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Haiti sun ( March 15, 1959 )

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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: March 15, 1959

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00226

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: March 15, 1959

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00226

Full Text





I,-in ral gun


VOL. IX SUNDAY, MARCH 15th. No. 25 PORT.AU-P RINCE


JEAN-RABEL ARRONDISSEMENT

STRICKEN BY SEVERE DROUGHT


THE RAINS MAY COME TO LATE


Famine is 'no stranger to the
Haitian farmer who ekes out
a living on an average half-acre
plot of land. He makes up more
than 90% of the population.
During the dry season'it is not
uncommon for some particular
area to be harder hit than others
and be faced with a diet of
lard-as-marble green mangoes.
But it is no ordinary dry spell
that is burning up land and
spirit of the hardy Haitian far-
mer in the once productive re-
gion of the Northwest. Today,
famine is -affecting the lives of
some 45,000 in the Arrondisse-
ment of Jean-Rabel and two
neighboring Arrondissements.
No rain to speak of has fal-
len in this region for more than
a year. When a sligbit shower
wet the ground in December the
farmers happily rushed seed in-


Tour Of Area Reveals
Shocking State Of Once
Productive Farming
District

Population In Need Of
Food, Medicine Relief

i't dry up and rot. Unlike the
barren, brown. habitually dry
coastaL area on the south side
of the Northwest Peninsula with
a miichi smaller population. Jean
Rahel still has a little greenery,
but of mirage quality except for
the mango tree which' is provid-
ing -the mock meal of green
fruit.
The areJa has one road which
does not facilitate travel as even
a jeep must buck and bend to
make the twenty-seven miles
from Port-de-Paix. The main
highway continues to Mole St.


to their garden soil only to haveNicolas and up the mountains

This Family Is Typical


to Bomibardopolis ilhere it co-
imes to a dead cnd. The road to
continue circling the country
from Bombardopolis has yet to
Ibe built on to Baie de Henne.
Father Marcel Cornet of the
Jean-Rabel parish said, Sunday,
as he prepared to set out tih
following day to make a tour
of -miall di.peisaries in the hun
ger region with Dr. Painson of
the town', Hospital-dispensary,
that tlie most discouraging sign
in his parish is that the people
have lost hope. They are resi-
gned to their fate. Even if rain
comes, who has seed left to
plant? Whq has animals left to
sell for seed? How can a far-
iner mortgage a crop to a mer-
clant 'for seed when he wants
to feed his family with the har-
vest? How can a merchant give
credit when he no longer is sel-
ling, as his customers are broke?
There is no sign that rain
will come and when and if it
does few able men or women
will he around to search for
seed. Many have migrated in
searcli of work to other parts of


the country. ,

S. ..... T-hese are-a -fe t of the ques-
tions which convince the farmer
in this stricken area that his
TSW PO case is hopeless. In the opinion
of the French priest disease
such as typhoid is now hurrying
as the end of many of these peo-
ple. He pointed out that the
I hospital dispensary was short or
lacking medicine to treat these
diseases. He gave a list of me-
dicine needed urgently to be
THIS PHOTO was not posed. These people have no clothes. Farmer transmitted to Port-au-Prince.
Sanvian at Fond la-loi four and a half miles from Jean-Rabel has noPort-au-Prince.
In one family, he pointed
food as his once productive garden has dried up. With his wife; brother
and seven children he spent last Sunday weaving six baskets which he
hopes to sell for one cent a piece. I Continued on page 21


Farmer Estilen Vital of Porier near Jean-Rabel was caught by the
camera just staring at his parched, empty garden. This land was handed
down by his father. His fifteen year old son died of fever last week. se
the line of succession is broken.


Executive To Submit Law On Import
Restrictions To Congress


The dispositions provided for in
Article 1 of the Decree issued
January 27, 1959, prohibiting the
importation of products and arti-
cles manufactured, transformed
or cultivated in Haiti, have been
put under reserve.
A Decree published Friday stat
ed that the said prohibitive mea.
sures would be submitted to the
Legislative Corps, in a proposed
LaWr abr gating them, at the com-

Dr Nelaton Camille's
Sudden Death
Mourned Here
Impressive funeral rites were
held here, Thursday afternoon,
for Dr. Nelaton Camille, at the
Sacred Heart Church in Turgeau.
He was 62 years of age.
SThe well-known physician, for-
mer Mayor of Portau-Prince, and
one time Minister of National E-
ducation succumbed Wednesday
night, after being rushed to the
(continued on page 14)


ing session of Congress. The pre-
sent Decree states:
*Considering that Article 9 of
the' said Decree authorizes the
Continued on page 16)

Famous American
Columnist Here
Columnist Drew Pearson arrived
here last night from New York on
a brief visit.
Accompany by Irving Davidson
a friend from Washington, Mr.
Pearson, it is believed, will interv-
iew President Dr. Francois Duva-
lier prior to returning to New
York today.
Mr. Pearson received at the
airport by Carl Barnes and Ro-
bert Klein of the American Em.
bassy recalled that the last time
he visited Port.au.Prince was.
-back in 1931 when Ambassador-
Gerald Drew was Embassy seeie-
tary. They are "lodged at Hotel
Montana,


Cruise Passenger
Breaks Neck In Dive
Into 3ft. Water Ships
Pool
DIES AT CANAPE VERT

A young dancing instructor,
travelling with his wife and
small son on a pleasure cruise
lost his life here, Thursday,
when he dived into the ship's
swimming pool which had only
three feet of water. He suffered
a broken neck.
Robert Callahan. 26, of New
York, his wife Jane 23. and
their son Lee 4, were passen-
gers aboard the S S. ,Jerusa-
lem, a cruiseship which spent
the day here Thursday.
Callahan is said to have been
(continued on page 16)


(VOICE OF PEOPLE BRANDED ME ZOMBIE MAKER;

ZOMBIE WAS CRAZY RELATIVE)' SAYS ENACIER
3 HOUR DONKEY RIDE
FROM BOMBARDOPOLIS .---..-- Haiti Protests
ENACIER APPEALS Embassy Incident
TO REASON I And Threats To


Ensrier: Never even seen a Zombie


Several weeks ago the story
that a tobacco farmer in the
northwest was keeping ?ombies
and making them work in the
fields after dark broke in the
that area. Supposedly one zom
bie was picked up by police
and then given back to the
bocor after he abribeds the
corporal with 400 gourdes.
The corporal is now being

(continued on page 11I


Cure Laroche: Interviewed that
Zombie


Throw Grenades
On Edifice
An energetic protest and a de-
mand for protection of the HaiL
tian Embassy in Havana was made
to the Cuban Government this
Week following several .incidents
which included threats to throw
grenades. upon the edifice.
Haiti's Charg6 d'Affaires, -Mr.
Jacques Dorismond presented the
note of protest to Cuban Minister
of State, Dr. Roberto Agramonte,
(Continued on page 13)




SUNDAY, MARCH 15th


PAGE 2 ((HAITI SUN)


JEAN-RABEL STRIC

IContinuel from page 1I


out, four persons had died of
typhoid.
Four and a half miles behind
Jean-Rabtl. in the hills, is the
small Baptiste Mission of Poi-
rier. Pa-tor Wallace Turnbull
who was -first to signal that star-
vation conditions existed along
the arid coast from Anse-Rouge
to Bairn fl- Henne, and behind
in the mountains, was Isockerl to
discover this past .weekend that
his own church members within
sight of the small tin church
were in a tragic condition.
Pot-bellied children with spi-
der legs, sagging skin and hag-
gard eyes were seen hanging list
lessly around the family acaille
with the tired attitude of -old
men.
Young members of the Catbo-
lic Youth, out gathering infor-
mation, said higher up the mona
Stained the emaciated men and wo-
men, in many cases, hide them-
selves from visitors as though
to be starving was a sinful thing
Few, they said, resorted to beg-
ging.
W a I lace Turnbull was
born in Los Angeles in 1925
while his missionary parents
were on vacation from their
work with the Christian and
Missionary Alliance in India, and
came to Haiti more than a de-
cade ago with his father.
Although he had not vi-
sited Poirier in.five months, hiA
deacons and fellow-workers bad
kept him informed. His Sunday
distribution of United States
gift corn meal to some 150 fa-
milies provided them with their
first meal in days, and in some
cases weeks. In most cases that
food lasted them only one day.
In walking around the vicini-
ty of the church where proud
farmers once called out happy
salutations as they prepared
their fighting cock for the after
noon. matches, and the children
put away their Sunday clothes
after attending mass in town or
at the Baptist Church, there is
a dejected silence except for cry
ing babies. The crops of beans,
peanuts, manioc for cassava
bredl, bananas, coffee, millet
and live stock, along with the
farmer's dearest possession, the
fighting cocks have all disap-
peared.

Starving Families
Interviewed
Farmer Lherisson, nursing one
of his 13 children a h'is wife
prepared their first meal the
gift of the American people --
of corn meal on an open fire
in the center of their new
ccaille, built, they said. on ere-
dit as their old home recently
was burned down said: ,Thank
God for this but we have no
idea where the next meal is


coming from". He pointed to a
few coffee beans that could be
easily counted, as they -baked,
in the front yard, and explained
that if these were cleaned with
care he might get enough mo-
ney in town for another meal
of amais moulus (corn meal).
In (a little hollow called cFond-
La-Loiv. before a .caille. of
Sanvian, a farmer with a wife
and seven children, was spend-:
ing his Sunday weaving baskets
with alataniar, (palm fiber)
which he hoped to sell for one
cent a piece. He was doubtful
whether he would find a mar-
ket after the long weary walk
to the town or 30 miles to Port-
de-Paix, but he said it was some
thing to do.
He wQuld like to go off in
search of work in other parts
of the Republic hut someone
lias to stay home with the chil-
dren. Two of the amaciated ba-
bies had severe burns from
crawling into the open fire. in
one "caille'.
Sanian said practically every
one has left and soon his region
would.be empty. He is trying to
sell two goats lie has left.
SIf rain does not come we're all
going to .die. If it does come
we'll just have to look ,at it be-
cause we have no seed-. Perhaps
some peanuts will grow. he said
looking at what appeared to be
some weed at the end of his gar-
den.
Etilen Vital, 52, who was
found prodding a little fire over
which a tin of small green man-
goes boiled while his little pot-
hellied son slowly poddeld a
small pile of peas into a
can that could hold no more
than two eggs. This was going
to be thdir meal for the day.
Asked why lie had not sold
the large flat as a hoard sto-
mached pig in the yard.
ViV .l replied: "It is too
dried up, and nobody would buy
it". If he could have sold it. he
would have done so to give his
15-year-old son a funeral when
he died the previous week of
Sfever.


L





I







I
i,

P


Corn-meal gift of the American Reo
familiess near Jehn-Rabel.
ved and respected rites for the
deceased.
Explaining the methods used
to fight the drought and culti-
vate 'the soil, the farmers told
how they dig around the mango
tree roots and chop them and
allow water to ooz- out and
moisten the crops.
Contrasts and complexities of
Haiti are illustrated by the re-
gular Sunday enrckfight in an ir-
rigated corner of Jc.in-Rahel.
Last Sunday, the human tent.


a r ef i o e .


KEN a
a
t
o
s

a














fer he said.













