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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00182


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



AL


QARD DIEDERICH
EDITOR
THE HAITIAN


V


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ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER


OLU1VIE HI Port-au-Prince '


R4pub be DE TT


* *t '---L~aL.a Uljl |'wi; IUO


Plans For Development Of Tourism:

Interview With Minister of Commerce


b Ambassador and Mrs. Mills Irving surrounded by
ariesat the Coronation fete held at the British Em-
Wednesday evening (Story Page i6)


Tompt Service-By Immigratiou ,

il Bad Risks, Deport Unwanted


ken a tourist arrives by
She spends one single
ute before the imnmgra-
'officiali at Bowen Field.
r, the Director of the Im-
ation Department, Mr.
SBellande, will know by
nplified chart whether
touristt has spent more


than a minute before the im-
migration official. If he has,
then an explanation is de-
manded from the official.
This is record treatment for
any country to be proud of.
Last April Your Reporter ar-
rived in New Orleans on Sun-
(Continued on Page 14)


w Zealander Conquers Mt. Everest

Is Coronation Gift For Queen


:is our policy .to print
1ocal news, but there are
when great events in
rorld overshadow even
lbcal scene. The conquer-
.f Mount Everest by a
Zealander is one of those
nons we like to do a lit-
ihoing and furthermore
the recent visit of moun
r Herzog many Haitians
:become vitally interest-
& this daring struggle of
lover mountain. It is of.
i.wportance, of course,
e man who conquered
it was born in the same
ity in New Zealand as
Reporter).
. June 2nd issue of the
..York Times reports a


British expedition has con-
quered Mt. Everest. It was
the first time man had reach
ed the top of the world's high
est mountain.
Edmond P. Hillary, a New
Zealander, a .member of the
expedition, and a Sherpa
guide named Tensing were
named as the successful climb
ers.
Queen Elizabeth, resting at
Buckingham Palace, was told
on the eve of her coronation
that the British expedition
had conquered the mountain.
The British climbers had
succeeded in theirplan to give
her a world-shaking corona-
tion present.
(Continued on Page 2)


In an interview with Min- season as resort time in Hai-
ister of Commerce Daniel ti. A recent study shows that
Heuirtelou, the Haiti Sun fifty per cent of the people
learned that the Government in the United States :take
is busily studying new detail- their annual vacation in the
ed plans for development of summer, while Haiti has been
the tourist trade as a means drawing mainly from the ex-
of liberating the national eco- elusive winter holidayers
nomy from its dependency who comprise only eleven per
upon the coffee crop as the cent of the population.
chief source of income. The lowering of hotel rates
A committee comppsed of to fit the pocketbooks of the
representatives from the va- summer budget travellers is
rious divisions of the tourism one of the main proposals un-
field is now beging formed to der consideration. Other draw
blueprint ithe development pro. ing power would be felt in the
ject and put it into action. establishment of mountain
Secretary of State Heurte- hotels, the creation of a spe-
lou said emphasis would be cial summer French course
put on boosting the summer (Continued on Page 15)


Telijol Makes Mountain Out Of

Mole Hill In Nude Photo Hoax


Quick and efficient action
by the local Police Depart-
ment squelched a malicious
attempt at defamation of
character and (possible black-
mail intended for a well-
known local businessman.
The intended victim's of-
fice was looted of some small
items, the most important of
which was a camera and a
box of ordinary snapshots.
The culprits made up com-
binations, mixing respectable


photos with artist model tor-
sos and put them on the
streets, making sure to asso-
ciate them with the name of
the intended victim.

Unfortunately, the business
man was unaware of this plot
until several days after ifs in-
ception, whereupon he report-
ed it to the police who round-
ed up both culprits and
photos within twenty-four
hours.


,Comedie de Paris Gives Opening

Performance; Player Is Stricken


A large receptive audience
which included the President
of the Republic, Madame
Paul Magloire, government of
ficials and diplomats saw. La
Comedie de Paris> theatrical
group play cHommage de
Paris, and ginaireD, a XVII century com-
edy by Moliere, at the Rex
theatre Wednesday evening.


The comedy was hailed by the
critics as good as anything
you would see in Paris. The
XVII century costumes were
magnificent. Actor. Serge
Lhorca, gave a fine perform-
ance even though he was suf-
fering aoute apendic pains.
The following day he was in-
terned at hospital tAsiele
(Continued on Page 15)


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RONY CHENB, r.
ZERANT RESPONSIBLE

No. 33


PERSONALITY -
OF THE WEEK
A'.
If Haitians have been in a:'
nite club mood lately, it is
more than probable, the stun..,
ning blonde chanteuse Diane
Adrian, is responsible. 1
Diane arrived straight from i
a successful engagement .at
the Caribe Hilton, and has',
kept uv breathless and sleep-. :
less ci.ching her different
shows about town. Her pre-,'.
mier performance at Cabane
Choucoune started the chase,.
and from there, v were able
to glimpse and listen to the
lovely Diane at the Interna-.,-i
tional Casino, and again dur-..
Sing the supper dance- at Iba ~ d;
Lele.
Curious about .he back- '
Ground that granted Miss:
Adrian the ability to sing con
vincingly in three languages,
a selection of songs ranging .,
from comedy to semi-classic,.>
we asked a few questions.
Born in Manhattan, New ..
York. Diane began her career r .
as a dancer, and was a junior :
member in a concert gro"ipe. j
in New York City. While in ,'
(Continued on Page 14) '








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DI ANE has a nice voice and .

personality. Her dislikes in- -
elude.dogs and waiters. "' I 1

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Page 2

Consul General

Holds Flag Fe
Reprinted fraoy the cSausali-
to Record.
A large gathering of mem-
bers of the diplomatic corps,
Civilian and military repre-
S sentatives of various foreign
S governments were in attend-
ance last Sunday at the Alta
Mira Hotel, when Haiti Con-
S sul General and Mrs. Andre
i. Rouzier of Sausalito were
Shots at a reception -in com-
4 m. memoration of 150 years since
the flag of Haiti was design-
Sed and first unfurled.
Assisting him were Dr.
and Mrs. William Hahn, Con-
aI. ul of Haiti in Berkeley, and
'Mr. Fernando V. Valdez, Vice
4.A Consul of San Francisco.
Dr. Hahn a prominent East
SBay onthodonist, is also a hon
orary professor of dentistry
at the University of Haiti,
and is a frequent traveler to
S that country.
tOonsul General Rouzier is
in charge of both consular of-
S fices, as well as the consul-
ate in Los Angeles.
SARC ITIjTCT
A. n architect by profession,
S Rouzier has been affiliated
with he. well-known- John
Bolles firm of San Francisco
:" since 1950.
llhe-Consul General moved

NEW ZEALANDER CONQUO
IS CORONATION GITT FOR
Continued from Page 1

S Mt. Everest, the 29,002-ft.
.i -'giant, was the last main out-
'post of the world unknown to
.man.
The thirteen Britons of the
Expedition formed the ele-
Sventh team to try to conquer
.,,'.the mountain in the past
S.tihirty years. M Many climbers
'..have died in the'high ice and
..-snow of thea. Himalaya giant.
The Sher pa guide, Ten-
s. :sing; is a.'39-year-old native
...*veteran of more climbs than
S any- other man on earth.
1 '1...Col. H. J. C. Hunt, of the
I ing's Royal Rifle Corps, led
the British tear. ,
With 362 porters, 20 Sher-
Spa guides and 10,000 pounds
Sof baggage they left the Ne-
palese base of Katmandu on
.March 10. Thus they -ook 80
'-days from start to finish.
SThe expedition carried
three flags the Union .Jack,
the Unite4 Nations and the
S.:.,Nepiaiese flag-to plant on
i the summit.
.hey made an approach to



A.-'" ."-:.. "
1 ;,"


Andre Rouzier Consul General Rouzier stu charge of improving trade re- stated especially frog

Ie In California died in France, holds a de- lations: with coffee, cacao, States. A giant hydroel
-ren from the TUniversitv of cotton, bananas, rice, sisal, plant is now building oi


to Saursalito in 1948, follow-
ing his marriage to the for-
mer Elizabeth "Del Alva of
Pasadena and Santa Barbara.
They now reside at 200 San
Carlos Avenue, where he main
tains his official headquart-
ers. The couple have a 5-
month-old daughter, Janine.
Appointed Consul General
in 1950, by Paul E. Magloire,
President of the Republic
which shares its island with
that of the Dominican Re-
public, Rouzier, like the coun-
try he represents, has had a
colourful background.
FLAG SYMBOLS
Discovered in December,
1492, by Christopher Colum-
.bus, Haiti eventually became
dominated in later years by
France, but under the inde-
pendence movement led by
Toussaint Louverture, the is-
landers joined their six arm-
:es of liberation. On the flag
of the Haitian Republic, ihis
is depicted by six flags drap-
ed around a Ipalm tree, plus
two cannon, and undei-neath,
the motto,. '(L'UNION FAIT
LA FOROCIE union makes
strength. The flag was first.
raised at l'Arcahaie battle-
ground between islanders and
the armies of Napoleon.

IERS MOUNT EVEREST :
QUEEN
the (.Goddess Mother of the
Snowsv from the south, or
Nepalese, side..
All previous parties had
started from the Tibetan side,
now closed to explorers since
the Chinese Communists.have
moved in.
'The ,party traversed stret-
ches of dangerous ice and
passes are liable to open ulp
suddenly into chasms of fear-
ful depth.
On their way up these mas-
sifs of ice, rock and snow the
Hunt party carried a new
kind- of (avalanche gun*, re-
sembling a two-inch mortar,
to dislodge loose and danger-
ous snow which might start
avalanches in their path.
The victorious Hillary, who
is a 34-year-old New Zealand
bee-keeper, joined the expe-
dition in India. He has had
wide climbing experience in
New Zealand Alps, where
heavy snowfalls and peculiar
ice-falls make conditions not
unlike those in the Himala-
yas.

.


CURACAO TRADING CO. Distributors for Haiti




..*-3i ...C. *


V


JUNF 7th, 1953


A\


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BILL HOLLANDI


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Remember tt fact the next time obtiy tires.
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ERE RgM VWAMURItyDDAVIS 1940 TWILBUR SHAW


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1 dUl)IIS MEYER


1091 106.24 M.P.H.
193IKELLY PETILLO


1Q A..04.6 M.P.H.


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Ig FLOYD ROBERToDS.


