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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00228


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Full Text
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VOL. IX SUNDAY, APRIL 5th. 1959 No. 27 PORT-AU-PRINCE


RAIN, AID AND MORALE BOOST FOR

NORTHWEST DROUGHT VICTIMS
jo n d i t ions of thousands lived somewhat improved since Haiti under title HII of U. Si
'of small farmers and their fami- rain fell last week and broke aid. i
lies -in Northwest Haiti are be- the 13-month-bld drought. The first shipment of a mil-
z


1~7 Refugees At
Vlniezuelan Embassy
'I-iHere Departed


,; Ex'des departing
Three diplomatic cars_ covered
i. with the flags of Venezuela, Cuba
:and the Mexican Republic carried
i:a group of Haitian's who had been
in asylum in the Venezuelan
Embassy, to the airport on Thurs-
I aay at 1:45 P. M.
S (Continued on page 6)


Many of these.farmers who
had exhausted their meager re-
serves of seed and livestock in
barter to feed their families had
become resigned in the tradi-
tional philosophical manner .of
tlhe Haitia' who under the most
dire circumstances recites the
bid saying: -Bon Dieu.bona
(God is good) struggled to
exist on their ration of boiled
and roasted green mangoes.

During the past month reli-
gious organizations have step-
ped up their distribution of Uni-
ted States surplus food given


lion pounds of mixed commo-
dities of bean, rice, corn meal
and milk is expected to arrive
in Cap-Haitien this month un-
der the new agreement signed
between the Haitian Govern-
mept and CARE;

CARE on the request of the
President Dr. Francois Duvalier,
is getting up offices in Port-
aiu-Prince, Cap-Haitien and Port
de Paix. CARE plahs, du-
ring its first months period to
reach 75,000 people with food

(Continued on page 13)


$4.300.000 D.-L. F. LOAN

FOR ARTIBONITE VALLEY
The United States Government announced Thursday authori-
zation by the Development Loan Fqnd of a loan of $ 4,300,000
to the Government of Haitq to complete the 80,000 acre irrigation
project in the Artibonite Valley in Haiti.


.Dempster Mc Intosh, Manag-
ing Director .of the DLF, said
that loan funds would be used
to complete drainage ditctlies for
25,000- acres .now patially irri-


/ ,
Lack Of Water Closes Dagphin
President Makes Personal Enquiry
-Some 1500 persons are out of valier flew to the plantation.
ork as a result of the shut- Friday, to make a personal en-
own of Plantation Dauphin, quiry, accompanied by experts.
e. world's largest Sisal Plan- (Continued on page 11)
ition, which lacks water for its ,
ecorticating process. Ethiopia Establishes
Establsliedin Haiti for more Embassy Here
ian 25 years, Plantation Dan- Ambassador Arrives
bin closed down operation Diplomatic relations at an
temporarily on March 27th. Embassy level have been establis-
uhen the 800-gallons of hed between Ethiopia and Haiti.
Father a minu te required Mr. Emile St. L6t: has been
or their Phaeton operation accredited as Haitian Ambassador
oad. not be obtained. hn Addis Abbaba.
Pt-eaidenf Doctor Francois Dn- (.Continued on page 13)
r __-


.'. VISIT TO NOTED DEMOCRAT. AUTHOR,
'; AND WILLIAMS COLLEGE PROFESSOR.

S ...
















.The Lion & The Fox. author Jim Burns (right) wife, Jan (left) and drum-
mer sons Tommy and David with hosts, Professor and Mrs. Bill Gates,
Sretuin to'Williams College, Tuesday. (See Story Page 13).


gated, and construct further ir-
rigation works to bring water to
an additional 30,000 acres. [rri-
gation and drainage of this addi
tional acreage will contribute
substantially to increased crop
production, which is important
,to the economy of Haiti.
Despite the fact that Haiti is
predominantly agricultural
there are not sufficient locally
grown foodstuffs to meet inter-
nal needs. Foodstuffs now ac-
count for approximately 201%
of Haiti's total imports.- With
land !bro'lght into full irriga-
tion, annual production of rice
and other foodstuffs for inter-
nal use sb~otld increase by $ 5,
000,000.
Begin in 1953 as a multi-pur-
pose irrigation, drainage, flood'
control, and hydro-electric pro-
ject, present facilities consist of
a buttress dam designed for
eventual installation of three ge-
nerators with a -total cavacitv
of 40.000 k. w., and canals and
ditches to fully irrigate 25,000
acres.
(Continued on page 13)


The principal conquests and
prospects of the Cuban Revo-
lution were outlined during a
Press Conference held, this
week, by Cuba's Ambassador
to Haiti, Senor Antonio Rodri-
guez Echazabal.
The question period was ter-
Sminated briefly because of the


Nineteen passengers and four
crew members aboard Cohata's
daily CalfHaitien, flight escaped
with minor superficial cuts 'and
burns Tuesday morning when an


British Writer Here


'Norman Lewis, correspondent for
the London Sunday Times gave his
opinion on Port-au-Prince during
his third visit this past' week (see
page 10)


language barrier, the diploma-
ti' tenure of the responses and
tendencies to monopolize the
floor.
Fifty newsmen and radio sta
tion representatives had respon
ded to the invitation of Am-
bassador- Rodriguez who gave
the Conference and reception


...,
1. -".: .







AF"

engine failed, three minutes aftdr:.
takeoff and the Pilot-, made a.
near-perfect crash- landing' on the
outskirts of this city.
Lieutenant-Colonel p6lissier Ni-
colas, a veteran of more than
seen thousand flying ours, made
the right split second decision and
set the DC-3 dowln in the only
clear field near the Capital.
In the recently cleared -sloping
field next to the new -Simone
Duvalieru housing project Col6net
Nicolas landed wheels-up down.
wind and according to ColoneL-
Oscar G. Johnson Chief of the lan
S. Air Mission to Haiti, there
could not have been a better land-
ding.
The belly landing caused the
aircraft to burst into flames
though which the passengers and
crew escaped. The passengers
were calm and showed no sign of
shock when released from the
Military Hospital where several of
them were. treated for minor cuts
and burns. Elderly Tourist, Miss
Alix Causse, of 209 Nodhill Road,
.(Continued on page 16)


at his home in Bourdon, on
Monday evening. The Ambas-
sador spoke in Spanish.


Declaring that
been no violation
tian Embassy in

'(Continued on


there had
pf the Hai-
Havana, the


page 8)


VETERAN PILOT SAVES DAY



Plane Lost Passengers Saved
In Airlines First Mishap


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CUBAN AMBASSADOR

MEETS PRESS HEAD-ON


.. 1.-;


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U. Views On Proimoing
Americas Economic Develop6#ieiit.

The State Department this w Mek made public the-.text of
a statm6ent of. United States suggestions for promoting Wie
Economic Development of the An ri~as. ,Copies of'this state-
mient-were made available to the Delegations of the other
Govu)nment members of the Committee of '- on Febnary
28, 1959.
The text of'the Statement follows:
The Delegatiori of the United States is pleased to set forth
herewith the views of its Government on the approach -it
believes could be employed most effectively in promoting
economic -development in the Arn(ricas.
1.--General. -
Between the yoers 1950 and 1957 there was a 4.5% ave-.
rage annual rate of growth in the gross_ national product of
Latin America, a rate which substantially excauded the rate
of growth in the United States and most, if not all, other.
areas of the free world. There is good reason to expect that
this rate of growth can not only be maintained but accele-
rated, assuming a continuation of Inter-American coopera-
tion and the. pursuit of sound economic policies by all of the
American States.
If however, we -speak of increasing pEr capital, as distin-
guished from national, income, it is necessary to take into
account the rate of population growth in the area. Only a
half century ago all of Latin America had 61 million inha-
bitants. Today the figure stands at approximately 185 million.
Forty years from now, if the present rate continues, popu-
lation will treble again and, by the turn of the century, stand
at almost 600 million. The United States and -Canada, by com-
parison, will have, according to these estimates, only 312
million inhabitants at the turn of the century.
The United States has therefore on various occasions ex-
pressed its agreement with the thesis that the task of in,
creasing per capital income is,. in vidw of the projected rapid
increase in population, so formidable that it must be attac-
ked on all fronts by all of the American States. Not only
must account be taken of the privatd capital and. technical
know-how required to create employment for those who to-
day are under-employed or unemployed but also of the need
to create new jobs for an ever larger number df.workers. In
addition to the expansion of industry and agriculture, which
this implies, very large additional amounts of public funds
will be required for facilities which -only governments can
provide; for example, highways, sanitation facilities, hospi-
tals and schools.
In these circumstances it will be necessary substantially
and rapidly to increase production.
A dynamic rate of economic growth is possible within a
di Eocratic system of government which respects -te dignity
of man and attends to his essential needs, both material and
spiritual, provided there is a concerted effort on the part of
individuals to expand production supported by the conti-
nuous-administration of sound government policies. The ra-
pidity with which the national product can be increased de-
pends in large measure on the sacrifice which peoples anhd
governments elect to make.
It is against this general background that the Government
of the United States considers that all facets of the problem
of increasing living standards needs to be appraised. These
facets can be divided into various specific separate catego-
ric;. .
2. Specific. -
a) Increasing .the Flow of- Public Funds into Economic
SDevelopment Projects.
It would not be appropriate, for the United States-to pass
judgment on the feasibility of the adoption by other go-
vernments of policies.to encourage domestic savings and to
mobilize larger amounts of domestic capital for investment
and productive ekteprrise.
Insofar as the United States is concerned, there have exis-
ted for sortie time very h'avy taxes on -individuals and cor-
porations. Notwithstanding these tax burdens, .the United
States in recent months has,.withib the Spiit of Operatinh
Pan Anmrica, undertaken to increase in very substantial
amounts its ..public funds available for- ecoiomid develop-
ment assistance to Latin American countries. The magnitude
-of such amounts is indicated" by' the following specific actions-
of the Gov -nment of the United States:
a) Current negotiations for the formation of a inter-
American financial institution, the total capital of which
-should initially approxiniate $ 1 billion, a substantial
piolortiori tr be contributed by the United States;
b) A recent increase df $2 billion in the lending -authority
of.the Export-Import Bank, which conducts close- t one-
'-- (Contiaued on page 7) -


z '7.. 'is ug



.w e in Hiti d


he, was eceivaI bry the Ptes)jdet 4to0heWlpIi hW dbeve pmet t s ca- WwI
of the Republic, Dr. Fra 'is t j h sould erge. -.- -" .e p" "w"d to 11
vaer. --Austin -A. A sttPr-. the distW ig slierea s a .l1 ,at
den't oth hil2f thedbiiuhdettie States" .- p .s




The :U. &.. Negro finincier>- of guest at Hotel Chou ne. beauty that wil o ere
st any,.ofndian orik, -spente. a- co.ffe-Y- r. 1tipnii: o7 f .Hait' o-:ir c
.ek-Wn in .H-iti during _wh.i..: ing.,thig..sesike: qf. S-..Z Negr-de ": '.


