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Haiti sun ( September 24, 1961 )

Digital Library of the Caribbean Duke University Libraries
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: September 24, 1961
Publication Date: September 3, 1961

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00174

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: September 24, 1961
Publication Date: September 3, 1961

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00174

Full Text




















bu4#


by ~ ~f ~biet

~ Uer1~Bo~rT!Ie~

es% ?~esident Dr.
p~is~I~yahe~ e t c m6difi~tioiis to
~dg~liPwiIi~1~ } o~ix ~r~s27n~Wiokdo
%1ii~ ~r
~ ~ibji~i~pee~ wilh~ha~ 6 ~eavi~ages also a new poTheyK,
er en aii 9 rnti~th~fr the National ~B~nI~qLthe

~'th~ 20 je~ 'cent d~d~w~e~ national Ins$ituti~~xi". '1I~
e$~ ( a~tia~o, 1e '~ & The dpcE~unent eminent, with thi~s ~
~al~o ~ Ame4 ~e en~bIe~ to start ~ie pa~yxp
~eii' j~iio a of 'sme ~ovemnmenta1 de
~ ~s e~re4, Coi~tr~Cted by preceed~ng ad~i~
~k to~i~i~p!4he~ / -
(Uegl~, heade(1~ e~ that >the pwovisi{~~"


~ QET~R~ 4 Woyen~

~> I~J~5,~O


4







she w~as ex~bth~g ~d di~st~
~t19n ~o f torsvot~ d~y'~inorn1ng ~to~e

P~ ~iii~f for of

J~ j~her~ w~i ~& tW~ie V~s~J?
~t~h m-~~~h w i~npre-

Krt

~ the ~gi~o

a

~ K~VV~~4~


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A4~K~K~.






SA I T'I S U N : unuay S epte4ner aora-,oi.


I..A. G 2 . '




tIn Haiti This Week'
By AUBELIN JOLICOEUR


t*"How come, asked artist Charles Beecher,
a painter and cartoonist for the INK AND
PAINT INC. of New York, taxi drivers always
try to take you to a hotel other than your
choice". That happened tb us also, said com-
mercial artists Robert Moscowitz and Edward
John Bach and Fred Zimmerman, a teacher
for retarded children from New York...
S-Psychiatrist Dr Henry Ellenberger, from
Canada and wife Emilie, a Swiss Psychologist were guests of Dr.
Enierson Douyon this week...
Dr Ellenberger is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Mc
Gill University of Montreal. He stopped here after a five week
trip through the Latin American. He was invited by the Universtiy
of San Marcos. Lima Peru for a series of lectures, after that he
visited fifteen countries. He did not want to go back home with-
out visiting laiti. he said. We weie told a great deal about Haiti
by some very good friends, Dr Metraux and the French Ethno-
logist Miss Yvonnc Oddon and we know Dr -Louis' Mars but what
\e saw with our very own e.ves exceeded our rosiest expecta-
tions. We just came from Latin America and have seen a lot,
but Haiti is the country closest to our hearts.
The Douyon brothers are doing a pionnfer job in the field of
mental health. We ought to congratulIate the Haitian Government
and the Minister of Public Health for their comprehension, their
help in assisting thzce young pionnricrs in their dedicated effort.
Mental IHealth is cra well taken car of in Ilaiti tod:iy ..

Mi Feliks Bocliher.ki, a s.nipathetic figure of tlhe World Bank
flew down here last e%-r-k irom Washington, D.C. and was greeted
by friend Horace Ashion. Mr Bocheoski spent more than 2 years
in Haiti as a representative of the World Bank and made a great
many Wiends here. if -3'as back vc-r. I:c,.ntly with a delegation-
stEnt by the BID to confer with tle Go-ernment. He is guest of the
Ashtons at their beautiful Villa Rosa...
Misses Bernice Eugcnia Wright and La Voncia Canada, two
lovely teachers hurm Chicago airited here-last Saturdiy for a
S day \isit. They were warnl., rccon-rrmminded to Architect Robert
Baussan, owner of the Iho-L.cle li)tel by his daughter Mrs Ray.v-
mond Ch.assagne. foi.rer NI che'c- Baus-jan. Bs n:ce and tlic
Chas-agne are ne,ch.-.,-,s. r.ain,'jnd _Chissag.,e antic'pated [hat
Bernice would not be able to dance ihe m.rinngue like the Hai-
tians. he was wrong. Bernice and La Vcneia are keen exponents
of the Haitian mering e..
'Miss Lana E. lmirenl'id, a 20-r-. 'o't i dent at ile'.m Y-ork


as
ta

si
cr
al
Et
ric
ur
pl
ca
fo

a
the
or
fr
cc
to
an
wi
Bi
m
a
Fig
de
Vo
de


-A
Americaz Drimhirves




Go To Europe .
... ', .-'

"JOSE 6O. 00 E -SICZE the cryptic have been produced unschooled artists in Italy, S 7
[ the current edition .of the on American. shores for many and Peru (Mario Urtega)' .
Am'ecas centuries, and,. curiously, they The exahp)les .frtm ,the Carib1
What we call punitivee Art is have survived the impact" f bean knd Central'. American
s old in Apec&"'as'lts iihabl- time, the academies, and mo- area, .which wetd assembled by.
nts. Timheworks:: oL early pre- dern .mechanistic civilization.;-... the Pan Americab Uhion-for this
olumbian cultures -were often -Twenty works- by contenipo- vvorld show, include thbe pictUres
mple, unacademic graphic des- rary Latin American primitive. shown on the p 'pan', l,, o6rn
riptions with the directness. Oft artists are now touring Gefma- the..front inside frorit. covers., Tn-
1 spontaneous 'popular art. The ny as part of large exhibition, addition, frori. Haiti, heree arei
' sponta neusar."a
uropeans who came to Ame- "The Naive -Art of the'Worldr" three .more metal. svu ptur~Sia.y
ca added their own instinctive arrariged by: the art museum -Georges Liautaud;" a' 'paintigrig
rge to convert nature into a of Baden-Bader. The show open- The Unfaithful Woman, by -.if
astic image. Later, the Afri- ed-therq July .2'aaid is going on late Hector. Hyppolite; Lotuver:
ins brought their enthusiasm to Frankfurt-am Main and Ha- ture Boisson's .Adam -and..lve-
r brilliant color. nover. The Sin; and J. Chiappini s--Pr'
Painting in America was thus As. the 'centerplete of the ex traiMt of Toussaint L'Ouverture.
natural way oT expression for hibition- there are several works Houses and 'Garden in Barran-
a people, whether their ancest- by the douanier Rousseau. Other qt4ija is by Noe Leon of Coluni-
*s were indigenous or had come French artists included are Vu- Four Cuban paintings appear: a
om other continents. In earliest vin, 'Bombois, Bauchant. and Still Ufe'by E. Bustamante; Ra-
lonial times, paint was applied Caillaud. From Germany there fael Moreno's Homes in 'Maria-
useful objects for decoration, are works by Dietrich; Trillhaa- nao; The Discovery of Cuba by.
id to canvas, board, and tin se, 'Bluhm, and; Paps; from Yu- Christopher -Columbus, by the'
ith an artistic aim in mind. goslavia, works by "Generalic,. late Felisindo Yglesias Acevedo;
ut painting also could be a Fejes, and Skurjeni. The primi- and La Cuerda Farni by. J. Ca- -
agical element in ceremonies., ive trend.-in the. United States sas. -
narration of a calamity, or a is represented by Grandma Mo- The. group of 'contemporary
gn of the importance of strange ses, Morris. Hirshfield, John Latin American paintings and
itics or a prayer to them. Kane, Horace Pippin, William sculpture.-- thus includes ritual
)tivc- paintings, portraits, and Doriani. and Edward Hicks. designs, portraits, historical nar-
scriptions of the magical and There are still other works by (Continued on page 15)


TI WORL TURS TO UWbte LazbeV
-
., .






4/ r .. '


University stopped h i.c last cli-end vith her-m )t'er Edla i
a sv.wing thru the C.r blear.. She is studying speech therapy at
NYU and is taking dlncil-i- lessons. Lana and her mother ,cie I. .
guests at the El Rancih Lana who-e tv. in sstcr is n wi in Italy
had a bug for handn--me Feder-co M.itigrn):ie. a 20-year-old si-?d- '
ent in Architecture from Rome who was visiting here with his
parents, Lawyer Giacomo Martigno-ne, and wife Lerenza and his
beautiful 18-year-old sister Amnna Minria. a student in language: and -
Dr and Mrs Federico Tarchetti from Milan...
"Miss Gertrude Elaine Johnson a teacher from Philadelphia
v.ho arrived early this Vcek wce joir.ed at the Montana Saturday
by two lovely Secrctaries Toby K. Alanlin and Frances Bressler. Spint' obe and ountryf cu-" t ps b'_ :" ""
Gertrude is on her ijurth trip. Spin tie globe, and country after country P46Me Itl o-
large and. small, old and new, from the Tropics to the Poles. In
of them lou can be sure of fiEdng "wmlTELABL"-a. .
great Scotch wvhiskies of the world. The unique softness iSc6 i, .
burn water, and more than a century of find bleindig ha -
INSURE WITH SURE INSURANCE combined to make "'m -ABIla" Wu"i-kymoa whiu k,
CALEDONIAN INSURANCE COMPANY t.iw
Founded In 1805 t L