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T SSNA J


S' ominican Delegation Jacmel Has Flood
Attend Diplomat's Funeral Crisis


A special delegation of Do-
n Officials fw to Pt Minister of Public Health
.; minivan officials flew to Port
fle w to P Roger Dorsinville and Water
'/ au Prince. last week-end to e Direto.hLov
S-attend the funeral of Haitian Services Directo Joseph Love
lace flew to Jacmel Tuesday
Ambassador Leon Dejean.
.".41* mb d L Den to supervise repairs needed
SThey included Foreign Minis- super r s
ter Tulio Frano y Frano, as the result of the flood of
Hter Tulio Franco y Franco,
.Id. r t rotary Arturo Cal the Orangers River last week-
Under-Secretary Arturo Canarea around the Gef
:enti and Protodol Chief Ped- areaaroundtheGef
iE- frard. market was under wa-
; ro Purcel-Pena.
rSTOPL- P ter and a part of the system
SSTOLEN that brought drinking water
IS;' Stolen from an English that brought drikg water
e, ~tolen from an Enolish to the lower section of the
,pJeep were the following
-, city was destroyed by the tor-
B.-., bboks: 'j
Sent.
cPractibal Occultism*;
Pratial00,000 Guinea m gs;; ow the system is being
4, 10,000,000 Guinea Pigs";
'. waves that heal; reconstructed in such a fa-
i.. e shion that it will be able to
; 'The truth about vaccina-
io"' .' t) a withstand future rainy sea-
tion;
o,. ; *sons.
: B. iBiochiemic Therapeutics; ___
.t. Athletic Injuries ,
':The yellow robes;. 'alian Repubhcan
.b he Buddah's Paths; Day Celebrated
SC"he Essence of Buddhism>; Ambassador Guerrini Ma-
P.'Psychial Phenomenai; raldi and Madame Maraldi
S, ,iStrange Cults and Secret So- entertained the cream of Port
cities of Modern Londonm-; au Prince Monday evening at
; a gala reception at the Casino
M A reward will be given for International to observe the
VA their return or for any per- anniversary of the birth of
i'"sgon informing the police or the Italian Republic.
g owner of their whereabouts: Government, diplomatic
"Owner: Mr. Fred Tellander, and military officials plus
o. Bx 1055. leading lights of the business
i All the books are *marked 'and social world enjoyed the
i- cO6ecult Books, Samuel Wei- sumptuous buffet and th
i.fic ., 117. 4th Avenue, New sparkling Italian champagne.
Yb6r 3, NeW York. A .highly enjoyable evening '

.LOTERIE DE 'ETAT Deputy Fignole has a new
RATIE' H IEN journal.
"'Tfi cbnqudst of fortune.
.Tbo regular drawings every 1-:0- ,
S'imonth. The lfqin prize of the Dumont Bellande is Italy
first drawing ip '100,000 gourdes bound on business,
-- 20,j00 dollar;. there are -:0:-
:- 99 -additional prizes." Claude Petrus has just re-
,~..'fe first prize' of the second ceived word that he has been
: .drawing is 60,000 gourdes awarded third prize in the es-
'12,000 dollars. The 'nd draw say contest sponsored by the
".:hg offers you 2015 additional Pan-American Union on Pan-
es.' When you buya _ticket American Day. ifundreds of
the rLoterie de l'Ettfk'Hai- candidates took part in the
i'.tn. you are doing a deed of competition: a n d Claude
,ighi" humanitoran scope as well should be congratulated 'on
j:.as acquiring an. easy FOR- his successful effort.



ki:
STNE.-Ad. -:0:- -




aBABY

CL.APP'S FOODS
I ,,Saleat:Bichara Izmery, Au Lincoln, Bazar'de la
: Pos, .Bazar National-, -Georges Coles, Maison Simon
V'ea, Mme Joseph Magiio,'Razar.Edrn a d: Phipps- -/
T .D ONIE MOURRA COR .
i .:ns~eive Distributor for Haiti Phone: 3513


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Cocktail ,,Dansanti At
Cercle Port-au-Princien


Last Sunday's cocktail dan-
sant at the Cercle Port au
Princien was a success fou.
The guests of honour, lovely
Nicole Mallebranche, Jacque-
line Godefroy and Frederique
Naude were led on the ball
room floor to open the dance
with Minister Mauclair Ze-
phirin, S e n a t e President
Charles Fombrun and Club
President Fernand Crepsac.
The' trio of lovely belles had
won the crowns for beauty,
grace and elegance at the
Grand Bal earlier this month.


-:0:-
Mrs. Carmen Brouard save
a. delightful morning musical
at her Petionville home last
Sunday. On the programme
were Mrs. Pierre Wiener, Mrs.
Max Questel and John Frier-
re who read his ,,Silencei de'
dictated to the charming'hos-
tess.


-- O:-
Red Cross President Louis
Roy made a trip to Jacmel
last weekend to 'examine the
damages of the flood, leaving
the city without drinking
water. The Red Cross dispat-
ched antiftyphoid vaccine and
disinfectant tables to the area
to help keep down the risk of
disease. -lothing articles are
also being rushed to the flood
region.
--:0:-
Mime Rony Chenet celebrat-
ed her birthday Tuesday even
ing. with her hubby son Con-
rad and relatives.


New 4 Million
Dollar Airport ?
cLa Phalange, lent an ear
to the telejol last week and
reported that a four million
dollar figure has been set as
the price estimated for a new
Airport at Port au Prince big
enough to accommodate the
largest sky clippers bringing
tourist to our sunny climes.
But no one knows. what ar-
r.ngements are being made
to finance such a major un-
dertaking. Haitian Officials
and representatives of vari-
ous airlines are now talking
things over.


PARAMOUNT ,


Sunday, June 7th at 3.30 p.m.
LE, RQI DES ESPIONS
9th and 10th episodes and
A COWBOY FILM
At 6, and 8.30 p.m.
ARENIES SANGLANTES

1,Monday, June 8th at 4 p.m.
NOUVELLES AVENITURESS
DU CAPITAINE BLOOD
At 8.30 p.m.
GREAT ARTISTICAL
SOIREE
Mme 'Mahy and her pupils
will offer a song recital by


talented artists. Wellj
songs of CARMEN,
BUTTERFLY, SAAl
FAUST, SAMSON ANI
LILA, LE BEAU DA'i
BLEU and many other
be interpreted.

Tuesday, June 9th at:'
8.15 p.m.
ARENTES SiANGLA.
Wednesday, June 10bhi
and 8.15,pm.
LA MASON BONkNA

Thursday, June 11th a*
8.15 p.m.
S.O.S. CARGO Ed
FLAMES
Friday, June 12th at-W
8.15 pn.m.
ARENES SANGLA.

Saturday, June 18th at
8.15 p.m.
LE ROI DES ESIi<
11th and 12th episode
A GREAT FILA

Sunday, June 14th at
p.m. .
LE ROI DES ESPI(
11th and 12th episode"
A COWBOY FIIA
At 6 and 8.30 p.
LE PASSE SE VEIl


iHaiti Ch6rie,

i A MagnificentPicture Book on

Now on Sale at






e Price: 6.50 Dollars
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JoErrL


I AuxORCHIDI





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-Montezuma of Mexico will
meet Tarzan at Stadium
Magloire Thursday night


EXCELLENT '



^M6-/0 -IN


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SUNDAY, JUNE


.IHAITI SUN,




, JUNE. 7th, 1953
5, JUNE. 7th, 1953


shows Caribbeani
CF DEVELOP A RE W .FISH SOURCE


standard of living o
tian people can be in
between 20 and 2f
t within a generation
jhard work by the pei
he'advice being mad
Ieto them by the Uni
o'ns .
:the view. express(
J. Wakefield in th.
Nations Reporter,
r he concluded hi!


f quest of its' governXent.
SHe lays great emphasis on
5 the fish farming industry
n which has been started in Hai-
d ti and 4dded: (I thing that
e within a generation Haiti
i- will be supplying itself with
fish. At the moinent it im-
d ports 500 tons a year from
e Newfoundland.
One large company in Hai-
s ti is now cultivating. fish in


SHAITI SUQN
B- -, -- ---^ ^ ^ a ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ -i ^J ___ __ ^ __ L ^ ------ _


.EARTHQUAKE SHAKES SECTIONS
OF COUNTRY SUNDAY AND MONDAY,
Haiti's lava core has been the metropolitan area. A


shaki-ng again but luckily the stronger shock shook Saint
earthquakes registered more. Marc, Petite-Riviere, and the
bn the instruments at the Pe- C'e.ntral Department.
tit Seminaire than they did Monday the authorities in
on the inhabitants of our Ca- the North reported a violent
pital. tremor was felt along the Cen
Last Sunday afternoon a trial Plateau. At BeJladere it
tremor shook some objects was strong enough to crack
loose in homes in downtown the walls of the customs
Port au Prince but it wasn't house.
felt in the higher sections of
O O fil *eeeeee e


-r .assignment- with ponds for its employees. When QUEEN ELIZABETH
That 'country last the peasant sees. the big man ,
S-"*',. doing, it he will follow. Haiti ComamuniquB.de l'Ambassade
$kefield who is now with 300 people .per square Britannique
ent Representativ'emile ii showing the Carib- A l'occasion 'du Couronne-
nited'Nations for bean how.it7an develop a ment les t6l4grammes sui-
1 Assistance in Bur" n(ew source offish at a time vants- ont 6t e6chalg6s :
Director -of Agri- when food is so ei y badlyF 2.6.1953.
SJainaica :siome 10. needed..- To Private Secretary, Buck-
;iidis welv~ known Rqprinted .from. cDaily ingham Palace,
.h report on the 'Gleaner> of Jafmaica. Humble duty. British Sub-
Sof Jamaica which j.' jeots in 'Hayti respectfully
ame. Working On South
Interview with the African Question Passing Of Two Well-
rter, Mr. Wakefield. known Former Diplomats
1 co-operation which "Mr., Dantes. Bellegarde will
.'people.were giv- stay in Europe till July; his
erts of the United work with UpN on the South Last, Sunday Haiti bid a
0 -.had beeli Sent African discrimination question. sad farewell -to two leading
iaobntry at the re-,.has been prolonged, figures in its diplomatic ranks
,"eee e Leon D6jean and Albert
Blanchet.
Thlre former was Ambassa-
dor to the Dominican Repub-
lic at the time of" his ill-
ness. 1A. lawyer ,of note,
"so "vMi Dbjean had also served
....: his county with distinction
S: as Secretary of Foreign Af-
fairs and Minister to Wash-
ington.
0 Minister Pierre Liaustaud,
lPaul Bouchereau and Me.
Granville Auguste delivered
eulogies at the grave .site.
/The same day funeral ser-


^.., Get that feeling.
Iand traction .
awer. Here's a trac-
will meet more of
ns.ore of the time
. other tractor you
SNo other tractor
educed has better
6iacteristic (lugging
lit will pull you
'the toughest soil
slowing or stalling.
p on going where
Stor quit.


