Hai-
. "tian food.
r-.- ":. -After coffee, tourism is Hai-
ti's most important industry,
and although it has been af-
fected by internal political
troubles and rumors of invas-
ion Jby exiles and foes of the
Dominican Republic with
which Haiti shares the island
of Hispaniola advance book-
Sings indicate that a busy sum-
mer may be ahead.
'Dring the winter season,
December to March, 37,125
tourists came here 27,059 by
cruise ship. Airline figures


By BERNARD DIEDERICH IN THE NEW YORK TIMES


PAINTED BOAT-May be the fiist of many to brighten harbors.
were 2 per cent lower than for drive from -downtown, over
the previous season, but guests bougainvillaea-lined high,
had a tendency to remain lon- lies a World of flowers, vi
ger than in previous years. All table gardens, whispering
hotels 'were full during'Mardi nes, and courteous, ge
.Gras in mid-February. mOuntain folk. A favorite d
Summer rates,. representing is to Cap-Haitien to visit
a 35 per cent reduction from palace and citadel built
winter tariffs, are now in ef- Henri Christophe, the fon
feet at most hotels. At first- Negro slave who declared h
class hotels the rates average self king of Haiti in 1811.
$ 14 to $ 19 single, $ 24 to $ 29 route is through sugar c
double, American plan. Seve- land and mountain villa
ral small pensions and guest farms.
houses, offering excellent food Sumner months in Haiti
and accommodations, have op- not disagreable. Port-au-Pri
ended this past .winter on the is aired by prevailing wi
seven-mile stretch of road be- which blow offshore in
tween the capital and Petion- morning and change their
ville. reaction precisely at noon. Th
Other pensions and small are several fashion shows
inns, with rates as low as $ 6, observe, a gambiling ca.
American plan, are available and night club to visit on B
in the mountain village of Tevard Harry S. Truman,
Kenscoff. It is cooler there, and a greyhound race track, wit
one can get an excellent view capacity for 1,000 spectat
o.f the surrounding Caribbean. which opened earlier t
The competition for business month.
between six different car-ren-
tal firms is encouraging more Round Trips, Stop-Overs
and more visitors to discover Pan American World A
the countryside away from the ways files three times b
capital city. A forty-minute week from New York to Po


r a
vay,
ege-
pi-
ntile
rive
the
by
mer
im-
The
ane
ges,

are
since
Minds
the
di-
lere
to
sino
lou-
and
:h a
ors,
his



Air-
ach
ort-


au-Prince. Round-trip tourist
fare costs $ 209, but for the
same fare travelers can, if
they wish, make additional
stop-overs at San Juan, P* R.;
Montego Bay, Kingston, Cama-
guey, Havana or Nasau and
Miami.
Pan American also offers a
special excursion fare of $ 114
round trip between New-York
and Ciudad Trujillo. From the
latter city, Port-au-Prince can
be reached at a tourist fare of
$ 25.20.


KLM (Royal,


Dutch) Airlines] of


was offering until
thrice-weekly seo
au-Prinbce out oait
this has now beI
from the airline'
Delta Airlines, hi
operates regular'
the United States' 3
South.
A more lesurely2
made by Panama I
operates two shipso
York on a fourtee
around. This trip'-
days to Haiti and-i


$ 135 one way.


HOTEL

SALVADOR


PETIONVILLE /
CORNER -OF RUE GREGOIRE & RUE VILAI

RESTAURANT


DUCK & 1'orange
LOBSTER an rhum
LAMBI & la sauce rustique


FILET MIGNOUR
STEAK au polvm
CHICKEN & 1 I


EUROPEAN PLAN
EVERY ROOM WITH PRIVATE BATR
WINTER RATES: $8 to $10 singlep
$12 to $14 (doubleW

SPECIAL OUT-OF-SEASON RATES.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION WRITE:
ANTOINE DUPOUX P. O. Box. 474-,
PORT-AU.PRINCE, HAITI
TELEPHONE: .7894
el *


You know
It's a really fine
Scotchl when it's
JOHNNIE
SWALKERk ;


4.