West Indian cruise -:aboard the l. -- e '.reogntiou fi,.i
of the Republ!c, ,Dr Frann v Du_- Is s o ud' emerge. ..... sen-. .. ;.., .:


Panama Liner eCristba which w- Yi PriZe t ftowe



Friday m-rning. He should -have T s.''- exhibits.,that Haiti- won. T, i
-t-ceeded next morning byP'9l\ Qhatelet des Fleurs has just prizts- aid- trophy. -
American Airways to Jamaica but received a letter dated 1Iarth -
-decided to prolong his stay 'at the 31st fFrom the New..York Flow V' Moreover- garden and -fwer-
invitation of Mr. Claude Robinson;. er Shovw.held at the C-lise enthusia"ts- Tfoim. a id&a-."
Jamaican businessman. March 7th ttlruh 1farh'-4 ),ied segment qi the t a
As the :UCristobal eoinered p-t, o aguextract e .f ohlli ,roads, t ic and bayatha e re
West Indian -o -igin, "was_-on IC._.- .





r. Aust ndian ias met aboard by Your entry-lovely-. .. It the tta eo n.to sucpe_
Coanama Liner Crist Lar who ic h much pleasNerie that











.at Cofumbuspier where e was The International Flower s h matter what tflofere 'ioa
arrived at Port-auPrinF0ee, w iP t .a e cat hs x ierd ial





grdat by Captaing. igHe i of thve Trophy.- Pexri at otshat it ha -exhited on es





prt wi be forwarded to ou sht -' brought -a.hpe- l ..-ze-an
-..-.-eeeded next morning by _P-a 'Qhateletde Fl&eurs-has j u rizs- phy .. .





A Mr. Austin who speit a few cl...e isived a ter dated Mrb.c
decm o prolong the i stay.mat io TheNew YorkIrntew.r.Yok Fo. in' Moreidergaiden mneif1e
whvita sited Haiti Mr t thClaud e Rinvita- Flower Show.is the latest and n h'usiats-fobm .a-te





on of President S io Vincent, most elaborate such specti et F-. ..
Jin ,1934. One of the Founders of in the World today. Entries Pan -Aerican W Air4
As the Crismovement formal Federation of come from all-ct er the Worldh roays coopedated-with a






the British West Indies, Mr- including coutiotiessiidch as En *:seuim Flowet Sihoranld.Chai
.Austin said: met aboal France, Japan annd H- telet des Fleurs. ,in the- fast
oloMy interest in Haiti ha o never land :notauchble qe -tr.asport: of the flowersfrom






flagged since that first visit in of their flowers. .. -- PorthatelPincet 'The fI,-we
-1934. I remember that our report The& Show offered as.its high- were exhibit in the iauite oil
conluded with the staiti mend- es prizes eleven trophies. Cha Athert e'i -








in the-Western Hetisphere, Hait E GUE SPONSORS CAM- -r
was not only captain M aigna:l of tho TPph.. Prize and T t h A'eIi








Negroes everywhere but should- KENSCO-F FORu .OUTH SE O T -
Pnever billbe forwarded to. o'tpermitted to lack Unitd o.









.1 believe that this is a widely the Ligue Feminine d'Action iug in a- cordial- tnrosli~@ of
held view among lSiegroes ia the Sociale were given the ,oppor- mutual understand Th
and willing to invest money and Ke nscoffw- he gi.r- enjo.s ed wor











know how' in aiti. if they only -- garies ad songs- i t -moun,.
s knew hoati last year w Ldged in vilaplaed at tains, _ao- this first fi-a l of











*One line of approach, accured the disposal 'of :the League, Rural Study tamnp, and bthebe
t- him, Mr. Austin continued, these young students visited v..I I ent- .t1f0the abp
member of te U. S. omnhission- The- New York-.. t'












when he had theipport iunit-y o w daily the -peasant families of .and .1 for ia onisag sjor.












4 : .. .:::- l- s.';- ...:-"-: "<.-,





SW- -



i^^ ^' AND JEWEL ROLLER -BEARINMS
tion of -PresidOnt St6nio Vincent, Soa laorate suc- eAt da 6 Vi t
in 1934. One Gf the Founders of in the Wol l f today. )Ent-ries Parf -,..erican. ... r
the movement forx Federation of come -from allover the WoId. e wayg cooerated.wth.. C.
the British West Indies, iluin ouiess as E t
Ausin said: gland, France an nd'H tele'des leurs' fast
My interest in Haiti has never land notable fJDr-theex celltence tr~msport:ofthe flower~fromj
flagged since-that first visit in of their lowers.--_ Port-' -. ce .. -The..-fl: we
-1934. 1-remermber fihat our report Th6-S.ow _?f feared as.-its high- wre :exhibit in the..ne"e of..:
concluded with the statimenL-es" prizesTeleven tr ophies. Cha.1"Atherton ,L--e.. :s;.:
that as the first Negro Republic... '. '- "."
in the-Western. He-ri 4here, I- fi ":._:.
was not only an inspiration to-
Negroes everywhere but should- 1KEsc O FFTOR.YOUTH SECTION-
never be permitted- to lack .Unitefd
States help and assistance., Ten young girls, embers'of -th-e XCnso-6ff .4re4-, I "fr
.1 believe that thi is" a widely the Ligue Femi-vne d'Act on, in'g i'- a- -or_'di-i Os dos
held view among "Negroes h-the Socia weregivdn t ppor '' '
United' States-,. he stated, cand ',i-nity bf-studying the -peasant,. phases. ..: of .:. '- ..6 hihi
thar-many cf them are- anxious and. RuraiT Lif_ for a -week dt- iol. arid--ino; d-:-6 'o ; ..
and willing to invest money and Kenscoff.-- .. e' gq ,ol--. .- ,7-
-know how, in Haiti. if they .only _wne abd .o .-,-'=-
knew how they- could help-s Lodged ir a villa :plaed at .taing,oh.--F-is f fi -t ffo ..... .0
-One -line of approach; accured the-- disposal -of :the League, Rural.S tidy, tamp,-a, d. hei
td him, Mr. Austin continued, thBs.e -young- students visited v..ll bw. -s1e1 t"---.t.-.tFM6"Pii
when he had th-_opportunity of- daily. the.peasant' fabiilis -of ,-.1--vlr ii Icigs~jddi.'7















-XEL
0 -aW


n ,: ,= Wait, .
,,~r- -S le

1'' -:- _' .o. -. .- -. "+
s- !e
-- e ..;,






M O E ST N I A the River M1e St Nicolas or the and the great fortress, with its
I N I O LA Gorge. two hundred heavy guns, immense
IB AA F Mgle St. Nicolas is the only 'materiel,, and entire garrison of
GIBRALTAR OF THE ANTILLES break in an uninviting coastline. nearly a thousand men, surrend-
.'' East and West of this bay stret- ered withuot striking a blow.
': NEAREST POINT TO CUBA HAS PLAYED HISTORIC ROLE ches miles of rugged, coasUine. in I, 1798, Toupsaint Louverture
the. shape of a rough, concre# qeived esugr de oT ro
'::..;I.up ,t .termost tip of the refrigeration nor electric lights stand in mute testimony of a more step that has, uet to mo. tip i ,h Sar'
aI V peninsula once stood here. prosperous past at Mile Saint Ni- But as mig4y and fo S
-the great fortress of the Mole M61e Saint Nicolas is what colas. as it was the M6le changed gairi- Domingo was on November 28th
L, Saint. Nicolas, the key of the could be a Caribbean Tourist sons several times with only the 1803 with the evacuation by, the
PiWindward Passage, proverbially Mecca with its ruins of.a fabulous Striking examples of British noise of Honor Guards and fan- French of Mble St. Nicolas.
.known as th' Gibraltar, of the past and its unequalled fishing engineering skill is the long fare renting, he air, with the dates M61e St. Nicolas.. moving. up.
.: Antilles. and clianat. T~gQ hout Haitian rampart of Fort St. Georges on of September 22, 1793, 1798 and from the shelf on which il was,
t h ( b the East side of town. This fort
SForgotten sin ~ co ry ? "a eens ocea wa t s e n0 ish as wb as 1803 coloring the early history of reposed by history is back as, a
war when its n ral &tr r ly -. as a potential a bu by e english, as s San Domingue. topic of the day, A good eight
:- ha long marked a a a ase for the Uni- a huge powder magazine whict, is On September 22, 1793, a single hours by jeep from Port-au-Prince,
la refuge in calrked a i eew a still i n good condition today. The ship appeared off the Mole with not counting time oqt for repair-
dis.aster.ege ie ranked by forts, a double wall, and the roval inte- a hundred British grenadiers ing tires which ofeor little resie
.- iisamter. .rotu a0) Manked by forts, a double wall, and the ,oval inte- a th-ns
. rior is of brick Not a brick is out aboard, but at the mere sight of tance againstt the touglh thorns
1- ..~ .nrior is of brick, Not a brick is out
-.- .. .. place on the b ikNt and *icdk s o the English flag. Major O'Tarrel available on the roads which take
oirilW *ltf M lj "SC" F /of place on the ceiling and sides. of the Irish battalion, came ou
~ l lf t hef loor is no arbd b of the Irish battalion, came oul
I' The floor is now marbled by the '
vsitos to this shrine of old engi- with proposals of capitulation,. (Continued on page 16) .
eering skill the goats.
Mole St. Nicolj 9,tQ.yopce 'the .o% liC s oh spacious parade th Look Beautiful And Well-Groomed
i 'ore in the news wi g lrutm gro4, and i rkable cemetery. Christopher Columbus was, the Coiffure Facial Massage--.Manicure
being beaten over ils horizon. i fi A a statues and deco- first to ferret out the potentiali- ..
st hort 50 'miles acres th-" 'LTO'.i n headstones are ties of the Mole, n December 6,inting Per nen
,,white-capped seg ia Cuba's 0. sti -q, metery where the 1492, followed the jagged cliff
'.iente Prov6inq" A ij ^ of recent years along until he hit upon this placid-' B
si.,r-o's Tevol. S00"', 6 among them. The bay. It was here that Chris found A
itbloomed and whiere'- .Iu .#~6l 4 ss and. headstones sweet water'to fill his casks from BUY PR
s.trlaet of invainl hrnnught -


ki-clad tourists la of ghoBdo
-town. -
.. N.estling in thie embrace of a
i.:.large bay the old town consist-
":agng of a fewstaggering two-sto-
I-iey wooden' houses, and fi her-
~ mien'e hbts, arid colonial acqua-
Sducts and' bridges, M-ole St. Ni-
,tcolasi, proud forts are once again
- ringing with the sound of sen-
': tries strutting the ramparts.
SArtillery batteries of Haiti'p
SArmed Forces have di-carded
,. the old cannons that have pee-
red out across, the narrow 50-
mile straits to Cuba for nearly
;, two centuries and replaced them
by- later models.
';' The arrival of these young
:tourists has been, for the lobster
S'fishenmen who almost give away
.their catch for a few cents, and
:.-the little boutique which smile
; ''if you ask for ice or a cold drink,
somethingg of a great event. A cool
:;-drink is available. The bottle is'
"' placed in an old colonial well deep
::in the earth. There is neither



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Designs
AND SUPERB

GRAND RUE





*
From A

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Vesl e of a by-gone era is lhis entrance gale to a French Fort at the Mole

H A O W..


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OF SELECTED
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AND FAMOUS
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RTENT A


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BEHIND -TI ST. PIERRE- STATUE
(AFTER GASOLINE SINCLAIR)
Mine. Ernest Dodyon, Proprietor
Specialist
in Scientific care of ithe hair and skin
Giddluate Of The Akiefieian School
.Of Bieautj CulfiCe Of Chitago


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S President doctors, four nurses, an anesthe-
..... Desires E ricity ties specialist and a mid-wife. The
SDesires Electricity has am ambulatory
^^company hL. as am ambulatory
l+n- T^117 Of .