"ates w'ho made a house-to- 1
handfigure of deaths fauthed b fan
Umine bs life hat region is over 200.
iThe drought has come before, the
dut never had har being buried at night to,
deer he g nd. c t
Comagainst the Haitian cuations

hic cll for an elaborate h ser-to
house survey, said the overall F
figure of deaths caused by fao t
mine in that region is over 200.
With no money available, the
dead are being buried at night,
without sen-ices just put un- (
der the ground. Tbhis is strictly S
against the Haitian custonms 2
which call for an elaborate ser- v
T.

l"',


IL


hat surrounded thlc fighting who request it. A new shi
ocks iwas in -its same happy Itas expected this week fr"'
Ibaidconed mood and no reflec- Ille States.
ion on the misery that existed A reader of the "Haiti Suna
inly a mile away. Vendors were a Danish Tourist. enclosed $3
clliing tlieir bread and little in a letter with instructions th
'andied peanutis with shrill cries it lie used for the people facing
mnid two gambling tables. famine. Of tthis gift of mon
Stepping up si5) ,ecnt to. the Catholic Wel
Relief fare to help buy medicine f
th .lean-lia-bel Hospital-dim.
Food suppliess to victim, of Hospital-di
I.h droughl-,.tri.cken farming i.n- l ary a rl defray lrana
re. wa,s stepped up this week Iportation cos s for further food,
v religious organizations hand- lIpents. The other $150 wa
in tl.. Jisrib n of food gi- handed to Pastor Wallace Turn.
ipg tlIn diirrihutiin0 ot' food r"'-hull for 'transporting suppli
.n Haiti under United StIate Vull for 'tranorting supplies
to the Northwest.
ritl. Three Emergency Aid, on todthe rT thwee e
earning of Ilh; desperate plight Under g Tile Three of the E.
Sthe population.id he U. S. Govern.
Catholic Welfare Organiza- nent gives food to Americaefi
ions and the CLhurch World Ser volunteer agencies. In this ease
ions and Crthe Church World Service an s
'ice protestantt organization ha- the Church World Service an
th .e Catholic Welfare Servic
e been given for thr fiscal year t atholic are Sice
ntiling July 1959. six thousand were selected o distributedhi
o.l of foodstuffs from the Uni- aid. These foodstuffs are deei.
ed States, double the pre- ated to the needy people and,
ous y ear. Uder Eerge there is no limit on the amount
vious year. Under Emergency of food they an request. The
Aid regulations, the Haitian Go Uniteood Stathe o'reqneet. Th
ernment must pa y internal transportation cs otpay
transportation, but as the hard- transportation costs of "the
pressed Government has not far. foodtuhffs to the port of ent
nished the money, the U. S. au- ad he Go of the
authorities waived tbih clause and try must assume the internal
permitted church organizations transportation costs accord
to the agreement.
:o proTide funds. to the agreemei
Students Help Stout Farmers
Last week students from two Not Lazy:
Catholic colleges provided 60 Want Work
dollars which were used by the A trp through the ineame
Sepours Catholic to transport ea whi ac ble ly by
20,000 pounds of corn meal and jeep over what used to be a mah
while flour which was sent after road and is now a rough donkey
h w-s,-e ftwer trail (Port-de-Paix to JeanRa
hel) will convince you that th
SHlaitian 'farmer is not a
individual. Farmers from the
.Northwest have been walking.
'i ^ half the length of theb Rpubh
in search of work. Many o
these mountain people, wi
their pride and dignity, have
""accepted this fate, and having
:. given up all hope will re
S..'.: "' your salutation of chow are
you?- with their NNot-too ba
tank you*.
They Hide
Their Plight
Father Cornet of Jean-R
told how on. a tour of the mo
tains he would stop at a ceaille
and call out to the farmer who
-' would try to hide his ,plight b
remaining in the dark interim
t 'or pretending not to be at home
B Giving free food has man
.''- complications,, said a busin
man in Jean-Rabel, this week
)ple provided Sunday meal for 150 What these. people need is wor
and roads,, he added explain
special request came from Jean- ing work on roads now wol
Rabel. They had also included help to 'tide them over the f
2.400 lbs. of clothing in the ship- mine and the roads would heJ
meat. them get their produce to m
Rev. H. Ormonde McConnell ket when the rains return.
who is the Church World Ser- Incredible though it may seem
vice representative who sees that few people k n e w
one and a half million pounds ra;vity of the situation i
of food is distributed over the the Northwest. There have
country through all recognized ways been some eases of death
Protestant groups was surprised by starvation in Haiti. Peop!
to hear of the desperate situa- are always hungry .and with t
tion in the Nortbwest. Food sup- economic crisis brought on
plies are given to all pastors (continued on page 16) A






K -,


F




SUNDAY, MARCH 15th. 1959 (HAITI SUNS PAGE 3


FIRST SHOT COULD ERUPT CARibBEAN WAR

ISLANDS TENSELY AWAIT CASTRO'S MOVE


F nk H Bartholomew e-


si
n
ti
ii
s
d
P


(
t
ic
t
o
e


ra Ir r2. a mAllt p1l-
ident of United Press Inter-
rational, is on a Caribbean
our and reports in the follow.
ng dispatch on the rising ten-
ions that have brought the
[anger of more war to the re-
publics in the U. S.' back yard.

By Frank H. Bartholomew

United Press International

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico-
:UPI)-The Caribbean area
oday presents all three Amer-
cas North, South and Cen-
ral with another Balkans
Dn -heir doorstep that could Air and Mrs Bartholomevw ttA Iriend
erupt in warfare, temperature taking of the Caribhean.

Tensions appear to be mount we soon fight in the forests of
ing steadily in the potentially the Dominican Republic".
explosive military-political sit- A public address system in
nations involving the island the restaurant played the Cu-
republics. If the first gun is ban revolutionary song -Day of
fired in invasion attempts Freedom,n ending in a simulat-
against the probably initial ed burst of machinegun fire.
targets of the Dominican Re- Some of these revolutionary
public or Haiti, it seems equal- groups in Cuba appear ready
ly probable a whole series of for immediate action.
wars may start in chain reac- Haiti, under President Fran-
tion around the Spanish Main. rois Duvalier, seems to be re-
The decision appears to rest garded as the ripest target at
on the dramatic person of Fi- the moment with an invasion
del Castro who ousted dictator unit under former Haitian Sen.
Fulgencio Batista from Cuba Louis Dejoie announcing itself
and who is committed to sup- ready to take off this month.
porting revolutions in the Do- The overthrow of Duvalier
minican Republic, Haiti anc in Port au Prince would not
Nicaragua in the Caribbean only place a man friendly to
and Paraguay in South Amer- Castro in control, but would
ica. 'His argument is that their give tile Cuban leader an op-
presidents are as dictatorial rating base against Trujillo-
as Batista was. his primary target since
Catching his zeal, revolution- Haiti :nd the Dominican Re-
aries from these target nations public share the same island.
have been holding meetings in RespandIng to the mount-
Cuba many of them public ing pressure, Trujillo has an-
and well advertised to formul- nounced formation of an canti-
ate their own plans. Communist legion,, of 25,000
A typical incident was ob- men armed with new machi-
served by this correspondent guns to supplement his regular
in .a crowed suburban restaur- army.
ant outside Havana. Multi- col- Trujillo has begun dispersal
ored handbills distributed at of his air force, the most mod-
the tables called for -libera- ern in the Caribbean and his
tion of Santo Domingo (the primary defense, amid repeat-
Dominican Republic), and ed rumors that American sol-
concluded -down with the ty- diers of fortune friendly to Cas
ranny of Trujillo. tro have assembled surplus
To Castro and his support- warplanes on an isolated island
ers, Dominican strongman Gen. in the British West Indies in
Rafael Trujillo is the prime hopes of destroying the Do-
symbol of remaining distator- minican air forcp in a single
ship. raid.
An excited Dominican leap- The probability at the mo-
ed on a table, called for si- ment :s that Castro himself
lence and addressed himself' would not directly participate
to the Cubans present: in any military moves against
uAs you fought in the jungles the target nations. But he is
of Oriente (Province), so will believed to have given so much


Pierre Chaur'ct at El Rancho during


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BEST IN CAP-HAITIEN


HOSTELLERIE
direct encouragement and the
promise of arms to revolution- < aries from these lands that they
may launch offensives on their N
,own, unless he orders them to


stop.
Despite all threats, no trigger
has been pulled yet. And each
day without gunfire is one
more day of stability.

World Health Day.
To Be Observed ,
April 7th
This year's commemoration
of World Health Day on April
7th, is to have a special feature,
it was announced here this
weak. The Public Health De-
partment is organizing gran-
diose .celebrations with empha-
sis on : Mental Diseases and
Mental Health.,
With Haiti's new Psychiatric
Institute now open under the
direction of international I lv
known Doctor Louis Mars, a
specialist in the treatment of
mental diseases, World Health
Day brings an encouraging
thought to the patients and
their families.

Ti-B 1k- r1= nrated
Rv Hasi*an
Government
The decoration of the cTous-
saint Louverture Order of Civil
Merit" was conferred, Wednes-
day morning, upon HerbertJ.
(Ti-Barbe) Morrison during -a
special ceremony at the Natio-
nal Palace. The insignias anrl
diploma of the Haitian order of
chivalry witl the rank of - mander by President Francois
Duvalier. Mr. Morrison, an Ame-
rican, is the Director of Public
Realtion for the Government.


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AS


WITH SOUP LESSEn,
IMPORTERS ABSTAIN FROM ATTENDING MEETING
WITH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COLLEAGUES


A certain suppless will be
necessary for apphcation of the
new Decree-Law prohibiting
the importation of products
manufactured in Haiti, was
the opinion of leading indus-
trialists expressed during a
meeting at the Chamber of
iCummerce, Monday afternoon.
au u.po:-'r werc remarked
aL the meeting.
They were agreed that the
progressive and national cha-
racteristics of the Decree were
incontestable.
Chamber of Commerce Pre
sident, Louis Decatrel, in open
ing the meeting stated that he
had called on the indus-
trialists at the request of the
Haiti Metal Company in view
of discussing and obtaining
the viewpoints of the different
sectors of the Haitian economy
affected by the Decree.
The. absence of representa-
tives from the local import
firms which are -aid to have
many objects to the new Law,
was deplored by the industrial
lists and manufacturers attend
ing the meeting. It was thought
that this would have been an
excellent occasion for the im-
porters to debate on the ques
tions contained in a report
they had submitted to the
Chief of State.
Clifford Brandt and Otto
Madsen who revealed to the


gioup that such a report had
been made to the President
declared that the importers
had presented figures that
were, to say, the least, Cfan-
taisistesx, in support of their
arguments.
Mr D-ecatrel announced an
open forum, and a number of
the Chamber of Commerce
members expressed their opin-
ions.
cIt is normal that the in-
ports be in opposition to the
Decree, Mr Calmann Levy de
cleared some means must be
found so that the interest of
all are considered so that the
importer will not be obhged
to brusquely stop his activi-
ties. The interests of the im-
porters and those of the in-
dustrialists must be reconcil-
ed>.
.Mr Raymond Roy in read-
ing an expos he had prepared
on the question declared that
this ,was the best law made
in 20 years, because it embra-
ces the full problem of use,
that of devices and is suscepti-
ble of attracting capital.
eThe law must be maintain
'ed,> Mr Roy said. done this year, it will have to
be done next year. It repre-
sents the unique chance we
have to retain these devices
and to give us time to prepare
agricultural production. It sug-


gets the procedure, insular as
application of the decree is
concerned, by modifications of
Article 2.
Mr L1lio Dominique spoke
saying that he was disappoint
ed not to see the representa-
tives of the absent importers
who had, it would appear, sent
a report to the Government.

, lemen only treats the question
of cloth., said Mr Clifford
Brandt, pointing out that the
figures they had submitted
were imaginary and erroneous.
He expressed his regrets at
not seeing them .attend the
meeting.
Speaking at length, Mr Otto
Madsen, explained that for the
past three years, the bales of
cotton and cotton cloth has
BFen accumulating in stock in
Haiti, finding no further mar-
ket abroad.
,The.Haitian cotton is worth
only $19.00 while the Amer-
ican cotton is quoted at $34.
00, Mr Madsen said, stating
that therefore they had cloth
in stock, cotton in stock and
Jabor> in stock, for in these
times people are begging for
work.
In commenting on the report
of the importers to the g-v-
ernment, he 'aid he -.stimated
the production of -local factor-
ies to 3 million yards, while
.h; factories can .roduice 8
-'d a half million yards. There


STAY


is SUlllcc.lt cotton, laoor and
machines for that, he said.
-The exportation of cotton
:s difficult,Y Mr Madsen conti-
nued. ..The prices bring little
rcmuinration, foreign c(ompa-
tion floods the market. There
is an article imported by Haiti
from India, which I, aold at
a low price and is of inferior
quality maze rit:> But w.hat
bu .i;nes do we do v.aith India?
The Monetary Funds have say
ed us from bankruptcy, but
we must not abuse it. The
application of the Decree is the
means of retaining the devic-
es.,)
Mr Madsen further stated
that the functioning of the fac
stories was going to cause the
peasant to cultivate cotton.
The Government could even
require local manufacturers to
maintain a stable price to ru-
munerate them.
,:When t'i-: importers say
they import 14,500,000 yards.
I estimate that this figure is
exaggerated,o Mr Madsen con
tinted. J.They are under the
impression that they are going
to disappear. They have fac-
tories abroad, they have their
little monopolies. Their retail
price is not known. The impor
ter sees the local manufactur-
er as an emeny. But why can't
t be done like the foreign ma
lufacturer and come to an'
understandingg with the import
ers. There could be an inter-
esting commerce on both


IN


HAI


.i#1 RENT- CA R


%~ ...._ .... .:', ..
S. :. .. A.. / 7 .. ,' ; .