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JOHNNIE WALK
Born J 20 -sill going 'strong


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excursion fare. For reservations call your Travel Agent or PAN AM..


Rue Dantes Destouches-Port au Prince-Tel: 3451


W Fly to Miami in the wonderful world of Pan American


-* .
eaar ar RtC a"


SUNDAY,


c







DUNDAY, APRIL 26th. 1959


_--


aHAITI SUN)


ANOTHER BOOST FROM PANAMA LINE
-'
the Panama Line's two comfortable ship's, lies a Magic islands,
s the introduction in this month's Panama Canal Review
Rd.escribiig Haiti as a new vacation spot for Zonians-persons
; live and-work in the Panama Canal Zone.
--Witih an impressive cover showing floating Haitian mahoga-
.en'vendors (Bu.m-boats) along-side one of their liner, the Re-
yveit devoted three gages of 'pictures and information to what
i ey.:dedlare gone cf the World's most attractive vacation is-
:a-ds..
..The line which brings more than eleven thousand tourist
io Haiti annually with eighty-four calls here, on the New York
a -Pan-ama service, is endeavoring to induce some cf the thou-
ands of -pec le who live and work in the Panama Canal to
acatio in Haiti.
A: s Panama Line manager in Port-au-Prince Mr John .Cusick
decrDbed-his company's efforts to aid tourism here in a pote
.attaeJ4ed to the Review: <;we hope to bring more visitors who-
.ill buiy more mahogany, eat more food, use more taxis,..burn
t- more gasoline, wear out more tires, rent more hotel rooms and
in general, will bring more money into the Haitian economy.
A-W:oapanying photos of Haitian hotels, street scenes and
.h.i folklore and cockfights the Review calls Haiti the
Sonlay .en.ch-speaking republic in the Americas.
SSince tihe Panama Line resumed its stops at Haiti's capital,
i.tPort-a~aUPrince, six years ago, more and more Zonians have
i.eveloped a nodding acquaintance with Haiti. The few hours
-tihaeir stay i1n port, however, gave them little .more 'than a
s ouenial knowledge of the Magic island's charms.
f.:iNow Haiti is becoming a vacation spot for Zonians, the place
Sa between-sips stay of one to four days. Special arrange-
nents at reasonable rates for package touns have been made
.rb the Panama Line and the Haitian Government Tourist Bu-
Ireau-.or visitors from the United States, Panama, and the Ca-
-ial Zone. Package towrs include expenses for hotels, meals,
tni sighOtseeing tips. .
"'r-A group of Zonians 'recenlymade one o f these between-ship
Ais ts to Haiti. This and the' following pages show some of the
thingss they svawa nd did.
Even before his ship docks, 'the visitor knows he is in a fo-
i:-rign land. The pincushion hills which border the harbor, the
Amg green island of La Gonave. the amphibious boys who dive
.ofor coin tossed from the deck-shown on the cover-are all dif-
fereMtfrom anything he has ever seen.
SAshore, the, signs are in French and the soft French patois
falls strangely on ears accustomed to English and Spanish. But
.-most f he Haitians with whom he will deal have some know-
ledge of Fnglish and a visitor will encounter little or no langua-
ge barrieri.;
'Customs officials are courteous and friendly. In only a few
i.i;,nurtes, the baggage of the visitors from the Canal Zone was
:checked and they wdre on their way to their hotels.
SSeveral good hotels are located in or near Port-au-Prince.
iiates range from $10 a day per person in the summer at a
:'hotel in the city, to $37 a day during the winter, or tourist
"iSeason, for a super de luxe hotel in Petionville, a 20-minute
drive out of town. Both rates cover room with bath and three
anes a day.
I' There is plenty to do. The group pictured here hired a car
-nd drove to the world-4amed mountain-top restaurant Le Per-
.choir, more than 3,000 feet above the city. The view is quite
rally breath-taking. They might have chosen instead to go
Another mountain peak. Kenscoff, at 5,000 feet or to La De-
pouverte, which is a thousand -feet higher.
-:iNightimes, they dianceld the meringue at the Cabane Chou-
oune, and one night they were in the crowd which watched
i-oodoo rites at the old cockpit.
ometines they shopped, at the familiar Iron Market or the-
tity's stores.
The women found perfumes and leather goods, handmade
bas, and carryalls of hemp. A prize find was the embroidered
.dresses; the material was already embroidered, and skilled seam
trees made it up as the buyer wanted, in 24 hours.
m-.: The men found the display of carved mahogany figures, trays,
and other items just about as attractive as the women did the
1-1
zdesses. And considerable time was spent bargaining for native