INCORPORATED BY SPECIAL ACT OF BDEWA EGUTPI-':VllSy WiSK ,t'
THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT -I . -" --TV- *


RONY. CHENET & SONS gn t D1i t '
AGENTS FOR HAITI Agent Distributor: AWL
ANDRE JHAWLY '.4
Address Rue des Miracles Opposite NationOal an. o- B Ox 1t07 Port .au Prince, Haiti -
Address ue des Miracles Opposite Nationl .8, Rue du Magasin de l'Etat Phone: 3721



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OF ;TO SUDY-Y4;EEO DUE."NA

Mr dLearr.i elon of uioChm-the oueding hand beone baptesm
-77 7 -K7 ,77 77- S chw geitz er H rospta loralvesceremony Sse.Ja's wr
Gbhorlys floriatnday visieete to th rogeh ounso akIo
arrited Staes Intatsort atPine n e Ao- fotdeo theMat miun Hefscald Mr.;
Mrtils Melon say donated wlato tend ces bsheakingl aidet orn the Hatwor,
nolestan M thgree oseprt.Vne ts om a eti derobably. ndhi


S dholeain o f jundiorpe Child- Tpheal ou has no eegon e u nheardo


rt~~~abe Floridaci exee Two through Thee colmn ofnc Innoect a ua leean eealA ei
cialistsv inloe Por the Prieau ondi Mpeoalst ande ofo n a anst bev the structeald M ,
de Cedi Agrtol. (ICA) Dep senfe' a armnabgemrting- geiftsoeraion-f tseU.. e
artment~~~~~fu Koofe Agicltre write sevetral.arcutrl rdt ytea
sareduled toov bor donatedted Site ce bepak ai for~a vistin workualara
States ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Ja Marare ofe St. Vincent'sek thi devoted womanre and UhMtiiwtespldto fcr-CRMTE ADTECT
trai~~~~~~~iH ndcape 'Child- ap ea hgialts nod gone unheard Go en etterdtt.h dvd a am
credit twue ilvsta gicl A YPA Ez n answered.UVOUIN


t~~~~~e spcNI litUDdEDce~
cialLIFE employedRC by thh Braceii canbank amtio wa obsurv theRTE sY ruTOcEtU
de ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~n Crdtontl 9A) e-sly ifingmn j-ue getd o ionrssof thet U.SU.ANAMRCA
a r t m e n t~sh o A g i u t r a e c a i .a r i sc entu r tal' cred at s st m e, asP T O I L E A T
schd uled t ro, leave' itoth forn n the Unite Wla ell: lasavstng many rura arendans .PO8Xas hn
Stts hi ee an.a 6wek Jinetly Sponssoedso by a O relto viewig th Rldtno.ee


fullyi,g, Besdmes thm -agiuturatvly and ithenHaitia Govternme int the, pot o thea indivda farmen.- The4I NDT ECIA E
geared wit,..- ther msabvylaesn will uvisiet.ean dan- ONEen We deigtfl n thY LNE.N WAY BYVILEIMOU1N




the im notable chtinge owith gests,
ad one agetsa t e imression thate AVENU PA AM' Ory ilAINEB
she ~ ~ ~ ~ ro ise entertain -'t om ', PET ORT-VIU HAI TIE
(continued~~~~~~~ ~ ~~~~~ frmpg L notefutia h l A l;vrleasn t a wl y the E spend aefec32thne 76
ine room 'whic -'Missa setti- ans on our lasts visitit now~oe o lesse
ham- aysisfor vsiingdini -han. i tok lac-lsomasy ing S hinday there isar small b t t
a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ mns when youo not-c suere hav no Wa8t fluenc ofth eclipse Ottcestr ..o an i n
'f uly, Bsids t.,attactielyandintnsiy o th rwhee pol aea and. gardens Thec
.ga ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ relcs 6is Duh1 atisr wates there ios a aey leaves. nb on suece,.da adn n. dlgtu n iePe


Jezzeettle into~ you noutine and -For thisn spctcl th gust 5" lryg e
Duhmwllf ambiac e u f ther e
Their oTAncec o lul
pladed by oticerigtis dow toGY. aoam e
the, fine,,, selctd dfrom eini


theTimmortal dishe of the Fraro

by te 016 cmposd o theof-et cMlthituee nif onl Tiinulest
pe flor abdexchilnt orhe leae~ther~silaitabls adva nce iou adviesabl e.inil na93~oul eslomsin
ocdupy~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~~rr thee1 ofthro.sad nbtee fud-heTusa tgtatCbn Co- EN#teaty PnOnTar ge-PRIg Ndt E
authetic a alithizi we hve Slot 17 theshowtherewhl in c arleo the gasta r eff ect O t A CIii e -~die m :oe
ev46seen' ~~~~ th old Coona sethttcng is ael leeal icue oen - S .. Ueb ow kif lbo: s
r oi n a hu e tee/lvit Lewoo, th. carmng viceoftitilltig thing.Te roeis are il moa-


ssin, d~uit hefr~ of Bah rpetoie '' -. o OWhere lae on eat. duarehich









SNew Law Creating In
And Industrial


LAW
C Dr. FRANCOIS DUVALIER
President of the Republic
- In view of Articles 48, 66 and
90 of the Constitution;
In view of the Law of Sept-
ember 12, 1951 creating the Hal-
tian Institute of Agricultural and
Industrial Credit in its present
-form;
In view of the Law of Decemb-
er 17, 1959 creating the Spbeial
Investment Account;
In view of the Law of July 13,
.1956 on the operations of insur-
ance companies;
Considering that agriculture
and industry constitute the prin-
cipal sources of national wealth;
Considering that the Haitian
State must invest its reserve in
the economic sectors most ap-
propriate for creating favorable
influences upon the movement of
production, and must orient the
placement of private capital to-
ward these same sectors;
Considering that experience
has shown that the Institute. as
constituted by the Law of Sept-
.ember 12, 1951, has not achieved
its true objectives; and that it
is necessary to create another
for agricultural and industrial
development, to fix its statutes,
and to define its criteria for
granting credit;
On the report of the Ministers
of Finance, of Agriculture, Na-
lural Resources and Rural De-
velopment, and of Commerce
and Industry;

And the Legislati'e Chamber
has voted the following law:
CHAPTER 1:
Creation, Objectives and Func-
tions.-
Article 1.-There is created an
organism of agricultural and in-
dustrial development under the
title: 'INSTITUTE OF AGRI-
CULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL
DEVELOPMENT". This InsLit-


13


stitute Of Agricultural.
I Development


ute shall operate under the ac'
counting supervision of the Na-
tional Bank of the Republic of
Haiti. Nevertheless, the Institute
shall have its own juridical per-
sonality and capital separate
from that of the National Bank
of the Republic of Haiti.
Article 2.-The Institute has
two principal objectives: the de-
velopment and the expansion of
the economy. Either directly or
indirectly, by investing or by
granting credits, it finances pro-
grams and specific projects of
physical persons, cooperatives,
and legally constituted cpmpa-
nies, with a view to promoting
agriculture in general including
exploitation of forests, livestock,
fisheries, and industrial produc-
tion.

Article 3.-The Institute has
the following functions and acti-
vities:
a) To promote the formation
of agricultural and industrial en-
terprises, particularly cooperati-
ves, which contribute to aug-
mentation of the national pro-
duct;
For this purpose, to grant
short-term, medium-term, and
long-term loans destined 'for
the development of
agricultural and industrial pro-
duction, to persons, to private
enterprises, to companies, to co-
operatives, and to popular sav-
ings funds, or to any other en-
tities not directly subordinate to
the Public Administration;
cl To promote the develop-
ment of production of certain
articles now imported;
di To render credit effective-
ly accessible to small peasant
producers.
CHAPTER n:
Capital and Other Sources of Fi-
nancing
Article 4.-The authorized so-
cial capital of the Institute is


Caribbean Construction Co. SA.


Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD

Phone: 3955. P. O. BO.. 284




Beautiful Peligre Lake
for any and all who wish to partake of the beautiful
goodness of a peaceful vacation amidst the sur-
roundings of nature's own greenery.

38 Miles. From Port au Prince
HUNTING ........ FISHING
SWIMMING .......... RECREATION

BUNGALOW ........ RESTAURANT
WATER SKI ....... ... RELAXE


For your reservation, call up in ODVA Radio-Station at
PORP AU PRINCE -
,* Corner Rue dn Centre and des Cesars 68.


'rU
ir
-
'.4,'


fiAed at 50 million gourdes and jtal .for, pUrposes of.-constituting
shall be. constituted, at tihe be- reserves.. .
ginning, by the net--balance of CHAPTER IV .Management.-
assets and liabilities transferred ,. Article 8.-The Institute is. dir-
frmm the Special Investment. Ac- ected by a Director' General' as-
count and from the Haitian In- sisted by an -independept Finan-
stitute df Agricultural and In- .cial Committee, of whiih' he is
dustrial Credit. This capital shall legaly, a member. .
be augmented, up to the author- 'Article 9.-The Director Gene-
ized limit, by the total of reve- ral is a technical functionary,
nues granted by the present law, possessing the necessary back-
particularly those provided in ground in banking and finance,
Articles 5 and 6. .as well as experience in econo-
Article 5.-The sources of- fi- mics, agriculture and 'industry.
nancing of the Special Invest- He is named. by the President


ment Account .provided in Arti- of
cle 3 of the Law of December th
17, 1959, namely the internal tax da
of 4 per cent on articles of the of
customs tariff now in force de-
signated by List A, and of 6 per
cent on articles of the same cus-
toms tariff designated by Lists
B. remaining an integral part Of,
the present law except for pa-
ragraphs 3201 to 3700.
The tax relative to these para-
graphs will be applied only to
the extent that it may be ne-
cessary to protect industries est- -
ablisbed in the country.
The tax shall be assessed on
the value of the merchandise ex-
customs.