MAIN OFFICE

in Petion-Ville

SINCLAIR Gas STATION

Short Distance
from the Hotels
to Petion-Ville


Phone 7436


Office- in Port-au-Prince

Haiti Cherie

Next To RCA Building
opp. Royal Bank of Canada
Phone: 3968


pi

H


DAI
$9.00 per


?45
F
.All Ra
In isran


HAITI'S INDUSTRIALISTS SUGGEST NEW LAW PROHIBITING
IMPORTATION OF ARTICLES MAIUYFAC'tO UK Dh) it ArtLIED


sides.7,
Mr Madsen said that
merce which consists si.
of selling and buying is
ing. It is the industrial.
agricultural production w
must attenuate this dea
devices and attenuate un
ployment problems.
Mr Brandt pointed out
the importers h ad sti
cient strength to send tjj
pages of nonsense to the c
of State and had not had
courage to come and disce
the problem with the indi
trialists that afternoon. '
JThe climate of the meet i
is comforting,> stated Mr Ai
toine Bervin. of the bureau of the Chambo
of Commerce to see how ea
one is discussing this impo4
ant problem. The Chamber .
heard three sectors (Cloth. ,-
Haiti Metal --Pharmacauti
Products). It would very mu'
like to hear the point of vie
of the other interested pdi
ties. 7
Mr Fritz Mevs expressed t1
opinion that the law shodu
present more details. Certa
industries cannot support t
15% taxation, he said.
Dr Seymour Day said th
certain people would like'
falsify the spirit of the Decr
Law. cIt is clears, he sai.
'that all that is similar to t
products we are making in H
ti and which have alwi
given satisfaction cannot be i
ported. :
The blue denim manufacti
(continued on page 13) ~;


TI













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SUNDAY, MARCH 1


PAGE 4


HA TI SUNa




SUNDAY, MARCH 15th. 1959 ~HAITI SUNs PAGE 5


HAITI SUN
THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
.Commuiity Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
CERANT-RESPONSABLE PAUL E. NAJAC
ESTABLISHED IN 1950

STARVING NORTHWEST NEEDS,
FOOD, MEDICINE, SEED
h AND WORK
Many of the 45,000 persons who inhabit the Arrondissement ot
Jean-Rabel need help. They need food to keep them alive, and
medicines to fight the diseases that 'lne gaining ground as their
physical constitution rapidly deteriorates.
The mountain population of Jean-Rabel has reached the
crisis stage, and if the'food and medicine that is beginning to
be channeled to them can tide them over till the rains even-
tually.come, the next stage of assistance is to provide seed.
Most farmers have sold their seed or lost it in the ground
in attempts to outwit their enemy drought. Seed suitable
to the area must be shipped now in readiness for the rains
which may or may not come before the month,of May.
Title III of the special U.nited S t a t e s Gift Food that is
received by the Catholic Welfare and the Church World
Service must be given as a gift ard cannot be sold or earned
through work.
If in some manner, the people in this area could be permitted
to work and rebuild the Port de Paix Jean-Rabel road
which is almost no road and which the very first rains are sure
to render useless, they would be kept from migrating to other
denser regions of the Republic. They would be around when the
drought is over to sow seed, and eventually harvest their crops
A Danish lady, Mette Rolff, a reader of aHaiti Sunn, sent
$300 this week to help the people faced with famine. Miss
Rolff's timely contribution was used to send food and medical
supplies through the. Catholic Welfare, and through Pastor Wal-
lace. Turnbull, to Jean-Rabel this week. It is sure to be a great
morale booster for the people of the Northwest.
Pastor Turnbull shipped 170 cases and bags of Church World
Service supplies he had on hand, along with UNICEF Milk
and kMulti-Purpose Food by camion, on Thursday.
It is suggested that those wishing to help the people of the
Northwest contact the Catholic Welfare Service at its offices
before the Cathedral, or Pastor Turnbull at Fermathes.
Also readers may send contributions direct tp the region of
Jeatn-RabeT dressedd ,to Father Marcel Cornet, or in care of
the ,Haiti Sunn.

NEED ANY MAGAZINES,
NEWSPAPERS, BOOKS,-etc.?
Just Walk to
LIBRAIRIE DE LA PLACE
Right on the Pefion-Ville Square
ANear the Church)
YOU WILL FIND EVERYTHING
YOU WANT TO READ
We also have for your convenience
TORTOISE SHELL ARTICLES,
FRENCH PERFUMES, ETC.
Frantz E. Gardere, Manager.


DISCOVER THE FASCINATION
OF HAITI
Through Its Postage Stamps
For complete information in Haiti
Stamps and other details which will be
furnished y;ou free of charge, write to
0.. Box 723 Port-au-Port-au-Prince


Secours Catholique

ASSOCIATION RECONNUE
IYUTILITE PUBLIQUE
Monsieur B. Diedrich
Directeur Haiti Sun
En Ville
Le 12 Mars 1959
S her Monsieur,
Je tiens a vous remercier
pour le don de 150 dollars re-
ceuilli aupres d'une lectrice de
votre journal et que vous m'a-
vez transmis.
Vous pourrez voir sur la feuil
le ci-jointe comment cette som
me a 6t: utilis6e.. Une parties
($96.20) a servi A payer les
m4dicaments achet6s Chez G.
de Delva et chez G. Gilg. Le
reste. soit $53.80. servira a-
cheminer un nouveau' contin-
gent de vivres alimentaires jus
qu'j Jean Rabel.
Veuillez agr6er, ches Mon-
sieur, I'assurance de mes meil-
leurs sentiments.
R. P. Yves Pouliquen.
__W T CH


On Soil Conservation

March 13, 1959.

The Editor. Haiti Sun.

Are incpiries in order concern
ing the cogent story on water
and soil conservation in your
issue of March 8th?

The problems are the selec-
lion of crops for hillsides that
will liold the soil. increase soil
absorption of water, survive
droughts, and not only give pro-
fits to the farmer, but profits
not .too long delayed. In this
last dase, certainly maholgany
can he a profitable hill-side crop
at warmer elevations, and it can
survive droughts, bold the soil
and aid absorption of water.
But the poor planter will long
be dead *from starvation before
he obtains any returns from the
plantings.
It should not e forgotten.
moreover, that although wage-
scales in Haiti are low, most of
the Oriental countries have wa-
ge-scales even lower, much lo-
wer. And where farm machinery
can he u-ed. machinery is usual-
ly more economical than the
cheapest labor. '
The country needs a Moses or
a Solomon. under these condi-
tions.

IS): Pro Bouo Public


it's all waiting for you at...



Calhlaiti
DINNER DANCE NIGHTLY
TO THE MUSIC OF THE
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At 8.00 P.M.
FLOOR SHOW
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For Reservations


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It is the ,LARK, manufactured by STUDEBAKER-PACKARD
CORPORATION. Neither large nor small or rather, large and small at once
Offering all the advantages of large cars, 6 to 7 passengers,
Stability, Comfort, Power and all the advantages of the small car Low
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THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE AGENCY, S. A.
7--
Place Geffrard, Phone: 3216 or 3929

Garage, Rue des Cesars, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Ask also for a demonstration of the Pick-Up and Trucks their saving of fuel.
solidity, power and capacity are already universally known.
oLiiypoeancaaiyaeara uieray nw.


I 'SUNDAY, MARCH 15th. 1959


(HAITI SUN


PAGE 5


j., :-




SUNDAY, MARCH


PAGES uHI SN


The


Panama i
To Promote Tc
Panama Canal Co. will


soon embark on an extensive
program to propagandize Haiti
as a year iound vacation spot
for its employees in the Canal
Zone, including Army, Navy,
Air-Force, Civilian employees of
the Panama Canal Co. and the
dependants of the above,
amounts to 50,000 persons. A-
bout 90% are United States Ci-.
tizens.
S From March 7th. to 10th,
Por-'-a-Prince and it.; environs
w re studied and,photographed
by Major and Mrs. H. C. Jones
(Military Aid to Major General
Potter, Governor of the Canal
S Zonb) and Mr. and Mrs. Clyde
La Clair (Official Photographer
of the Canal Zone). The gentle-
men will contribute their find-
inxg to a four-page spread in
the wCanal Zone Reviews a
monthly house organ of, the Ca-
nal Company. This magazine
has a circulation of 15,000 co-
pies per month and this pic-
ture-story will be the first shot
in the -Vacation in Haiti, cam-
Spaign.
Nest- on the program. will be
S a package tour developed in con
7- junction with the Panama Steam
Ship Line. The Lfne has tu-'
nounced special rates, round-
trip between Panama and Haiti.
In addition, endeavors will lie


Canal Co.
aurism In Haiti
made to point out to residents
of the Republic of Panama, the
attractiveness of a sojourn in
Haiti and an effort will be ef-
fected in Panama ,to introduce
Haiti to the many tourists pass-
ing through on the way to South
America.
The traveling time by Pana-
na Steamship Line between
Haiti and Panama is only 46
hours and it is believed certain
that large numbers of tourists
can be repected to arrive here
from' that Republic.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wiener
are down fr6m New York on a
two weeks vacation and busi-
ness trip. They are lodged here
at Hotel Choucoune. Mr. ,Wie-
ner is in charge of the Carib-.
bean region for the large firm
Towel Timer Systems.

Communique
The Department of National
Education wishes to inform the
families that rumors tending to
cause the belief that certain
schools have been dispensed
with conforming to the clauses
of the Decree of January, 21,
1959, relative to the school fees,
are completely unfounded.
Port-au-Prince, March. 9, 1959
of National Educatibn
S Department


GALA FOLKLORE SHOW OF SEASON TONIGHT

THEATRE DE VERDURE


aThe Great show of the


1959 season is tonight at 9 p.
m. at the Theatre de Verdure
through the courtesy of the
'National Tourist Council and
the Social Welfare Institute,
with the participation of the
Compagnie Natonale d'Art Po-
pulaire claiti Chanten the
Languichatte Troupen, the Ba
coulou Group, the Troupe of
aLes Jeunes ,Chanteurs de
1'Islen, the Artists Ti-Roro, An
dre Narcisse.\


PROGRAM


I)-At the riverside Djou
ba-Ballet Choreography by
Andre Germain. In the Country,
on certain days, the washer-
women get together to go to
the riverside. They tell secrets
to one another and talk about
current events of their locality.
This ballet is the story of one
of these meetings This time,
while singing in order to light
en their burden young' people
come along and want to court
the washerwomen. Spurned by
whim first, they are accepted
at last and the washing turns
into a country dance The djou
ba dance used by the choreo-


S-grapher is an old Colonial


PART II


5)-Congo and Ibo


Ballets


AT NIN
/


dance, the most popular among
the Blacks. This danc* became
later on a country fanty dance
and also the dance of the coun-
try God ZACA. Principal stars:
Lucienq)e Thomas and Pierre
Desrameaux of the National
Company of Popular-Art.