::. All members of the party were enchanted with the primitive
Lrt on display ip the Art Center which was the subject of a
reent REders' Digest, story. A few had time to visit the
M- ed mur in the Episcopal Cathedral.

-- ?' .


SALES RESPONDS

TO CRITIC...

(continued from page 9)

it rather expresses, in a more
adequate and precise man-ie,
a representative, p.otorial fact
of a common tendency.
The esthetic problems relati
ve to the ae-inition of a school,
to a clear and precise differer':-
.alit, of former canons deserv-
n,g analysis, in, the case; but,
would bring such limits to the
inspiration and to the F:'3s-ib:-
lilies of each artist that it.
seems to me it would be pre-
nature to submit them to it,
and would be determined prov-
.n common characteristics.
I shall underbake, then, by
reference, to present, specially
the principal works in the col-
lection of this Exposition, st
ne same time as the authors;'
and also, to bring out that their
characteristic makes a commu-
nity of their works: aspirations,
needs, sense of. research.
Inmost of the canvasses of
these artists, and I should say
almost all those which date
from the secession the pre-
sence of one or more visages are to be remarked.
They are particularly, unique
and testify to a shared worry:
the worry "of showing the Hai-
ian man in his natural,cadre,
.nd at the same tbne .harmo-
nizing 'it. For, up to the pres-
sent, their praises have not
been sung.
The omnipresence of the hu-
nan in the figurist works mrak-
es it the prefigurated form of
a new Haitian humanism, a
moving aspect of local research.
'The Haitian man is found < iegrateds into them. He is ana
lyzed, disseeted studied with
passion. His .presence becomes
a eLeit-bnotiv.> And it is the
question of what he has be-
come, of his swrvival'which is
combinedd in the sub-conscious-
iess of these artists, as well
as in their daily tasks, their
art, their life.
These tableaux are'proof of
this.
Better than this conmmenta-
v, they will expose to your
own eyes the present tenden-
cies.
There are a few of them, the
special particularities of which
nust be pointed out.
Beauvoir, Denis, Cedor, Jean,
Lazard. Obas.


O--


IOTEL ASSN PRODUCING
NEW GUIDE TO HOTELS

A handy Hotel Association
guide map is coming off the
dresses in New York this week.
The colorful guide contains
.r _.- .. .. -fl-.
i compete listing of hotels
their prices and geographical
situation.


1 i
,^. .' .-. .

..* ':


I-


Agent Distributor: Haiti Trading Co.

Chamber of Commerce Bldg.


Caribbean Construction Co. SA. .
Builders Of The Military City
Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD
Phone: 3955. P.O 0. BO.. 284


PAGE 13


a.


uOF nea Gnke/
OF HRITV S.RF.


*
I' '







PAGE .




















































^; ,'PAG 1C


,....