Come h ahd ask for a demonstration:
I TRACTOR and EQUIPMENT CO. S.A.
AURICE BONNEF IL, MANAGER
RUE PAVEE. BA BOUM BUILDING

14 I .] p. :14 (* 'x.sz ~


SAYS THANKS

tender loyal greeting to Her
Majesty and heartfelt' dishes
for a -long happy and peach-
ful reign.
j- ,, ,


Ambassador..


4.6.96
4.6.1,963


1
To H. M. Ambassador, Port-
au-Prince.
I thank you and all British
Subjects in-Hayti most sin-
cerely for your kind message
on the occasion of my Coro-
nation.
Elizabeth R.v -~
Distngushe Deuy


For


ices at the Sacred Heart
Church of Turgeau were also
held for Albert Blancher, who
had also served as foreign
minister and Wahington en-
voy.
Our sincere condolences to
the bereaved families of these
two distinguished statesmen.




KI PI

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Distillers Leigh ScotlInd
Distributirtor General Trading Co., S.A.


----------~~----7--;--


Page 5








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Disribuor in Haili:
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;hemisphere, for it is 'he 150th
aiiversar of the adoption of
"Ithe 'national flag of Haiti.
S The celebration of this im-
tpoi*tant occasion and the his-
.tor events related to it will
:' .e'climn; ed' next January 1st
-i by the observance of-the 150th
: anniversary of the proclama-
;tion of Haiti's independence.
Today I should like to pay
M':. tribute, sincere and well-de-'
: .' served. to our sister republic
in a few brief remarks. I
know that my colleagues in
i "'%tthe Senate join with me in
S.c conveying our warmest fra-
terhal congratulations to .Hai-
'ti, to her government, and to
.her peopade.
We of the United States-are
i. ow keenly aware of how


terest to us.
I refer in particular to the
extremely disturbing develop
ment in the recent election in
British Guiana. I refer to the
Guatemalan ferment, and to
other problems elsewhere in
the hemisphere. But wholly
aside from the oCmmunist
menace as such, there is every
reason why we should further
cement our relations with the
Pan-American 'nations.
As we turn to our friends
in Haiti today, we .view a
brave, industrious, and friend
ly people, dwelling in an agri-
cultural land blessed with
deep natural beauty. We see
a people which has slowly,
painstakingly, bu t always
with a fervent faith, built and


~HAITI SUN' SUNDAY, JUNE 7th, Ii


n'..


















C adets of the military A uam my aia`La guard -around the



U. S. Senator Speaks In Tribute

To Haiti On Flag Birthday.

From the Congressional Re- closely intertwined with our
ford of the United States Senate, ,own fate is the destiny of


-o. '-of the Haiti Flag. eThe prosperity and the secu-,
rity of our good neighbour
-'v -VMr. Wiley: Mr, Presidenr t nations are matters of deep-
.a' k ..mi"moo consent that'. est significance to us.-
44 Imay epernitted to speak, PREOCCfUPATION WITH
for 5 minutes in tribute to EUROPE, ASIA, CAN BE
.,,. :.. .















Haidi o6 the 150th anniver- HARMFUL IF UiMS-
J0.fary of the adoption of her PAERE IS IGNORED
'i.'ational flag. .' For far too.slong, in a pre-
l Tlhe, Yfice President: Is occupation with'eents in Eu-
there section? The Chair rope and Asia.y any of us
-hears none, ath lihiea Senator tended to ignore what was go
From Wis coin isrecognized ing.on in our own backyard.
or 5 minites.'- That ndifrence was ex-
: :ljMr. Wiley: M1r. President, .troein unfortunate. From
? y mar'l ian important' oc- every possible standpoint,
-caaion. fii 'the history t one certainifi e tinous develop-
-.y our- sister r apublti of ths mernts there areS of racial in-
L. -:


played an important role in
what was ultimately to be-
come our Louisiana YPmr-
chase.


built well upon her republican
foundations.
THE cMIRCLCLE OF
HAITI'S PROGRESS
To the stalwart,; heroic
Jean Jacques Dessalines and
the other patriots who forged
Haiti's independence, and
who in 1803 first-'hoisted the
Haitian flag to inspire the'des'
Operate, isolated, revolutionary
troops, the progress which
has been made in the last 15
decades would seem miracu
lous indeed.
IEven those great patriots
gifted .with vision and cour-
age could hardly have con-
ceived how one day that lag
would fly not only above the
Haitian nation itself, but at
the council table .of the Or-
.ganization of American States
and of the United Nations--
as the well-respected emblem
of a free and independent
people, contributing construc-
tively to sound decisions in
the dynamic world of the 20th
century.


Mont Joli Hotel


CAP HAITIEN


WAR OF INDEPENDENCE .. :
AFFECTED UNITED
STATES HISTORY
I wish that time' were
available for me to present in
detail even a brief synopsis
of theepic struggle which cul-
minated in Haiti's freedom.
I should like to point out in 4
detail, for example, the ex-
tremely interesting fact that Contact the owner, Mme Yvette Busseniius,'
the victory of the Haitian ar- Carenage Hill,
Cap Haitien, Haiti.
mies over the French forces Cap.Haitien, Haiti.
----" ---.---


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Distributor in Haiti. CHARLES FEQUIERE
54 Rue Roax -Tel: S279 2245 5173


- --i-------- Oamm


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BE

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SUNDAY, JUNE 7th, 10


Napoleon Bonaparte had
hoped to make the vast Ame-
rican mid-continent region the
foundation for a colonial em-
pire, but the army which was
needed to hold it, had been
destroyed in the insurrection
in San Domingue. That fact
contributed to Napoleon's of-
fer to our envoys of Paris to
sell the vast region of the
Louisiana Purchase in April
1803 for the paltry sum of


'HAITI SUN,


$15 million.
Amazing as it seen
fore, the bold deterni
the indomitable couraj
the military ability of
slaves of Haiti helpedd'"
our own beloved
from the entry into oij
try of a powerful as
French veterans, an|
whose 'presence on i
continent could have ,
tely changed the entire
of American history. .
Thus it is that their
ol a struggle for free
(Continued; on Pagi


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(Y, JU NE 7th, .1953 HAITI SUN. Page 7 ..

R RETURNS HOME AND HOUSE FOR RENT Pn '
,FOLKS ALL ABOUT HAITI fPensi
New house on ruelle Ri San i le
the ,Brewster Stand- the roadside. viere. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath- 11 '.
.w York. Mrs. Howe described the room; 1 dining room; 1 living in cool Pelionville
pril meeting of Enoch Cathedral of Port au Prince room. Call telephone 3527, Frech and eri
Chapter, : Daughters which contains'beautiful mu- Dr. Thomas Large.
American 'Revolution rals, the art center and the Cuiine; Hot an .Cold.
armel Monday after- museum where the anchor FOR RENT Ruaning Water.
s weU attended. Miss from the Santa Maria may beh b if vie
--Horton, regent, pre- seen. She stated- that Haiti Flat with beautiful view Special monthly raies.
over the sea. Very comfort-
I opened the meeting is preparing for tourists and able. Owner will rent Telephor 7894.
usual kitual. many improvements are being '
ished or unfurnisned. Tiele-
.Hanimornd reported made. There are now 3 hot- ished or unfurnished .T.le
box of clothing had els and the ruined home of 'ho rNo. i.rV.phone No. 749.. N o
i to 'Kate Duncan P-uline Bonaparte is being FO SLE
School MJrs. W. B. restored. The. modern and Bed so
Played charts show the primitive are to be found CLAMO ON THE CUFF- ..
iror of the Ioquois side by side in, all phases of One of the attractions in the hair mattress, cotton mat- *
o of e, side by side in, all phases spring fashion show "held by tressand cushions. Price $50.,
in ou '.ate. *rhese island life. It is still a land Parisian glovemakers recently ess and cushions c $50. .
S' :: was this pale pink glace pair. Contact ac SMs
3st only one dollar per where a inan.who owns a Overshadowuig the glove is its -.*EW 8 j .a 2387 ;A
all interested -may burro is considered wealthy. long billowing cuff of alternat-
ing bands of black and bink
ir order with .her. Most loads consisting of fruit, __
decidedd to hold a live poultry and young kids HOLD. THAT LINE .*..
"e:-ii f'Miss are toted iii baskets on the The gendarme, was modest- i
LD n op'.,5hurs-' head. ly explaining how he won the
S r'ih r 'de- At the conclusion -of her cHonneur et-Merite.s U l U
n at a later talk Mrs.' Howe Adonned a. SThe Captain said he, want S0 iV t S *. '
beautiful native skirt a.nd ed a volunteer for a very dan-
iet A. Ferris in-" showed how-the voodoo dance gerous mission. It was unlike-
t.Regent, Mrs. which often goes on for hours ly that the man would re- s t ..
W:;who gave 4n at a time, is performed. turn, and he anted one man a R dc ord
on ..laiti .to step forward, "
ied several A social hour was enjoyed And you teped forward ON PRICE..BUT .
sV everal at the inclusion of the meet- from the line,, one of the wo- THE RIGT PRICE i
I .:broi ~ ht .ing a delicious tea was served men gushed admiringly.
ii.g small by the hostess .Mrs. William "Not exactly, the soldier- .
S '-3.i heI igh H. Miller and th'i other Car- explained. < ri. t'. l uiimna- mel members. .Mts. Bernard line stepiped-back. AU LINCOLN, Will Dbliver roceries to y aour : :;
P pastel coloured Harrison and Past Regent ,
FOR RENT
~Eac.h home contains Mrs. George Purdy poured. FOR
Sign ha.p iness, Eid. Note: Mrs. Howe is the Furnished house in Petio
f the living is dong 75-year-old mother of Mrs. ville heights, 3 bedrooms, 2 .
d. "It i common Charles MacNeil of Tete de bathrooms, hot water, ref rig.- .
ni41 er bathing L'tEau. erator and electric stove. B
iesa n Ialns by Contact E eHaiti Sun., ,

WHi 'A S A21t0 FOR BARGAINS :
FISHER
Saturday was such a big day. It was'the T, i Curio Shop "--- I
of the town! A great day foreveryone! Wise Rue di Quaa
shoppers from all over saved to their heart's
cofitent.
FRENCH PERFUMES
Local Handicrafts .
Splendid Mahogany
Ware

1BI t 1 Superior Estahlishu~ents Use Superior .r Co .'
A -i fieners. qpu get tIis EIama Qualif y *hen to ::
Buy ,'

MaiSn O0rintale WESTNGHOUSE.