2) Mardi-Gras, dance
music, composed by Antal Mu-
rat after the Ibo rythm, played
by the Orchestra of the Natio-
nal Company of Popular Art.
The singer is Gerad Dupervil.
3)-Languichatte, called the
King of laughters, and his
group present a bilingual
skptch and sing songs.
4)-The Bacoulou group
with its star Gerard Dorsinville
performs a ballet.
,Musical Interlude.: With
aChoucounes, classical Haitian
meringue of which the music
is by Moleart Monthon and
the words from Oswald Du-
rand.
Ti-Roro, the virtuoso of 'he
drum in a recital., ,


DAVID t WRLLYTALRMRS

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PAGE 0


lHAITI SUN*


performed by the Troupe Ha
Chante under th% direqti
Ines St. Phard.
6)-The Jeunes Chant'
des Isles under the diredc
of... in tli execution of ,a
let...
7)-Andre Narcisse ind
group in the execution of,
8)-Haiti Cherie, a bea
ful Haitian meringue..pla
by the Orchestra
9)-Poules et .MalfiN
choreography by Pierre, Bi
This ballet centered on 1
Congo rythm d e r i :e
from a tale of the Haitian -I
klore. It is the story of a'p
try-yard where roosters eij
themselves with many hens
a time. The umalfinis. co
along the nightmare' of. I
poultry-yard, hens, frightbj
take refuge behind the rd
terms, that take fright also,
away. And a marriage tal
place between hens and ,
finis. The choreograpl3tr i
chosen the congo to stige t
story because this dance 6by
cadence is the true loie dat
and perpetuates the a
one of the most importMant,
mographic groups of Saiint'
rhingue. ,
'Y ..:'


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s' 'SUNDAY, UMARCH 15th. 1959


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Fisher's, the American's favorite shop where
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Where a well-trained and courteous staff will
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Where checks and foreign banknotes are accept
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' PAGE 7


-HAITI SUN.





PAGE 8 ((HAITI SUND SUNDAY, MARCH 1st. 1959


SCUBAN COVERAGE'


WHAT IS JOURNAL

ITS RESPONSABILI
IBy Herbert L. MAttllhws N. 'Y.


' Having Jet off a lot of steam
at the Overseas Press Club hln-
cheloh on Jan.' 22 about the
news coverage on the Cuban
revolution, I felt that perhaps
there should be some calm-
thoughts on the subject after-
wards. The problem really goes
to the Jeart of journalism:
il'iat it is, what its rc-ponsibi-
lities are, what it should try to
do.
The first few days after Ge-
neral Fulgencio Batista fled on
the morning of New Year's day
offered nothing but the usual
technical problems of finding
out what was happening/ and
getting it out in time. The cor-
respondent did a good or poor
jolb according to the' amount of
news he got, its accuracy, how
well he presented it. and the
timing. This was elementary
journalism, the sort one would
do in covering a fire, only more
complicated.
Real Test.--
The real test came as the
story developed in scope and
ddpth. The revolution was an
event of major importance, one
of the greatest in the whole
history of Latin America. The
man who led it, Fidel Castro,
had performed an epic feat and
was, in himself, an extraordi-
nary figure from every point of
view. A whole nation Cuba
- was being transformed and
was starting a new life. This
was the sort of story that de-
dicated ,newspapermen dream


The N. Y. Times' Herb
hews won the OPC Geo
Memorial Award for his
,i 7 i' Fdel Castro and
ban fR-volu:on. Matthews
)cr of the Times' editor
has served as reported
(lidor and foreign con-i
-"I:' the paper for thii
Se'ar'. -.

about.
How was it to l_ cover,
is wivere the basic corfl
Lretween differin-2
of journali-.m. One co
centrate on some im
hour to hour events
concern for thie pictn
iihole aind without inte
those events Ti i:; is thl
agency method of cove
cept thlit some interpre
possible in round-ups.
there method is to place
in their context and ir
proportion, and thus


crt Matt-1
)lge Polk
stories in
the Cu-
;, a menl
al board.
r. fCitign
r it'foref


orf m now until Jmi me i


Cuba had had a terrible tv
IS ?ny. It wa, n ow free. It ,ha
ISBM ? enorniously corrupt governll
*rl S It now had tile first comipl
T Ei hone.t gqvcrnmuelnt in Cu
History. It hail bIenl a nation
ing in terror and bilternue.
niit only a true picture lbut the in I in t'ieor a d pittert c
whole picture, insofar as that a no t
in the world.
as possible., ,
I could go on. liut ih.i-. Jh
One Part of Story.- ,
be e-*nough to mnake my po
My contention was, and is, ie douri t uli and, ir
SDid our public and ouir i
that tle American reading |pu-s a
Senators and Congresmcn n
hlic got one, sensational piece
were raving about I,bloodl ba
-f the Cuban story the exe- r
get tiis picture? They idid
"utions or got it to such an
ovehelming degree that what They got a picture of ve
o\me'r'helnnng degree that whal ,, , ,
little else came along was lost armed ffian t
Sth .ffle. I am speaking vengeance against lers of the Batista regime wl
of t'he press and newsimaga- r
Se p was allegeda to have been
.uires in general. because there va g to have ben
honorable exceptions in listed to torturing and kill
re l honoralble exccplions in
Fidel Castro wa,. as the c(
whicl I include my own paper, o Life pictured hi, a h o
tl:- Christian Science Monitor. o ptured i a
monster raviug al)oiit wh:il
thi Botton Globe, tile Milwau- r a
kee Journal and doubtless o- wa, going to do to the At
call Nlarines if idic-y Inud.rd
others I do not know about. I can marines if h
could not follow the radio and Cuba.
If so happens, tll.it all -
television, but certainly the re- If o ens t
cent two-night coverage of the


espondnt Cuban silory by Jack Paar was
rtv-sei en an outstanding example of fair-
ness and accuracy.

False Picture.-
e'd? TIi-. The technical argument is
ict came simple: the executions were hot
concepts news. Of course they were. Of
uld con- course they had to be sent. That
mediate, was not the problem. The trou-
without ble was that by concentrating on
re as a then. a totally false picture of
rpreting the Cuban revolution was being
e classic, given to lie American public.
rage, ex- Moreover, by treating them as
'talion is hour to hour, day to day-events
The o- the readers could not know 'or
e events realize why the Cubans were
i proper carrying out tbe executions in
to give that way. For Americans in-
ecluding our Congressmen -
tile history of Cuba began on
S Jan. 1, 1959, and the agencies
and correspondents, and hence
the newspapers and radio, did
not tell them otherwise.
The facts of the Bati-ta re-
gilme were easily ascertainable.
I am not going into details here
except to point out that it was
one of the most brutal, terrible
andcorrupt dictatorships in La-
tin American history. When
Batista fled, the tension, hatred
and bitterness of the people
could have exploded in the
most awful fashion, as all of us
expected it to do. The astonish-
ing news to those who knew
the situation was that nothing
of the sort happened. Disci-
oline was imposed swiftly and
S instead of the rioting, looting
and personal vengeance, there
were qitick executions of men
who were known (and anybody
following the 'Cuban situation
r could realize how they were
known'l to le torturers and kil-
-lers under Batista.
yal
yl What was Journalism? -
ch
cWho was right? What was
journalism? T he executions,
nriod? Or the executions set
in their proper framework?
SMoreover, wh;it about the his-
toric picture, the facts tliat his-
torians will be writing about


DISCOVER 1

0


rain-
Ian

*tely

]iv-
s. It
nitry

oul'l
)int.
lear
who
tAllo
th -.-
not.
n ge-
Sing,
kil
lici
ad-
ing.
over

I..
eri-
l in

Slit-


y
.
y a e ac ng gures


in the new Government of Cu-
ba, Fidel included, are men of
idealinsmi, honesty, pata-iotipm
and a determination to make a
newi, better and democratic Cu-
lb. lfhly have their human
l.nill-. aiu l I could list a num-
,i.r o tlheli for Fidel. They
' it iiae nme hilbad inidtakes.
.i \,i- ha ,_ a right to tell
the'in -,. Tih menitods used in
lhe execution werit ol)biously
i,adly misitaken.
Whole Truth not presented.-
The good and the bad make
II) the piictlure. The distortion
and fal-ity of tie Cuban cove-
ra e,. in nmy opinion, came be.
rauoe the "hrole truth was not
prvsenled and because a small
,).rt of the truth was presented
in a twisted, inadequate, mis-
leading way.
Cuba has been a case history
in journalisnl that would ire-
.uire a far longer article than
.'>i I ~exhaun.t. NWe live and
]earn.


iHE FASCINATION

F HAITI


Through Its Posta-ge Stamps
For complete information in Haiti
Stamps and other details which will be
furnished you free of charge, write to
.O. Rny '23 Port-au-Port-au-Prince


Agent Distributor: Haiti Trading "Co.

Chamber of.Commerce Bldg.


. ... ...


PAGE 8


((HAITI SUNn


SUNDAY, MARC 1 Ist. 1959


11






SUNDAY, MARCH 15th. 1959


(HAITI SUN.


Do Your



ShLjpplng

in Haiti

It is getting so that people are
'taking vacations as much to
.shop as to play golf, lounge in
the sun or just relax. And, no
wonder-when you consider the
savings to be.had through Free
Port-Shopping. A couple who
normally might spend $500 on
Christmas gifts f nds they can
buy the same gifts, in free-port
shpps, at savings up to 60% of,
U. S. prices. So, for the $250
or so they save, they enjoy a
wonderful vacation in Haiti.
.Perhaps the most famous free-
. port shop in the world is La
1''Bqlle Creole. located in the
Heart of fascinating 'Port-au-
..Prince, Haiti. Here one can
find a veritable wonderland
full of the world's most de-
. sired. merchandise. Swiss wat-
,ches, Cashmeres, Handmade
bags, Gloves, Crystal, China,
Silver, French Perfumes, Ca-
meras, Liquours and a seem-
irigly endless array of native
Shadicraft make La Belle
Creole more a shopping cen-
ter, than a ordinary shop. Con-
sider that one can buy the
world's most famous Swiss
watches Patek Philippe,
Ot.ega, Ulysse Nardin, Tissot,
Nivyaa, Jagger Le Coultre,
Bdret Juveiiia, Audemars Pi-
giet---t discounts of .0% of
the U. S. "advertised prices,
and it is no wonder that La
Belle Creole is famous. The
same applies in China, Crystal
and the rest every fine brand
is represented. Before buying
an expensive watch it might
be well worth your time to
consider a trip to Haiti.

Al Neustas, President of La
Belle Creole andHaiti's most
vigorous' promoter of tourism,
is perhaps another reason for
the surge in popularity -of
freetport shopping. His ad-
vertising in support of travel-.
.shopping has appeared in most
leading U. S. publications and
S he continues to pursue a po-
S licy of cooperating with tra-
vel agents in their various
promotions to' increase tou-
rTsm. Among the,most popular
innovations he has created is
the practice of sending a bot-
tie of free champagne to any
visitor to Haiti who happens
to be celebrating a wedding
anniversary or to be on a
honeymoon.
This year La Belle Creole is
itself celebrating a 10th an-
niversary and AI.Noustas has,
doubled his efforts to make
the world conscious of the
advantages of traveling-to-
shop. The store will hold a
two month long sale offering
even greater discounts on fa-
mous brand merchandise,
Everyday exclusive items will
be selected to be sold to visi-
tors at prices that will as-
tound them. No doubt thou-
sands of tourists this year will
come home from vacations in
Haiti, richer, in a way, than
when they went away.


- "a--


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DRAGSTEEF. GENSE.



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ITALY, AUSTRIA,


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STUART, LEERMAN.


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JEWELRY





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SPORT SHIRTS


SCULPTURES


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MAHOGANY
- The Best.


Typical Costume-Iressed DOLLS

World Famous RUGS & DRAPERY

Haitian RUM BARBANCOURT


-"


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without affecting your quota.- See us for more information.


i


OMEGA, PATEK PHILIPPE
JUVENIA TISSOT, BOREL,
AUDEMAR PIGUET,
JAEGER LE COULTRE,
ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO,
ATLANTA, S'TUIJO,
VULCAIN.


KISLAV,
ENGLISH
ITALIAN


DOESKIN,
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' 4;


PAGE 9


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER

P. O. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI




AROUND TE WORD IMPORTS,

AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS


PRINGLE, BALLANTYNE,
BERN HARD ALTMAN,
LUISA SPAGNOLI."