SUSAF spent three days here this past week.before returning to
Panama... The Colonel helped close out tlhe U. S. Airforce ad-
visory mission to the Dominican Republic. Both the Army and
U. S. air missions have pulled out of the Dominican..: A naval
S mission remains... Wealthy Cuban, Senor Former is here on
business... The distinguished French speaking CGban is stopping
at Montana... Marie, Marcelle and Raymonde Hippolite flew to
New York Wednesday... 250 tourists are expected to sample
rhum barhancourt cocktails at the Cul de Sac sampling station
next.to-the factory today. *grs. Gerard Lafontant formerly with
KLM is fow running the pretty rbnum sampling station... The
Earl Ruddells of Petionville met homeowners Larry Seaman
.and Greighton Shoor etc. from Manchester Conn. Thursday and
introduced them to their new hometown... Bobo Vieux is ex-
, pected home from her visit to Europe this weekend... Katherine
D iunham, husband John Pratt and secretary Miss Scott have left
the'Island, for the Summer. The Dunham troutp is to tour Europe
this season... Bruce Henderson of Time Magazine flew to Cara-
cas Tuesday after a week in Port... Hotel Montana was full
houses this past week... Affable America Consul Tom Davi,
observed bhis birthday Thursday and visitors including affidavit
carriers enjoyed birthday cake delivered by his talented wife to
the Bureau.
Al Seitz filled a wisdom tooth this week:.. Rain every day
since April 5th. in Kenscoff.:. Athertoqn is now growing wa-
ter lilies... Henri Borno has received a four-roomed trailer
with air-conditioning, hot and cold water laid on... The la.
test addition to Avenue Marie Jeanne in the Exposition City
is a Coffee bar reportedly put up by the Office du Cafe../
Newspapers report Panama is scheduled to have a surprise
invasion in May...


THE ROUND BAR
Smart Rendez-Vous
Monday: International Buffet
Friday: Pool-Side Barbecue Dinner


it's all waiting for you at...


I hih


12 TO 12 P. M.
BUSINESS LUNCH
NIGHTLY: DINNER BY
CANDLELIGHT AND
DANCE TO THE MUSIC
OF THE CASTELCOMBC
SUNDAY:
730 FILET MIGNON
DINNER
TUESDAY:
730 POOLSIDE BAR-B-R
FRIDAY:
730 SEA FOOD DINNER
See C. d la FUENTE
For Reservation


SUMMER COURSES FOR U. S. AND L. A.
Jv" A Orep. ort STUDENTS

T'nder the sponsorship of the sojourn of the students, and
the University of Haiti, a ge- will be in charge-of aHaiti Ho
neral summer course will be liday Toursu the newly
inaugurated at Port-au-Prince created travel agency whose
from July 13th to August 14th. experience in handling sight-
It is believed that several stud seeing a n d transportation
Tabu Flower truck over turned for the second .tme in a ents from the United States, around the country will be a
collision on the Petionville road this past week. Accident attri- Canada and other Latin Amer- good help on this program.
buted to failure of brakes... Mr. Bryan Bredy, prominent law- ican countries will participate.
yer of Washington D. C. is here on business lodged at Hotel
Ohoucoune-.. Professor Charles Leveille object of the teachers The University of Haiti is NOW ENJ
strike has been given a position with the Public Health Ser- working on a veiy interesting Radio ]
vice... 'Dominican Military attache Luis Trujillo Reynoso flew program to provide teachers
to C. T. for Wednesday. His country recently declared an extra and classes for adequate cours-
state of 'alert Throughout its redtritory... 'Fern Baguidy was es in French, Arts- Sociology,
given an embrace by, PAA employees at Bowen Field Thursday Tropical Medicine and Ethno-
when he flew)in from Washington enroute to B. A. Fern logy.
who worked six years with PAA's Rue Pavee office has been This program is also of in-
in the Washington Embassy for'the past 18 months. He spent terest for the Airlines connect-
/the'night here... Cecile and Claire Lambert clippered-to New- ing Port-au-Prince to the differ
York Thursday... Louis Griswold returned to Long Island this ent countries of the Hemisphe
,past wpek -Louis has been living in Cap Haitien since the re.
death; of his wife... Dr. Demetrio Boersner former Professor Special arrangements have
of Economics at the University of Venezuela, and now with been made with the Hotels and
the Caracas newspaper %El Naciqnalb spent a week here with Guest Houses located at Port-
;s wife reporting the local situation... The Boeraners were au-Prince and ,etion-Ville for TROPIC 103
squired around by Roussan Camille... Colonel Stancock of the INTERNATIONAL 6-BAND RADI(
L .!-_ B_ I ADI


w-ri


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It P .hau rinc outlt p .
r sU ,e a, uerl: 0 ,r,,i, OlC
P.Irtau ~prlfrltisIJ


Served exwc svrr at Hal ta
HOTELS RESTAURANTS W& BY CO
THROUGUT THI WOwB .