Articres exempt from duty un-
der the general tariff shall not
be subject to payment of this
tax.
.The amounts shall be paid ac-
cording to the procedure esta-
blished by the Fiscal Depart-
ment of the National Bank of
the Republic 'of Haiti and shall
be deposited automatically, at
the responsibility of the Nation-
al Bank of the Republic of Haiti,
to the account of the Institute.
A percentage of a half per
cent shall be granted to the Fis-
cal Department of the National
Bank of the Republic of Haiti
to cover the costs of collection
of these taxes.
Article 6.-All sources of reve-
nue provided by la,'s to the par-
ticular advantage of the Haitian
Institute of Agricultural and In- I
dustrial Credit shall devolve
upon the Institute.


d the Republic for a period qf
iree years upon the recommen-
ation of the Board of directors
I the National Bank of the Re-


.' ... ^ .j ,



-...1 S'-.'


CHAPTER III: Profits-
Article 7.-The Institute is au-
thorized to deduct from the pro-
fits of its operations up to 50 -
per cent of the authorized cap- ."




Chatelet des Fleurs


FOR VACATION PLANTINGS IN: KENSCOFF

HAS SThAWBERIRY PLANTS: States nioa erity.$100' per 100

SCalifornia Bkack flig trees. $1.00 eae-
$I., O& 4

.Call Lillies 50 cents each'; Nile Lillies $1.00 e -,

Geranuimns, Trumipet Olimbers; Otripr ,

'MtNIMIM ODER ,.0 '
4 -
For lower attitude tropical iilants. ,

Inquire, at GHA'LJET. DES F]LEUIS, .
d ..

or Cdsier .Postal 6 Por au. Prince ;;.
'$. L -* -. , , ', . '. s' "--.""t' ;
xv'' *- ^ ^i*^,.'; .fA sr'^


i H


i


MIL, p


itublic of 'alti, traif fnitte'd b'
the Ministers .do finaxace and of
Coinmmerce and "Industry. His
mandate 'may be renewed 'Accbr-.
ding to the established proced-'
'ure. He may', be reiqved only
for malfeasah6e or rave, fault,..
according to -law.,
'Article 10.-The following may
not be'.Director, teneal. of the-.
Institute:
1.) Members of-the :--eat Pow-
, ers of the,.State;
2.) Directors oMr managers of-.
private or : public ..anlnkig ,
institutions; '- .. ... ..
3.) Administrators q.- commer-
Scial companies, or.of agri-
(Co.ntinued n page") '
_, -, .- .


'. '






Sunday .September 3rd, 1901


PAGtr S


"HAITI 'SUN"


HAITI SUN
STHE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
Edltor-Publisher BERNARD DIEDERICH
Gerant-Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1950


WHAT ARE WE DOING ABOUT IT?

A recent visit to Haiti by agents who deal with group
tourists disclosed that not long ago a meeting of cruise
-hip lines took place at which Port au Prince as a port-
if-call was listed among the trouble spots in the Car-
bbean, and various lines agreed that something must
e done to eliminate here the teen-aged, self-styled
uides who pester the tourists to such an extent they
return to their ships in disgust.. as well as the appall-
ig begging.

Some of the cruise lines already havi reduced the
Lumber of calls at Port au Prince for these reasons
,or the coming season, and if conditions do not chang-
(], as has been promised by the Tourist Department
f Haiti, this .city will be completely eliminated from
lie itineraries of the cruise lines next year.

A.recent survey made by a Petionville hotel also in-
licptes from their questionnaire given to each guest
lie day before departure, showed frequent complaints
if these same conditions with guests stating that those
iere the only things which would prevent them from
making another visit to Haiti.


What' are we doing about it?
The Minister of Tourism, in a recent article, and at
meeting held by him with various tourists interest,
promise was made to rectify these conditions, but
he same conditions have worsened since.

Let's not kill the goose that lays the golden eggs.
tourism can still be the economic saviour of this proud
onntry.



YOUR HOME AWAY FROM HOME :



La Clairiere

BUNGALOW WS

FRANCK ED. ROY, -Manager

In the delightful "SOUSBOIS" of Bizoton
The comfort and privacy of your own cottage >.
with the best type of Hotel service.
BAR, RESTAURANT, SWIMMING POOLS,
COLORFUL GARDENS
ATTRACTIVE RATES


SE11









IRE CAR PERSONAL. TRAVEL GooSe



B-a
mSU' ^i^ a e^O^TiB~ r~fy~


59 Ballarat Street,
Ellerslie, Auckland, S.E.6.
NEW ZEAAND.
June 1st, 1961.
The Editor,
HAITI SUN,
Port au Prince, Haiti.
Dear Sir:
Could you please forward my
letter to anybody -interested in
corresponding with me in New
Zealand. As a member of the
Red Cross, and also a mother
of a family, I feel that one
should be well informed in world
affairs and able to understand
the people and their customs in
other countries. And by having
a penfriend, one can visualise
the happenings and events in the
world today with a better un-
derstanding and enlig h t e n e d
mind.
Thanking you so much for any
trouble involved,
Yours sincerely,
Jom Price (Mrs).

93 Glendora Avenue
\Vilowdale. a


Ontario, Canada.
August 1961.
Dear Sir:
I have been tempted to write
you after looking over some pho-
tographs taken on a recent trip
around Central America and the
Caribbean, including Port au
Prince, where we spent some
three days, and at the same
time recalling an editorial in
your newspaper commenting up-
on the scarcity of tourists in
Haiti cnd urging some action be
taken to remedy the situation;
so now a few observations -
"straight from the tourists
mouth".

First impressions are import-
ant and that was pleasant enough
-a cup of coffee offered gra-
tis- but why before one gets
through immigration and all the
other procedures, when one is
-for no good reason- in a hur-
ry. Other similar gestures were
experienced in El Salvador, Bo-
gota .and Montego Bay, but in
these cases -it was served either
to all and Sundry at the airport,
in a lounge, very comfortably
seated whilst awaiting imigra-
tion or in the customs room, in
all cases one had the time to
enjoy it. The next impression
was decidedly poor, that of be-
ing asked in a somewhat brus-
que manner .,for $2.00 each.
"Landing fee'", the only place
where this little piece of ancient
robbery was encountered in vi-
siting nine countries, it's not
that a tourist misses $2.00 it is
merely the niggling, pettiness of
. it, and in a country which is
endeavouring to encourage the
tourist, it is stupidity.
The next irritation was being
charged one dollar each for four
persons travelling in one taxi for
a drive of less than three miles
to the Beau Rivage Hotel, this
was again the most expensive
taxi from airport to hotel on the
entire trip and some drives were


over 15 miles. Sightseeing by
taxi at $5.00 an hour outside the
city was also too much, the aver-
age is between two and three,
and why it is more outside Port
au Prince, than in, completely
baffles me, gas presumably
costs much the same. The hotel
we found excellent, although
somewhat empty, and the kind-
ness of the owner-manager to
one'of my companions who was
taken ill there was much appre-
ciated. The sightseeing mention-
ed above was reasonable, con-
sisting as it did of being led
from one tourist trap to another,
however we were sufficientl.t
well versed in these matters by
this time as to be able to sa.\


no -and mean it. The Free Port
Shops were only fair, duty
free is one thing but "fancy-
profit-percentage-free" is quite
another, and the traveller visit-
ing Jamaica or Curacao -where
competition is stiffer, finds few
bargains here, however this as-
pect of tourist attraction is a
little exaggerated one doesn't
spend several thousand dollars
on a holiday then start look-
ing for chances to save $50 in a
camera.
As a city I found Port au Prin-
ce interesting, but singularly
lacking in places or buildings of
real interest, it is clean, and
can be seen quite easily on foot
(Continued on page 16)


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Sunday September 3rd,, 1961


New Law Creating Institute Of Agricultural
And Industrial Development

(Continued from page 4) qualifications required. Internal
cultural and industrial co- regulations shall fix grounds for


operatives;
4.1 Bankrupts or debtors of
bad faith;
5 ) Those who have been con-
dcmnrd to corporal or de-
grading punishments.
Article 11.-The atti ibutions of
the Dirctor Gcnietil of the Ins-
titute are as f[olo-.vs:
lo-c bears sole responsibility
for the npeilatir.ns of the admin-
is'traliuo of the Institute;
He siup-r'vis inmplc-mentation
of the Inslmiulr's programs of
credit ~rInd inic-stment granted
I.y ihe Finmc-it Committie.
Ht.- pr':sid,.s ovcr the work of
the Finncim l Committee;c
He_ hears sole responsibility,
for tlih- h Iinc of per,'onncl of the'
Institute. un the bass of the


discharging employees;
He gives his opinion on all di-
rectives concerning the distribu-
tion of credit and on all internal
operations of the Institute;
He coordinates the activities
of the various divisions and sec-
tions of the Institute;
He proposes the internal regu-
lations of the Institute;
lie submits annual reports to
a Board of Directors of the Na-
tional Bank of the Republic of
Haiti and, when so charged by
the latter, informs the Govern-
ment and interested institutions.
Article 12.-The Institute is
composed of:
A Directorate General.
A Financial Comnuttee and 3
Divisions- Division of Operat-


WITH A







BESSAMAT.IC



,o, C A M E R a s AT fii:.i: fi'l iff Ii'.