DANISH SILVER,
GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY
and BRAZILAN GEMS.


I'UERLAIN, LANVIN, .
CARON, CHANEL,
RAPHAEL, PATOU,
BALMAIN, WORTH,
REVILLON, VIGNY.
CARVEN, LE GALLON,
FABERGE OF PARIS,
JEAN D'ALBERT,
JACQ19ES GRIFFE
FATH, .PIGUET,
CORDAY.

MINOX, CANNON



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ROYAL DOULTON,
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.REAM, All FRENCH,
DANISH and
SPANISH LIQUIEURS.





P AFFIA BAGS
& SHOES





SHAITIAN MUSIC
-Collector's Items


Aft IAA--


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----------------. ........ ------ ---- ------ ------

0'o f aw


,c-,


\


..


. .o


'09 10 A


r u-.
~-'':


'I





PAGE 10 uHArri sui'm SUNDAY, MARC


I


-~~r~rr~LrCCYrnrh+CL --- I,,, ,,


HAITI AS I SEE IT pool swilnning. tennis golf. A
(Continued from lat week I trip in a glass Iottom boat fur-
By Eleanor Curtis DAILEY any work in the house, to this nishes a spectacular scene.
Editor's Note: Mrs. Eleanor Madame is delighted and willing Although a Catholic country.
Dailey, wife of the internatio- I migh add, to keep her prestige there are many other denomi-
1 n nations. To hear the choir oni a
nally prominent physician and on that score. nais. T h t hoir n
surgeon. Dr. U. Grant Dailey, That terrible, despicable and Sunday morning in a Metlholist
Daileys continues her interest- horrible, prejudice and discri- church i. a joy.
ing .nj informative .artico Port-.a-Princc' poor popu-
ing and informative 'article on uinnation which is rampant. in Port-L-Pri s p pi
Haiti. our home land is unknown here. lae present. a pitiful picture,
----At least it does not show it ugly laavy of whom till live in hlut
L T1or bleep on l the round. My in-
there are two classes or groups head. It is not visible and it is
here, although there i- emerg- i pleasure to go places and meceti the chi n has i
,1 ri polled me to ask friends in the
ing, as in other parts of the people of all nationalities and ll to ak friend in the
world, a middle class. The edu- races on an integrated basis. We State, to forn Hfaiti'Q Children
catcd. cultured and wealthy Ha- often laugli and wonder what Friends, clubs .and send used
SI *t surunior clothing to be disfribu-
itian speaks pu re Parisian Faubus would say and do if le um r cloi to diriu
French, whLle, the uneducated. were here to see them dining ted. These may seem like a drop
underprivileged speak "Creoles and dancing together. We might in the buckcl, lut it will help
to clothe he nude ones.
whicli is the native tongue, tell him that they even inter- other he d ones
French is the official language. marry. We say that if the Amue- Relroduced hfom The Chi-
It is said tha'85 per cent of rican, living here (and there is cago Defender..
inhabitants -are illiterate, but a large number of tlcm l had
I am heartened at this good or still liave prejudice, it seems Dejean To Attend
sign: At school hour, the streets to be in cold storage, or better Course On Plant
.are filled with happy throngs still it may have vanished since Quarantine
of children school bound in uni- association with the Haitians hal
forms of many colors who at- made them see their folly. USOM in Haiti announces
tend private as well as public Having lived in a white man's that Mr. Justin Dejean District
schools. There are elementary, world all one's life and switching Agronomist at the Direction Ge-
secondary schools -and colleges. to a black man's world poses a nerale de U'Agriculture has been
The University of Haiti. the me- great problem. It emphasizes selected by ICA..W to partici-
dical, dental and other places of what liberals have recognized pate in a Plant Quarantine train
study.are found here. There is and stated that more -and more ing course which is scheduled
a compulsory school law which it is becoming a one world with to begin March, 25. 1959 in Was
is not enforced, but it is hoped rluman beings being alike in so hington.
that in the not too distant fu- many respects regardless of race, Plant quarantine is designed
ture this will not-be the ease. nationality or origin, to restrict the spread or intro-
Spdaking of some changes duction of insects or plant di-
which have been promised is It is a treat to see the native seases, from an infested region
tirat of destroying the unsightly Haitian dance, whether it he the to one not yet infected. The
slum area which. is in view 9s folk dance which sometimes in- work oL the Plant Quarantine
one drives from the airport. It eludes a square dance number. Officer is partly a police finc-
gives a most unfavorable im- the meringue, the cha-cha. or tion; often it is largely edran-
pression of picturesque Port-au- old fashion waltz, it is done with tional in its nature.
Prince before one gets to see the same rhytlim, characterized Haiti lacking in trained plant
'the 'broad boulevard with its by the same for which descen- Quarantine Regulatory Officers
attractive architectural buildings dants of Africa are noted. The who are familiar with the exist-
the lovely statues, the beautiful music of the orchestra, with its ing import and export plant qua_
white edifices, which includes tom-tom accompaniment, play- '
the National Palace (much like ing modern as well as the old
the White House in the United beloved numbers'is a symphony MODERN COMFI
States) surrounded by a flower to be enjoyed.
be-decked park. In this park are Milady would revel in the *DINE AND
statues of former heroes like gifts which the shops offer as
L'Ouverture, Dessalines, and well as the street vendor's wares HOT
Christophwr, Petion. Mahogany and sisal articles, je-
There is much to be done to welry, perfumes (at a disepunt)
overcome the primitive and an- are ready for her delectation.
tiquated way of life which still A trip to Madame Alexander
prevails in certain quarters. Ho- Celestine, to Jacqueline, Nanote A Distinguist
ever, the burros with their for gorgeous hand embroidered
multi-colored robed riders car- frocks or blouses must never be Convenien
trying their wares to market fas- overlooked.
cinate one, although he knows Ond easily finds amusement All Air Condi
there is another side more mo- in the swank hotels which flon-
dern. rish here. They are comparable
Servants furnish no problem and surpass many to bee seen
as they are plentiful, and many in the larger cities of the world
households h ave four or five. I Their flowqr-bedecked gardens I Un
have be%, askekl often b)y visi- with swimming pools, fine cui-
tors if they are competent? sine, and floor shows furnish all
(please pardon this personal no- that the visitor requires. To men DINNE
te) I would say definitely yes, tion a few: El Rancho, Haitian
and they are quite teachable, owned, Montana and ChouFro
For example, take my SylvAnie Choure, Swiss owned; Castle rythn
who serves as cook 'and maid. Haiti, Haitian dentist; Belle I the R
She is a gem, and the best ser- Creole. Haitian physician: Ri- the elax
vant I have ever employed. She viera. American and many
is quick to learn the American others. For a quiet home-like Choice M
way always with a smile. She atmosphere there is the Hotel Choice Men
is neat.'honest and loyal. A great Pla za (Mme. There Pierre Cocktails, Wir
bond of affection exists between Louis). Hotel Splendid. Mrs. Ro- No Co
us. bert Mi3nse (American). Make your Re.
Madame loses face and her There are many recreational
dignity if she attempts to do facilities, fishing, each and


BUE BIE
on the label
1nl :i
IgA-i 1


I, fr.I tlS,,,

b u'"I e
tt c be paul e ri 'a,,,
lL Jrtl. uprin0t ow


Saweda e san V v at HNaitib ea
HIOTES & RESTAURANTS & BY CONOSMSEU1RS
THROUGHOUT THI WORLD


ORTS WITH OLD WORLD CHARM

DANCE EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT

'EL SANS SOUCI


(IN TURGEAU)


led Hotel In the Heart of the City

tly located to the Shopping District

tioned Rooms with Private Baths
And Hot Water

New Pool Terrace with outside Bar
and Swimming Pool
passed Cuisine! Finest Service -
Air Conditioned Bar

:R DANCE EVERY FRIDAY

n 7:00 P. M.. To Midnight
1 of Joseph Duroseau's Ensemble
ng Atmosphere of the-Tropical
Flower Gardens

ius at 3.50 (Dollars) per Person
tes and Drinks, Reasonably Priced i
ver Charge No Minimum
servation for the Best Tables
by the Pool Side


SUNDAY, MAARC


PAGE 10


vHAIrT SUN


rantine laws. tle training course ledge lie will have gaiv6
in Washington will enable* A- he returns for the benef
gronomist Dej ca n, to train. Haitian community.
other technicians w\ho are rin- Mr. Dejeau will depa
played in his deparmncut and au-Prince on or about
also apply him training and know 11. 1959.

;I -----


** *





Y-IC 1h9R !


NitCE OF THE

S0MBIE-MAKER.

(continued from.page 1)
anseed to another post,
S-wher as a result of this tale
Snot is unknown. The abocora
lias been. ostracized from Bomr
.bardopolis, as are his children.
He cas not have any of his
Grand children baptized.
i The story was complete ex-
:cept for one detail. No onp
iad ask ie the bocor for his
'.ide of. the.. story. No one in
Bombardopolis had gone to his
land and searched for zombies.
The Haiti Sun, in its search
S;for truth, organized an expe-
'.ditioa to the area to give the
hocor a chance to defend him-
s'.elf. Whether he is a maker
.of zombies cannot he proven,
..blt evidence picked up indi-
-: -ate: that he is maligned by
'the e northwest.

OSTRACIZED
SBY COMMUNITY
'Boinbardopolis, a rural town
yi tle nothest corner of
.'Hiiti,-i torn-with a controvers-
Sial roabie story, which now
Sha its victim, a so-called bocor
-and zombie .maker, self-impri-
sioned &h his own tobacco farm.
This incident was set off
when a relative of thje bocor,
,'known by many to be insane,
turned' p in that town and
claimed he was kept as a zom
bie with five others to work
the boCor's tobacco fields.
.The'bocori visited by repre-
sentaTivesi'; iof -The Haiti Sun,
was found 'working down in
Sthe garden by the river. His
. farm, ,it hard by the drought,
yielded so little at this point,
that he and his family had
g6ne five nights without din-
ner.
CRAZY FAMILY


The thin puckered, face En-


hers were also insane, and that
lhis 'maiaaie was common ii.
that family.
In cne of five small latice-
wood cailles on a barren cliff
ledge high above the river Hen
.ne, Enacier.with blazing hypno-
tic eyes made a Mark Anthony-
like appeal to his visitors.
PlJeading his cause with Se-
natorial repertory and demon-
trative hands, he made his au-
dience 'forget their thirst and
three hour donkey-ride.
The nephew, Bolosse, for the
past 10 years, had forsaken
clothes, food and lodging given
to him by his relatives prefer-
ing t- live naked as an animal
in wilds of that area..
Enac;er reported how hig
nephew would occasionally ap
pear in localities scaring the
entire, witch-happy population.
aHorribly, horribly thin,,
,aid the Bocor of his nephew.
,,We would give him clothes
but he'd throw them away.'
Youthful guide 'Michel who
only agreed to make the long
lho journey after he had got
the assurance that ,a part-time
farmer and rural policeman
accompany the visitors was as
confirmed ,as everyone in Bom-
bardopolis that the man who
startled the town almost out of
their wits was a zombie.
(Enacier contends small ru-
ral communities don't have any
wits).

"When he walked, his feet
did not seem to touch the
ground. He wodld not sit like
a human, but perch on a rock
like b birdn. said Michel with
conviction.