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Use this simple, efficient men b
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a V ..ra .dio, .
ON COacnft


-~ PAGE 14>~ ((HAiTI SUNS SUNDAY, A


NBC FILMS'T

The Casino wrao i
night for the Nati'
casting Company ,
Millions of T. V. vyi
United States will
side and outside'of-i;.t
on Harry S. Trumao'
coming week. The. fil
'done by local repress


[OY HI-FI
Pleasure


MHAITI SUN


SUNDAY, A


- -- N A I JL MLAJLWA ILA T JL.JLA JLIWAAk,';Lj.




& APRIL 26th. 1959


- PAGE 15


' .





S -



!' Capt and Mrs Veatch ended
ih-week'here at Choudoune Fri-
l dlay.and clipped on to Ciudad
orujillo and San Juan before
turning ,to their grandchil-
l.drqn in the States. The Veatchs
?":were dined and wined here by
,friends 'Frambrinis of Morne
ItHercule and the Landreths of
i.Petionvile. World travellers,
Sthe Veatchs loved their visit
tb H Haiti and depart cau coa-
.ranto with the folkways of
Whis-- isle.-
--. xxx

:Mrs Douglas Crew, wife of
.the Shell Company director is
.fxpkted, to return to Port in a

of ih victim England.
xxx -

:-Jacques Honorat the able
touriAt Bureau';'director recor-
Ad aIe on HaiWu-for the Ger-
Sna. adcasting system Fri-

-.', xxx .
5'Private Secretary of Presi-
*adent Dr.. Frangois .Duvalier,
iL;ueh Daumec flew -to the
: S. Wdnesday:with his wife.
bey are expected to spend ten
.ys abroad.. -"
-a -
'Passionate '.Disciple. of good
.nusiv for his birthday Tues-
^day.' '. '-
S. xxx
STi Son 1VcacIntDsh flew home
ith his wil -from -a;-three
$eek--flying trip to London,
aias and Geneva. The PkA
eue Paire executive said they
oted signs around Paris ad-
'ertising the arrival of Mor-
sseau Leroy and his creole
ntigone players.
1"" .- XXX
m an4 Jean Schild are down
j' pNew York visiting with
eir tbeice. This is their se-
Svisit and .thdy are lodged
te Monatqna.
XXX
D.. Raymond Johnson, of To-
-s visiting Haiti on a short
auon from his, inlerneship
U.S. Hospital. He had com-
ed eight years of medical
Sides in France prior to going.
tlhe United States.
Te young physician was in-
d to Haiti by the Edmond
e family of the city of
jayes where he is expected to
S.end a week.'
SL-odged at Hotel Excelsior, Dr
solinson was ,presented to mem-
Sara of the 'rofeesion 'here by
?r roger Vill.




1 ; ^


Rita Chauvaux of Canada,


General Foods staffer
the overland journey
Haitien this past week.
-born Miss Chauvaux
ping here at the Beau
-.-


made
to Cap
Quebec
is stop-
Rivage.


Dr Edouard .and Francinei
Petrus flew to New York last
weekend.
.---o--
Mrs Fritz Roy went to New
York last week.'
6oo
PLAN TO kIDNAP
TEACHERS
Fritz Gebara was arrested by
police two weeks ago, accor-
ding to informed sources, on
suspicion of master-minding a
plan to kidnap several school
teachers and prolong the school
strike which was settled ami-
cably Monday, April 20th.
The plan, according- to the
source, was to keep the pro-
fessors under.-cover and throw
the suspicion of abduction on
the Government.
xxx

Three members of the Etheart
family, Misses Jacqueline, Ma-
rie and brother Maxime retur-
ned from the U. S. this week.
xxx *

Miss Myrna' Davis, lovely
brunette froin Boston, arrive
Saturday for a sojourn in
Haiti on her" first trip to the
magic island. She is a noted
Executive Secretary and career
woman.
aXXX
Police Lieutenant UWinck De-
sir wed Ginette Charles Fri-
day evening., -
xxx

Mrs Erich Bondel presented
her husband with a'third boy
Friday.
xxx

Dr. Elie Villard celebrated
his birthday last night.