AIR CDIoOlTIONE DJ
Coine again ... get your share of the magnifi-
cent Bargains and Savings that Wtelcotie BetUr Desigi.ed
in evr .34izs i~n. iE S.P- BerDin
DUCTIONS ARE STILL YOURS FOR ONE
MORE WEEK. Sotake time, off toprorrow'and 4d r v e Caretlily duilt
parfLum e Installed by Experienced Engineers .
.KE ETO-PRI E MIILO T ea.stinose dve more coolngFfec pe Do .i
PAIIS
WilE LOMIASTPRICE, 1S THE OntY. -PRICE p "


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cHAITI SUN. SUNDAY, 3T


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Q e jousance quand on est aa volant!

Sunrtot ptani I'enene ESSO nest pas trop loin


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SQuel que soft 1'endroit o vous trouvez fl ya tij, .
une station Esso sur votrb passage...


Phi. de p01


-9uspour.o oteui!s .

g a" -I -oe ur 'q tourne rond kilom6tr ,.
*,. -i------1 '-- 'n moteur qu -ue
"b Umai WU I cumontidO chuile est r 6duit-d aun'
- bw Il du~.Pra---ne,- elle garde ses proprti6r
u ~ or2t'_- e2 s temperatures Elle nettOi pedat5
d n .- --- -_ .e .. ente selon les numeros 3 et 5
'W e "te lo" ,, moteurs ag Cls.
*~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~e us "'* ."* *' --*!**


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SVISITEZ LE DISTRIBUTOR ESSO 1LEPUPISPROICR


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Ayes "Ila '
I'aV ga..ntie que p~h,,j
v'teaur l b' e et leaePnend "
tion d ..m.. i Oiv qt I',ttei..
vie Main etex Un
ie Pier et et "J.6 ser-
Isegneig ~ P U. table' .


lanltages 'lm'l fJ


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ESSO STANDARD
OIL, S. A.


MM i vous,- *.
mmaulaininia pks & 1ouM,


SERVING HAITI FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS


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IHAITI SUN.


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A N h 1 5-3-AI I


TICK LECTURES AT H-A INSTITUTE
NEGRO LITERATURE AND POETRY

t week,-intelledtuals and unusual amount of poise and
nts in the capital had platform presence.
opportunity to hear two Mr. Bostick- has been in
eating lectures on Ame- Haiti since September 195.2
NeIgi Iterature 'deli-. studying and doing research
.,,by Mr. Herman F, Bos- 'under a fellowship awarded
it the Haitian-American 'by the Haitian .Government
tute. i under the provisions of the
. Wednesday evening, Buenos Aires Convention.
'Srd, a responsive and Here in Haiti, Herman, as. he
igushed group was pre- is kpown to his friends, has
t hear Mr. Bostick dis- been working hard on a study
development of cAme of Contemporary Haitian Poe
.,' Negrb Fiction, Friday 'try and hope o publish the
g, he continued his dis work soon. He has been liv-
6n with a consideration ing- at the ',Pension Desonur
i'iemarkable develdp- ches while in Haiti'arid ias
,of, American Negro circulated widely in aade-
B 'obthileetidres were mic and intellettial circles
%edby. a questionn period even since his arrivTl.'
h 'brought up, some live- .A native of Atlanta, Geor-'
Iearching -discussion. ia, n the southern Uni-
i'the' tbhreat'bf raiu and 'ted States, Herman receiv-'
ays presented by the ed his B.A. degree from More
S0Company on the same house College in his home
'Sthe lectures were very town. After that he' cotinu-
attended and the audi- ed 'his studies in- French and
fwas treated to two .l- English at Atlanta Univer-
ihought-provoking, and ity and M ia ed his degree of
itly i presented lect-u, Master of Arts. After Col:
Which were moreover lege, he taught French. and
j'ithe .dlearest sort of English for two years at Fes-
senden Acadetmy in Gaines-
iEs by the.Irector ville, Florida and thenjoined
e inttitte, Mr. James =the faculty. ofMorehddse Col
a Idy Mr. Bodtick de-: lege'-as ltistructor of French.
,: his lectures with an 'With this background he prb
F-: ---. --''-- ------ .


SLe nailleur des pneus, geantsl



i.Mila RIB
S Le pneu qui vous do
S' advantages inesp.rsa a
pense supplmentairelt
r TUne march stabhle et d


.Hr er .


.gd:


nne'des
sins dE-
,ulirp


bably could easily present his
lectures in French, but his
modesty makes him prefer
his native language. Herman
is a man wdth a purpose a-rc
,he has been, waking hard at
it here. Moreover, being a
likeable, handsome American
with a ready smile and joke,
he has been a most effective
unofficial ambassador i om
his country to Haiti.


moine de risques de derapage
. .une carcasse extra-resistante
d'une tenue inegalee .. en
r6sumE le &ilomdtrage le plus
dIeve au prix le plus bas.


Dane le monde
entier- on trans-
porte plus de
tonnage ur
pneus Good-
year que, sur
pneus de t6ute
autre marque.

AUTRE ECONOMIC DUE A GOODYEAR:
Ii-MIiler "All Weather" possede la fameuse
. de roulement "All Weather" de renom-
.minondiale qui assure une resistance au
page et une traction exceptionnelles sur
lea sols.
4 2-51-14F


The delicious Chocolate
Laxative
BROOKLAX
brings relief overnight. So
take-
BROOKLAX
to-night and to-morrow
you'll be all right,

MR. JULES HERAUX
Piano Tuner
May be contacted at 18
Chemin des Dalles or
Telephone: 2440


STime &" Life"


The Leading American


MAGAZINE


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tUI GARANTIT LA PERFECTION flCAf0fl
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aNewscomberi .

Hakime and Rouzier have
bought Raymond3 store ,on
Place Geffrard.

SThe 250th anniversary of the
Founding of the Holy host'
Congregation was celebrated
with, moving ceremonies last
Sunday. T'le lprge attendance
included parents,..pupils and for
mer pupils who'expressed their
gratitude to the Fathers of the
Holy Ghost Congregation.
S --:6:"
Seen dining'at the Savoy .in
London last week, were Clifford
and Gilbert Brandt.. Clifford' is
on a European busIness trip' and
Gilbert i .speroing a. year ii. I
England learning all about th
insurance business.


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?AY, JUNE 7th 195S '


.'^


*HAITI SUN.


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iA ANATTEPT TO RETURN TO THE
BLACK MARKET SAYS 'LA'EMORATIE


In the Wednesday June
3rd edition of :,tie. -the following article ajp-
ppeared.

I:A IL'ATEN'TION DU DE-
RPARilTMETNT DU COM-
MEROED.

a:,'iBoutiques and bars have
fiixed the price of Lucky
Strike,: Camel and Chester-
feld cigarettes at 2 gourdes
i5 'cents a package $0.50
. -. .. The 'same cigarettes
spost 80 cents five or six years
g. The manufacture price
|o' these cigarettes has not
0 *:' ,


risen, and one is' wondering
why their price has risen on
the market, while the State
does not benefit from such a
rise.

So, Splendid cigarettes
which cost 6 -gourdes 59 cents
a kilo two years ago now
cost 9 gourdes 30 cents and
their manufacture price has
not risen.

We signal these facts to
the Department of Com-
merce which will take the ne-
cessary steps* to counteract
this attempt to return to the
:m.arche noir.,


Gooo FGOD.b.CUUD PRICES

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ENJOY
WW YqPuI flo'
-.:..


'cHAFTI SUN*


TfHATW WS NO HUSBAND!

A woman whose husband
was missing called the police
and gave his description as a
handsome ,'briseur>, six feet
three, with wavy black hair,
blue eyes, tremendous shoul-
ders and an excellent dresser.
The next day a friend called
her and said, I read where
your husband is missing, but
what kind of description is
that? Your husband is short,
fat, bald and dressed like a
slob.
, said the woman,
< back.a

xxx
FRIENDLY DISCUSSION

Did you hear about the man
who travelled to the Provin-
ces regularly who returned
home after a month in the
South to find that his wife
had been untrue to him?
< he demand-
ed. No,, anwsered the faith-
less one.
(Was it my friend Tom, or
Joe?.
Nop, answered his wife.
AWas it ny friend Harry?,
Whatssamatter ? scrdam-
ed the woman; don't you
think I have friends of my
own?



Le Picardie


FAMOUS FOR ITS
FmRCH COOKING
Specialities -
* Onion Soup
* Filet Mignon
* Pepper Steak
* Snails
* Escallopie de Veau
Picardie
LOCATED IN COOL TETE
DE L'EAU
PETIONVILLE
For Reservations Tel. 7-116.


SUNDAY, JUNE 7th,


Dinner Dances



.
at




Hotel Ibo Lele :

Evry Tuesday and Fridal from 8 k.m. io 12 p.q
*;
Every Monday from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. ,
RESERVE YOUR TABLE IN ADVANCE
TELEPHONE: 7886

I -Sm. em


CHATELET DES FLOURS
Sn Cool Kenscoh
S For Lunches and Dinners of Distinction
9 Almost 5,000 feet; almost a iile
above sea-level
"Yet only 15 pleasant miles, 35 leisurely .
minutes from the heart of the'Capital

SUnexcelled American French-CGerman- Hauifi
SCuisine and Beverages

w ,O ., '., ,alu,, 91D,-, ,.,o mo O u ,m "9 M O .-i


---


,U U


we I
q;.1M


---occ----u u ------
DINNER SNACKS

FISH BOWL,
At Rizoton on the Ave. Fra nklin Roosevaelt
A most charraing restaurant y the sea
Cool sea breeze available disy and night
Open up till 1:30 am Week-days
Onen up till 2:30.am Sundays and Satuidae
French and American cooking. Bar service .
Speciality: Creole dishes which are available at all tih


IT L AS WEST HOTEL
THE CAPITAL'S NEWEST HOTEL


Is Now Open
On The.ltie Ot The O.1St. franeis
aWRS TOPS IN1HAITI,


DENER
COCKTAILS
2,000 Feet Cl ser to Heaven
alaime W. Cameron, Manager


Telephoise 7887
oooo -- Tnm -rnn 1.- __-nu :o-;=L .J


no frrlm 1nor ms
Y del jatWC CRCOt'S
rgRsLf t-lN"




WOFT DRIIIKS
MILK SUNrDAES
A.ALTTED h 5MAKE'5
FRUIT JUICES
iCE- CPc.AM
YOGURr
Br ER
B.COrl oC H'AM AonD EGGS
5 r iDA Ct-IL
COFFrEr
.&c C6 CQAeo
ca f^^K cneff


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Y, JUNE 7th,. 1958


*HAITI SUNM


INATOR SPEAKS IN TRIBUTE
TI ON FLAG BIRTH DAY


itinued from Page 6)