Newsman Aublain Jdiicoeur flew to Jacmel' Thursday to the
bedside of his sick father. Jolicueur's mother also ill has been
hospitalized for the past eight months... Roxy Bar on Tourist
Avenue is new and airconditionad... New on the WV- terfront is
-Chri.tmas Bar-... Fifty boys and girls observc.s the end of
lent with a dinner party at Beau Rivage. Mar e Al;ce Fombrun
-was the chief c. :..I.r... Thre- Cuban exili. lait :Haiti for
the Dominican Republic Tuesday by ro;t! 1J:ie .f lrlson of
PAA flew to'Miami Thursday for a brief sejourn.. Sonma
Marin cli.ppered home to ''enci,.2.n i : .: -
schodi pal Alena Haralson...... Bill Mitchell Goodyear-man from
export Dept in Akron. Ohio visited Shasa on a latin American
.inspection of agents. He lodged at the Villa Creole... A sweet
Demoiselle in Petionville is awaiting the i- turn of Jilad Lutfi
who is visiting his brother in Colombia... The St. Marc-Port-
au-Prince train is running again.... Carrefour Li Mort is getting
a new gasoline station. The new visibility is expected to cut
accident rate on this corner of death down from the Oloffson...
- Ti Barbe's voice can now be heard over the Voice of the Repu-
blic, the daily Government radio program Mr. Eric Tippi.q-
hauer flew to C. T. Thursday.... Joe' Wherler of New York's
National City Bank was herp at th.e C3stelheiti nn his second
visit Lavigia Williams is preparing her bal!ic f:-: u -xi:-s3en-.t'on
at the Capitol theatre Sundri -':' 1 '
cruising on the Mauretania dropped in tc ?se Minister Dr Louis
Mars and hear.of the plans of Haiti's Psychhilric Institute
Thurtday... Paul Whifehous6 of t.he Fort Lauderdale News
spent three days here this past week on a story. Staff writer
White'house left Friday... Dr Juan Manuel Ramirez is the new
Ist Secretary at the Mexican Embassy. Eleven years in the
Foreign Service have been spent in Central America and Cuba
"Senor Ramirez arrived Sunday... U.S. Columnist Drew Pear-
son is reputed to have more pipelines in Washington and thoug-
hout the world than any of his collegues... Gerard Tippenhauer
.is back from a six month visit to Jamaica... Marion Huber and
Violet Wallach (sixth visit) dined at the Oloffson with Atheton
Lee Thursday evening. They spent part of their vacations in the
mountains and at Kyona...... Olympic long jumper Adhemar
Ferreira da Silva of Brasil spent a short time here Wednesday
enroute to Texas. from Rio. Silva who revived memories of
Haiti's Olympic jumper Sylvio Cator was champ in Helsinki
and Melbourne --- 16, 22, and 16, 35... Another sporting type
to stop here Friday was eJudae a Colombian wrestler ivho
wears his-hair in the style of the Cuban revolution Pony tail
SGerard Alien is over his bout of Malaria... Rene Hoorbergen
of Camera Press Ltd. the largest Photo Severice for magazines
in Europe is on the Caribbean circuit Castro, Batista and
Haiti... Major Fritz Leon, Commander of the Military District
of Jeremie, is interned at Hospice St. Frangois de Sales where
he submitted to surgery for a stomach ailment... The Silver
Wedding Anniversary of General Antonio Th. Kebreau was
observed on April 4th. The General actually at his post as Am-
bassador to the Vatican, Madame, the former Yvorine Charles
is here with the family........: Veteran businessman Augustin
Austin of New York altered his itnerary to change
from the Panama Line cruiser at Port-au-Prince to fly the same
day, Friday, to Kingston. He decided on his last year's suite
at Hotel Choucoune for a long week-end and fly to Jamaica for
three months on Monday before returning to New York... Ted
Poston, top feature writer, reporter and social lion, is ma-
king his first bow to Haiti this week. The well-known newsman
now with tthe New York Post has been dispatched by his paper
to most of the corners of the world when news was popping...
Karl-Henri Fombrun was welcomed back from New York by
his wife and daughter Friday. They -are expecting a new ad-
dition cbient6t>>.


Caribbean Coastraction Co. SA.


Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD

Phone: 3955. P. O. BO.. 284


I Fifteen thousand tons of baux
The *o.vn of Miragolne is soon produced an exported
to have clct.ri lights. President hebyt company. To
Francoi' Duvalier last year asked
o products contains from 40 to
the National Bank of Haiti to
percent of aluminium, and
advance $20.000 to the Municipali-
ty of Miragoane in view of the
acquisition of the necessary mate-
rial. For more than a year the
project of lighting for the town
has .been under discussion.
Plans are no.w shaping up the
materials have lived and the -
Reynolds Mines will supply the SI
power for the electric system
according to the plans drawn up
by Engineers Sajous and' Bois
Albert Juste and Edouard Brun.
Mr. Edwin John Ryan, Resident W1
Manager of Haitian Reynolds
Mines, on March 25th was made
honorary citizen of the town o
Miragoane in recognition of hi
efforts to improve the condition:
there.
In the hills at Paillant, n- ar
Miragoane, the Reynolds Co:np.-
ny has one of the finest camp
sites in the Caribbean. At thi',
Dispensary more thna 1200
persons of the region receive .
treatment furnished by two


..ou. CATERPILLAR* i
.d -'. ."-a






SHAITI SUN
-E HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
::.. o. community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
S- TOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
';E~xANT-RESPONSABLE PAUL E. NAJAC
ESTABLISHED IN 1950


Iean Rabel, March 23, 1959

IVKIDirector: "

) 5. "' : .._"
W'' e have received a package of medical supplies from the
'Catholic Welfare of PortAau-Prince with the mention: Gift from
'iMiss Rolf, through Mr Bernard Diederich.of Haiti Sun.*
--May the generous donor receive here, our heart-felt thanks.
a..We have turned these supplies over to Dr Painson qnd to the
':Sister, a Nurse. Both are having the joy of serving the patients
"which, we send them during our visits to the chapels in the
i n&intaiis of Jean Rabel.
"'.'Thanks" to you also, Mr Director, for the article in 'Haiti
B.i.ii on March 15th last and for ,he interest that you are taking
':inthe-: ppuTation of Jean Rabel which is so afflicted by this
udsast'otuA drought.
S Ihe reportage; the fruit of a personal investigation_.over the
se tor of the commune and not the most afflicted, can only
.touch the, hearts of persons animated by real Christian charity.
Some accuse you of having dramatized th6 situation.- I do not
Think so.-,You must enter into p&sonal contact with these poor
peo"pleto& penetrate their distress and all its repercussions on
theiri daily life ...
-Redeive, Mr Director, the expression of my sincere senti-
X: ments and gratitude.

S (s) Reverend Father Jean Quentric,
Cur&.


-HOPE IN.THE NORTHWEST -
:-.CARE Mission Chief Jean Lauriac stated, Tuesday, that seed
.'for the Northwest, hard-hit. by the drought, may be shipped
4.down from the United States by air. Mr Lauriac who left this.
week for San Jos6, Costa Rica to turn over h's former post
I'to his-s replacement, before returning to his new task here, said
:definite.confirmation could be expected the coming week.
'As a.reslt of the notification.,published in last week's < 'Suna-.hat rain had broken the drought in the Northwest, the
CARE official said he had informed his New York Hendquarterg
'. of the need for seed.
In return, the New York office, had sent back the encourage
ing information that they were considering shipping five ton
of-seed by air. '
Pastor Wallace Turnbull, Missionary of Fermathes, who is
spending two weeks in the Northwest cabled this newspaper
that rain was falling and seed was needed.
S CARE, recently returned to Haiti, on request of President
uvalie rhas charted a program-through which they intend to
reach 75,000 persons in the -Northwest and North with food
during a six-months Iperiod which is expected to start with the
:- .arrival of a milon pounds of food in Cap Haitien on the 27th.
T:. The picture in Northwest Haiti looks a lot 'brighter, and the
.-thousands faced with a daily green mango diet have taken
:heart. Thi inhabitants of the isolated area. now know they have
n'*.'.."not been forgotten.


NEED ANY MAGAZINES,
NEWSPAPERS, BOOKS, etc.?
Just Walk to
ILIBRAIRIE DE A PLACE
S: Right on the Petion-Ville Square
(Near the Church)


1


l .. ..


Sways; lie just smiled and shrug- AID TO HAIT
going his shoulders said that. the March 30, 1959.' "
boys were 'the piti Travaux Pu- April 2, 1959.
blicss. 1 -'
Dear Editor:
I further 'asked some people De ar tor:
in Cap-Haitien what the driver A tabulation prepared by Dr .
meant and they explained to me J- Fred Ripp y, Professor of ;
New York, March 24, 1959 .that the boys, on their own ini- History at the University of.,
tiative, were helping the Pu- Chicago (Journal of Inter-Ame' .
The .Haiti Sun' blics Works as the Government rican Studies, Volume I, Num "".
Port-au-Prince, Haiti, W. I. was not doing anything for the bqr 1, January 1959, page 89) ::.,
Attention Mr. B. Diederich highways of the country. I un- shows that from July 1, 1945
r M. derstood in fact, that th.e boys to December 31, 1957 the Unit- -
Dear r. Diederich, stop every car going by-and ask ed States had' given grahfts and'
for money, for their pays; it credits to Latin America-to-
I brought home with me a co- is a kind of toll roads fee, ex- tailing $2,607,009,000; that is ,
py of your 'Haiti S n' andI I cept that the money, goes into more than two and a half'bil- .
would like this published with th, pockets of these hungy lion dollars., ; .
possibly your answer. I have kids. Haiti was the 10th from the-
bpen told that it is better in top in the list of recipients,
Haiti to withhold your name. but It surely was a sight never with outright grants of ftund .
I will leave that up to you. witnessed by us before.' I do of 20,854,000.00 and addition': :
While I-4vas visiting in Haiti. believe that it is commendable al credits utilized of $24,517, .
my wife and I happened to take to see private initiative on the 000.00 making a total of $45-, -
a trip-in the North of Haiti; we part of the boys but I still think 371,000,00. This is indepen- "I
went there by way of the high. it is a pity for a Government dent of aid from the-United.:
way between the town of Cap- to let highways get in such, a Nations of which th6 United '.:
Haitien and the borderline town condition where tourists are ex- Sttes paid 40%. -
of Ouanamintha. There we saw pected to come and enjoy their Brazil received the largest.
several groups of young boys, traveL total grants -and credits with/ '
apparently from 12 to 16 years Can you possibly give me $764,358;000.00; Mexico was -
of age, working on the highway some kind of explanation for second with $386,677,000.00.
with a shovel and a bucket fil- tis state of affairs? Haiti received much more ,
led with dirt, they repaired than either Cuba or the Dom-
the numerous and quite huge Very sincerelyyours, inican Republic. The amount :
holes which have apparently which Haiti received per. year,',-
developed on the asphalt sur- E. A. PEARSON averaged for the 12--/ yeiar.,
face over the years, probably period were.Grants $1,668,300.
due to lack of maintenance and A somewhat per year $2,000,000 were ,fi- -.
repair. I asked my driver what .bewildered tourist! lized which total roughly $3, -
it meant and why children were 147-15 76th. Avenue_. 600,000 per year.
allowed to work'on the high- Flushing 67. New York. continued on page: 16) .