.'xx

Cowboy Joe Evans is believed
to-have left town on a bucking
bronco. He was second in com-
mand of the bankrupt rodeo.
xxx,

The new Minister of Agri-
culture G6rard Philpeaux is
dressed for work. The Minister
is well dressed in a blue demin
shirt and pants.


The nuptial benediction was
receive n itesa., evening
by Miss Mona Mitchell and Al-
oert Uhauvet who were jomea.
in wedlock at the Eglise d.
.acrE-Coeur de Turgeau in a
6:30 ceremony.
The young couple was atten-
ded by Mrs Jean Brisson, sis-
ter of the groom, who serve
as Matron-of-Honor and Andy
Anderson, Best Man.
The wedding cortege inclu
ded 16 flower girls dressed ir
pink and their escorts.
Following the religious cere
mony the bride and groom re-
ceived congratulations fro-


...e targe number of frienca
and Wed wishers who gathered
-. mne presbetery of the church
The bride and groom the.
.-..e lo senscoff on their ho
C.J-;moon trip.


X:x
Miss Vivian Barbot, studying
Musical Art at the Institute St.
Pierre, in Paris, recently ,oh-
tained honors for her talent as
a pianist during a contest held
there. *
000
Al new, films being shown
will include several made by
liss' Williams of her own ta
v'ork.


with -



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1'
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ANTIGONE OFF
(continued from page 1)
has presented the play at his
Morne Hercule amphitheater
*TheAtre d'Haiti and in the
French Institute here.
He has accepted a contract
to present the show in London
and in Paris where it is repor-
ted that advance announce-
ments and reservations are
js.ing made on a large scale.
Mr. Leroy has made an av-
peal to certain personalities,
patrons of the theater, to aid
,he players by helping to ob-
tain material and funds to
cover travel expenses for the
cast.


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'*tm





?AGFIS *. -- diITI UN) SUNAY


President Reads i ressage...


(Continued from- page 1)
Explore eacti posswiue step
.towaras that ideal to be builI
in general security, accrued
security; to watch'over its ex-
Spansion; to never be weary -of
Sfighting:foi it is to drive back
the spector of disaster which
is tracking the peoples without
will power and internally di-
vidpd.
The 'resident of the Repu-
blic, in conclusion, declared
that he retained with patriotic
emotion the wish which had
been express, Dy- ie Hono-"
rable President of the National
Assembly, Senator Marthold
on beha of his colleagues
S-tihat: the collaboration bet-
ween the Executive and the
_, Legislative Powers from day
to, day were becoming more
Police Uncover
Grenade Make--..
(Continued from page 1)
a~gne, an employee of the Mai-
eon Deschamps, was. arrested
for another offense on Friday,
and later released.
Police shrugged off as un-
t tre the public rumor that
members of Haiti's Coast Guard
I were arrested on Friday night.


Miss WILLIAMS Presenting
Film Of Ballet At Cine Capitol
This Morning
Miss Lavinia Williams, Ame-
rican dancing instructress whr
opened her studio here six
years ago, is sponsoring- the
special showing of Films of the
Ballet this morning at the Ca-
pitol Theater, at 10:00 o'clock.
. .. !


real, with-more of the aureole
JI presuge and national gran-
aeur, more positive than a
rinpie exchange of relations
necessary for the passing au-
,ustment of political interests;
but ratflur a coficrete ceau; of good will in recipro-
cal comprehension and esteem;
an accord, harmonious, loyal
and sincere of two interdepen-
lent thoughts directed towards
ne and the same goal of reha-
bilitation of the Haitian name,
safeguarding of the sacred
rights of the Nation, protection
and defense of the -e> Sacro Sainfb of the immor-
tel founders of the Fatherland.
I am professing, believe me,
the equal faith of my Govern-
ment.
I thank you, gentlemen.