The bocor said he realized
now he had made a mistake
in fetching his nephew from


acier ostracized by. the town, the police station and sending
-reported that his nephew, the him home to Jean Rabel.
so called -zombie had been .What I should have done
crazy for the past ten years, was to leave the so called zom-
Enacier also declared that his bie there, and made the crazy
nephew's father and two brot- boys from my nephew's fa
1 __ _ _ __ _ _


SCOTCH WHISKY


a.~nr(4


"


The
Celebration
Scotch


V O- Wn .... ,A..f.. "
Ii IW na 5v l s I -r


mily come from Jean Rabel
to pick him up.
sThe voice of the people
has forced this on me, but
I want to fight it. Let anyone
come and look in my house,
my garden or any place and
see if they can find a zombie
working. I myself have never
evpn seen a zombie.
"If I had done something
like this to one of my relatives
children they would have been
the first to come and protest.
The last I saw of my nephew
was when I gave him food,
put him on a mule, and gave
him to a boy to take to his
brother.
As for bribing the corporal,
why I have never even given
him a cigarette.n
Apparently Bolosse was tak-
en back to his brother's home
on Feb. 26. He again rari away
into the woods, and two week's
later was found dead on a
trail.
Police weqe called from Mo-
le St- Nicholas to-'rify the
death.
Also interviewed on this
case ,was neatly-robed Pere
Laroche, a Canadian who has
been in Haiti pince 1948.
The Cur6 of Bombardopolis
with the look of an executive
and flare for'road building told
the Haiti Sun, the'story which
has been circulating about the
town for some weeks now.
As the story goes, a group of
boys had been playing cards one
night when they were approach
ed by an'emanciated man, hands
tired behind.his back, and ask-
ed for a glass of water because
he was ahot from diggings.
Supposedly Bolosse had been'
digging another man from the
Bombardopolis cerretery which
he said Enacier wanted as
another zombie.
A check of the cemetery
this week showed the grave
had not been disturbed.
The card players jumped
out the window and loped
down the road several hundred
yards to the.police post.
They pushed the'guards 'back
to where they lead left the zom-
bie.
The guard. extremely hesitant
told the men as they had found
him thly would have to keep
him for the night.
The card players tied the


PEOPLE HAS BRANDED ME
ZOMBIE WAS CRAZY RELATIVE


long hair naked creature up to
itle porch of the house opposite
hbe Police Post where he gnawed
through his ropes twice during
the night.
The second time he told his
involuntary guards at 3 a. m.
,This is the time I must go for
water.
When they commented on
how thin he was, the ozbmbiev
stated 'That's nothing, you
should see the women'. The
zombie- then told them he and
five others including two wo-
men were kept in caverns at E-
nacier's tobacco farm where they
worer brutally treated 'and gi-
ven nothing but sour oranges to
eat
The .only food noted at Ena-
cier farm. IMonday was a single
sour orange.
The next day he was taken
to the police post where he was
interviewed by Pere Laroche.
Lying on a small bencbh his
body wdas so thin it did not
even overlap on either side of
the bench. With his.head in his
hands he looked at the priest
and told him he recognized him
from wHen he was buried three
ye'srs before in a rural district
near the area.
Three years previously, a ne-
phew' ofEnacier, called Elius
'wai buried. Bolosse may have
had attended the funeral.
The police station reported
that 'Enacier was called to town
to see the corporal. He .'said
the :zombie- was.his crazy ne-
phew a'4d he would fetch bimI
and 'send him back to his fa-
mily.,
A relative of Entlaier, Acius,
who has been estranged' from


his uncle since he became Bap-
List said le had not seen his
umcle in a long time.
4I do not know if Enacier is
a witch doctor, but I do know
he is a leaf doctor*. Acina also
verified the fact that his uncle
had a crazy nephew who had
been existing by stealing chic-
kens and living in the woods for
the past ten years.
Enacier's convincing oratory
is lost on the Bombardopoli-
sians. A man died recently be.
hind St. Francois Cathedral and
the population quoted Enacier
as starting: good now Ill have
a seventh'.
Lowering his voice, Enacier
declared: cI am not a bocor. I
used to dispense medicine with
the leaves but ]I have Ing since
given up because its ta thank-
less task. It takes you away from
your garden and if your cure
does not work you have pro-
blems.
Enacier who claims he is the
father of 31 children, 20 living
sighed and declared there is
no lafk of crazy people in Haiii.
SYesterday I saw a crazy one
on my back from trying in vain
to buy some Petit mil from a
St. Mare boat that was reported
jn Baie de Henne.
This person they also call a
zombie. The population of Bom-
bard has sinned 'against me in
saying I'm a Zombie-maker.
Back in the small mountainn
town it was said that Joseph
Portali who diedn the night
before the 'zombie, appeared
obstensibly to dig him up, was
being treated by 'Doctorn Ena-
cier, prior to leaving this world
'prematurement,.


I c ,15th. 1959


Caribbean Construction.Co. S A.
Builders Of The Military City
Gen. Manager' Gerard THEARD
SPhone: 3955. P. O. B0.. 284
=I -a ,. .., .~


4F .


Born 1 P20 --tlltQgig stthg *


Designs jn qiiiiii R~l ljPip i ni Rush
AND SUPERB ._ AND FAMOUS
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B~1~?ZRL'~i~~--'"i-'~-----C-~---


.' ._: ,
IEt/[l N ,


PAGE 11


W.




,- ana 1-11bUM SUNDAY. 1M


7 : For all kinds of French perfumes
visit Haiti's Smartest Indian store
Select your favourite perfume
from our large collection

JEAN PATOU
CHRISTIAN DIOR

We offer you the world's famous
brands at free port prices

LE GALLON

CARVEN

LANVIN NINA RICCI

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etc... etc...

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* TUESDy MONTRNRa PUnch-pouil'aPtS 7.00 p.m
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* WEDNESDArI MoNTANA Buffef 30
HOTEL Contest Ppise ,30p.m
ShOou),'Oancing to 12.Aep.m

*THURSDFR CHOUCOUNE Iunch-0owlPaPrty 7,o0p.m
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PFRID4y CHOUCOUNE fRooj-arden 7,30 p.m
HOTEL Contestr rle to
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*SRTUDRMy IRMU5T CRBNE ,o.m
ICHOUCOUNE 3,ooam


Poultry Raising
Project

One year ago, in order to as-
~ist the --H clubs in carrying
out a poldtry raising project.
the Rural Youth Program Sec-
tion of the Service Agricole de
la Coopertaion Technique IS.
A. C. T.) sent to St. Raphael
land nILX Cayes 500 cross-bredc
chicks from the Poultry Sta-
tion of the Department of Agri-
culture at Damien. The reason
for this choice was thi t the 4-H
clubs wanted to raise chicks that
would he resistant to all disea-
sei.
After six months, 94% of the
chickens in Caves and St. Ra-
phael were in full production.
The loss of 6% was almost en-
tirely attributable to injuries in-
flicted while they were in tran-
Lit. The 4-H clubs in the region
of St. Raphael were able to ex-
libiit excellent poultry at the
Fair organized in that section
last year. The 4-H clubs in Aux
Cayes held their first exhibits
on December 20. 1958. These
aroused a great amount of en-
thusiasm among'the youth andu
adults in..the. area.
Encouraged by such a -ue-
cqss, SACT and the Department
of Agriculture decided to carry
out similar projects in other
sections of the country. Tl.ev in-
terested the Heifer Project, an
American institution which pro-
motes livestock breeding in ge-
neral throughout tile world, in
their plan. W ith the help of
that institution, 3,600 certified
chicks have been received. Tb'
chicks are kept four weeks at
the Poultry Section at Damien
and are distributed only after
they have been vaccinated a-
gainst cholera.'New Castle and
yaws. thde three diseases most
common among poultry.
Such institutions as the Ru-
ral Supervised -Credit Bureau,
the Service Cooperatif Haitia-
no-Americain d'Education Ru-
rale ISCHAER'. the 4-H Sec-
tion, the Agricultural Extension
Service. tlie Methodist Mission
of Petit-Goave, the Catholic Re-
form School of Carrefour. and
the Poultry Station at Damien
have already received hundreds
of chicks for the improvement
of the local breeds. All possible
health measures have been ta-
ken to insure complete success
of the project.
These arrivals thus far are
the first of a series of shipments
which will help supply the a-
b. i e mentioned institutions
with thousands of chicks selec-
ted from good hatcheries and
of breeds such as Rhode Island
Red. White Rock and Plymouth
'Rock well known for their re-
sistance to diseases.
This experiment is the first
step toward a general livestock
improvement program. This will
include rabbits, hogs., oats. dai-
rv and beef cattle which the
iHeifer Project will supply.


HAITI'S INDUSTRIALISTt
(continued from page 4)
e'


rered by the Brandt Textile
Mill is of a superior quality to
that imported, Mr Frantz
Brandt informed.

A representative of the
Klein & Saks firm asked to
be allowed to speak, saying
the firm is here to advise the
President of the Republic and
this counsel can be given only
to the Chief of State. The
Mission is very much interest-
ed in all measures susceptible
for improving local produc-
tion, he declared.

The discussions of the day
were suspended and the mem-
bers of the Chamber of Com-
merce agreed to invite the im-
porters for a round-table chs


- '.i .n, as their point
deserved to be expose
Le Nouvelliste, ini
10th edition, editorial
reporting the details:.
meeting as follows: *4i
that the next time, j
be prompt at the rend,
so that the different
view may be heard, k
a question of vital imn
for our national econ.Y
caution Power is too ini
for its being put into e.
application before bei
bated thoroughly as to'tl
dalities of this applicatfi
the passing without'
from the former regimdI
situation which the -
Law has just created:I


Stdne and only




and Iis magic drum


Visit


EL RANCHO -HOTEL


French, Haitian and American Cuisine
under the direction of the internationally famous
Chef Olympias Passales and
Featuring the International Buffet every Monda:
and Pool-side Barbecue each Thursday
Delicious cocktails and other drinks
served at the smart rendez-vous, the Round' Ba
Dancing under the stars to the music of -
Raoul Guillaume's Orchestra
Feature Entertainment
presented by Haiti's stellar .artists......
and the one and only Ti Roro
with 'his magic drum
also the weekly Fashion Show
uA Night, of Loveliness*
produced by the Coin de Paris j
For Beauty... ...Elegance...... Refinement......i
for the FINEST


CHATELETS DES FLEURS
-r
in cool Kenscoff, at 5000 feet, almost a mile above ,
Restaurant featuring savory delicious Haitian dishes ff
mets. .
Please read the small print; 5
Haiti is a word of the aboriginal Carib Indians:
(Wooded mountains And Haiti was well named, for 84i
of its surface area is mountainous.
You have not seen Haiti until you have seen its mj
The Chatelet des Fleurs is well situated to show the fis
Haitian countryside. It is reached by 15 miles, 351
minutes, of pleasant driving, over a road now gorge
flaming Poinsettias. "
Chatelet des Fleurs producps- and exports cut flo~
tropical perfumes of highest quality. The high poin0
visit can well be this visit to Chatelet des Fleurs, with..
tryside, its gardens, its delectable Haitian dishes au i


,UD A ."


[


a" t&a'X a 3luAIA




MARCH 15th. 1959


Wesner Leconte
To Leave
For Germany
On 2 Year
Scholarship

Twenty-six-year old Wesner Le-
conte, Linotypist at the Imprime-
'..rie de I'Etat, leaves for Germany
next Sunday to follow specializ.
'" ed courses in printing technique.
SHaving taken up the trade at
the age of 16, Leconte has 10
years experten-e in his branch,
having worked in the printshops
-of Haiti Journal, Le Matin and L.
National For the past year he has
been a staffer at the Imprimreri
Sde I'Etat.
Mr. Leconte will enter the
Goethe Institute in Stuttgard, Ger-
many on April 6th to study the
German language prior to begin-
ning his courses in printing tech-
nique.
A scholarship granted by the
Federal Government of Germany
has made it possible for this young
husband and father of two to go
Germany for two years' studies.
His wife, the former Miss Claire
Moise, and two small sons, Ernst
2, and Claude 6 months of age
will remain here while he is study-
ing abroad.
Claude Desmornes, also employ.
ed at the Imprimerie de l'Etat,
will leave at the same time for
stuttgard to perfect his technique
as a pressman, on a scholarship
from the federal Government of
Germany.