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Offering all the advantages, of large cars, 6 to 7 passengers,
Stability, Comfort, Power and all the advantages of the small car Low .
fuel consumption (30 to 32 miles on a gallon.
Easy to drive, length reduced
Reduced Prices, in spite of-its great luxury
Ideal for Haiti .



JI
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THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE AGENCY, S. A.
Place Geffrard, Phone: 3216 or 3929

Garage, Rtle des Cesars, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
SAsk also for a demonstration of the Pick-Up and Trucks.- their saving of fuel.
solidity, power and capacity are already universally known. .
-' W' iL
--- -- --------- .j_----ju~L l~"uA GENCj Y ,w^~~/it/W'^*"





6HAITI SUNM


.n .. '.. -
SUnDAYMiJ


Mole St.-Nicolas... Haven For Ships Exiles Leave...
(Continued from page 3) (Continued from page 1)
The Mole is also a haven in
the traveller through Port-de-paix bad weather or when sudden ,On the runway the first car No.
to Jean-Rabel and up to the moun- storm spring up in tihel area. 468, covered by a large red,
tain tbwn of Bombardopolis where it was reported that several yellow and blue flag, carried a
a German colony farmed during boats were surprised Th;ursday contingent formed by Messieurs
colonial days. night by a sudden tempest which Lyddrn Bonaventure, Nathanael
Even with the severe drought in :,.,-.t the roat of Mole St.- Michel, his wife, n6e Laborde, and
this area the Gorge flows quietly Nicolas. It i, feared that some his children Daniele, Jean Yves
on and the banana as other fruits of the were victims. j and Magaret (the oldest is
grow on its banks The ,AMcrcede ., a motor-ves- ',,ly 3 years of age) Franck
n the large bluff southwest of sel commanded by C.plain Cla- Leonard and Yves Bajeux.
tie Mole inhabitants will tell you rel narrowly escaped." The crew The second contingent of
*ild herd" of cattle left over rom el narrowly escaped.The crew
wild herds roam and aer fro was obliged to jettison 150) of ,Haitian refugees were in the. gray
!o 1 nvs roamthe Caro of 4.000 swik of ,. -IBuick, property of the Cuban
danlt tc Iace. ,nent defined for thd North- Embassy. At the side of the
he surrounding countryside est and the Nor, into the Ambassador, Antonio Rodriguez
the town is also uninviting Echazabal were Mr. Pierre Del-
Rocky and overrun with bush ea. mont,* Chief of the Hasco Syndi-
ehd cactus, in contrast.to the Gorge Having thrown the cargo over
a I 1 cate, o Messieurs Jean Hercule Re-
which is a comparative garden of board, when -the weather aba- g, Messieurs ea n Here Rd A -
.eden even now. The sports of ted they returned to Port-au- nor Bernard.
,fishing and exploring the ruins Prince. In the Mexican Embassy. car
can' make a tourist safari to the The daily -Le Mlatin edito- were writer Stephen Alexis,
Mole worth whila rializing on the report said: r M G
'frravel to the 'Mole is mostly by IHlad it riot been" for the pre- Mr. Edouard Bellande, Journalist.
sea but it is highly recommended sence of mind of the men aboard Mr. Andr6 Moreau, tailor and Mr.
.t6 eiinbUonce your impending arri- ie -Mercedes, and its crew Jean Philippe, Chauffeur-Guide.
-vai in advance if you don't want would doubtless have gone to
-a shot across your bow. the bottom of the sea.


EN OY


Arrival At The
Airport "


As soon as they'anrived at the
aerodromq at Chkncerelles,, at 1:
45 p. M., the 17 Haitian refugees
went to the left wiqg of the exte-
rior chalet of the Pan American
Airways. Accompanied by Mr. C16-
ment Vincent of the Protocol
Service and the Chiefs of the
Diplomatic Missions of Venezuela,
Cuba and Mexico, they descended
from the automobiles to await the
Sarrivla of the pAA Clipper,
Flight 435 aboard which they


STA!


YOUR


would go abroad.
A crowd of officials,


Seaboard the clipj
relatives for Caracas., '


and friends were present at Chan-
cerelles to witness the departure
of the Haitian refugees. Dressed
in dark suits, the refugees of the
Venezuelan Embassy were grouped
tc.ether, in the shade, and avoided
photograheas. The were attended
by Mr. Jose Enrique Miliani,
Charge d'Affaires a. i. of;Vene-
zuela in Haiti, Miss Carmen Da-
lencour, Secretary at the said
Embassy, Miss Gisele Arnaand, A
red and blue flag was carried by
Emmanuel Beauvais and Jean R6-
gis. They also carried the insigns
of the Mouvement Ouvrier popu-
laire (MOP), in their buttonhbles
After an hour's wait, the flight
No. 435, coming from 'Havana.
Cuba was announced, Formalities
were fuLilled, the 17 Haitian refu-
gees advanced an.fdot to embark


proceed by the :t
du Venezuela, cirlo
sieurs Pierre Delmbnti
',el Michel. S
'Among those seenat
were br. Juan Manreti
the Mexican Embas .
Luis Trujillo Dpminlcca
ry Attache, Lieutefi
Thomas, Chief of the ...
Service (Depa-tmen .'
police), several officers^
Aviation Corps and a li

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Carter, U, S. Naval>.
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Mars.


CHATELETS DES FLEUIiJR

in cool Kenscoff, at .4000 feet, Almost .a mile above ji
Restaurant featuring savory delicious Haitian diush i f'
mets.

1 Please read the small print;

Haiti is a word of the aboriginal Carib Indians
aWooded mountains* And Haiti was well named, for 85.
of its surface area is mountainoq. -

You have not seen Haiti until you have seen its mno
The Chatelet'des Fleurs is well situated to show the f
Haitian countryside. It is reached by 15 miles, 35 I:
minutes, of pleasant driving, ove ai road now gorgeous
flaming Poinsettias. ,
Chatelet des Fleurs-produces and exports cut flot
tropical perfumes of highest quality. The high point
Visit can well be this visit to Chatelet des Fleurs, with
Stryside, its gardens, its delectable Haitian dishes and



Y IN HAITI


.~8/-s;RE T--~rim~~7


- MAIN OFFICE

in Petion-Ville

SINCLAIR Gas STATION

Short Distance
from the Hotels
to Petior-Ville


Phone 7436



OffPe in Port-au-Prince.

Haiti Cherie

Next To RCA Building
opp. Royal Bank of Canada
Phone: 3968


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--o~--o--"i
WEEKLY RATE-
.545 00 per 7 Day e.
Plus 10c. per Mile.
All Rates Include gas, O'
SInsurance ..


PAGE 6


-~_~_.


l


~~'~.~~ "."... ..~. ..i.. .:: >
:~~I*.j $:*
"'
"" ly;:::~
'" ~C' :'9
9~j2 :;;:




tCH 5th' 1959 L- A IT I SU 5iW


.' -.'." .. PA'Y -., "...,"y
. .PA y f- '


-VIEWS ON PROMOTING...
S (Continued from page 2)
if of its-total operations in Latin America;
president Eisenhower's request of February 12, 1959
Isfi. Congressional authorization to increase the United
fStates contribution to the International Monetary Fund
y" $ 1,375,000,000. This will facilitate increased' quotas
ifopr Latin America and would thus materially assist coun-
:'trids in balance-of-payments difficulties;
) President Eisenhower's request of February 12, 1959
i'_ fir- Congressional authority to increase by $ 3,175,000,
:.'.000 .the contingent liability of the United States to fa-
iilitate the doubling of the lending facilities of the In-
:erlnational Bank for Reconstruction and Development.
4'i A',substantial proportion of this increase may be ex-
i- pected to be utilized in Latin America; -
t.Inhcreased resources for the Development Loan Fund.
s:- Requests havd been made to the United States Con-
t gress for a supplementary $ 225 million for fiscal year
i959 and $700 million for fiscal year 1960.
VWe: :agree that even larger amounts of public funds from
11A American Govei'nments will be required for economic
development in'-the future. While the Government of the
united States is unable, by the nature of the democratic
rce.ss-to'-make further commitments at this time for fixed
counts over a period of years, it may confidently be efx-
eced that the United States people and Government will
oorate wholeheartedly in supporting the efforts of other
berunehts to increase the rate of development, looking
d .fulfillment of the American aspiration of improving
'he living'stardards of all Americas.
e) Increasing the Flow of Private Funds into Economic
| .-,Development Projects. ...
:Theability of all American Governments to provide funds
~ugh-.taxation for economic development is limited. Thee
iagtide-of the task, rather than doctrinaire reasons, re-
q ,:e therefored, that new efforts*be made to attract larger
aind "arger amounts of private capital to supplement public

in the past few weeks various delegations have considered
i^Bsure which can be .taken by the capital importing and
,taexporling countries to facilitate a" greater flow of
piyavte investment.
:T.he Ui~itd. States would also support sounds programs
for intereasig domestic savings and mobilizing them for in-
.,- vestmerit -u ,productive ;enterprise.
c).Tie Need 'for Better Planning of Economic Develop-
ment. ......
The Government of the United States shares the view that
Sthere-is an urgent need for better development planning.
> .::Differeinces in the economies of the various American na-
-lIions suggest that. planning-would be more meaningful and
i- effective if it be done. on.a national basis. We. have three
i.`sp icific suggestions in this regard:
F:. First a draft-proposal has been submitted for certain eco-
iomic .sfudies to be undertaken by the Secretariat. of the
Finter-Ame.ican Economic and Social Council on a country-
rbcountry-basis. These-studies should, by developing basic
diata regarding economic development in each country, prove
st useful to govr rnments .in their economic development

Second, there should be created within the new Inter-Ame-
'?"rincn Banking Institution a technical assistance department,
aff4dWithe.h~ best technicians available, for the purpose
ACi:' advsing with governments concerned the formulation of
i kcoiomic'development policies and plans, assigning priori-
.s. ms among projects and assisting in the preparation of pro-
cets,.for both public and private financing. Firmly believing
at this type of-assistance will be of prime value, the United
a~ Steshas stated its support of the proposal that it be esta-
sd.'The draft charter of the new organization deal's
This subject.
ird, the United States has suggested an annual high-
et meeting.of economic experts to exchange, on an infor-
t basis, information and views on current economic pro-
Mes, particularly as they relateD to economic development.
would provide all governments with an opportunity to
eW periodically the progress being made and to exchange
afor improvements that could be made in their indivi-
M 4:and common efforts.
.'-,d) Increased Trade as a Means of Promoting Economic
Pif Development.
^;v'The. United States considers that increased trade, between
itin America and' the free world is indispensable to rapid
?:,t .nomic development. Although conscious that under the
crajtic. system -which we all cherish and. defend occa-
ional 'setbacks will be suffered, we have and will continue'
to cooperate, within the framework of the GATT, to remove


barriers to international trade, including especially barriers
to the sale of Latin American primary products.
Within this principle of increased international trade, the
United States also supports the efforts of Latin American
Governments to create, in cooperation with ECLA, one or ."
more regional markets designed to increase trade within the
area, to provide larger international markets, and to im-
prove efficiency of production through competition so that
more goods may be made available to the public at cheaper
Prices. -


e) Search for Means to. Prevent Excessive Fluctuations in
the Prices of Primary Products as a Means of Promot-
ing Economic Developments.
The Goveinments of the, American States are already aware
of the cooperation of the United-States in facilitating inter-
national arrangements by exporting countries to stabilize the
Lot'ee market.
Whii. we do not believe that commodity agreements, in
general, serve the objective of obtaining more efficient pro-
duction and distribution, we recognize that they may' serve
t;:,mporarily to avert severe economic dislocations and to
(continued on page 16)


BACK FROM D. C.
And S. J. Workshop
Mr Ren6 Pilet, Supervisor
at the Financial Section of the
Mini-stry of Public Health, and
Mr. Jean Saint Aude, Supervi-
sor )f the Procurement Section
of the Service de la Coop6ra-
tion Technique pour les Res-
sources Hydrauliques returned
to Port-au-Prince on March 28.
Both of them have taken part
in the Eighth International Sup
ply Management Workshop
Program sponsored by the In-
ternational Cooperation Admi-
nistration. Although a major
portion of -their six month
course of training took place
in Washington D. -C., the pro-
gram did include 2 weeks of
tr-'ning in Puerto-Rico.
Mr Saint-Aude is expected
ro resume his position as Chief
Purchasing Agent as well as
Customs Despatch Officer it
;he Service de la .CoopBration
Technique pour les Ressources
Hydrauliques and Mh; Pilet
..- :n. 'e th Supervisor
t' 9- Financial Section of the
"'n:ry 'oT Public Health.