35 American Artists
Due May 2
A group of thirty-five artists
-f the American Institue of
)ecorators are spending four
lays here, May 2-6.on a post
conventionn tour of the Carib-
)ean under the direction of
institute President Harold W.
3rieve.
Lodged here at El Ran.cho
hd group meet Haitian artists,
Architects and" interior' deco-
rators at cocktails next Sat-
urday night.



SWISS WATC


rersona IN on rrata
cnULuLIAU LuI ll ipa,,C .)

installation of the new Vene-
zuelan Ambas.ador to Haiti.
They declared the four asylees
may possibly be transferred to
another embassy. The new Ve-
nezuelan Ambassador who will
probably arrive in Port-au-
Prince, Monday, told El Nacio-
nal he hopes that the same re-
lations that Bolivar and Petion
enjoyed.
Charge' d'Affaires Mi.iani
who took up residence, late in
January, in the large two-
storey Brandt house on Ave-
nue N, ushered seventeen Hai-
tian refugees out of the coun-
try, last month.


This past Monday, the diplo-
i-at notified the Foreign Orfi-
:e of the presence of tour new
refugees in his residence. They
w.vere identified as Mirs. Pierre
.Armand and her two teen-age
daughters, and an ex-pilot Ray-
mond Annoual whom it was
rumored held a ticket for the
flight on the recently kidnap-
ped DC3 of the Haitian Air-
line COHA'-A.
Mrs. Armand is the wife of
the former Port-au'-:Prince Po-
lice chief who is in exile in Ha-
Sana. She had been received
in a special audience by thr
President of the 'Republic the
lay Colonel Armand .spoke
over Radio Progresso (Hava-
na) on-an opposition broad-
bast.
Last week, Mr. Miliani made
a protest through' the Diploma-
tic Corps against the fact that
Security police had entered the
embassy grounds 'and were
obstructing entry to the Em-
bassy. The guards 'were imme-
liately withdrawn.
1t is-reported that the Fo--
-eign Office circulated the re-
oort that in view of the calm
-Ind peace reigning in Haiti
there is no reason- fo grant
asylumm.
A Spokesman for'the Fo-
eign Office is quoted in Thurs-
-ay's edition of .,ste* as saying: < .n view of the excellent relat-
ons which from a historical
standpoint, exist between Ve-
iezuela and Haiti, the'attitude
f this young diplomat is un-
friendly>. .


The daily further reported
that the oas> had announced that Pre-
sident Duvalier, according to
UPI chad asked. Miliani and
other chiefs of dilplomati'c mis-
sions to no longer accept re-
fugees as the country is calm
and he had granted amnesty
to the.political offenders.


THE WORLD


FAMOUS


4 ASYLEES IN VENEZUE- for the refngees....;
LAN EMBASSY NOT TO GET Persons in ith
SAFE CONDUCT Emba.ssy are l~r
It is reported that the four mand, wife of the ei:'
persons presently in -asylum at Police of Port-au-Priij
the Venezuelan Embassy here children and Mr* R" i
will not be given 'afe conduct noual, a businessman!
out of the country. The Foreign Officej
Based on tile fact that the led to plead an adc
count y is actually going the question of .fi-
through a period of political using the thesis tht
calm and that all political pri- no need for granting a
soners have been granted am- these asylees a'td. tlier
nsety, the Government is said need for their having'".
to intend refusal of safe conduct duc t.:-


wBIG SHOW TONIGHT A

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AT I

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GUY DUROSIE

AND-
THE KING OF THE DRUI


TI-RORO 0

AN ADDED ATTRACTION
GERARD CHARMIEl
THE HUMAN FLUTE Al
INIMITABLE MASTERI-
CEREMONIES -
Free Admission During We~
Saturday and Sunday Admission
2 21-1,---

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FOR EVERY OCCASI


Back in HAITI?


Don't miss a Sunday owth HAITI'S
favoritee friendly Newspaper.
(Rtmbselr"WHAITI NUN" Cliihed Cflunpl I tihe Fad4ft.
___l__i__i <


'PAGIAMS'


H A 1 T I .S U 1n


SUNDAY, A


'




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