"ate throughout the
-Justas the American
Independence so mag-
tly contributed to the
ion of foreign peoples,
great battle for inde-
e which was waged in
jand in other lands to
th, helped -directly and
fly in far more ways
,e average American
rates to' shape for the
ouir own history and
toryof the world. An ,
ding of that histo-
nterrelationship is all
good.
-that 'matter, I think
1i of us could profit a
deal from a better un-
'ding of the' back-
and the culture of all
.sister Republics to the
.pd our good neighbour
north. Such under-
is essential in order
e more fruitful pan-
cn cooperation. "N
F.BL ARTBONI;TE
PROJECT
operation itself.is a fea-
.6f *Hatian progress.
..: cpoperation takes
rorms. An outstanding
eis the long-cherished
l, dreamt- land recla'-
0 in the Artibonite Val-
rough which runs Hai-'
|gest river. That valley,
.. garden spot of wealth
)enty, had through the
rtions become a waste-
Serision and barren-


nodel farm dr pilot pro-
iarted there. last year
iint Haitian United
..upices, utilizing tech
expertss of the Institute
ter-Ainerican Affairs,
the way toward
thae problemm by dem-
n g how varied food
an ibe profitably grow
ifrigatidn water from
Ier .in an. area where
Inds of small farmers
lor generations been ek-


ingg out a scanty living from
the dry saline soil.
With the assistance of a $14
million credit from the Ex-
,port-Import Bank, the Hai-
tian Government is now com-
mencing .a large construction
and' agricultural development
programme in the Artibonite
Vialley.. The project involves
the building of a dam and ir-
rigation and drainage dit-
ches and tha. clearing and re-
settlemept of upward ,of
70,000 acres of land..
SThus, in time, Haiti pro-
-poses to do for the whole val-
ley, with the assistance of
United States financing and
technical know-how, what the
pilot project has.already de-
monstrated to be feasible on
,an experimental scale.
OTHER' AREAS UTILIZ-
ING TECHNICAL
ASSISTANCE
The Artibonite project is
only one of several areas in
which Haiti- is enthusiastical-
ly utilizing United States
technical assistance.
Among them are agr.icultu-
tal extension, livestock im-
provement, rubber develop
ment, irrigation, f-irii'fl
water supply, and- thp treat-
ment of disease.
Haiti is paying -a fair share
of the cost of thede technical
cooperation programmes. The
ratio of Haiti's contributions
to joint servicio funds for car
trying 6ut technical assistance
prdgrammes in agriculture
and#iealth has risen from $2
for each United States dollar
in 1951 to $3 for each United
States dollar now.


THE GOVERNMENT'S EN-
TERPRISING PRO-
GRAMME
'Mindful of the needs of its
people, the Haitian Govern-
ment is utilizing its $26 mil-
lion national budget wisely to
improve the Haitian economy
and the health and education
of its people.
It has earmarked $40 mil-


lion over a ,period of 5 years
to provide for public works,
public health, general agriculi
tural development, and educa
tion. An unexpected drop' in
revenues, occasioned partly
by a smaller coffee crop and
a fall in the prices of certain
agricultural exports, such as
sisal and sugar, may make it
necessary to curtail or post-
.pone a part of this ambitious
programme.
But the will of the Haitian
Government and people to
make sacrifices in order to de
velop their country should do
much to overcome these finan
cial obstacles.'
ENCOURAGEMaVENT OF
PRIVATE ENTERPRISE .
I should like to stress one
of the particularly important
factors in Haiti's progressive
development. That is the en-
couragement which she has
given to' private enterprise,
both Haitian and foreign.
On several occasions I have
commented on the Senate
flpor that unfortunately, a
continued recognition of the
contribution of private enter-
prise, both native and of for-
eign nationality, has not char
acterized certain countries.
What they choose to do in
their internal' affairs is of
course their own responsibil-
ity. But the consequences of
their arbitrary acts are a mat-
ter of deep concern to other
:peoples as well as to their
own..
Fortunately, I can report
that a favourable climate for
private investment exists in
Haiti and is a factor of the
deepest significance for at-
tracting new industries and
expanding on old ones. Haiti
.has, for example, enacted le-
gislation, liberalizing import
duties and income taxes, to
help bring in new companies.
A recent listing, drawn up
by the Haitian Governmfent,
of 23 industries for which
Haitian raw materials are
available includes leather and
shoes, glass, salt, tropical
fruit processing, dairy pro-
ducts, metals, transport, soap,


0


% e ro oSuRusA ,CSYJsr/-t



'OMMISSIN PAID TO AIDRVE
'OMMISSiO~N PAID TO TAXtiDR1VERS


__


chemicals, limestone, grain,
chocolate, fiber products, ve-
getable oils, talc, lumber and
'beverages-
SLess than 1 month ago, on
April 20, at the opening of
the 36th session of the na-
tional legislative body, the
President of 'the Haitian Sen-
ate emphasized the import-
ance for his country's econo-
mic development of establish-
ing new industries and exi-
couraging private foreign in-.
vestment.
He said in his address:
Haitian and foreign capital -
ists recognize that they. need
no longer fear to invest their
funds in Haiti, because they
know the time is past when
laws governing such invest-
ments were likely to be modi-
'fied according to whims
and caprices They also
know that they can count *
ulpon'the courts If in.the
past insecurity was the most
serious obstacle to the devel-
opment of industry, it has
been replaced by a climate of
security.
A'similar confidence, and a
similar cordial attitude to-
ward foreign investors, was
.expressed in the annual imes-
sage of the President 'of Hai-
ti, who said that one'of the
striking evidence of Haitis
climate of security is the
ceaseless flow of foreign ca-pi-
tal into the country.

*GUARANTEE OF
INVESTMENT
Last month, also, in -an ex-
change of notes between As-
sistant Secretary of State
John M. Cabot and Haitian
Ambassador Jacques Leger, a
United States Government in
vestment guarantee agree-
ment was concluded with
Haiti. Thus, Haiti became
the first American Republic,
although the 16th nation, to
enter into such an agreement,
Which makes possible Mutual
Security Agency guarantees
protecting new American in-
vestors in the country against
currency incontrovertibility
and loss by expropriation.
As mutual Security Direc-
tor Harold Stassen pointed
out when announcing the'
signing of the agreement,
Urfited States private invest-
ment in a friendly country is
doubly advantageous. It can
be of major economic benefit
to the country wherein in-
vested, and can contribute to
the Eisenhower programlme
of peace, progress, and pros-
perity for the free world.


Page 1l..' ,
Peace, progress, and pros- :
perity are 'the goals which. -^
the Haitian people haven't .,l'"i
for themselves.'They are good'
goals for us all.
CONOLUSIONi .
I should like to conclude '
these remarks by renewing
my warmest fraternal greet.- .
ings to the officials and citi-"
zens of Haiti.
I believe that in the de-'
cades to come, they will equal ::
and surpass the splendid pro'
gress which they have miadb .
to date.
I know thit the fraterni:
sentiments which w'e of :'.t.i
United States feel are reflectS
ed .iv similar feelings through
out Latin America and in Cani
ada.
Jt-is my earnest hope th .t,
we of this hemisphere will re -'
main united in the fac ofi-
the great challenge oftorld'.,l
communism which now.con-'..
fronts us and all other peo.-
ples.
It is a challenge to the bag:.-
sic concept of human dignig I
It is a challenge to Gris-i
tianity and to all other w
tual faiths to which manr ad-Z
heres. It is a challenge to lit-li"
man progress.

There are, of course, dif--
ferences-of opinion within the':"i
hemisphere, today. But there'..
are no differd6nes \ armoag
anti communist nations,4
which cannot .equitably be
solved, peacefully and a `ica--*.
bly, particularly in thI.:f :'fe
of the common danger. "'
It is uo to us to reason to :L:,.
gether a. .und the conferenceoii;
table in the Organization0
of American States, in the Or-
ganization of Central Amei--.
can States, in the 'United'Na-
tipns, and in every other 'inm- '.
strumentality which men haWe ,
devised for a peaceful,- fair'
solution to their difficulties." ,2
The people of the United'-ii
States respect as equals their i4
fellow peoples of the henmi-4s~-
phere and of the world, .s -
There is. no country sq-
small, no country lacking: i'.::,.'
material strength or wealth, ;:!
which does not have .our .rei?-
spect and. which we do not.:1i
consider, as being entitled to,
be treated as an equal. :
This is in striking contrast 4.
to the brutal, tyrannical atti-; .,
tude of the-bullies and enslav:
ers in the Kremlin. "
And so, in peace and -fee- $
dom, congratulations to the' *
people of Haiti and good luck: -'
in all their future undertak-':
irigs. .


!~". i |


;.
ru
.-'*.i,!:.e -.r.-... j-:" ; '





Page 12


WISE and OTHERWISE
By T. J Grant


.HAITI SUN.


turning into one of those
mad scientists,' like you see in
the movies.
So I started to hedge. xWith
in reasonable limits, Marcel,
I said. ( times my tongue runs away
with me. *
I have your word, Tbmmy,
and I know you to be a man
who loves honour more than
life>, was his reply.
He had me there. What he
said was true. There was no
. backing out. I waited to see
what fate he had in store for
me.
He thought for a moment.
Then he asked abruptly, you familiar with Planck's
quantum equation ?)
< familiar), I stalled, a course -
He interrupted, cI see you
are not so I will show it to
you.> Whipping a notebook
from his pocket he opened it
and stuck, it under my nose.
The page was blank except for
one line on v'hich was written:
-E nhv.
To tell- you the 'truth it
didn't mean .a thing to me,
!but I wasn't going to admit
that to Gentil. I have my
pride.
So I said, < ty, Marcel.o
He flew into a page, trying,
:Pretty, you imbecile! This'
isn't some .of, your silly poe-
-try. It's an equation idiot!b
cPlease explainh it to me,
Marcel,; I asked humbly, try-
ing to placate him. I am not
happy when Gentil is angry
with me.
'This seemed to quiet him
a little. But only a little. He
was still angry. He put his
hands behind his back and
started lo talk. It reminded
me of Dr. Perigord lecturing'
at the Haitian'American Ins-
titute, thb same dignified bear
ing, the same scholarly lan-
guage.
An atom- of ordinary ter-
restrial matter, physicists
have Iproved,> he said, con-
sists of a central nucleus
with planetary electrpns re-
volving around it, the nucleus
carrying a positive charge of
electricity, and each electron
a negative charge. Certain
theoretical considerations led
Dirac and Gamov, two fam-
ous nuclear physicists, to
dream up another inside
out kind of matter in which
the electric charges are re-
versed so that the nucleus is
negatively charged and is cir


plosion.*
< equation I have proved the
theory of Dirac and Gamov
to be correct, have produced
small quantities of contrater-
rene, brought them into con-
tact with terrene, and :have
controlled the released ener-

He paused for a moment to
get his breath. I took advan-
tage of the opportunity to
tell him that I must leave as
I had an appointment.with
my doctor. (Injection of a
heart stimulant.)