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S r
Haitw TW111g CO.
Chamber
ot Commerce Bldg.


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(The Most Wonderful Hotel in Haiti,
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- Tropical park Magnificent verandas -
Tennis court.
THE BEST FOOD OF HAITI


- ENTERTAINMENT PROCIRRM


* TUEDSOR


MONT'NR 'iPnch-"ouolaptr 7.0oop.m
OTELI Ito 8.00p.m


* WEDNESDRy MONt-BNR uIfe et
HOTEL Contest PPiee 7.30pnr
5hou),')ancing to l2.oop.m
* rHUR5DR9J CHOuCOUNE '1unch-oa10tf19al 7,00 p.
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* FRIDRy CHOUCOUNE foof-Canden 7,30p.m
HOTEL ConTesr IPi3e to
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*SRTURDRy R MUST CRBARNE 9
I s-- I .-iCHOUCiUNE p
I aOUCQUHE a J


I i


I




-:.-!:AGER :.r U A l SUNi- _


CUBAN AMBASSADOR ANDP ERESS
*-..ET HEA -OQ!

(Continued from page 1)


Ambpsador told newsmpen who
question him that it was a
matter of a' iaple street; lici-
'dent that had 6curred, 'last

Sen6r Rodriguez spoke brief-
ly, or champagne, thanking
the 'ress for its collaboration
aid dE leir -importance as the
Fourth Power. He said that in
these difficult houirk ,hete the
winds of lie and democracy
ari sweeping the miord, no, free
pe;plesi' would accept the
chaixit tf -ictatorship.
In evoking the memory of
IVaceo, of Marti, of Toussaint
Louverture, of Dessalines anid
6f Petiob, he-spoke of th'e cor-
dial relations, w!ch h a N: e
always existed between Cuba
Sand Haiti. Ie then placed hm
self at the disposal of the news
men foI 'iany questions tley
cared dt ask'
A newsman asked the Ambas
sador if the Haitiano-Cuban re-
lations had not beenlaltered by
the recent viold'tion of the Em-
bassy of Haiti in Havana.
-There has been no violation.
of the Haitian Embassy in Ha-
vania,, Senor Rodriguez ie-
plied,. it was a simple street
incident.


When reminded that there
had been gunfire in tAe direc-
tion of the Embassy, he stated:
aWe have no proof that the
gunfire was directed at the
Haitian Embassy. The investi-
gation revealed that no trace
of bullets had been found on
the walls and windows of the
building of the Embassy. There
exists 'another problem connect
ed with this incident, a problem
of a diplomatic character which
I am .idnble 'to :reveal in .my
capacity of Ambassador.-
To another question Ambas-
sador Rodriguez declared that
,the. present state of the relations
between Haiti and Cuba is har
mo9 gqs without restrictions on
either side, and referred to the
,traditioQa tiqp of- friendship
between the two.' countries .
More lan 85,000 Haitians re-4
side in Cuba, he informed, un-
der the protection of its laws
and actually possess fabulous
fortunes.
.When an .interpreter was
suggested the Ambassador ac-
quiesced saying that the cover
station must be cordial and
fruitful with no misunderstand-
ings, and Spanish-speaking Jo-
seph Thevenin, of ,Le Nouvel-,


listed' was elected and did an
excellent job of translating the
french questions and answers
for his colleague. Questions pos
ed in English presented a pro-
blem.
The Ambassador was asked
if the Cuban Government had
adopted aty attitude against
.the presence of the Haitians in
Cuba. To this he repeated that
85,000 Haitians benefit from
the protection of the laws of
Cuba and have made fortunes,
and pointed out that the young
Revolutionary Government has
not yet gotten around to the
study of the problems caused
by the exiles.
He further said with referen.,
ce to a question that a Pro-Li-
beration Movement exists in
Cuba with Cuban personalities
participating that each Cuban
is free to have his own politi-
cal opinions and that criticism
is admitted even in the bosom
of the Government. An official
may therefore take a position
and be a party of no matter
which group.
Ambassador Rodriguez in
answer to another question said
that he had no official note
announcing that Fidel Castro
is combatting the bourgeoisie
and given support to a represent
tative of this bourgeoisie, Louis
D6joie.
"Fidel Castro is not combat
ing the bourgeosie,, he declar-


ed. Ia am neither a policeman,
nor a detective. I have never
carried out any investigation
nor examined the actions and
conduct of' Mr Louis Dejoie.u
With this declaration the
atmosphere became charged as
the pogtical element entered
into this phase of the. Press
Conference, with the journa-
lists all speaking at once.
aWhat about the invasion
which is being prepared in Cu-
ba against Haiti?n a newsman
demanded in English.
He was informed by the Am
bassador that this was news to
him, and that no official con-
firmation had been given him
on this subject.
"Are not the Haitian exiles
Dejoie and 'Fignol6 .using the
Cuban radio to attack the Hai-
tian Government?, the Ambas-
sador was asked.
.Democracy has been rees-
tablished in Cuba," Senor Ro-
driguez replied, which is now
a free country. Certain persons
which can be compared to mos
quitoes are flying over the re-
gion of the Caribbean and at-
tacking the Cuban Government.
They sting you and then fly
on. You can flit them all you
want but they fly away only
to come back again.n "
Ambassador Rodriguez when
asked if he did not read the
invasion news in newspapers
said that there are two cate-


DFIVtI WBLLY TALRMRS

tvoud be happy to be

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sisit at


WRLLY


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_ i.i d


i JJitis mostfamous MR4I.Io FjaCTOR9


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* Stalan aeoelryu

SAtoami3zers


6


----- 'flT FRE-" PORT PRICES
Graind'Rue No. 342. POR-AU-PRINCE
_____ HAITI'


DRVID


-, 'i


gories
that
and
KWhich of. :.
believe?
'The
said that
the Miaii
York ....a
nounced'tn
bassador.
not oblip
true.
W Byjthia^
the newsaig'e
ny demaidj
cussions '
tensionqros. e
To reestai
ference to.:
phere of cor
dor. Rodrig
each person
ask his quqstid
not try to.
ly. But ti
the for a whiil
icompletely.'..
Again the qu
Cuban Gove
tonr of invading
replied,, Cxihai
Then he tol1i
they were dot.
her in the mdi
ral campaign,
there togeth'
exchange viewM

(Continued
'.1':


PSA


.,.', -Si'V- --Q


.r


I





. ..ARC M..1939 -.


De Your -
.4 -. 'O


Shopping
--it
,m l '' ..

It is getting so that people are
talking vacations as much to
p as- toF play golf, lounge iM
"" t sun or juSt relax. And, no
W -4, .B r vhin you consider the
." to b ed through Free
!i',':p~I g. A couple who.
z mIigh upend ^$5O on
., u findB tlji tan






1P ince, i Hait. Here othe
a ver ta~tio. wonderland.
... the .t .ia.o n.s A;ee- .
.. : -- r'th wold a. La
.:.- 1 4.:icated.;~u *thei
heart of fascinating Pprt'au-
iuintce, Haiti. Here one can
n d id a veritable, wonderland
v / ful: of the world's most de-
sired merchandise. Swiss wat-
shes, Cashmeres, Handmade
b' gs, Gloves, Crystal, Chi'na,
silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
'me ;as, Liquofirs and a seem-
S' ingly endless array of native
handicraft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
ter than a ordinary shop. Con-
S'sider that one can buy the
world's most famous Swiss
S wathlies Patek Philippe,
Omega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
Nivada, Jaeger Le Coultre,
Borel, -Juvenia, Audemars Pi-
e guet-at discounts of 50% of
-the U. S. advertised prices,
S.and it is no wonder that La
B11ee Creole is famous. The
a. e applieA in China, Crystal
'- and the rest every fine brand
i. ii s_.epresented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be well worth your time to
consider a trip to Haiti.

Al Noustas, President of La
Belle Creole and Hati's most
vigorous promoter of tourism,
is. perhaps another reason for
thle surge in popularity of
free-port shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-
shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
he continues to pursue a po-
licy of cooperating with tra-
vel agents in their various
promotions to increase tou-
risnm Among the most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tle of free champagne to any
V isitor to Haiti who happens
to be celebrating a wedding
S anniversary or .to be on a
honeymoon.
S This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niversary and Al Noustas has
S doubled his efforts to make
S the world conscious of the
S advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
.: mous brand merchandise,
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
'touind them. No doubt thou-
sands of tourists this year will
come home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
wken they went away.


"Z"ee~u ~ a ~r


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER
P. 0. Box 676, P'OfT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI






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FABERGE OF PARS,


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CREAl All FRENCIH,
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HAITIAN MUSIC ,
- Collector's Items


Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS

SWorld Famous RUGS & DRAPERY
Haitian RUM BARBANCOURT


Have us send gifts to your friends in thq U. S. A.
without affecting your quota.-- See us for more information.


27l

^r* r~ *O- -l M16 vrCI~ '~I~\CUI-L


JEAN D'ALBERT,
JACQUES GRIFFE
FATH, PIGUET.
SCORDAY.


S


4-


I


Y;: MARCH 5th. 1959


S- ..-


HA SUlF !


i


L"


C' '.:


e.




.~.. :;
-~i.. -
.I.
r,
'' "


* *-1.7 SU DI


The entry of Hawaii into State-
hood was celebrated by the Hawai-
ian Colony, Friday night, at the
residence of *Malihinr, Mr. and
Mrs. Nolle Smith afid Mrs. Tsulan
Choy, Mrs. Smith's sister.
The Diquini Kennedy-Burns
Villa, with its verdant setting and
tropical flora was like a trans-
planted piece of terre- from the
M':I :.: .;i:e of Honolulu.
Hav.aiians from the big ocean
the other side of America were:
f.r. and Mrs. George Hogiwara,
fiom Point IV. He is the Horticul-
turist at Damien. Igor Allen and
wife, Prudence, and their daught-
er 'Ramene, who lived two years
in Hawaii and sixteen years hi
Tahiti.
Mr. Nolle Smith, the host, is


Facts On 50th State
Public Administration Advisor for
Fiscal and Financial Affairs who
is working with the Ministry of
Finance.
Revenue to Hawaii, with a popu-
lation of half a million, and in
the same geographic attitude as
the Republic of Haiti, in 1958 was
as follows:
Tourist 85 ,milloin
Pineapple 124 million
Sugar 148 million
Miscellaneous 48 million.
American Defense. over 25C
million.
New industries to ee; inaugura
ted in 1959 include a $100 million
dollar oil refinery to use import
ed crude oil, and a steel mill
both to be installed on the West-
ern tip of Palm.