1461 ofyfiffd4SA


Phone-. 2310
AIR-CONDiTIONEC


PAGE 6
t- _ -


CHAPTER
mittee


V: Financial Com-


Article 14.-The Fin a n c i a I
Committee includes, in addition
to the Director General, a re-
presentative of the Economic
Planning Board and a represen-
tative of the Board of Directors
of the National Bank of the Re-
pubhc of Haiti.

Article 15.-The Ministries of
Agiicutlture, Natural Resources,
and Rural Development, of Fi-
nance, and of Commerce and
Industry shall be represented on
the Financial Committee for
questions arising under their
respect,-e, jurisdictions, either
directly b, their Ministers or by
delegates.
Their mission is to assist and
to participate in the delibera-
tions of the Financial Commit-
tee, without te right to vote.
Article 16. The Financial
Committee has the following
principal attributions:
a) To receive from the Direc-
tor General its elements of work
of information;
b) To authorize studies and to
prepare plans and credit pt-
lects which have been present-
ed, or direct investment pro-
jects;

c) To decide upon utilization
of the Institute's resources, in
terms of loans to be granted or
investments to be made;
di To approve or reject re-
quests for credit or investments.
This Committee shall have tle
option to delegate its powers
with regard to grant of loans to
one or more agencies of its
choice.
In the Financial Committee
votes are decided by majority
of the members, but the favor-
able vote of the Director Gene-
ral is necessary for the decision
to be valid.


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lons, Division of Development,
and the Technical and Supervi-
sory Division. I

The attributions and operating
methods of the three large divi-
sions mentioned above shall be
determined by internal regula-
tions rendered effective by de-
cree of the President of the Re-
public.
Article 13.-In its relationships
with private persons, physical or
legal, the Institute shall be re-
presented by its Director Cgene-
ral, whose legal acts shall be
valid.


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A'


CHAPTER VI: Obligations.-
Article 17.-The Institute is au-
thorized to issue obligations gua-
ranteed by the State. These obli-
gations shall bear interest at 4
per cent per year, payable an-
nually.

The conditions of issuance of
these obligations, and the man-
ner of their amortization, shall
be fixed by the Insfitute with
the Board .of Directors of the
National Bank of the Republic of
Haiti.

Interest produced by these
obligations shall be exonerated
from any tax whatsoever, pre-
sent and future, in particular
from income tax.

Article 18.-Exporters of cof-
fee are required to place in non-
negotiable obligations of the Ins-
titute bearing an interest rate of
1 per cent per year and maturing
in 5 years, an amount of 5 gour-
des (G. 5.00' per each 60-kilo-


FOR SALE

Refrigerator, two bedroom sets
and miscellaneous furniture.
Apply 12, Impasse Lavaud,
Bois Verna.


gram bag exported."' under pen-
alty of refusal of the authoriza-
tion provided in Article 14 of
the Law of December 6, 1946
creating the National Coffee Of-
fice, and in Article 2 of the De-
cree of November 12, 1958.
.In conforming to the provi-
sions of the present article, cof-
fee exporters shall be acquitted
of the obligation imposed upon
them by-Article -24 of the Law
of December 6, 1946.

Likewise, exporters of sisal
shall be required to place in
non-negotiable obligations, bear-
ing interest at 1 per cent per
year and maturing in 5 years,
, amounts at the rate of G. 0.10
per pound of sisal exported, un-
der penalty of revocation of their
license by the authority"of the
Ministers of Commerce -and In-
dustry, of Agriculture; and of
Finance. This amount may be
modified by decree of the Presi-
dent of the Republic according
to the course of international
markets.
In addition, the deposit of
75,000 gourdes (G. 75,000) provi-
ded by the Law of July 13, 1956
on the .operations of insurance
companies shall be for the cre-
dit of the Institute. >
(Continued on page 11)


RUE BONr.E IFOI

M.,o .'- S.KiIHAN[


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"HAITI S1VUN"












:Why, H.


SThird and last of series by
Prof. Sidney Mlntz '
-Since transportation and com-
^.:.munication facilities in Haiti are
* largely undeveloped, the move-
i ment of goods and traders
.around the countryside occurs in
.the face of serious difficulties
5 and relatively high costs. Fur-
thermore, since peasants in gen-
eral produce only small quanti-
ties of diversified goods, it is
rarely to the peasants' advanta-
ge to undertake long trips in
search of buyers. Peasant pro-


2iti Has Market


Places


sewing supplies, and spices; i
is the market women who sell
these things as a regular occu-


ducers will go to speculateurs at nation. Of course the wives bof
the nearest market center to sell many poor peasants may occa-


their export products -sisal,
beeswax, goatskins, cocoa, cof-
fee, etc.- and peasant wives
may carry in something to sell
locally at the same time. But
most of thd selling of local pro-
ducts in the local market system
is left to women who specialize
in trade. The same is true for
imports, such as kerosene, lard,


sionally undertake some minor
trading venture. Such women,
and many thousands of children
tinder 14 years of age, slip in
and out of trading' as opportun-
ity comes and goes. But the bulk
of trading is carried on by wo-
men who have licenses to trade,
who specialize in part i c u 1 a r
goods, who follow particular


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2-5WF


Women traders of tha coun-
tryside usually learn their skills
trom older women -mother, sis-
ter, tunt, or friend- and start
in trade as assistants. With time,.
and The acquisition of skill, they
will be launched in trade for
themselves, usually by a tiny
gift of capital from a family
member. Tnis money is clearly
understood to be capital, as.its
name, "maman I'argent," (mo-
ther money,) makes c-l e a r -
"money" is simply "'argent."
The initial stock may be a hand-
ful of mangoes, its cost no more
than U.S. five cents,. It is worth


they form in trade, -.and, yields
the highest reward for the ac-
cumulation of -specific trading
skills. The variety of such spe-
cializations is enormous, and.
well worth exploring, but it need.
not be done. Here. Among the
things such women do in order
to earn their -profit are; arbi-
trage (hyich' is simply carrying
a product from one market to -
another, to take advantage- of
an' existing price' differential); -
processing (as. when a woman
buys shelled corn, has it ground,
and resells it as cornmeal); 'bul-
king (as when -a woman buys


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routes, and who are known, by noting -at this point that ouri''.
particular names (marehandes, questions about. whether, trade at
revendeuses, grosses zouzounes, this 'level is "worth .it" have to
Mesdames Sarahs, commercan. be .put 'i a context where there'.
tes, ,etc.). These women are com- is. absolutely po other econdnic
plemented by a proportionately activity as an alternative. Such'
much smaller .number of male trade is "worth it" to the child
traders, who may be craftsmen trader because -there is always
who sell their own artifacts (san- a-chance she will sell some mah-'
dal makers, hat makers, tink- goes, or end -up knowing more
ers, carpenters, ironworkers), about trading than she knew'-he-
butchers, large-scale dealersjn fore. It is not. as if she could
cloth, clothing, shoes, or hard- choose as an alternative to at-
ware who 'attend the markets, tend dancing school, take French'
and porters, packers, truck driv- .lessons or; for that matter, gaze
ers and their assistants. Most vacantly at a television progr-
rural Haitians, believe that wo- am. If a youig trader is success-
men are inherently better at ful in her operations, she will
trade than men. It is interesting seek to enlarge them, one way
that Haitian men in the coun- or another. It is possible to get
tryside say they believe thi, .as life histories of market women
well as the women. Women also who started with'ten cents' worth
express their liking for trade, as of brown sugar and today deal
men express their preference for in hundreds of dollars' worth of
agriculture. Hence there is a fair- merchandise each week. Most
ly clear division in the peasant women seek to specialize in par-
household between male activi- ticular products, to travel parti-
ties and female activities, the cular routes, and to fill a parti-
sexual division of labor corres- cular spot in-the trade network.
ponds to the division between This gives them a certain secur-
production and distribution, so to ity, increases the economic va-
spea I n luef thf nprsnnnal nasnsiaihnn