Havana Embassy

(Continued from page 1.I

against the -moral threats- made
to the Haitian Embassy by menm-
bers of the police, Monday night.
Mr. Dorismond explained that
50-some-odd policeman and nine
vehicles patrolled the immediate
neighborhood of the Embassy, and
that insults were hurled against
the functionaries and shots fired
into the air.
Twelve persons are said to be
in asylum in the Embassy, and
Mr. Dorisn:olnd lu.ther said ltij
Monday night they were told to
come out of the Embassy because



Ruddell's Fete

Earl Ruddell, associate of
the Roy, Beliard firm located
in the Exposition City, observ-
ed his birthday anniversary on
March 12th and entered a
nouveau Printemps,, sport-
'ing a chic gray tie with tiny
blue polka dots, one of the
many gifts he received.

aJournalists of Yesterday-
Old Newspapers, was the sub-
ject of a lecture delivered at
the French Institute on Tues.
night. The lecturer was Mr
Ernst Trouillot who was ap-
plauded by a select public .at
the Institute.


OOFVAU RNT
DIFFERENT


grHAIBRB



111VB- r -


rrofn ametior; de la bande de
roulmerrt donne une traction et une)
6curit6-supplementaires. Un ingenieuZ
dlspositif de silence .r6duit les diffe-
rents bruit' d6sagr6ables du pneu.
4andis que ,la construction 16gcre do
Super-Cushion Sans Chambre lui
permit d'absorber les cahots de la
'oute. Vous aurez moins de pneus &!
Iplat, et moins de delais parce que la\
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B De GENS DANS E MONDE ENTIER. ROULENT Sl DESU PF
ahr MuE U Q SUwE DES gaeUSMa _IO MIBE L-_


they were going to throw grenades
dTr The building.
No new refugees have demand-
ed or been receiv-d at the Embas.
sy since January. The building is
being watched by more than 10
policemen, the doors are closed
by iron chains, and the house next
door is occupied by a rebel officer,
the Haitian diplomat said.
Mr. Dorismond said he was sa-
tisfied with Ith.e attention given


the matter by Foreign Minister
Agramonte who gave the a assu-
rance that such incidents would
not happen again, meanwhile the
Government was investigating the
affair.

The Diplomatic Corps in Havana
is reported to have also protested
against this incident which took
place before the Embassy of Haiti
there.


with I



CAT No.955%



Traxcavator




i


Visit
Of Mrs Cumberland
Taps Memories
Of Electric Light
Consumers
Mrs. Edith Cumberland, who
spent three days here at Hotel
Salvador, in Petion.Ville, left
yesterday delighted with her visit
to the country after 25 years, and
the improvements she found here.


and Side


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Is Ils~--~IY----LI~~E~51~ I - _II ---- --- -~--


HAITI SUN>


PAGE 13


---rrr r~i~


P-l


l." .P" 'Y.
t >!_ .'A ,; #,' 1 .


H"nSUPAE1






3 U. S. Navy Units
Here
Fifty-four officers and 663 en-
listed men arrived on the Li. S.
Navy units ,CAPRICORNUS-,
SCHARLES P. CECIL AND
WACCAMA>, yesterday. These
ships are not saluting vessels.
Captain J. W. Darroch is Com
manding Officer of the Navy At-
tack Cargo Ship The NXvy Radar Picket Des-
troyer tCharles P. Cecil, is com-
manded by Commander D. H.
Green. The vy Oiler is undei the command
of Captain T. H. Henry who is
also the Senior Officer Present
Afloat.
Scheduled to lift anchor to-
day, March 15th., at 4:00 P. M
5:00 P. M. lare the aCapricornus
and the Chas. P. Cecib. The
Waccama will leave at 7:00 P.

Dewitt Peters To Judge
Ford Art Festival
Dewitt Peters, Director-Foun-'
der of the Centre d'Art in Haiti
leaves for Michigan next week.
Mr. Peters has been invited by
the Fond Initrnational Motors
to sit on the jury of judges for
the Second Ford Employees In-
terniational Art Festival. The
Festival will take place in Dear-
born, Detroit, Mich. on April
1st. witli 150 entries to be jud-
ged on 18 oveIrseas locations
where Ford Motors Co. has in-
terests.
Paintings and sculpture work
are the subjects of this Interna-
tional Amateur Art Festival.


Famous Writer
Edna Ferber Here
Mliss Edna Ferber. famous au-
thor I-Show Boatl So Big,,
- 'Saratoga Trunk-, Gen-
tl4men Prefer Blondes,-.-Giant
is visiting Haiti, accompanied by
her sister, also a celebrity, Mrs.
Fanny Fox, They are lodged at
Hotel Ibo Lele, where they are
spending a week and scheduled
to leave on Tuesday.
-
Coffee Prospects

Coffee usually accounts for
more than 75 percent of Haiti's
export revenue. Some rains
improved prospects for a good
1959 crop. On thie other hand,
Brazilian (Santos) coffee, as an
index of prices, was selling at
this time in New York at 55
cents per pound. Wednesday, it
was selling 18 cents lower at 37
cents per pound, a drop of
roughly 33 percent.



Beachcomber
Miss Eva Escala, beauteous Pa-
namanian, and Keima Perez, Pro-
fessor are among the guests at
the Hotel Salvador.

--0--

Author Nathaniel Speai who
came down from New York on Fe-
bruary 6th is gathering data for
his coming book on Haiti and en-
joying life at the Salvador Hotel.


HOTEL
SALVADOR

PETIONVILLE
CORNER OF RUE GREGOIRE & RUE VILATTE
RESTAURANT
DUCK a l'orange FILET MIGNON
LOBSTER au rhum STEAK au poivre
LAMBI & la sauce rustique CHICKEN a 1'Haitienne
EUROPEAN PLAN
EVERY ROOM WITH PRIVATE BATH
WINTER RATES: $8 to $10 (single)
$12 to $14 (double)
SPECIAL OUT-OF-SEASON RATES
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION WRITE:
ANTOINE DUPOUX P. O: Box. 474
PORT-AU.PRINCE, HAITI
TELEPHONE: 7894


YOUR CHOICE

A
1 w
Izkea


NBC Washington
Commentator
Interview's President

Martin Agronkky Washington
Corre-,pondent for the- Natio-
nal Broadcasting Company in-
terviewed President Dr. Fran-
oiss Duvalier Wednesday.

Mr. Agronsky who came to
Port-auiPrinci with Colonel
Heinl in Charge of the United
States Marine Mission to Haiti
returned to Washington Friday
on the Marine Corp Aircraft.



Dr. CAMILLE..

(Continued from page 1)

Canape Vert Hospital following a
sudden indisposition, at his home
in Turgeau.
The deceased, son of the great
physician Lamartine Camille, was
highly esteemed here for, his scru-
pulous honesty and his dedication
to alleviating the suffering hmong
the poor of his country, and en-
'joyed a long career in professional
service and Public Administration.
With the death of Nelaton Ca-
mille, Haiti loses one of its outs-
tanding sons.
He is survived by his widow,
the former "Melle. Thelemaque, a
son, Dr. Raymond Camille, daught-
ers, and brother Mr. Lelio Camille,
and numerous relatives, to whom
the "Haiti Sun,wishes to present
its deepest sympathy and regrets.

000

New 1959 License
Plates Go Into
Effect April 1st
Car owners will benefit from a
further delay to obtain their 1959
License Plates.
An official communication from
the Trafic Service of the Military
Department of the Police, infor-
med on Thursday that delay had
been extended to April 1st.
'This news will be received with
satisfaction by car owners who
are tardy in paying up to obtain
their v59 license plates,, "Le
Jour- in its March 12th edition.,


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IS'SSff Cie i
..ISo -Srh kSSSU 1^
L _ _2 7 ^ S s
2mWWffii





AY, ARCH 15 1959


'cHAITI SUNS PAGE 15


000
Miss Marie-Marthe Fritz'berg
became the bride of Jean Car-
nas. last Saturday evening. The
nuptials' took place at the Saint
Trinity Cathedral, with the Re-
,verend Pastor Desir performing
the ceremony. The distinguislheIl
young couple were accompanied
to the altar by Mrs. Edouard
Clesca, emarriane" and Mr. An-
dre Charmant, aparramin. The
religious rites were followed by
a reception at the home of the
mother of the bride, Mrs. Pietar
Fritzberg.
-0-
Cuba's Ambassador to Haiti, Se.
nor Antonio Rodriguez, hosted a
farewell dinner for Ambassador
Arnaud Mercerion who left Satur-
day to present his letters of Cre.
dence to President Urritia as
Haiti's new representative in
Cuba-
South and Central American di-
plomats accredited here, and Am-
bassador Joseph Baguidy, Proto.
col Chief, attended the dinner at
the Beau Rivage.

-0-
Elaine Barrymore, and her mpt-
her are back from their New York
business trip.
-0-
Ti-Daniel Roy grew two in-
ches taller this week, pulled
up by his bootstraps with the
big news cabled him from
France. His wife, the former
Rolande Audibert, presented
him with a baby daughter, born
to the young couple in Paris
ion March 11th. The arrival of
the new addition to ,the house-
hold preqeeded by one day
the wedding anniversary of the
Daniel Roys. They chalked up
four years of wedded bliss on
'March 12th.


weeks before going on East to
-the Virgin Islands on their
Yacht cruise.

l'iThe oung cadets of the Swe.
dish Navy unit Alvsuah .enz
W-rve conducted on a tour of the
"In famous Rhum Barbancourt dis-
tillery on Monday morningg
s here they were given a de-
monstration of hlow the nectar
is concocted.
.-o-0 Ken Bern-tein who has Itic
The Ulysses Daileys enter- Igravt-yard -hift on the NBC
trained at dinner, on Wednes- radio and T\V news desk in New
day, at 'their homrp n Mpitis- York (pent two days sunning it


saint where the socially promi-
ment Ch.cagoans selected a
spot for the Doc's retirement
from active service, and have
been living in Haiti a year.
-0----
Mrs May St. Cyr left on the
PAA direct flight for New
York yesterday for a sojourn
Stateside. The v4ell-knowni
former SCISP staffer drew a
large gathering of relatives and
friends to tle Bown Field air
port to Wish her *bon voyage.*
She will visit with her sisters
residing in New York then
head for several weeks then
hof off to Washington, and a
new bi-lingual secretarial post
in Dee Cee.
o--

Robert S. Pritchard plans to
leave shortly for the U. S. The
young piano virtuosos pent three
months here, gave several con
certs end was one of the Foun
ders of the Fondation Pro Arte
&Litteris. Mr Pritchard's corn
mitments for the coming con-
cert season will take him to
Europe and perhaps to Africa.
-o-

Colonel John R. Brindles
(U. S. Army Retired) sailing
with two daughters and a
friend on the aMiss Tristram
III, a Rhodes 50 ketch 50 ft.
long, arrived in the Casino
Pier, on Tuesday. They came
to Haiti from Miamia via luan
gua, cleared in Gonaives and
visited St. Marc on the way
to the Capital.
Colonel Brindley and his


party expect to stay


here two


Look Beautiful And Well-Groomed
Coiffure --Facial Massage Manicure

Tirting Permanents
At Petion-Ville's Modern New


BANDA

BEAUTY PARLOR

AVE. PAN AMERICAN
BEHIND .TT ST. PIERRE- STATUE
(AFTER GASOLINE SINCLAIR)

Mine. Ernest Douyon, Proprietor

Specialist

in Scientific care of the hair and skin
Graduate Of The American School

Of Beauty Culture Of Chicago


I ti at IMoitani after a w-ekl in


C. T.


000
Businessman Bobby Gaillard
clippered to the States Thurs-
day on a six-week voyage. He
\wa- accompanied by his wile.
000
Miami Herald's star reporter
Evelyn De Tardo KLM-ed
to Floridla Tuesday ending a
fortnight busman's holiday. here
and on the -Bombard) trail.
This is the budding foreign-
correspondent's second visit.
000
ooo I
Kryn Taconis of MBangnun
Photos has not quite decided
whether covering the Algerian
Rebels was as strenoai as tra-
velling mountainous Haiti by
donkey. A top flight photogra-
pher Kryn is doing a Haiti ei-
say.
000
Franck Magloire flew to Mia-
mi Thursday afternoon.
ooo
iTi Barbes Morisson's press
conference ait the Casino Wed-
nesday night was dropped on
his request.
000
ooo
Polo playing got underway
again at the Military stables this
past week.'
S000
Newest sign on tllie Petion
ville road is the Auhbry's .new
,Bay View Pension' opposite
the Petionville chLb.
/ ooo
Tato Plhipps olser\cd llii fete
Thursday.
000,
Sale of Lottery tickets jumped'
Friday. Twas 13th.
000
A-sociated Press cl~iief 'ihoto-
grapher Murray Beicker was here
wi-th his wife and Bolex
Friday. With AP for ti.irty
years Mr. Becker although cruise
ing on the Homeric found it
impossible to be separated from
one of his beloved cameras.
oOo
The Capitol Theatre bar is
the neatest cleanest ina town. The,
balcony view has an interesting
uole weighed down with wires.
Looks like a surrealist painting
and is photogenic. Gebara prays
it will be removed.
-0-
Dominican Colonel John W. A.
Garcia who motored to Port from
D C. in his big green police.driven
auto this week flew back to the
R. D. Saturday afternoon.