The only airline that ,
flies to every major i
llAm:. AflJ d L


xxxx -rIuanU in nme..
SSitting at my desk later in
the evening with my heart
beautifully stimulated, I pon-
dered over the strange words
I had heard earlier in the day
from the lips of Gentil. The h o
Pan American has over 1
sincere and forceful manner flights weekly-more tha
in which he had uttered them any other airline-throug
had engraved them forever the Caribbean area. Cho
in my mind. UWhat a brains, your day abd'departure
I thought, ed g, o ad island vacation spots. Pa
ed energy from terrene and American's vast Caribbe
American s vast Garibbe;
contiaterrene with four little network takes.you to
letters, Ei- nhv. How does one and all.
he do it-, .
Under- the influence of the NORTH COAST
stimulant, my subconscious PAA has frequent daily
ptithed into the upper layers 'flights. It's just A few hou
of my mind a story about Gen flight between aracas,
a r Maracaibo, Barranquilla
'til I heard shortly after my ndany point in the
arrival in 1aiti. How the man Caribbean. Convenient
has changed since then. connections can be made
It seem.; that when he was Barranquilla for Panania
about sixteen years old -he andCentral America, o;
south to Medellin and
used to spend a few evenings Bogota
a ('eels at the home of a girl B
4, CARIBBEAN CIRCLE TRIP:
friend. He was there one
evening when a terrible storm I Miami, Havana, Monteg(
d Eqy, Kingston, Port au
burst 6ver- Port au Prince.4 By, Kingston, Port au
Prince, Ciudad Trujillo, S
In those days the streets of Juan, New York and retu
the city were neither paved ... all for just $212.40 (U.
n6r macadamized and storms Availablk in either
turned them into rivers of direction and from any
mud, knee deep. point on route.
At eleven o'clock the storm *
showed no signs of abating, Forre~ Aon ,
and the girl's mother sug-' see yourTravel Agent of,
tested that Gentil pass the .J"fy l rrsfrc
night with them.. We have a rieIl f Nzu iAr~
spare rooms, she said, and. WORLD'S MOSt
we can have it ready for you EXPERIENCED AIRINE
in a few moments.> Rue Dantes c estouches Port-au-
in a e moment. Telephones: 3451 and 2822.
Gentil accepted.. The girl
and her mother went upstairs Sove time add money U
(Continued on Page 14) Air Mail and AIr Nd ael P


LO
an

os?

Ot






ri

.: i


'i
_. .










..o*,
'*3


SUNDAY, JUNE 7thi


cled by positively charged elec HOUSE FOR RENT
trons.* For Rent: House complex
ter is called contra terrene to Nice view. Call 3295.
distinguish it from terrene or
earth matter. 'If chunks of
terrene and contraterrene a
were to cdllide complete anni-
hilation of the smaller mass
would ensue and the huge
amount of energy released
would cause a tremendous ex


I


.,





,JUNE 7th, 1958 HAITI SUN Page 13 y


4:
&\ V


SGardere is homi
sting from McGi
y in Montreal. Yi
back yesterday w
e Marie Jose Nad
Joseph Nadal b
a Line.


e after
tl Uni-
ves ar-
ith his
lal and
y the


-:0:--
.nou Dejoie and Engineer-
t Etheart are flying off
w York and a Scandi-
holiay today.

social event of the sea-
t Cap Haitien took place
say when Mile Ketty
nius was joined in holy
mony to Jean-Marie Si-
. The nuptial benedic-
ook place in the Cathe-
a the morning. Friends
all corners of the Re-
:attended the wedding.
a Kenscoff honeymoon
Muple will journey to
Be.
* *


r. Marcelo Casaburi, pro-
bt Italian doctor of Rue
ifs, left the island Sunday
moon by the U.S. bound
Clipperr' Dr. Casaburi
tts to return in six
hs after visiting with the
folks in Italy. -
- ,-:0:--
ell' known Gerard iSou-
,Bonnard exchanged the
I'of holy matrimony last
in with Micheline Poly-
,daughter of Colonel Po-
oe of Petionville. The nup
benediction was held at
'p.m. at St. Pierre's
bh in Petibnville.
I -:0:-
SJuliette Jean of Pe-
1ie clippered to New
last Sunday. She is re-
| --


;.TRADE MARK "


turning
suite.*

Stephen
Parisian
tree mod
Lele this
return to
ders. M:
ing expel
sist the (
their hou
Artibonit
turn for


College man Dick Gleason
arrived in Port Friday on his
second-visit this year. Dick
is a house guest of his sister,
Mrs. James Caldwell, wife of
Chief of the Sanitary Mis-
sion. He intends to spend
two weeks here.


IV^ -:0:-
Elizabeth (Buffy) McNiel

to Port tout de and mother, wife of Charles I
of Petionville are New York
-:0:- bound on MV Panama today
for a five-week summer va-
V. Arneson and his
wife will end their cation in New England. On
ntl stay at the Ibo arrival in New York the Mc-
coming week and Niels will meet young Nicky
Washington for or- McNiel who is returning for
r. Arneson, a hous- the summer from school in
t, was here to as-St. Catherine, Ontario, on a
rt, was here to as-ip.
RTr^ ,, o+ ,,,Dutch Line iihip


urv.Tnl nl bseuA g u
sing project in the
be. He hopes to re-
a longer assignment.


Plantation Dauphin mana-
ger Don Lungwitz was in town
Tuesday en route to Virginia
to visit with wife Lois and
daughter Bonnie arid son Ti
Jo.
-:0:--.
Mr. Gordon iStenner of the
Telephone Company, is slow-
ly recovering from a fifteen
round bout with Ole Man Ma-
laria. ,
-:0:-
Mr, and Mrs. Wilfred Pur-
dy and family enplane Sun-
day for New Orleans and
Points North for a two-month
leave.


Seen eating up the highway
early flhursday morning were
Axel Etheart, Guy Boucard
and Claude Paquin. The Lnree
musketeers are on a week-end
motoring trip in the Domini-
can- Republic. They are ex-
pected home this evening.


-: 0:-
Christine (Auguste) Boros,
wife of Spanish artist Botel-
lo, went to France last week-
end. Artist Botello is report-
edly setting up shop in Puer-
to Rico.
The city has been bright-
ened by the return of two
Ghislaine and Elsa Scutt re-
turned Friday for the sum-
mer vacation from college in
Pennsylvania.


.-:0:--
Mrs. Gladys Bogat Meu-
nier is expecting the first ad-
dition to her family in Paris.
cbientot.D
.:0:--
Among the ,charming cou-
ples vacationing in Port this
past week were: Connecticut
lawyer James Buckley and
wife Ann on their honeymoon.
James's brother wrote the
iblest seller Man and God at
Yales. James is aso a Yale
man. They were entertained
during their stay at the El
Rancho by Mr.. and Mrs.
Ralph Bercovici.


-:0:--
SMr. Franck Wilstn had sev-
eral cases of glassware des-
tined to his new elaborate
house in Gros-Morne, damaged
'Tuesday nookt when a truck
found the grade of the road
too difficult. Two crates slid
to the asphalt.
-:0:-
Friday evening Mr. David
Post, Second Secretary of the
U. S. Embassy, dined with
Madame at Le Picardie in ce-
lebration of their 13th wed-
ding anniversary.

Commercant Georges Mour
ra is down for Washington
this week-end to join. his wife
ahd await the arrival of the
expected.


-:0:-
Charming Mlle Liliane Du-
vivier became engaged this
week to Creighton Puckett, a
US Marine who was in Haiti
three years ago during the


Ta mous since 86k


J.P.B
_i


~-~
~ ~if~i~


-:0:-
Wilfrid Purdy of Scipa and
Mrs. Purdy offered a dinner
party at their home Wednes-
day evening for the Principal
and staff of the Union School
in appreciation for their fine
work. The Purdys' daughter
Nancy was one of the gradu-
ating class of the Union
School last week.
-:O:--
Voyaging in Canada and
the US is Mrs. Tilly Desias-
des, wife of the popular ma-
hogany manufacturer. Mrs.
Deslandes will return home
July 4th.
-:0:-
Mrs. Jean de Lespinasse
was feted last'Wednesday
night by her many friends.
The birthday party which in-
cluded a big cake and a buf-
fet upper took place at the
Lespinasse home in Turgeau.
-0:_- -- -
On a business-com-fishing
trip in the US are Mr. and
Mrs. Anton Kneer.
-:0:- .
Photographer Chaton has
got himself a nice new Mer-
cury convertible.
-:0:-
Owing to unforeseen busi-
ness commitments .business
tycoon Franck Wilson.. was
obliged to sit out the Corona-
tion in Port au Prince. He
had planned to be one of the
Abbey spectators. -


-:0:-
At the handicapped ball
Sunday night in Cablane Chou
coune Madame Daniel Heur-
telou held the lucky ticket and
won the title 195>,. She also received a
gift.
-:0:-
are Mile Janine
Rodriguez and Roger Dupoux.
-:0:-
Mile Jacqueline Etienne,
daughter of Capt. Jacques
Etienne, Chef of the Research
Criminal, accompanied Mlne.
Louis Romain to the US. last
week.


-:0:-
In kenscoff Thursday morn
ing at ten the inauguration of


Exposition. Creighton return
ed to the US and duty Thurg-
day. Wedding bells are sche
duled to ring in January.
-:0:-
Hdlen Christian returned
to her copper mine in Grande
Riviere du Nord and to at-
tend the Bussenius Simonet
wedding Friday after several
days in Port on business.


---


the <(Berg Hotel> took place.
Described as a hotel restau-
rant, the Berg is being oper-
ated by Richard Wolfgang
Wagner and Karl Schewe. -
--:0:- :
Maurice Nazon arrived
from the, States Thursday.
Guy De Catalogne clippered
into Port from the U.S. Thurs
day. ':

A young lady in town this,.
week with her kodak shoot--
ing u. differentt aspects of l
our movements is Inga Beau- :.
saca for fashion magazine. "-

Student Anne-Marie Meyer'
is returning to Berne, Swit-
zerland, today, after a month
here on a Unesco fellow ship .
Miss Meyer whose field isi
base evaluation and survey of'i7
field projects, visited. Ma- ,
bial, Bayeux and ,Lhe Artibon- '
ite.
-:0:-
Mme Pierre Paul left for
the States last Sunday. l





Shortly to go on the payroll :
at Maison du 'livre is the new
son of Mr. and Mrs. Claude' :'
Lebrun. Mrs. Lebrun is the..
former ElEith Delva. Her son 'A
arrived May 14th.
-:0:-
At 4 p.m. Tuesday, second
son, of prominent ,cement .;
*Ibllock maker arrived by, (ci- 4
gogne., ((Attouffi2, and his ':
ma Geralde Rosemond are re-.
ported in the best of health.