I '








he same itSm from a m-number
if different .Lllers and' adcetm-
ilates-. a large4 manipulable
itock); breaking: bulk '(as when
woman holds -a darge stock .of
'e item, and sells it off. in
all quantities appropriate to
e .needs of. many small-scale,
Iw-income consumers);- storage
whichh .is often associated with
king, but has other economic
values attached to it); repack-
gng; and so on. It should also
e fientioned thaf".these -women
field other rewards to the eco-
imy, because they pay 'propor-,
onately heavy taxes, pay char-
s for storage and for freight
d porterage, unite producers
d consumers, bringing distant
untrysides into contact with
e towns and'cities, and carry
,ws and information every-
here.
Now, the major criticism lev-
ed against a market system
ch as Haiti's is tht, it is
steful; and this needs some
ught. It is supposedly a waste-
system because -so many in-
iduals are involved in it. It
also considered -wasteful be-
use there 'are such meager
ans of_storage, grading, pre-
n-ation and shipment, such
i produce can easily deterior-
rot, become damaged, and
e value. Finally, it is often
led wasteful because it is ar-
ed that the charges whicH tra-
s level upon consumers, and
price -they pay producers,
prejudicial, and allow the
ders to make disproportionate
tits. While. we. cannot. exam-
these criticisms in great de-
1, something ought to be said
them, at least 'to- clear the-
a- little.
et us ]opk first at the asser-
that t.oo imay people are
olved in .the trading system.
s is, lt begin -with, an asser-
that ought to be'-made only
en the total '-.-esources of a
lety'are known --and not'on-
the total-resbares' (in terms
capital, labor, ana, etc.) but
o the relative plentifulness or:
city of such.Tresources in re-
on to each' other. Even a su-
cial glkne.e at "-the Haitian
nomy indicates. hat labor is
nitul, while capitf9 is scarce.
one of the remarkable facts
ut an economic -system is the
ee to which:.-.one resource
ch as labor) -aS 'be -substi-
d for another .(such as' capi-,
* -. ,. -_


40 0 00* CCo.o os a e**


tal). In the 'United States, we
avery often.substitute in tfie other
direction. ,For instance, certain
forms of imechanization repre-
sent the investment of capital'
and accordingly,- -the reduction
:of labor in some enterprise.-Pro-:
ducers will make such -a substi-
tution :when They think it reason-
able that the shift will end /up in
a profit, sooner or later. From
the ,point of view of the entire
economy, though, it is important
whether the labor thus displaced
can maintain its- productivity in
some other task. In Haiti, the
relative scarcity of -capital, has
long meant that labor has been
used for capital-saving, that is,
in place of capital. 'Even the
simple case of a market-woman
who walks many miles to mark-
et, rather than taking motor
transport, serves to make the
point. She is, so to speak, sub-
stituting the soles of her feet
for capital; her capital consists
largely in her own labor. In
some -economies, this sort of
practice could be economically
very inapp ropriat e; but in
others, it may make very good
economic sense. In Haiti, the
question is not really whether
this is wasteful of resources, but
rather, what would this woman
do with her labor if she were
not engaged in ambulatory tra-
de? When this is Asked,'a great
deal -of righteous indignation is
shown- up for'what it is: econo-
mic nonsense. To think that the
employment of very large quan-
tities of labor in an economy is
inefficient, without first asking
what- are the relative supplies
of different factors of production,
is like saying- -a meal is "too
big" 'or "too small" without
knowing" whether the- diner is
starved, normally hungry, or al-
ready sated.
Yet it is true that a market
economy such-as Haiti's is was-
teful in its waste of produce. It
would indeed be much better
weie it.-possible to preserve and"
maintain stocks in good condi-
tion. Here again, though the cri-
ticism should hinge on what this'
economy is like, not-, on what the
Ameiican or- rench or some
other .economy is like. Improve-
ment of storage often involves
the expenditure 'of- capital; such
expenditure- is justified when it
eventuates in savings to produ-
cers ani consumers, and is with-
in their means, or within the


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means -of the society. But the diversified crops means that no
price of:such economies "may be single- peasant is in a good posi-
,beyoihd the means of the society, tion toi sell his yield in bulk.
and for many -storage media, Instead, as we have seen, he
this.is :true of .Haiti. But in any sells', his products -which usual-
case,. the problem of economy ly come in a small, irregular
by storing is nbt the responsibi- trickle, not easily stored- to
lity of .the market woriien ,since,
under the, present system, it is
they who bear the cost of waste, ;e* ;P, P P,4
once they have acquired perish- -
able produce. They do all that THlE
they can within their knowledge
and means to -avert losses, but 0
they cannot bear alone- capital BACOULOU
costs which they are unable to1
share with producer and consu- takes pleasure in. &


mer. -
Lastly, we must ask whether
in fact the profits of the traders
are disproportionately high. How
much 'profit is "fair"? This
question is rather like that of a
"fair day's pay" for a "fair
day's work"; the answer to the
question is: "it depends." The
fact that most agricultural pro-
ducers in Haiti have tiny hold-
ings on which they grow highly


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women who. are intermediaries.','
At 'the other end of the distriba- ';
tion system are the consumers,
who are mostly low-income peo-
ple with little in the way of star- -.
age media; they tend 'to buy' ";
(Continued on page 10)






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I Why Haiti..

(Continued from page 9) hands, or one sold. directly by
their consumer needs as the the producer to the consumer.
'peasant produces them- in Strange to say, this "common-
small, diversified lots. By and sense" view is not necessarily
large, the consumer cannot go correct. A product handled by
directly to the producer to get many hands may in fact end up
what he needs. By and large, costing the consumer less than
the producer cannot economical- one handled by only a few. Price,
ly carry to the consumer what remember, is determined by the
he produces. The intermediaries, relation between supply and de-
then, are in the distribution sys- mand, and the supply-demand
tern because they are needed picture depends on the ability
there; it is obvious enough that of crowds of buyers and sellers
no one is going to pay a middle- to negotiate trade. It is the very
man if it is possible to buy and presence of large numbers of
sell more economically without traders, competing for the pro-
one. So to begin with, it is a ducts of the peasantry on the
little hard to argue that the Hai- one hand, and for the custom
tian intermediaries are "super- of the consumers on the other,
fluous"; if they were, they would which keeps the price of produce
not be able to stay in business. down. It is when trading activity
The next thing to notice is of gets concentrated in-few or sin-
course the very large numbers gle hands that price can be af-
of middlemen who take part in fected to disadvantage the pro-
Haitian trade. This characterist- ducer and the consumer. The
ic of distribution probably is re- key words "monopoly and oligo-
lated to the fact that both pro- poly," "monopsony and oligop-
duction and consumption are sony", are the basis for any "un-
carried on in very small-scale fair" profits which may be
terms, and are very diversified made. That so many small-scale
in character; in order to handle intermediaries are constantly in
distribution, many hands are competition in the Haitian market
needed. But why do women pick system means protection for con-
this line of work rather than sumers and for producers not
some other? One might suppose disadvantage. To prove this with
because trading is more profit- figures for all times and places
able than other activities and is very difficult to do in Haiti.
this is probably correct; but we But it is possible to collect de-
need add to this that in fact, tailed budgets of market women
hardly any other activity is even for fairly long periods of time;
a feasible alternative to trade, and these have consistently re-
That is, there are many women vealed a modest rate of profit,
in trade because there is almost with occasional proportionately
literally nothing else they can large returns and occasional los-
do to earn any income what ses. Just as producers and con-
the economists call "zero oppor- sumers would unite in trade
tunity costs." without intermediaries were this
One could suppose that an art- possible, so, too, would large-
icle handled by many hands will scale grocers and truckers move
automatically cost the consumer into Haitian trade en masse if
more than one handled by few larger profits were to be made.


JOSEPH NAUAL & CO. DISTRIBUTORS


CONSULT

sacha thebaud

architect U. of M.

for

decoration

construction

at castelhaiti

T p.m. 3 p.m.


The hard fact is that the market
women sell their services very
cheaply indeed, and what allows
them to dominate middleman ac-
tivity is this fact and no other.
We have tried here to spell
out some of the fundamentals
of the Haitian 'market system.
We have tried also to show why
it is useful and efficient as it is.
This does not mean either that
it should not or cannot change,
or, that it would be an equally
efficient system somewhere else.
What we hope is clear is that
there is a rationale for the.sys-
tem it has goqd reason for
being. To argue simply that it
is outmoded, primitive, dirty,
etc., is to stop questioning when
the questioning ought to begin.
It is furthermore to confuse eco-
nomic efficiency with technical
efficiency -one of the biggest
mistakes of our time. Many sen-
sible small-scale reforms might
be made in Haitian marketing-


JOSEPH NADAL &
Agents.


M. V. HAITI MERCHANT
PERSONALLY SUPERVISED
LOADING AND UNLOADING
SERVE HAITI AND FLORIDA
forthnightly sailings of the

Miami- Port au Prince -Miami
MIAMI ADDRESS:

Telephone: Highland 517687
Franklin 9-7228


PETIONVILLE

HOUSE FOR RENT ABOVE

A beautiful house 3 minutes
from Petionville on the main-
road for rent. 3 bedrooms, 9
bathrooms, a large livingroom,
etc. Excellent water supply.

For details see: J.B. at Po-
lice Headquarters.


FOCUSING, COMPOSING
EXPOSURE SETTING IN1
COMMON VIEWER-

REFLEX CAMERA WITH
S NIKKOK 50mm F:,.5 LEN
s 35mm. SINGLEC-LENS-



\Nikkor


New,

THE H(


once it is reaJly understood how superi6r.- knowledge .or iqtellUkf-
the system works now. 'And bet- .de is revealing jUst he. opposite,
ter roads, storage facilities, in fact: Any mechanic knows hd
agricultural extension service, .must. understand- how 'a 'motor ,
and fharketing intelligence could works before he sets out to re-:.,
ilso improve the system beyond pair it. How refreshing it-would
their' capital costs to the society. be if planners and techlicians,
But anyone who must start with had as modest and sensible, a.
the beforehand assumption of view! .. .-















,(LI3ERTYFABRR
lag. .D
me FAtP.t


WASH IT! SCRUBT! You cant mar its Matchless Beauty!