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PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI,
TELEPHONE: 7894




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JOHNNIE
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j OHNIME WALKER
B6rn J 2L -still. going strong "
--^ r -- --riiiii .i~m-i~i~j~nnir


Hawaii Statehood Celebrated
Here By Pacific Ocean Colony


old Hyppolite slaughterhouse, Us., a story :wi.
M-r Lewis thinks. 1954 Guatemai.i
Among the successful books as backgroitd' '
written by Norman Lewis are: travel books: A -Dr
iDay" of the FoxP, a story of ents on Indo-Chin
Spain; eThe Volcanoes About den Earth, on Bu


British Writer Finds
Haiti Spared From
Architectual
Massacre

Port-au-Prince and other
towns in this country are for-
tunate that they have not been
subjected to an architectural
massacre like so many ot the
Latin American cities, is the
opinion of a well-known British
writer who last week, visited
Haiti for the third time in ten
years.
Norman Lewis, author of
several successful- novels and
travel books, spent a week
here gathering material for the
London Sunday Times, and
making a film for a BBC Te-
levision Show.

The trend in so many Latin
countries of this Hemispheie,
according to Mr Lewis, is to
replace local architecture as we
have it here, which is perfectly
adapted to tropical conditions
with a Pseudo-Modernistic
style originating in the Medi-
terranean which is totally un-
suitable, to the tropics.
Haiti, as it progresses, should
heed Spain's example. That
country, says Mr Lewis, is very
enlightened about such matters
and :they have an. official -
the cAparegadorn whose sole
function is to see that no build-
ing Is put up in a Spanish town
which is not in harmony with
its -surroundings.

Purely because of its econo-
mic state this town has escap-
ed, and is today, in the opinion
of Mr Lewis, an exhibition of
classic Caribbean Colonial Ar-
chitecture all in the most per-
fect taste.

The writer likened an old
import the Iron Market -
.to the Effiel Tower, and a uni-
que period-architecture piece
that should be preserved. He
called the style ,Victorian Mo
gul, Mohamedan with four
miniature minutes.

The architectural value ap-
plies in a lesser degree to the


a


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H' 5th.i 1959


OF WATER CLOSES
DAUPHIN
tContinued" from page Ii


he -dilemma of confronting gion, the irreparable damage
.Plantation.Dauphin was not will .perhaps be avoided, for w:-
di ue to the lack of rain, thin the next 15 days the rains
-ing to Le Matin-, hut will begin and the Company can
were other reasons. The have .the 800 gallons of water
.'s"pte-d. which it needs each minute for
t'.' he plantations. installations and
or '25,years since the Comn- f-ctories. Already it has been
bhas been installed in Ha- signaled out that it rained abun.
iiJthap had to dig more than dantly on March 26th. and 271th
.~ tiaan wells which have in the region or m, andid
ta-ecause of the lack of rain. t-thn t waters overflowed the
a.'nds.. he end of the- past -iver bled and flooded the ri-
Ty, thie Company Manager, Mr verse.
giwiytz, wrote to Aayor Ber-
us Piehre of Fort Liberty sol- A newspaper. ,La Voix du
ting authorization to detour Nord-Estl in its April 1st edi-
aart of.:tle water from a small tiop said:
've in .order to furnish pota- (The enquiry carried out by
water fot the residents of the 'Voix du Nord-Estf revea-
i:nt Plantation. The Mayor, anx- led that this suspension of ic-
pjus to protect the interests of tivities is due to an unsurmon-
w large.planters of his town able rLoblem of water confront-
-trned a deaf ear; It was only ing the Company. In spite of
en the Central authority was tle 120 artisan wells which it
.f6imed of the request three lias dug in the sector .of Phaef-
niinths, later that the authqrisat- tnn. the Company has not been
i 1n was granted. But it was too hble to find any spring big
ae the thin string of water enough to give the required
the river could not suffice, nieds which call for 800 gallons
':1aving,.been absorbedby the of-water a minute. Also for more
i:j e-satu:ed riverbed, than 30 years the company fune
c'.Ths is the dilemma in which tionu only iby obtaining w-tr at
.I"e Company finds itself, at pre- the large Bassin at Garde-Saline
SIt was announced that Pre- from the Marion l.ver. The de-
'ideit Duvalir wa; accompa- viatioin ywich conducts the wa-
-'i d.- 1by several experts on the ter -of the river to the Bassin
--tter. Aecording- .to certain has been obstructed for over a
pe's.onalities who know the re- vear. The factory functioned on








Son the label






















S et i
:-4

S,
| ," NT t








S lved Yw a t ln ial_ t twn .
i imtisenpr gowow







et


te reserves of the Ba:sin which
gradually diminished and have
now descended to zero.


i-frmn thmteyhdn


iirforming them they had no
right to touch even a drop of
I w1'ter from the river .there.


, LACK
p -
- ^ ..- .


I Cosaques

. ~b41omar ,









nT !__ -


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SDaquirl service .... Fast Baggage Handling'
S... Junior Captain and Stewardess Wings
Se gyoungsterm.. Radar-guided Velvet Ride
Sand many other features at no extra fare


r


-


Ticket Offic JtNo Ie
Co. dfg. Jos Nidol
Geral Agen s
7on


-~~~~ ~ -. :. \F G l


"To those who would cry lack Whatever happens, thi tempo-.
of foresight, the managers of rary closing down is sueceptible
Plantation Dauphin discharged "r.f provoking a certain pertur-
their responsibilities of this ;i-' hItion in an 'immediate .way in
tuation in objecting to the fact the economy of the North East.
that in provision of this even- Itr:ansforming more than a thou-
tuality, they had undertaken in sand Haitian workers into unem
October of last year at the mo- played individuals. ,
ment .when the Marion Rii-r We believe that His Excellen.
was not yet dry. to reconstitute ey, the President of the Repu-
their reservedl by taking-water blic. is taking a major intere.;
from the said river. / in t1he question and that he iha I
But the local authoritires ar- taken in-hand this situation in
-'rdin to tle executivA of the order to find an adequate solu-
Plantation, vetoed the request '-n,".


U- -







/ I'


CUEDAD TRUJILLO

sAN JUAN,
,, -C' wM slosi r
i--YORK CIT
0.


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46





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-






RNS NOTED DEMOCRAT,

r, Political Science Professor
SiEnjoys First Visit To Haiti
With Family
finas captured .the interest The Burns family followed
capable Democrat and his I Adlai Stevenson's path to the Cita-
.fg family. Jim Burns, Profes- delle Lafenere and lost their
of-Political 'Science at Will- .i. iv-C coa s at Kyona Beach.
|1aCollege, in W e s t e r ,;' Monday evening the Gates invi-
i.nussetf, said-Tuesday a't ed all known William graduates
itered the ark for the trip and Burns fans to cocktails jn
i-that he intends to brin' their Gros Morne Villa.
4ily. back again because a It was Jim Bu;nu whi rocked
s "visit has roused their inte '' fC-:e.:i Jid republican soongh
uld on Western Mass. last Novem-
.Brns and his .pretty wife, 1'e- v.ith his campaign fro Congress
d.sons.Tommy and Da\dd, He missed being elected by a very
'iferre at the aBay View,. slight margin.


"B ardQon, were- persuaded to
* t..iis-Jse by. fellow Ethiopia
iliams, professor Bill.Gates and
e~. Sylvia -who are qualified
ao1, having live here tor
pt. o .year.
5 .. '.. :, -, .

t'Vips Visting

~~t'astelhaiti

aitingt the Castelhaiti Hotel
Oup 'of-18 officials from the
ie;- escorted by Mr.

iTrA'. -+*ht-- sugepestions of one


ETHIOPIA ...
i.Continued from page 1)


Ambassador Gabre Maskal
Hamarian,. former high-rating
Government Official, arrived here
last week as Emperor Hail. Salas-
sie's Ambassador to Haiti.
Fluent in French and English,
the Ambassador who is expected to
present his Letters of Credence
shortly, was joined here, Saturday,
by his wife and three children.
SThey will take up residence in
the DeMatteis'villa in P tion-Ville


Rain, Ai dFor
NorthWest

(Continued from page 1)

in Northern Haiti para.
CARE upon the report of a
rain fall in the drought
area and appeal for seed
for farmers is reported ar-
ranpging shipment of five tons
of seed by air from the United
States para.

An Association of Aid and
issiitance. formed here last
month by lending Port-au-Prin-
ce ,bu'inesnman and industria-
lists, has been given Public Uli-
lity status with President Doc-
tor Francois Duvalier.as Hono-
rary President. This group is
receiving donations to help re-
lieve suffering of people in the
drought-stricken area.


A returning visil er from
Northwest Haiti which was once
the third most important bana-
na-exporting section of the coun-
tiy'stated that the most impor-
tant aid given is the boost in
mprrale afforded these people
by the steady stream of visitors
who now are visiting the iso-
lated areas to inquire into their
condition.


rS.. Ex-Presidents of the Gray
e fn of the Castelhaiti Food is available in the town
,ag a- show, given last Artibinite Loan... of Jean Rabel hut oddly enough
e.ts .i Grd as. time, was (Continued from page 1) there is a practice made by se.
-.- ee. ldihonor of this Gray- T'he cost of the project thus veral merchants in this town to
Sfar, is between $ 31-32,000,000 distribute money to the people
t;4AIlS sF the Castelhaiti is a financed by the Export-Import -rowding before their boutiques
Si-j:u from New York/ City, Bank ,grants from the interna- every morning when he opens
.gmp.isig sonfe --members of the tional Cooperation Adminisira- ip for the hbnsiness which is
: 1:Wiational Associates of Cultu- tion (ICA) and direct invest- practically non-exisfent since
tt s Affairs, conducted by Dr. ment by the Government of people have no money to buy
:-James-E. Allen;. Haiti. nothing.
-.- imea-'E. -' -. .' -. n n-' 1. .%".P.%F .P.'-

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Unsurpassed Cuisine! Finest Service -
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DINNER DANCE EVERY FRIDAY

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Choice Menus at 3.50 (Dollars) per Person
Cocktails. Wines and Drinks, Reasonably Priced
No Cover Charge No Minimum
SMake your Reservation for the Best Tables
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,- i:n L r


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LEAGUE MAKE
CONTRIBUTION
FOR DROUGHT
VICTIMS

The Ligue Feminine d'Ac-
tion 'Sociale have joined the
number c c!ubs and associa-
tions sending aid to the
drought victims at Jean-Rabel.
This week, its President, Miss


- __ -


For all kinds of French perfrumes
visit Haiti's Smartest Indian store
Select your favourite perfume
from our large collection

JEAN PATOU
CHRISTIAN DIOR
We-offer you the world's famous-
brands at free port prices
LE GALLON
CARVEN
LAN-VIN NINA RICCI
CARON
CHANEL

I RRAPHAEL


etc... etc...
MIILOT


EL THE LOWEST PRICES, S


i-


Visit


EL RANCHO HOTEL


French, Haitian and American Cuisine
-under the direction of the internationally famous
Chef Olympias-Passales and
featuring the International Buffet every Monday
and Pool-side Barbecue each Thursday
Delicious cocktails and other drinks
served at the smart rendez-vous, the Round Bar
Dancing under the stars, to the music of
Raoul Guillaume's Orchestra
Feature Entertainment -
presented by Haiti's stellar artists......
and the one and only Ti Roro
with his magic drum
also the weekly Fashion Show
aA Night of Loveliness"
produced by the Coin de Paris
For Beauty... ...Elegance...... Refinement......
fort FIINe S T- .