Lt. Marc Jean-Baptiste re-
ceived word at the military
acad-emy at Freres last week
of the arrival of a daughter
in Cap Haitieni. Mother and
the ejolie ti fille> are doing ,
well.
-,:0:-- ".i
The 3rd boy in three years :: '
was welcomed into the Roger
Duret family Monday. The .:3
boy was delivered at the new ';'..'
clinic Noel -in Bois Verna. ,
Madame. Anselmo Paulino'.Al '. :::
varez, the former Andree Gar '- 'I
cia, wife of General Paulino,
Dominx an Minister without
portfolio, flew over froyn QT .i
to be with her niece Joujou
Pouget when the stork arrive.
ed. ';
-:0:- ..
Gregoire Jr. arrived in the
Gregoire Eugene family this
paqt week. other is the for ',
mer Gisele Pierre-Jerome;: N

o.... .,


:.:,.',.f.






Page- 14


Prompt Service By.Immigration.

Jail Bad Risks, Deport Unwanted


Continued from Page 1

day and spent, with the
plane load of passengers, one
hbur and ten minutes await-
ing. the arrival of customs
'-and immigration officials.
It took longer to go through
the red tape than the plane
ri ;de from Port au Prince to
New Orleans.
SThe Director of Immigra-
tion arrives on the job,
sharp at 7 a.m. The employees
'are all on the job before 8
a.m.

,... The improvement of this
,..., service over .the past year
Shas been heart-warming. The
Office has 'been enlarged to
cope tith the increased flow
;"V of visitors. A new complete
ad simplified filing system
,'has been put in operation.
This competent filing system
:'will allow Haiti to take steps
i- that, previously were impos-,
Sible. For example, Haiti
i, 'will shortly sign tourist agree
.' .nents with neighboring
S-countries, allowing citizens of
'' :those countries to visit Hai-
Sti on a tourist card which
'7"calls for only simplified in-
formation written on a card,.
immediately on entry into
.this country.
--'" 'A new grey passport made
S.: i' Haiti has replaced the old
:red. one. It is an attractive
.7.grey with a golden crest en-
."^ d raved. on the cover. Des-
,ch7bampp' did the job.
:' Two new type visas are
'. being introduced. One will al-
lAw people, mostly those who
VF -. A I !
vihave retired, to,come and live
i ere off their income. They
inust not work and must cer-
aiinly prove they can keep.,
r' themselves. 'The other visa
".'wil allow technicians td come
toa Ihiti and lend their know-
Fi-iedge to companies, and the
.,'training of local personnel.
k.y ,ey must return, fro#,
Swenee they came after their
V.edtrnlet expires. One of the
First to benefit from this new
!I;re. atiion has been the El
K,1. '
,.; -Ragcho hotel whp now have
.a. Frenoh Chcf.
SHaiti led other countries in
S.this area by introducing a sim
',plified landing form that re-
:g4ies simply your name,
where born, etc., doing away
Swith the yard-ong question-
; i ,re.at. travellers had.bee'n
-dced with up to then. Some


worthy citiezns at the time
of the introduction of this
card pointed out that this
would allow undesirables to
enter the country and the po-
lice would have next to no
check on them. To demon-
strate the vigilance of the im
migration department, here
are two recent, little publiciz-
ed demonstrations of effi-
ciency.
DO&MIN.ICAN PUBLISHER
DEPORTED
By order of the Director of
Immigration, Mr. Denis Bel-
lande, Senor 'Enrique Santa-
maria, a Spaniard who pub-
lishes a rather poorly edited
review in the Dominicarl Re-
public, was placed aboard a
PAA clipper Tuesday and de-
ported home to C+udad Tru-
jillo. Mr. Bellande, stressing
that people ,should be more
careful about doing business
with individuals they do not
know, explained that Mr. En-
rigue Santamaria arrived
here from' Ciudad Trujillo
and went on an advertising
campaign. Mr. Bellande's at-
tention wqs called to the bad
risk of such a visitor when
he came across an article in
the Dominican journal El,
jCaribe mentioning that Senor
Santanmaria had passed two
bad cheques before his depar-
ture. 240 dollars that Senor
Santamaria h a d collected
from advertisers here, has al-
ready been returned to 'its
source.
PRIEST JAILED PEND-
ING INVESTIGATION
Arisfide Papp, a Hungarian
arrived here March 4th dress
ed as a catholic priest and car
trying a passport that cited his
profession as theologian. The
Hungarian priest met arch-
bishop Le Gouaze who put
him up at the Seminaire. The
priest had a three month tour
ist visa. Ten days ago he
disappeared from the Semin-
aire and reappeared in Port-
de-Paix. He came here as a
tourist but isbelieved.to have
said he was a refugee. Pend-
ing. a complete investigation
Aristide.-Papp, is behind pri-
so r.h s. .. .


Refntirn- ita Heirti- Trip
Back from a health trip to
the States is Mi-. Bigmon
Pierre-Louis, President of the
C. G.


.HAITI SUN, SUNDAY4 JUNE 7th, 198g
_____-- i --


Personality Of The Week
(Continued from Page 1)


Mexico on tour, making use
of an emergency need for a
singer, she began the career
which led to many experien-
ces in many countries and
her international acclaim 4o-
day.
As it happens, Miss Adrian's
first tour as singer was
through the Caribbean, this
accounts for the Latin influ-
ence, she became expert in
Latin dancing and singing, re
turned to the Havana Madrid
in New York and was a smash
hit, I

From here she left for Hol-
lywood, danced in a film with
Bling Crosby and went on vau
deville tour with Lou Holtz,
Wendy Barrie, Arline Judge
and others. Back to New.
York and singing engage-
ments in chic nite spots
such as Versailles, St. Regis
and Mocamlbo. No doubt dur-
ing this period Miss Adrian
acquired the sophisticated de-
livery so familiar to New
Workers. Many interesting
trips during this period, Bue-
nos Aires, Montevideo and


WISE and OTHERWISE
(Continued from Page 12)

to fix the 'bed, as the servants
were all in their quarters,
some distance away from the
house. When they came down
twenty minutes' later there
was no sign of Geritil. They
looked for him but he was no-
where in the house.
They were just about to
lock the doors and put out
the lights when they heard a
knock at the front door.
When they opened it there
stood Gentil, soaking wet,
plastered with mud from head
to foot, carrying a dripping
bundle under his arm.

They gazed at himn in amaze
ment, unable to speak. Gen-
ti'l broke The silence.
cWhile you were fixing the
bed,, he said, ,I just thought
I would run home and get my
pajamas.)
Editor's Note: For the in-
terested T. J. has foresaked
the companyy uf his Scotch
friend and has prepared a
generous description of the
strange machine mention-
&d above which consists
largely of vacuum tubes, dials,
wires and levers.


Rio, appearing in smart spots
and on the radio.
In 1941 she returned to
Mexico a full fledged singing
star.
In 1944 Miss Adrian was
asked to do the lead in Pana-
ma Hattie for the U.S.O. This
was the first musical com-
edy sent overseas to the sol-
dierp. The show toured army
camps and bivouacs in Italy
for nine months, many times
playing under fire.

Returned for Broadway
show &Are You With It,. In
this she played a comedy part,
that of the carnival dancer.
Woolcott Gibbs gave her ex-
cellent reviews but as a result
of. this role, she had an amus
ing incident occur later in
London, England, when there
as a singing star. Miss Adrian
literally took London by storm
or perhaps we should say,
storm in a tea-cup. Then as
now, the American dollar was
a very desirable and very
scarce item. Lord Cherwell,
age 70, bachelor, teetotaler,
non smoker and vegetarian,
having read a reference by
Woolcott made to Miss
Adrian's midriff as seen in
her comedy role, took thd mat
ter to Parliament. Here he
discussed whether or not she
should be paid so many Ame-
rican dollars on its merits.
Miss, Adrian 'answered that
her diaphram was used as a
support, in her act only vocal-
ly, not visually. The incident
was made much of in all the
papers. In the middle of this
furore she went to Paris
where the French people
were much amused over the
storm caused by something
so common to everyone. She
was a tremendous success in
Paris and was -asked to sing
~D.a


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at many benefits and b1
functions. I -!
In St. Thomas this w
Diane was popular noi3a
as a singer but also a&j:
sonality. Besides hril
club appearances she
twice weekly radio '
gramme of some singini
much witty comment
local news, all interim
with promotion for. wort
cal causes. In no smaili
Miss-Adrian helped bull
fund- to start the first z
library to be used for
appreciation in a fast grde
educational programme.,
ane admits one of her i
interests has 'been in .'
raising and giving &
performances.
After she leaves herd4
week, Diane returns t
Thomas and an engage
at the Virgin Isle HBlteF,;
Lack to the CarNibe Hiiif
first 'time in history ofi
ton chain an entertAifiA
,been re-engaged in sucn
short period. No wonder~
this island activity shi
been called The CariAib
Whirl! >'
P.S.: Diane admits shei
lured to Haiti with the
of rest and a holiday I
by Peggy Harti

STORM ItOCKS
LA GONAVE '
1a
A three-day storm rof
the Island of Gonaye':
wveekl, flooding some setti
groundifig small boats and
ting off communications-
the mainland. In the vicd
of Ange-a-Galets, some .
sisal fields were ruined,
the floods.
-:0:-
2,000 DO LARS KMOR
FO11l ONAIVES
Elie Joseph Fils has
scribed two thousand doll
to the Gonaives Building "
it was announced last\wea
aa:aS


'4 :tI rl4Efijf;

$1G% T a


-. .
'%-1


Let the Insurance Company do the worrying.
See inimediately: .NORWICH UNION. Insurance Col
Joseph Nadal and Co. Agents. Tel: 3486


~IIILI~


- -


m






IY, JUNE 7th, 1953


s For Development Of Tourism:

view With Minister of Commerce


nued from Page 1)

diversity; the organi-
[a Summer Festival
of the Spring Car;
Establishment of a
Folklore Fete during
h of August and the
tof a special Tour-
cy which would have
f providing a special
to the incoming visi-
I'seeing to their com-
Iing their stay.