JOSEPH NADAL. AGENTS



-Nikon .
-QUALITY'
OFFERED
SIN
MEDIUM PRICE-
ex 'CAMERA!



At: LITTLE EUROPE."

OME OF EXQUISITE GIFTS ..


:2'
a's
.4K hx.satfl


k.






'Sunday September 3id, 1961


(Continued from page 6)
Article 19.-The Board of Di-
rectoirs 6f the National Bank of
the Republic of Haiti is author-
ized to place in obligations of the
Institute, for the account of. the
State, one-third of the dividends
of the National Bank of the Re-
public of Haiti.
Article 20.-The minister of
Finance is authorized to place
in obligations of the Institute any
funds in trusteeship.
Article 21.-The Institute is au-
ihorized to benefit by foreign
loans, through the intermediary
of the National Bank of the Re-
public of Haiti. It may issue
bonds for this purpose.
CHAPTER VII: Credits.-
Article 22.-Credit operations
shall be made through the Na-
tional Bank of the Republic of
Haiti and through its branches
in the interior of the country,
through cooperatives legally con-
stituted, recognized and register-
ed, as well as through popular
savings funds.





MAISO0
(Next to St.
'BLVD. JN-JACQUIS'
Port au Pri

GRAND OPEN
MAITRESS BOXSPRING




20" APT. SIZE ESSO-GAS



UPHOLSTERED LOUNGE


Article 23.-Loans granted by
the Institute for the realization
of projects, including revolving
funds, must .be sufficient after
taking into account other resour-
ces and financial contributions
by the borrower.

Article 24.-Amortization terms
shall be determined on the ba-
* e . .. -- -. -_ ... -. l. H -


Article 27.-Whenever, in the
case of a project presenting real
economic interest, the entrepre-
neur does not dispose of the 'ba-
lance necessary for its financing,
the Institute is authorized to in-
vest in capital stock of the en-
terprise, up to 51 per cent of
the shares, provided that the
sum of the loan and of the in-
vestment may not exceed 300,000
gourdes (G. 300,0001. -


New Law Creating Institute Of Agricultural
And Industrial Development


sis o forecasts o lutuire ptr.us Article 28.-The Institute ma I terprise. It may subject the
of the enterprise to be founded. invest directly the entire grant of credits to effective con-
Article 25.-Loans granted amounts of funds necessary to trol, or to participation in the
the Institute shall not exceed realize any project which is jud- management of the enterprise
200,000 gourdes (G. 200,000). Ne- ged to be of particular import- for purposes ot safeguarding the
vertheless, in cases of projects ance or urgency for the econo- interests of the Institute.
of great importance for the eco- e progress of the country. In Article 32.-The terms of amor-
notry, the Institute, by way of eux- such a case, the project must tizition shall be determined and
try, the Insreceive for its execution, the set forili in coinracts to be con-
ception and by unanimous vote unanimous vote of the Financial eluded between the Instilte and
of the Financial Committee, may Committee. For this purpose, its clients
grant loans in excess of this li- the Institute may form a com-
mit. mercial company. The capital of Article 33.-All legal steps tak-
Article 6.-The amount the any company forrhed in tlu *n b:, the Institute against its
Article 26.-The amount of the manneromaynotexceed 0 t.e debtaoi shall ie dra%. up for
loan granted for realization of manner may not exceed 2.0 r and judeeti l. the Civil Court.
loan granted for realization cent of the cost of the enterprise. and judged by the Civil Cowl.
a project may not exceed 70 per and the rest of the nds sha sitting iii its competent attrnbu-
cent of its cost as dehfned in tions, d.eiti all other matters set
Article 23. as a loan. aside and v.ithout delay or wait-
%As soon as the abilityy of an Ing tUn. Delay for appearance
enterprise has been demonstrat- shall be 3 orkinc days, other
ed, it shall be ceded to any buy.
er -private person, cooperative,
or company- capable of cair:,
T D 0 ^oIng it on or assurijig its ecuiio- J
Smc operation. The sale sha he
accomplished by bidding, to the
Marc Bakery) highest and last bidder, taking
DESSALINES No. 394 into account the cost of the in.
since, HAITI vestment. depreciation, profits A
reinvested since foundation, a.id
ING SPECIALS any intangible increase in the
wealth bf the enterprise. Thls
& 6 LEGS price shall be established by ex-
perts, according to the internal .
Complete set $99.50 regulations of the Institute. :: t

Article 29.-The interest rate R'"TR/
of any loan shall be established J.DUlT
STOVE $99.50 by the financial committee in O. ODU T
order to assure regular opera- '
tion of the Institute and to con-. A .DiN
stitute reserves. o
CHAIRS $19.95 Article 30.-Loans to adminis-


than that for distance, commu-
nication of documents shall be
made at the bar and the defend-
ant must produce all his means


trators and to members of Ins-
titute personnel are formally
prohibited. This prohibition also
extends to their close relatives
(spouse, father, mother, child-
ren) and to enterprises in which
they have an interest, except in
case of tulanimous vote of the
Financial Committee.
Article 31.-The Institute may
pay out by increments loans
which it has approved, propor-
tionately to thie needs of the en-


Do You want The Best In Nutrition For Your Baby
And The Family?
YOUR BEST BET IS:

S"5 MOLINOS"
.- DUTCH POWDERED WHOLE MILK
WITH ADDED

VITAMIN D3

S You Can't Beat It!!
SNOW ON SALE AT:
.. BOULANGERIE DE LA POSTE.
S''BICHARA ZMIERY,
MARCOS TALAMAS & CO.,
m BOULANGERIE ST. MARC,
-"'- -" ALPHONSE MARRA,
Boulevard Jean-Jacques Dessalines
"" PICERIE REX, Lalue
'EINTRA g ii PDD..i* GEORGES COLES,. Lalue
HENRI RIGAUD, Petonville.


AGENTS AND DISTRIBUTORS: .

'Hispano-America Trading Co. Of Haiti.S. A

w^ **s^^'y~y**"*^'^/'wsa"^!^^ ^, ^'N ssy~y?" ss~yy^- y~~yv

*- *, .'. "*..,. *S, ..: U .i


of defense at the same session.
decisionss must be rendered with-
n three days; they shall be pro-,
isionally executory.. not w i t h-
tanding appeal to a higher
court .

'HAPTEt VIII: Guaranties.-
Article 34.--With regard to
agricultural loans to private per-
sons, collateral extends to the
rightss of the occupant to his land
and to usufruct, and also to all
either goods incorporated on the
and or to property of the enter-
prise such as cattle, machines.
transportation, etc.
The loan may be granted up
to 90 per cent of the amount of
this collateral.
Article 35.-In the case of leg-
ally constituted cooperatives, the
provisions of the Chapter "Grant
of Credits" governing comrfier-
cial compaunes shall be applic-
able.
Article 36.-In industrial bases,
the guaranty shall apply to the
(Continued on page 13)


"HAITI S'UN"


OAGE j


O N I ONS

FROM




OGD VA.



Onions of first quality are available at the
sales counter of ODVA at the corner of Rue
des Cesare and Rue du Centre, atthe following
prices:



10lbs.-Bags 15 Gourdes
50lbs.-Bags 15 Gourdes
Wholesale orders will be filled on the basis
of Gourdes: 2.75 per 10lbs. bags (Minimum
10 bags) and Gourdes: 14 per 50lbs. (Minim-
um 10 bags.)


1 W-MIT-1-1117


I






t HAITI SUN"


Sunday September 3rd, 1981


O f e Te dio POPULATION MAN
7 te. Tdio (Conlinued from page 1)