Katherine Dunham returned
from ten days in New York Sa-
turday. Miss Dunham it is said
will rehears her troupe in Paris
for her coming European tour.
--0-
'Lawyer Ceorge Leger flew home
from a trip to New York yester.
day.
*--0-
Miss Yvette Dhaiti, former Rey-
nolds Mining staffer and Adrien
Bance had the knot tied at Conak-
ry, New Republic of Guinea, on
March 12th.
The bride.elect left Port.au-Prin-
ce earlier this month to fly to the
African State for her marriage.
-0-
Lamy Camille, Haitian Consul
to Santiago de Cuba returned here


Raymond Moise flew
from D. C. yesterday.


down


-0-
Dr. Elmer Langlin and Monsieur
Montes returned from New York
yesterday.
-0-
Frack Ross of Saturday Even.
ing Post is the ace shutter-clicker
in town.


WELCOMES ITS MEMBERS TO HAITI

AND SUGGESTS


FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE:


At PORT-AU-PRINCE. -
And PETIONVILLE.

HOTELS: Beau Rivage, Cas-
telhaiti, International Country
Club, Sans Souci Hotel, Rivie-
ra Hotel Simbie Hotel, Hotel
Plaza, Hotel Splendid.
RESTAURANTS: Aux Co-
saques. Nobbe & Bondel, Savoy
Restaurant.
GIFTS SHOPS: La Belle
Creole, Boite a Mupique (all
Haitian records), Canap6 Vert,
Fisher, Fritz Mews, Haitian
Craft (Airport). Maison Orien-
'tale, Marie Jeanne, Nanotte
(embroideries) Ramirez Shop,
Store Club and Tam-Tam.
NIGHT CLUBS: Casino In-


international And Cabane
Choucoune.
FLOWER SHOPS: Tabou.
LIMOUSINE SERVICE and
SIGHTSEEING: He aux Tours
and Magic Island Tours.
Auto-Rentals U-Drive: Hertz
System.
HOTELS: Hotel Choucoune,
Hotel Dambala. Hotel Ibo-L61i,
Hotel Montana. Hotel Vila
Cr6ole. Hotel Majestic. Le Per-
choir. Le Picardie, Rex Caf6.
AT CAP HAITIEN.-
HOTELS: Hostellerie du Roi
rCh-itonhe and Mont-Joli Ho-
tel U-Drive: Hertz System.
ROLAND VORBE,
Local Represeutative
"hone: 38 P. O. BOX 364.


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vIHAITI 'SUN))


PAGE 15


1


Friday for consultations. Mr. Ca-
mille is expected to return to his
post in Oriente today.
-0-
The dark-eyed Senorita from
Caracas is Sonia Marin, former
college Pal of Mrs. David Haral.
so nof P. AA. Sonia Leaves tomor-
row to revisit her School campus
in Jamaica.
-0-




/PG 16.AT U~SNAMR


Earthquake Rattles
Walls And Furniture
For 7 Seconds Here
An earthquake lasting seven
second ,was registered here, Fri-
day at 10:35 A. M.- Walls and
furniture shook in homes and bu-
reaux, and drivers on the Delmas
road thought something- was
wrong with their steering wheels.
The Observatory at the Petit
Seminaire St. Martial gave the
direction of the earth tremor as
Northeast Southwest at an in.
tensity of IV V.
Up to Saturday morning, the Obs.
;ervatory had not yet completed
work on determining the quake
center.
STARS IN HAITI
Helga Miller, Peter Witt,
Hugh Harlowe, A. Jackson
Declaring that their visit has
been a chainn of marvelous mo-
ments~ Peter Witt spoke Wed-
Snesday for the party headed 'by
Miss Anne Jackson and Hugh
Marlowe. Screen and TV stars
and Miss Helgar Miller of the
Caribbean Tourist Association
who brought them to Haiti.
Peter made the statement af-
ter the group had lunched at
Hotel Oloffson, in company
with-.bea'uteous Barbara Gould,
and Public Relations Officer
Aubelin Jolicoeur.
Mi-s Jackson and Hugh Mar-
low who starred in tb.e show
=Two For The Seesaw- were
resting up here from the art
festival in San Juan. In private
life she ib the wife of stage' and
screen star Eli W-allach, and is
herself one of the stars in
iJourney, now at Radio City
Music Hall, in New York.
York.
Marlowe will be remembered
from aEve in the Ellery
Queen series on Broadway.
Petter Wi-tt is agent for Miss
Jackson, and counts among his
clients such famous actors as
Tana Turner.
Lodged at Hotel Ibo-Lele,
the visitors saw Kenscoff, Le
Percdoir, met with Tourist
Board chief Raymond Roy and
Director General Jacques Ho-
norat, saw the Bacoulou Show
with Miss Gould, Mr. and Mrs.
Honorat and Mr. and Mrs.
Fritz Mews ,and took home
with them a number of Hai-
tian paintings purchased from
the Art Center,

JEAN-RABEL
the low coffee yield and world
prices, and multiple problems
it is natural that someone would
go hungry.
If rain does not soon fall soon
There is still the prospect of
the famine spreading to other
areas wiich still have a little
reserve, if rain does not soon
fall.


$3.000 in Prizes
Offered By President
In Big Contest
Of Painting
And Sculpture
The National Tourism Commis-
sariat this week announced the
coming Grand Contest of Paint.
ing and Sculpture being opened
to artists here.
Three thousand dollars ($3.000)
has been offered by the President,
Doctor F)ahiois Duvalier' to be
divided into four pries each for
sculpture and four for painting
The first prize will be $500, a se-
cond $300, third $200 and 4th to
be divided into 2 prizes of $250
eachJ for contestants in each ca.
tegory.
Rules of the contest require
tlat the subjects be typically,
Haitian and represent the Natio.
lal culture. Entries must be deli-i
vered to the National Commissa.
riat of Tourism not later than 2:00
P.M. on Wednesday, April 22nd.
The paintings ad sculpture.
work will be exhibited on May
Ist, Day of Agriculuture and La-
bor, and the winners announced
,hte same day.
The works gaining the prizes
will be come property of-the Hai.
tian Consulate General in New
York.
The names of the judges will
'be announced shortly. Further in.
formation may be obtained"by ad-
dressing Mr. Brun A. Candy, (hief
of the Information' Service at the
National Commissariat of Tou.
rism in Portau.Prince.
000
Two
TWO ;
Thousand Believed'
Fled To
Bahama Islands
More than two thousand pers-
ons are believed to have fled to
the Bahama island from the island
of Tortue and other drought.
stricken coastal areas in North.
west Haiti informed sources dis-
close.
Since Colonial times there has
existed a small schooner ship.
ping service between the North.
west Haiti and the Bahama island.
Mangoes and Other seasonal fiuit
and vegetables of Haiti are tra-
ded. for island fish and shell.fish

Major Maxime B. Smith:
Mr and Mrs Richard Wal-
ters.

Pretty Australian visitor to
town this past week was Pa-
tricia Hoogeveei Seitz who
works with a leading-advertis-
ing agency in Willemstad, Cu-
raqao.
Tie former .Sydneyite prom-
ises to return in six months to
visit Cap Haitian and the Ci-
tadel
Gerard Sada is spending a
vear in New York studying.


Minister Charles
Buys Beans And Rice
With Money
From President
For Jean Rabel Area
(Continued from page 2)
Minister of Agriculture M. Henri
Marc Charles disclosed in an in-
terview Friday afternoon that he
had purchased and shipped that
day relief supplies for the drought-
stricken area. The money the Mi-
nister said had been given him
personaIy by the President.
The Minister informed that the
supplies, 50 sacks of red beans
and 100 sacks of rice, left Port
Friday by Camion.
A similar shipment would go
North this Tuesday declared the
MVnister.

ON THE ANCON
The SS aANCONu of the
Line will arrive from New
Yoi'k at ,7.00 A. M.
'Passengers will disembark
at Port-au-Prince:
Mr Christian Aime
Rev. Achille Brunet
Mrs Madeleine Fequire
Dr and Mrs John Herma
Mr and Mrs David T. Hous-
ton
Mr -and Mrs Seymour Jar-
mul
Mr and Mrs Gordon Van
Bauren King
Mr Smarck "Michel
Major Korra F. Rudolph
Mr and Mrs Frank E. Shu-
mann
-0-
CRUISE-SHIP PASSENGER
BREAKS NECKI DIES...
(continued from page 1)
a slightly -under t*e weather,
when he dived into the outdoor
swimming pool aboard his ship
and do not notice that the
water was only 3 feet high.
He sustained a broken neck
and was rushed to the Canape
Vert Hospital by the local Ag-


IMPORT REk
(Continued
President of -he Republic to issue
Decrees all measures necessary
for assuring a good and just ap-
plication of the dispositions of the
January 27, 1959 Decree.
*Considering that the lack of
devices has been provoked the
last few months by the fall in the
price of coffee on the foreign
market and the deficit of the pre-
sent crop;
*Considering that the aid given
by the American Government to
the Haitian Government of
$6.000.000 to balance the 1958.59
Budget definitely puts an end to
this scarcity, assures and maint.
ains the liberal system of exchan.
ge and commerce to which Haiti
has always been attached;
*,Considering that it is equally
necessary to prevent any increase
i the cost of living and its unfavo-


STRICTIONM
from page 1)
rable incidences on the!
already heavily burden
sent economic condition
Upon the report of tV
ry of State for Finance
ce and Industry;
DECREES:
Article l.-The dispo,
vided for in Article 1 (
cree of January 27, 15
served, while awaiting
tive Power's submittal(
ed Law abrogating d
Legislative Chambers s
ing session.,...
Issued.at the Nation
at Port-au-Prince, Mar
156th Year of the Inc
By the Preside
Dr. Francois DUV.
The Secretary of State f4
Commerce and Ini
AndrB THEA2


SENSATIONAL SENSATIu
INTERNATIONAL CASINO OF H

Always anxious to satisfy its large,
distinguished clientele is proud to pr
TONIGHT and EVERY NIGl
THIS WEEK
GUY AND HIS YOUNG DANC'
OF THE ISLE
One of the most famous and sought j
Folkloric Troup of the Day
In a Debauch of Light and Dansinl
Of Rithm, Cadence, Gaiety...
Second Part
ELSA MARVAL
Gracious and Talented American Son'
of International Fame
Admission Free Each Night, inelu|
Sunday
SATURDAY $1.00

ent of the Zim Line, Joseph His widow and son
Nadal & Co. He was pronounce to New York on Frida
ed dead, shortly after. ing.


EVERY MONDAY AT 9 :45 P. M.

STHE OLOFFSON SHOW




.Every year the Oloffson show draws more people than we can
accommodate. This year bigger crowd than ever.

That is why the Management of the Hotel Oloffson has establish-
ed a reserved seat system so that everyone may 'be properly seated.
WE SUGGEST THAT YOU RESERVE YOUR SEAT IN AD-
VANCE. Tickets available now at Hotel Oloffson

Reserved tables $2.00 per person

, Standing Room at bar: $1.00 per person

Dinner and show $5.00 per person (The

Oloffson has gourmet cuisine)


THE WORLD


FAMOUS


SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCA


:


---------


SUNDAY, MARC


/PAGE 16


HAITI SUN,


''''
3~
.,


*