Mi


.viMarie-Therese Cohmon and
her members sent a shipment
of food, medicines and clothing '
for the people of the region
through the Catholic Welfare
Service. This was .there first
contribution.
Miss- Colimon stated that
members of the League are
continuing their efforts to aid
thC movement in favor bf the
interesting population of the -
N uriUhwest.


'~'

''


,


.


o I




", .. : HATI S-UN..
"L"". -"''"


ditor The Miami Herald:
JI~nr the caption, eCastro's
Cribbean Goal Likened to Nas.
,er Mpvye,. The Herald publis-
Led the second part of a report
bE Dew Pearson on the tur.
bulent Carimbeamn..
Inli a analysis of the situa,
tio, as far as Haiti is concer-
ied, the author contends:
1. CBeginniig around 1800
when Haitian Negroes under
Toussaint Louverture rose up to
mSrfE French sg.ar planters,
etc...
2. ,De~pite his, political nai-.
vete, PreaLdent Duvalier seems
to be doing a fairly good job.
He had a reputation for hones-
ty, also a reputation for. going
inf for voodoos. He is jet black
and belopgs to the Haitian cult
w~ilhc has sworn war on mulat-
toes.
I want to say that the above
allegations are false.
There never was around 1800
any uprising of the slaves hn
Saint-Domingue. under the lea-
dership of Toussaint Louverture
to -murder the French sugar
planters*. The revolt against the
tyrannous and ferocious planters
started with Padrejean and Mac-
kandal. Since then there were
'many more to come..
Galvanized rather than being
disheartened by the unimagi-
nable tortures invented by the
inhuman colonists, the slaves
decided to fight for their in-
dependence with their nails,
their teeth and the arms they
ciuld steal.


On the other hand, there ne--
.ver has been any 4dultn in Haiti
to swear war on the mulattoes.
SIf His Excellency the President
of. Haiti, Dr. Francois Duvalier,
one of our most cultured pro-
ducts of the Haitian middle-
class, ethnographer, ethnologist
sociologist following the path. of
/, ."


Price-Mars, J. C. Dorsainvil, did
devote himself to the study of
Voodoo it was because he sim-
ply wanted to know his people,
and not because he was or is
Svoodooisinga.
Dr. Duvalier and his numer-
rous disciples do not profess
any hatred against the mulat-
toe, nor does he belong to any
Icult praising and preaching
such hatred, He hates, and we
hate with him, all enemies of
our country, whether they are
mulattoes or jet. black Negroes.
KARL REY, Coi*ul of Haiti
Nassau, Bahamas

--

t(Le Matina 53. Years
Old On A ril Ist

-Le Matin, observed its 53rd.
anniversary on Friday, April 1st.
Notable is the fact that many of


Drew Mixes Haitian History -
r


the .employees h a v e b. e e n .- -A i -- "-. .... tl *.
theemployees ha the authorities, the press, the
with the morning daily for more' ress,
radio and" the travel agents as
than a quarter of century.
than a quarter of centu' well as the' travelling public of
The office boy, Elie Bazile, and expresse-hope that
4 y Eaiti, and expresses -hope that
chalks up 45 years with the News- pensionn of its above-men
the suspension of its above-men
paper, while Alphonse Cameau,
tioned services will be only
the pressman has been on the toned services wi be only
temporary.
staff for 35 years. temporary. -
K.L.M. ROYAL DUTCH AIR
.Le Matins was founded -by the
late Cment Magloire. LINES Manager for Haiti.
late Clment Magloire.
His son, now publisher-Direc- A. L. J. de Breed.
tor and MBC Radio Station owner,
Frank Magloire, received mem- -UNIDENTIFIED
bers of the 'Haitian press at MAN ATTEMPTS
cocktail to celebrate the paper's
anniversary, on Friday night. The SUICIDE
evening was passed in hvamonious An unidentified man is in
comradeship by representatives of critical condition at 'the Gene-
Sthe Fourth Estate, during the fete ral Hospital here after he jump
which took place at cBacoulou In ed, Friday, into the ravine,
Petion-Ville. near Pont Saint-Geroud.
The unfortunate man fell a
distance of 30 feet, crushing to
the bottom .of the ravine, sus-
a taking serious body, and inter,
nal injuries. An ambulance was
summoned and he was rushed
to the hospital, still conscious.
I CoIotors are fighting io- save his


life.
0 000
English Professor
Lefkoff Here.
English Prof. Stephen Lefkoff
of New York's DeWitt Clinton
High School is here looking in-
to his favorite hobbies Hai-
tian- irt and French culture.
Steve is himself an actor, play-
wright, painter and sculptor.














/I 0


C41 Ar d

rfntcI.


I rn


Through ts Pcstage Stamn
For complete- information in H'r
Stamps, and other details whi'h wil
furnished you free of charge, writ
.0- Rv a'23 _- ,- .rtuPi


Agent Distributor: Haiti Trading

Chamber of Commerce Bldg
'-.


K_ L. M. Royal Dutch
Airlines Drops Haiti

Run

As a consequence of a reor- im
ganizatiqn in its route network on,
in the West Indies, KL.I Ro-
yae-Du~th Airlines regrets, dri
apno unow tat its ti cri.c eely fer
services between Curaqaao, Aru his
ba, Ciudadd Trujillo, Port-au- roc
Prince, Havana aipd Miami the
must be suspended as from ed
April 1st, 1959. cic
The ,KLM interests will be wil
Iqpked after by Mr A. van
den Berg, KLM Manager for we
the Dominican Republic, in Ciu Cc
dad TrujiUo, whoq will pay re- Di
gular visits to Port-au-Prince, Se
while passages on KLM's world HE
wide network will stil be sold
and reservations madP through of
all the IATA approved agents Er
in Haiti.
KLM is very grateful for the
nnod nc-nneration received for


-q
St
flu
Sr



I
I
S
9.
I


OF HRAITI S-. R.i


-- "


i---


-09~i


.


'















C_.


'4tt "" "


SGeorges Dreyfuss returned
i Tuesday from spending
er.months with her daughter,
ci) e Auguste in New York.
i eyfuss became acquainted
ia -neyw granddaughter
Sher'visit.
::> -0--
i it Vieux is visiting with her
Alfred in Geneva. He .is stud-
ni refrigeration.

e buriall of another outstand-
i:ig-iedimbe of the bachelorhood
., "eB1 insight with the -official
E bf.word tha Jacques Martin and
'--arie Josie -Gentil 'have set the
r,: 'iste. -During- Mrs. Marcel Gentil's
S tlay eWeninmg last week chan-
"i e-'oast-ig -sealed the young
ouples iIture.
,- .... O-0--rn

.--SgEdwind BuUell and pretty
M ).lJonique Elie are making
f or" October. The luck,
es with th ,U. S. Embassy
'a fiancee is working at the
' .-.;. -..-_.a .j .. '
Storel ub.
,-. ',... -0-
I" .-ric, Tippenhauer and
S. h -bntS" -Helga with her two
iek went to Miami on vaca-
.. l _I t week.

.Joe Cichowsky returned from
a. 'week in Florida Thursday.
S- Mrs. Cichowsky is visiting with the
S-family in the U. S.

-,.* Mr. and Mrs. Gunther -Streit-
wolf flew -to Miami last week.
';- -. -o
i-- -

S Mr and Mrs Elias Noustas
..'flew to the U. S. last weekend
wit- ih son-Joe who was returning
to his studies. La Belle Cr6ole
proprietor expects to spend twv__
Smonths- abroad. Daughter The-
rese is also in Manhattan.

Nadim Ah Khal returned
SWiediesday from visiting his
.slfter in Cartagena, Colombia.
;- -gerchat i Al: n ilR spent two
months in .the famous old city
S ,ce sacked, by Henry Morgan.


Hiog r ai ard- clippered off
Sto t iinnisota Wednes-
'-; d-ay to a tend the funeral of his
r tridioher: TJ. S. Embassy
lKdarine guard Hillard expects
.to lb iivay. for fifteen days.
-.-0-7
The first addition to the An
r toine Joseph family was christ-
engd at St Pierre in Petionville
.'S nday. The new daughter was
christened -Nellie and held at
Sthe.foft by godparents Clau-
de-te Joseph td. Naief Hal-
loun. -


Dr Harold Najac resident
at the Jewish Hospital in Brook
1.n returned bcm-- f,?r ':- first
;n!:- n three years to attend
.he funeral of his 33 years old
: .her-in-law Morel Stacc
who passed away last weekend
;----0


The Carl Wendt family pr--
a3ring fcr their transfer to Pars
guay received the sad news
Thursday of the sudden death'
.; Mrs Wendt's mother, in In-
"- [he Business manager of
Health and sanitation division
,f uhe USOM and Mrs Wendt
flew to the funeral.
-0-

On a sentimental journey tc
San Francirco is Rene Branht-
cme'of PAA, Rue Pave office
and Montana Hoc.tl. Rene may
leave his bachelorhood in
Frisco.


--0-
Senator and Mrs.
ver Constanit fildw
Trujillo Thursday.
--0--

Haiti Cement
Edmond Kouri -flew
C. T. Thursday.
-0-


Victor Ne
to Cludnd



distributor
PAA to


Major and Mrs. Clauda Ray-


~3~6~~


mond have a second gii". The James arid daughter Lucinda
new daughter of the Chief of the spent four day- here at El Ran-
Presidential guard was _born cho this week.
La.t Sunday, o o o


NOW ENJOY Y.-F

Radio Pleasure'


PrII,'; TRO'rIC lIC
SIN'S"?rJ..'"iwCNAL 6-BAND RADIO
Listen to the High-Fidelity brilliance of this Philro ma- i.sr r.andl and
you'lJ hhing you're in the studio, so keen and cliar is \ev.rv programme.
But that's only one of this model's many fine features; others include:
Complete short wave and standard broadcast reception on G Bands.
Fascinating 'long-low' styling-fully 2ft. in width-with rich walnut
finist cabinet
High-Fidelity sound from speaker network of doo-cone front speaker
and dynamic side speaker.
Built-in antenna.
Separate bass and treble audio controls.







FIRESTONE INTERAMERICA Co.


1


Tourism Director Jacques Honorat his 3rd. vacation here today at
at Wedesdsday's banquet of' the the Costers with lovely wife,
International Culb of Commerce, 5' --- c.:- a!i daughter Tina' .
dealt among other things, with, (Miss Fish) a future olympic
the recent reduction in the -.'.:: "' .
tourist fare from New York to "
port-au-Prnice which Pan Ameri- T-: 'Vinel:; death of More] --
an Airways has just introduced. Saco hui-.l.t.l of -formn.r Ja- -
The text of the brilliant speech q line Tainc and father of
-;1 be published in our next edi- rt.o children came Saturday.
ion. aft-r a long illness.