',-rhi dog track seem- to be about firushed. They've dubbed
it Caribe Dog Racing Park. General Admission, weekdays 25c.
Saturday and Sunday 30c: Club House, 60 and 75c. "'I walchel
a young girl wearing a pink dress with rhinestones across the
chest walk right into a hole, she was so busy admiring the sparkle
of the stones in the sunlight. *""Walk In My Shoes" is the name
of the Bell & Howell documentary series of pix which will opeg
the season mid-September over the ABC Network. It depicts the
role of the Negro in American litf and some of the scenes were
shot surreptitiously. in Harlem. "'Try that recipe on the box of
Jello Butteiscotch Pudding, using half strong Haitian coffee and
half water. Yumm' *'"IA-on Nois.v's sign caught m.3 eye while I
was waiting in Raoul Kenol's doorway the other da\. Noisy offers
photocopies in 2 minutes for 50c each. That make 25c a minute
or S15.i0 an hour, when he's busy. Nice work if 3ou can get it!
'Mr henols has two large black & white photos in his office
mounted on polished wood 'quares (no framing), and the effect
is terniic -The recent article b3 Atherton Lee left out the fact
Ihat lie w,is i'raduated magna ciim laude from the University of
California, a vinr important fact to him. *'To add to the camion
& cameone:tt, name collection- A big camion saying Official Ser-
\ice Pot.al, Li' Vie Drole, Jaemniel. Only there ''- "Quotable quote
by Rtusalind Rus,-il (Frederick Brsson's ife: "If a woman has
\iacrilt and wit, she has intelligence and glamour". -' Ed. Sulliv-
an is complaining about the lack of "something new'" for his TV
show on hi.. 8-country tour for talent Don't know what countries
h1 hit. biii if he wants som.-thing new he should tap the Bacoulou
"T'1-L9p1 iHl claims perforni'-rs all o er the world keep copying
Americiin tali--nt. %\ell. they don't. "-Gerard Allen is paying a
buLsine.ss-pir asure to Ciudad Trujillo. *- A couple of the bie letters
iCre already missing from the Pan American sign on the front
snub-nose of that building How rome? -Sgt. Dan Savoy of the o
Marincs, ha. a jazz classics collection adding up to more than I
430 LP s Some radio station here should grah him. He's a disk
jockey ul repulte in California and points South. He's a linguist
too, and can deliver in Creole, French or English. "'John Daniel
Frederick Dehrosse was baptized last Sunday. Th3t monicker is a
being cut down to Freddie. but fast! '--The N. 1. Times recently t
reported that Grace & Co. was planning to sell their shipping in- s
terF.sts. Telediol now says that the sale has been consummated
and probably the agency is up in the air again. 'Jules Tomar, F
Manager of Pan American Modes, Inc., manufacturers of the last
aorld in shoes, is up in New Jersey. to return shortly with his
family. Mr G rant has been left in charge. *' Dr. Paul
MoIse of the Pubbc Hygiene Service leaves soon for a few days
in hot and humid New York City Rather he than I. '"Saw Daniel
Theard dressed to the teeth early Monday morning. He explained
he had a visitor in town. Isn't that visitor blonde? Lucky gal.
-'Georges Heraux is on his way to Europe to visit the children.
Incidentally. everyone is raving about the delicious food at the
Tuesday barbecue at the Sans Souci, and that's where the Marine
Corps eats, and where they eat, its gotta be good. They're nearly
all amateur chefs themselves! "'An.body interested in a 57 Re-
nault Fregate with new tires & battery? See Ernst Friderichs.
Hue du Qu:ii over the Haitian Chaft Shop. '"Andy Khawly and
Andy Sassine have a new snack combo: pate chaud, chocolate
bars and beei! Chocolate supplied by Daniel Roy. Ugh. shug!
'"The guy who drives (?i motorcycle No. 218 is a real "splatter-
brain boy". His cutting in and out of traffic on dare-devil chances
endangers car drivers more than it does himself. He must have
gotten his license from a correspondence school. "'Hotel Chou-
coune has a request from "St. Leonards near Ringwood, Hants,
England. for a few coasters telling the stor3 of the 'Lovely Creole
Maid' for "The Haunch of Venison" Inn, Salisbury, Wiltshire.
This from a man who had a cocktail or two at Choucoune while
visiting Haiti aboard the French ship "Antilles". Far reaching.
etc.? That's why every tourist should be treated with courtesy.
He's our potential salesman-sans expense account, sans salary '
sans tout except publicity.



K(AY MAJOR
i ,',t : S .i ,' L .w *.*... ..* i. .' i.:* j. '*'. ..;, ,,: ,'*,s'i;:.. .... ..... ,....


other authorities of the Govern
ment, the Church and internal
tional agencies represented it
Haiti. He believes that popula-
tion studies are important for
the enlightenment of Govern.
ment policy in matters of rural
economy, social welfare, public
health, education, employment
and other matters The- condi-
tions for such study appear fav-
ourable and it is hoped that a
demographic expert will soon be
found to assist the Government
in this task. Meanwhile two Ha,-
tian Government officials. Mr
St. Surin and Mr Mellon are re-
ceiving technical training at the
Demographic Centre in Santia-
go, Chile.

Haiti is the most densely poptu
latpd American republic; most
of the population is rural and
widely dispersed. Only one mo-
dern population census has been
taken so far, but it is hoped
that another census, now being
prepared for 1962. will furnish
vitally needed up-to-date infor-
mation. The rate of population
growth is not yet well known.
the civil statistics of births and
deaths being incomplete, but
this rate might be better deter-
mined b3 analytic study and
surveys, including perhaps an
examination of Church records
on baptisms and burials. As has
been the experience of other
countries. a sharp acceleration
of population growth can be ex-
pected to result from the mala
ria eradication campaign to be
Executed in the course of the
coming three years. Various eco-
nomic and social action progr-
ammes will have to be adjusted
o the fact of population growth,
structuree and geographic distri-
bution whose proper stud y ,
therefore. can be of crucial im-.
portance.


3 Latin American Presidents Were To Visit
Washington In Closing Months of 1961


I


On Wednesday afternoon Aug-
Ast 30 Mr and Mrs Napoleon
Grunder and their two children
left Port au Prince for Fort de
France. Martinique where he
has been appointed secretary
treasurer of the French West
Indies Mission of Seventh-day
Adventists. This mission terri-
tory includes the islands of Gua-
deloupe and Martinique.


note of the spiritual, moral, and
professional worth of this young
missionary couple and did not
hesitate to invite them to con-
tinue their high ideals of love
and service on foreign soil.
Without a doubt the Grunder
family will represent with dign-
ity the Gospel which they pro-
fess and their dear country
among the sister islands of Gua-
deloupe and Martinique which


Both Mr and Mrs Grunder are are known for their hospitality.
graduates of the Adventist Semi-
nary at Diquini In 1953 Mr. DE YOUNG GIRL BACK
Grunder began as teacher and
accountant in the same school ON HONEYMOON
where he had received his train-
ing. Following this he served as Mr and Mrs Arthur Siegel of
cashier of the Haitian Mission. Las Vegas, Nevada, are here
From 1959-61 he was secretary on their honeymoon. Mrs Siegel
treasurer of, the North Haitian is the former Ellen DeYoung,
Mission with offices in Cap Hal- daughter of Maurice deYoung
tien. The executive committee wellknown in Haiti. The couple
of the Franco-Haitian Union took were married on August 27th.


GRACE LINE


- FARE FOR -HAITI'
One Clas.

4 NEW YORK PORT-AU-PRINCE (DEPARTURE
EVERY FRIDAY):

CARGO SHIPS (12 PASSENGERS) $135 -ALL YEAR

COMBO-SHIPS (52 PASSENGERS) FROM $155

SPORT AU PRINCE NEW YORK (DEPARTEVERY SUNDAY)

LUXURY SHIPS: SANTA ROSA SANTA PAULA -
-t
300 PASSENGERS FARE FROM $195.00 ,

IFOR INFORMATION



| Joseph Nadal & Co|

OR YOUR TRAVEL AGENT'



p . . . ': .
.....:. '.. --. ". ::, ;, :;"' ,: : ...,, ; .. ............ .... *,*;.,. L .*- -.<- f't;.*?-:..i .......^ A ,M ,;,'- ^ .:.:;, ..... ,^C a .: .,, ,,= -4); ..... .


PAC.E


Washington August 23 The Washington, meeting with Pres-
Presidents of three Latin Ame- ident Kennedy, Secretary of Sta-
rican Nations -Brazil, Peru te Dean Rusk and other high
and Ecuador- will visit the Government officials. The Pres-
United States in the closing idents may later visit other parts
months of 1961 at the invitation of the country.
of President Kennedy. Mr Kennedy's predec e s s o r,
President Manuel Prado of President Dwight D. Eisenhow-
Peru will be the first visitor. He er, welcomed eight Latin Ame-
is scheduled to arrive in WAsh- rican Presidents to Washington
ington September 19th. during his two terms (1953-61).
President Jose Maria Velasco President Eisenhower's guests
Ibarra of Ecuador will be Pre- included Alberto Lleras-Cainar-
sident Kennedy's guest for three go of Colombia, Arturo Frondizi
days beginning October 24th. of Argentina, the late Carlos
President Jamno de Silva Qua- Castillo Armas -of Guatemala,
dros of Brazil was to visit begin- Adolfo Lopez-Mateos of Mexico,
ning December 5th. Luis Battle Berres chairman of
All three of the Presidents will the National Council of Govern- -
be making formal State visits. ment of Uruguay, Paul Magloire
As is customary, the Latin-Ame- of Haiti, Juscelino Kubitschek of
rican Chie f Executives will Brazil and Jose Maria Lemus of -
spend the first three days in San Salvador.

HAITIAN ADVENTIST MISSIONARIES
GO TO FRENCH WEST INDIES









New" Law C reiatiri Institute Of Agricultural e
: I.An. -.. obl
-And .Industkial: Deqvelopmeht net

Contflnued' from page li) A 'trdcture 'of the enterprises 'ad-.
S ministered by the said' agency, .
enteri.isg 'to be founded and the .following' measures ,shall be Ag
shallIibe assir by a first mbrt- taken: i dit
gage.' '- : cia
Transitory Provisions i a.) The 'Haitian 'Institute of. Ba
Article 37:'-ftfective with' the Agricultural and Indus'rial Cre- the
present La*, the Institute of dit shall liquidate 'in its accounts Ja
Agricultural .and Inddstrial De- the accounts. of each of the en- ba
velopinnt 'is substituted for, the terprises which it is'adnminister- tra
Haitian Ihstitute of Agricultural ing. The, Haitian Institute of De
and Industrial" Credit and .for Agricultural "and Industrial Cre. of'
the Special-, Investment account. dit, shall pass to its profit-and- dee
In otder' to liquidate 'the ac-- loss account the difference bet7
counts of,the ].aitian Institute of .ween-.assets and liabilities of the' in
Agricultural 'ari Industrial Cre- administered" enterprises whose lo;
tilt and to. facilitate the separa- accounts are thus liquidated. tin
lion ahd stippot of the financial On the other hand, each of the sh


b You know .

t's a really fine
Scotch when it's





, e m b.. a' 4e.:i *. *' '

JOHNNIE WALKER
D ,3m' i knMA-N- arig EtroHng

MSTf0RIJTOR PREETZMAN-AGGERHOIILM


* .
..