stance, now that the v
D;
roads are being de- i
for fast and easy tra- a
cial Chalets could be I
d along the auto a
house tourists'and f
I pleasant healthy t
during their circle tour j
provinces. t
.small inns could be
ted with native mate
be run under the
Seye of the Tourism
Ssee that their rea-
i.prices and standards
iene,served as an in-
ent to travellers who
pmple but clean com-
a cost they can af-

ible spots for such ch.,
nuld tie at Iroquois, the
rbrest, Carrefour Ray-
* Mer Frappee, and
from the Citadel. The
Ltion of transporta-
ices for the interior is
hder study.

take its rightful share
SCaribbean tourist bon-
Iaiti must convince va-
ers that it has some-
other countries cannot
.,In advertising and
ty abroad, it would be
e to stress the fact
C.is the only country
Sfolklore as rich and
hined. .. That if you
hear the tambours
Haitian drummers can
see the folklore
.s.only the Haitians
em, you must come
public. Stress should
laid on the variety of
te and the terrain
raordinary history
and which has been
ration for freedom
ut the New World.
the New York
u-Bureau transferred
S depths of Rockefel-
r to street level


Minister of Commerce
Heurtelou


vould be dn additional draw-
ng point. And establishing
Second bureau in the well-
)opulated negro sector would
ilso serve to augment the
flow of these racial brothers
;o Haiti where they can en-
ioy the first class services
they are denied in so many
other sections of the world.
Now that Chicago and Sou-
thern Airlines has set up re-
gulat flights to Port au
Prince from the middlewest,
a bureau, in Chicago would
also be an opportune spot to
attract a yet untapped source
of tourism.
The affiliation of some Hai
tian hotels with American ho-
tel chains for the mutual dis-
tribution of publicity would
also be an excellent way of
guiding the flow of Carib-
bean-bound visitors. And di-
rect contact with such organi
zations as the Rotary Club,
the Elks and the Knights of
Columbus cou'ld-be made with
the idea of promoting ou
Capital as the ideal spot foi
annual congresses and othei
group gatherings.
The continued effort to pu
Haiti on the regular schedulI
of passenger cruise liners am
major freighters also is
MUST in the new tourist de
development programme. Anm
the need for airline rates tc
be reduced is also stressed.
The establishment of thi
School for Hotel Enmployee
and Management will d(
much to improve the ((worc
of mouthD advertising so ne
cessary to the tourist trade
When a visitor has had a con
fortable and pleasant stay ii
a country, he is always anxi
ous to tell his friends. And
need we add, visa versa.
Courses for chauffeurs
guides, police officials an
all those having direct con
tact with foreign visitor


could also be added to the
school curriculum.
To give the tourists an in-
teresting schedule of activity
in Haiti, it is suggested that
a new and smaller theatre be
constructed to present folk-
lore shows, musical program-
mes and documentary films
of special interest to the visi-
tor leaving the vast Thea-
tre de Verdure for the Hai-
tian Public.
Such a theatre could be
part of a regular 'cTourist
ICenter> which could have a
dance floor, restaurant and
other facilities. Since our
folklore is one of the prime.
attributes of Haiti, it is sug-
gested that a committee of
experts be formed to oversee
the productions in the cam-
(paign to keep the productions
authentic versions of Haitian
popular culture, rather than
pale imitations of Hollywood
or Broadway.
If all the small museums
and galleries in Port au
Prince were combined in one
large museum it would do
much to facilitate the tour-
ist's 'attempt to view our his-
torical and cultural heritage.
A dollar entry fee. could be
charged to help pay the ex-
pense of such an enterprise.

It is also difficult for tour-
ists to see the natural beauty
of Our Republic because of
the lack of organized excur-
sions other -than the trip tc
the Citadelle and Kenscoff
A varietyy of other trips coulc
Sbe planned to interesting bea
Sches and other places within
r the immediate neighbourhood
r of the capital such as the
r Isle of Cabrits and Iroquois.
A weekly bulletin giving
t visitors an up-to-date account
E of all events scheduled during
d their time in Haiti would also
a be of great service.
Organization is the answer
d to many a problem and tha
3 seems to go for tourism a
well.
e The good start in supervise
s ing the debarking, transport
o station and treatment of vis:
d tors will be augmented b;
L- other measures aimed at mai
. ing Haiti known throughout
n the Americas for its courts;
n and hospitality. Thq Goverr
i- ment has already taken step
I, to prevent the visitor fror
being exploited by fixin,
s, transportation rates, instal'
d ing a safety inspection sti
i- tion for public vehicles an
s cracking down on the arm


of vagabonds who harass the
tourists.
It has also done much to
aid the construction and ex-
pansion of hotels so badly
needed for our growing re-
sort industry.

During 1952,.twenty thou-
sand tourists came to Our Re-


public and this year the fi-
gure will (probably go past
the twenty-five thousand
mark. But it is still a far cry
from Cuba's 216,000, Jamai-
ca's 93,000 or Nassau's 68,000
visitors. I
And Haiti has every natu-
ral asset to be the tourist
queen of them all. !


COMEDIES DE PARIS GIVES OPENING PERFORMANCE
PLAYER IS STRICKEN WITH APENDICITIS


(Continued from Page 1)
Francais> and Sunday morn-
ing at 9 he was placed on the
operating table. The opera-
tion lasted one and a half hour
instead of the usual 20 minu-
tes because of infection...
Tuesday night the members
of the Port au Prince press
joined budding theatrical
lights in a visit to the French
Institute to meet the mem-
bers of the ,Comedie de Pa-
ris., It was an enjoyalMe even
ing returned by SNAD Thurs
day evening in presenting ,cLe
Premier Jour at the new City
Magloire theater in honour of
the visitors..
The 'Comedie de Paris),
rearranged programme is as
follows :-
Monday, June 8th, at 8.30
pnm. at the Rex theater: faut qu'une porte soit ouver-
te ou ferm6ee by Alfred de
Musset and < Reve* by Saicha Guitry.
Wednesday, June 10th, eLes


Mat Aimes, by Francois Mau
riac f' the French Academy.
Friday, June 12th: Le Corn
plexe de Philemon> by J. B.
Luc.
Monday, June 15th: .La,
Peur des Coups>> by G. Cour-
teline and < by J.
Anouilh.
Wednesday, June 17th :
((Monsieur Chasses by G.
Feydeau.
Friday, June 19th: 'L'Ap-
polon de Belles, by J. Girau-
dboux and Le Jeu de L'A-
mour et du Hasard by Mari-
vaux.
Monday, June 22nd: ,La
Cid& by Corneille.
Entrance fees: 1 dollar, 2
dollars and 3 dollars.


Madsen Co. Contribute
$3,000 To Gonaives
Madsen and Company has
contributed three thousand
dollars to tle fund for the
150th Anniversary construc-
tion now underway at Gon-
aives.


AFTER EVERY GAN E


V9t 41


a;r





.t






- .


ribuors: sine a Glace Naionale
flistributors: tsine a Glace Nalionale


* *2~


*HAITI SUN,


Page 15


i


i-


I


q


- _---_-~ .___-____,





Page 16

A COMPOSER GOES NORTH


Tall, soft spoken Arthur
L. Duroseau left for New
York last Tuesday to fulfill a
contract with the Folkway
recording company.

Folkway Records of New
York will prepare albums of
Haaitian folklore for use in
American universities and
other educational and cultu-
ral organizations. Mr. Duro-
seau will be of great. assist-
ance as he is in the unique po-
sition of being one of the few
people who can translate-and
also edit Haitian folklore mu-
sic.
He will be away in New
York for six months. His
wife and family of nine, will
remain here. He has one 'nn
a lawyer, another is an agro-


SHAITI SUN,
-L.


Composer Duroseau

nomist.
Duroseau, an accomplishPd
violinist and flute player,
comes from a talented family.
His father, Lyricee Durosea1,
was a welli-known music teach
er, who fathered five. musi-
cal sons.
Mr. Duroseau has been
working as office manager of
the Thorland Club, and lead-


.I

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-


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SOutre I'ensemble montr6 cl-
dessus nous pouvons fournir
aussl les 2 apparells quo void
avec un changeur de disqups'
compl6tement automatique 6,3
vltesses. Les 3 radlor6cepteurs
ont une excellent reproduce.
ilon, un correcteur (r6glage
du colorsi" de Ia tonalit6) et
des bands 6tal6es. ..
: Pour tous d6talls adressez-
vous A votre fournlsseur.
j


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i


.L-- I
L i PHILIPS


er o their orchestra. He is s
expected to return to this a
work from New York.
He has had a number of
his compositions published 'n (
New York and several more
are scheduled for publishing
in the next few months.
MVr. Durodeau came to the
notice of the Folkway record-
ing Company after he had
,prepared the musical section
of (Haiti Singing>>, by Harold
Courlander.

'CORONATION
CELEBRATED HEBE AT
BRITISH EMBASSY
The Ooronation was cause
for celebration in all corners
of the globe. Last Tuesday
evening, a reception was held
by Ambassador Mill Irving
and Mrs. Irving at their resi-
dence in Pacbt. It was a spark
ling affair.-
Although all preparations
and provisions had been made
for the guests comfort in the
event of an evening shower,
,no rain appeared and it was
ra delightful evening.
Union Jacks of all sizes pro
vided a 'most effective deco-
ration.
Queen Elizabeth II was
toasted with champagne, and
a delicious buffet supper of,
fine .Virginia hams, turkey
and other delicacies was ser-
ved.
Ambassador and Mrs. Mill
Irving, new Consul, Mr. Peter
Caruana; his wife and daugh-
ter Jose~te, and the embassy
staff, are to be complimented'
on making the Coronation
such a memorable occasion in
Port au Prince.
SIn observance of the Coro-
nation, the Embassy remain-
ed closed for three days.


Neo
Tak

new
here
and
to


t IVi
bass
T
ed d
SerT
;CURACAO TRADING CD. OF HAITI S.A. r ta a
S. in



FAMOUS THROUGHOUT


STHE WORLD


B'is f --


fe^J^ ,._ _V ,.


w British Consul
ces Up His Duties Here
dr. Peter Caruana, the
, British Consul, arrived
e last week with his wife
lovely daughter in time
enjoy the Coronation fes-
ties at the British Em-
sy.
'he Consul is a distinguish-
member of. the Foreign
vice who was born on Mal-
nd spent most of his years
the Middle East. He


Ii


| IN BAGS OF 42 1/2 PORTLAND CIE
STANDARD HYDRAULICKgs NET 6 PLY
OFFICE: MTTC BLDG. EXPOSITION
Port-au-Prince Tel : 2387
~~LIIL~~~-d


-now Mmv---00


-.< *


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