17 I. S. Newsmen On Junket Here


hi
af
H
ar
H
tii

ne


Seventeen newsmen arrived They were introduced to the
ere from New York, Saturday excellent cuisine of -,Le Perchoir,
afternoon at the invitation of the at a welcome banquet, Saturday
aitian Government. Arrangements -evening, and will be .entertained
nd contacts were handled by by 'Mr. Morrison ta his Diquini
erjbert J. Morrison, public Rela- villa on Sunday evening.
ons Director, here.
This mixed group of leading- An elaborate program of sight-
ewspapers, magazines and tele- seeing, visits to historic sites and


vision orbits will be piloted by
Haiti's combined official and
touristic personalities.


entertainment was planned for the
visitors who I*i spend the week.
I n Haiti.


.r.


s^


SNo.ad U. S. Industrialist
and Texas Oil man with inier-
ests in Haiti, Clint Murchison
Jr. is expected here Wednesday.
0-
Mrs." Lachmi DadLani of
Maison Oriental flew to Boston
Thursday for -health reasons.

Lovely Evelyn d'Adesky and Bob
Loughlin were married in N. Y.,
at St. John's Baptiste Church in
Lexington, last week. Evelyn is
-le ?'dest daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Raymond d'Adesky, well-
.no -' in Ilaiti's bh siness and
social world. Bob is the son ot
Dr. and Mrs. Elmer Loughlin of
Brooklyn and Port-au-prince.
The popular young couple
'live rot made known their future
lians. but family and friends
':plct them home Itrs blent6t.
--o-
Miss Josselinc Bazelajs he-
came the bride of Lieutenant
Claude Edeline, last night in a
6:30 P. M. ceremony at Eglise
du S a c r -Coeur de Turgeaiu.
(Look for photo reportage in
ntur coming edition.

000
ooo

Miss Sue Carter whlo lha .been
appointed Executive Director of
tE- Haiti Tourit Commission
here arrive-d last week to plaoe
her analyst technique and scien-
ce- at Haiti'- disposal. She is
lodged at Hotel Beau Rivage.

0ooo
Noted L.'wvcr Nat Klein from
Miami spent the ,week end here
this past week

000o
Dr. and Mrs. Martin S. Bueh-
ler, and sons Martin Jr, and


?;I 1 A 'R
Sd.tr- --.. .....
Industrialist And TFanily Here Frdm
England For Kyona LaunchingOf -
(Ernie II) .












S' : -










MAr -r.d IMrs F:-cderi.' 7darzir;-ier (in stern) of England, officiated at
thle N:";na Beach launching of the all-British fiberglass boat ERNI3
T- e 'the MiTrzriners were accompanied by sons John and Loon.- The ra-
kish cral: is the property of Arg.ntmne Char26 d'AffaresTrrdcrick Massot '
and his wife Evelyn who is the Marzirriers' only caunter and only
sJcc;e.deJl -in Ciuting the bow with the christenir: ottle. .

New Yorker, Tom Skelton, o o o
noted artist of- the canvas was Insurance broker Milton Co.
drawn to Haiti by its reputedly hen and wife Barbara are here
beautiful landscapes arrived this from New York.
week i-tl. his brpwh. :
oo o -0-
-



















.An interesting group which Havelock Ellis and his gorgeous
.jyed the Rara at Carrefour wife spent -hvo days here at Hdtel
du Fort on Good Friday inclu- Beau Rivage this week. Thed couple '

rion Huber. laTwer Humanr Gold island-hopping, and after seeigat
and wife, Evelyn Levin, George ml- oitisfi other islands have
Siswell and wife, and Shirley adopted Haiti and plan to return'
Ste nberg. They were piloted by here this summer on vacation.. -
ksh craf: is ~th property of Arg.- atLme Charge tA.~2f~fafrps odcrick ashMsot .






















Tourism Director and Mrs. Jac- Havelk ques Honorat, and Public Rela- Rite, Novelty enterprises i.1 New .
tions Officer Aubelin Toliceur. York and produces shoulder straps- .
for bras *
~0 0 0
Sooo
nMrs. Jean Harris headed a s. Eleuanceor Nelson, noted
party visiting Haiti from Jack writer, spend a brief isit rhere
son. Michigan. last week. Inclu- omNew York t
ded were her mother, Mrs. J. T.
Charle o ----....
























Stadeker and her.daughters Tra- Charles Schuman of U.P. I.
cv and- Jill. The wife of the Mi. is spend six weeks her co-
vn interesting group which thHavelock Ellis and his gorgeous .....
























r';igan electrical contractor and vering the local scene. .
her party spent five days here.o d
Famous playtonight Alfred
The speech delivered by de

.





.


!
1


' ..


' ***.'*




1 *'


Airline Mishap...


(continued from page 1)

Wilton. Connecticut, a guest at the
Ibo Lele who was enroute to see
the Citadelle\said .Our pilot was
magnificent bringing the plane
down so gently.,
Pan Ameican World Airways
fire truck from nearby Bowen
Field used up its complete supply
of foamite flighting the fire. The
Port-au-prince kire-brigade end
volunteers spent more than
an hour extinguishing the fire.
The aircraft was completely gutted
and 400 gallons of fuel consumed.
The lost plane was the oldest
of.three DC 3 which \the Cohata
:. airlines possesses. Cohata is ope-
rated by the 21 year old Haitian
airforce which has a remarkable
.no accidents. record. The
aircraft was not insured.
The evacuation of the burning
S' plane was filmed by movie enthu-
siast passenger Ivan Stelanovich
o .f *Hamilton, Onta'io, Canada-who
was travelling with his wife. They
:. were lodged at Castelhaiti.
Other American tourist aboard
the aircraft were: -Mr. and Mrs.
" Max Holzran and daughter Susan
S of 805 North Alpine Drive, Bever-
ly .Ills; California. Mr. ahd Mrs.
SEugene S, Goodwin of 139 North
'Thuiston, Avenue Los Angeles,
S California.
: .. Co-pilot of the aircraft was
Lieutenant Roger Maignan.
'I ---


"'N
'I
I'


f
I .

r..t .

iT f1'


AID FOR HAITI

(continued from page 7)

The ordinary reader wonders
whether this $45 million left
a tangible amelioration of con-
ditions.

However, one thinks imme-
diately of the slums, filth and
stenches of La Saline in the
most prominent part of our
Capital City; unstable political
conditions as represented by
some 11 or 12 unconstitutional
changes in Government in that
period, or an average of almost
one per year; elementary edh-
cation reaching perhaps less
than 10% of the.. children of
the nation; highly destructive,
impoverishing soil erosion
with not even token control;
water conservation with -on-
ly a few token efforts. Food
hand-outs have been abundant
but still insufficient for mainte
nance or normal life.

Well the United Nations, at
that time administered and
pushed by John Wakefield,
pretty much eradicated the hu-
man disease Yaws.

A large part of the credits
from the U. S. went into the
Artibonite.. Dam, a preparation
fo rmore and cheaper electric
energy and. irrigation for 60,
000 acres.


We admire the generosity of
our great wealthy neighbor to
the North, but the question
arises have they been well
oriented for the job of econo-
mic recovery of this country?
Would not an over-all, long-
term plan for attempts at such
recovery be' logical at. this
time? You Tell us, Neighbor.

(S) Pro Bono PUBLIC.


it's all waiting for you at...






12 TO 12 Pi M.

BUSINESS LUNCH

NIGHTLY: DINNER BY
CANDLELIGHT AND
DANCE TO THE MUSIC
OF THE CASTELCOMBO
SUNDAY:

730 FILET MIGNON
DINNER


TUESDAY:
730 POOLSIDE

FRIDAY:
730 SEA FOOD


BAR-B-R


DINNER


See C. d' la FUENTE
For Reservation


INTERNATIONAL CASINO

-D'HAITI

PRESENTS


SINGING STAR

BEGINNING STURDY


BERNADINE READ OUTSTANDING

BEAUTY AND RARE VOICE

SThe beautiful blonde songstress appearing at the Casino In-
ternational d'Haiti this week is one of those rare vocalists who
,.not only-possess outstanding beauty but a rare voice.
'Trained under the,renowned (Met,) star, Marie Wilkins, and
Reinhold Schmidt, the famous Carnation Hour) soloist, at
Kansas University, the young Miss Read developed-a voice that
sent her to stardom a.short nine months after graduation.
While in school, she took down many honors, being president
of Sigma-Alpha Lota, the national music fraternity, and being
a member of the women's scholastic honor society, ((Mortar
Board.),
AND ANOTHER GREAT ACT GUY
AND HIS,YOUNG

DANCERS OF THE ISLE
Free Admission During The Week
S Except Saturday 1.00


THE WORLD


FAMOUS


SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCA!


r


U. S. VIEWS ON PZ
(continued from pag
furnish time for governments to remov.e6
balances and we have therefore also cdo pp
for ways of bringing world production bf
better balance and stand ready to examine.
on a commodity by commodity basis. Thle
participating in the preparation of a draft .,r
subject. Work is actively proceeding.
f) IA-ECOSOC Consultation.
Some American Governments have sugge 6
time that inter-American consultations aind .
economic problems of hemisphere intetestw
tated by the constitution of the IA-ECOSOC'.
rum for this purpose...
g) Sound Economic Policies.
An indispensable aspect of the problem. og
velopment is thel continuous application of '.
and fiscal policies. In recent years, progress-
in obtaining a better public understanding Qf
and some governments are already taking -d
sures to restore confidence in their currency ..i
effect policies which facilitate sQund and rapr
Thq Government of the United.States continue
cooperation in programs designed to accompis
tive. The increased -financial resources. whiil
made available to the Export-Inport Bank an.id
be made available to the International Moneta"y
current United States policies should make-tl
oven more effective.
h) Need for Low Cost Housing.
The need for adequate low'cost housing in.i
constitutes a major problem which requires, i
fectiv'e policies and programs by the variousIs
Convinced through experience that private invei
the most promising source for housing devei
United States is recommending specific technical
assistance designed to aid in development of':.,
loan institutions in order to mobilize savings.-
utilized under appropriate Government guidanceV
rance, both of savings and of mortgages. Of si
tancd is the need of technical assistance to the tho
truction and building materials industries.
'i) Support for Increased Agricultural Cooperati
Agriculture as a principal economic activity' of'
American countries offers an area in whiCn inte
cooperation can prove most fruitful. The Inttii
institute of Agricultural Sciences is the agency of~
nization,of American States dedicated to the :.imf
of agriculture in the Americas through, training '.
activities. Reaffirmation of the need to strenglih~A
tivities of the OAS in the agricultural field is hi
rable, as is also recommendation for the fullest pos
port and participation of all member states in:,-
American Institute of Agricultural Sciences. .
3. Concluding Comments.-
Doubtless the proposals referred to above, if-ti
with the agreement in principle of others,; will-be6
and perfected in many respects.
The Government of the United States .takes this|
nity. to reiterate its. support of Operation Pan Am
well stated by President Juscelino Kubitschek.-In.
United States has doubly welcomed President. Ku
initiative, which it believes restates a fundamenlii
inherent to but transcending our current deliberai
It has bean within this concept that the United Si
already taken significant initiatives, some involving
policy changes. As these are directed toward-the .ol
e)tprdssed in Operation Pan America, they do, ifi-a:
titute an integral part of the operation itself. Assui
the belief'of the United States that these initiatives 'w
to supplenient .the measures and recommendations
preparation in the Working Group of the Committ6l
The problem of increasing productivity at a pace ~
to meet the needs of the fast-growing populations.
Amuerica is perhaps the most important clialleng
times. It can be met if the American peoples andi
vernments each take the necessary measures in.ti
spirit of cooperation which characterizes inter-Amer
lations. The people and Government of the Unitel
will, within the limits of their ability, bear their :
the burden.


C-




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