's: .-b-W~ --g-* ;
.," ; ', " "*, ,'*

SMOVAD g ,
.... :. ,:- ( ^% ^ *, -


"-' '; AND "'LITTLE ,EUROPE' .- .. ,

N,. *F'SALrIAT MMSO6N'i qENTALE
.. . *{ '" ~; ; ^ ''* ,.* .:* .. '. *; "" .,.'.' '.'-. .^., ^ : '
":f'~ q .t ." .' .. ,'. ',.,. ,; . , :' :. .; ',..': :,. ,... ,.e ..'/'e '


Cc
'Na
of
I4


terprises shall' assume ainy
igation contracted for its be-
fit by the Institute with third
ties. -, .,:' j . .
'.
b.) The .Haitian' Institute... o,
rculturial and Indastrial -Cre-
shall .transfer to the Commer-
. Department 'of, the National
ik .of h.e Republic of Haiti
e balance of .loans.due as of
nuary' 31, 1961; as well as 'the
lances of all -olher loans whose
ansfer to the said Commercial
-partment of-the National Bank
the Republic of Haiti may be
emed desirable.'
Interest due but not received,
connection With transferred
ans, as well as-any asset .and
abilities related to these loans,
all also be-transferred to the
nimercial Department of the
national Bank of -the Republic
Haiti.
c.) The 'Commercial Depart-


CACIOUE ISLAND
"IBO BEACH"
ONLY 30 MINUTES
FROM PORT-AU-PRINCE
ENTRY (INCLUDING
ROUND-TRIP
BOAT
. TRANSPORTATION)

Children 50 Iteants
Private Dressing Booms
White Sand Beach
Fine Restaurant and Snack Bar
WATER SKIING
SKIN-DIVING

m i


-^'-^ .


ment of the National Bank of the
Republic of Haiti shall cancel tMe
special advance of 550,000 gour-
des in favor of the Haitian Insti-
tute- of. Agricultural and Didus-
trial Credit,' as well as the pa-
. lance of the account "4 per
cent Fund -' Profit of the Na-
tional Bank of the Republic of
Haiti."

d.) The other assets and liab-
ilities of the Haitian Institute of
Agricultural and Industrial Cre-
dir and of the Special Investment
Accoiiit, once they" have been
audited, shall then be transfer-'
red to the Institute of Agricul-
tural Industrial-Development.

The Minister of Finance is
charged with the application of
the foregoing transitory provi-
sions.
Article 38.-The present thw
abrogates all laws or provisions
of law, all decrees or provisions
of decrees, all decree-laws or
provisions, of decree-laws which


are contrary to it, and shall ble
executed at the responsibility. "&i'.
the 'Ministers of Finance,' :
Commerce and Industry, 61 Agrif
culture, Natural Resources andc i
Rural Development, each in that -',
which concerns him. .
Given at the Legislative Chat-.
ber, June 29, 158th Year of' In- I.
ber, June 29, 1961, 158th Year of'
dependence. 'i
The President:
LUC F. FRANCOIS
The Secretaries: .
GERSON ZAMOR,
FRANCK -QAPHNIS.
IN THE NAME OF
THE REPUBLIC
The President of the Republic.'
orders that the above law be.
embossed with the Seal of the
Republic, printed, published, and
executed.
Given at the National Palace,
at Port au Prince, July 3, 1961,
158th Year of Independence.
Dr. FRANCOIS DUVALIER
By the President:
(Signatures of Ministers):


"Soaping" duHfs hair.

ualo glorifies it!


-l


'S


Not a soap, not'a '
cream-Halo cannot
leave dulling, dirt-
catching soap film!


Removes embarrassing
dandruf from both hair
S and scalp!


a


.0


'".1








--A

"soft- water" laher -- -
-needs no special rinse! '"i1


Halo leaves hair soft, ''.
manageable-shining with
colorful natural highlights
M .;hI


Yese,,soaping" your hair with
even finest liqui&or oily cream .
v hampoos leaved dulling, Tfct.la-,oe "
.. airt-'dcatcfi .Hao; made," / aoThe-largest.
with a new, igredient, contains/ selling
no soap,,no sticky oils. ,,,
Thus Hlo glorifies yo 'hair haipo
the very firstatime you use. t.
.Ask for Halo-dia 's : I
favr.i' e 6 sha,'oo-today. Am ea



Iofll. reveals the hidden. beauty of th ha

-" .. t" ' ,., .: .." ' ...,
; .'' : "':,.c ; ""; '" "' "" Z'"-'
,' -,.. .,, .,. ..,. ..,,._ .. ,. :... r'. .. .. :.,,, .:. ,. : *L~ : 4:.


.- -


.CHINESE


NIGHT


STUESDAYS


Egg R6oll 2)

Won ton abup






Sweet & Sour pork

shrimp Fqo Yung,

Chicken chow mein

lobster chow mein'

tea or coffee


;
S$8&00 -,




-Candlelight



In MU ette


. I I


1












esthn36 hours thils week~end. mnunity's firt schol He id-
oated $2o00.0 Saturday to help cated the building pr-ojectwol
'7*
fianc.tw 14ita schodlbe W. ei neal(oebr


IJ
stuto~pet.TeUSS TANcKeER "TUCE"eILarE

Port syan Prine -AU.S Navyk nomitte saitd the s 1c00.0oouldhl
wos~anerta d oken nd her forfi nance p ojec s otr t of teve a t corn-e





lesss than 36 hour thi weekend, andt firs school. Her h GadHoe lodon hw l
dbite $200.00to Saturdayt tolin help cnted tee builning proet wouldamras ftr cl re
The shidpn was theon comlet Trucee. Committee selcte these scthhoonlo heula it




Haiti's "#Gingejrbred Paae Kandfmd-ot ey teGad. oe 1fsn hwplo,







atherilne Bsla
AA KanhOAA&

SANNO ONCES

BAR GeiA7%
BA-Geisha & 0 ALON"Guznee.,

OPEN. EVERY- EVENING -FOR,
CUISINE, OF THE FAR EAST
sent $100.00 checks to the EcrOe rican committee, which included
St. Vincent here and lEglise St. representatives of the Ministry
Pierre in Ganthier. of Education, U.S. Naval Mission
The director of the St. Vincent and three religious institutions.
School for the handicapped, Sis- As shown in the photo above
er Joan Margaret, reported that Captain Stephen L. Johnson,
the check would be used towards Commander of the USS Truckee,.
constructing a boys dormitory. personally presented his ship's
At Ganthier Pere Charles Be- check for the Ecole St. -Vincent.
to them by a joint Haitian Ame- to Sister Joan Margaret.



Dominican Steamship

Company ,,
Compa yPersonal Appearaficelof;Xatherine' Dtun ama

Allen & Baussan Agents GRAND SECTACLE
Wednesday Friday
OFFER A NEW REGULAR alIRECT STARRING
SERVICE FROM NEW YORK
Every Friday
New York De arture
SS Fundacion. Spetember 1st Masters,of, Ballet Moderne
LEAVES PORT AU PRINCE REGULARLY ISRAEL SHARES
FOR NEW YORK Exciting Brazilian So
Every Wednesday IN, A SETTING OF COLONIAL ELEGANCE AT
P-au-P Departure 'HISTORIC HABITATION LECLERC.
SS Fundacion September 6th
5 Km. from Port au Prince, on the'Route Martissant
For all Information See:

T. J. STEVENSON & Co. ALLEN DANCE TO THE MUSIC' OF
80 Brow Street Cite de I xoatin MICHEL, DESGROTTES.
New York, N. Y. Tel: 2697. SPECIAL SUMMER 9OVER CHARGE $1.50
FRIDAY SATURDAY ONLY
Refrigeration Cargo and Passengers Accepted







,TV F /W I
Of ~ ~ Or Mfios~icl d-9an ~RoekrPropulsion Slystem Under J
To, mark J heir fifth, year --of
Prfss re De lopment, ByUI..S. Firm'.




r-ogy)
An' and oraphd resu mes, will, 1


Nf Clud on~ u Jof Hait iAt N ar a.u e pro,
Grea tdonda d initrafion of Port au. Prince. vinej~a M.






Bne iea g7 T e w Compitteaof Rtcingab1he Rait
includese ?iaiihlbrolV be Bemb 7' ber eo



hoandscapes, ^l& farms, andetorobjectsd
Rhne Lvelaqt, 'Teaserr;eAlxandti'eantacqu'aaqd engeLaWatedartsrssse abdt taw cone
at~the1)ifecion-o Ecorinhic Afairsat Forign Afairs-epart-variedregins,-anhcombiateon Aerosstems omhenpilot asoabot 20 VIPH tch kph) Stea
spea t F 'M. logt as;r beno n fhtde nam ed:h ground
I9mzhg Iil qi 1e ofS AriIs t7ba0e Drbw F nteren



t s ee i shat ttroled fRehts. Inus e to jet the rvic e fo6r uh


e tdie (a strm d aPr" Ar hg h bt movement ofeisnbody Th
eedterh -Gf hill pna has n e-UeAry has hon interest
anese et Wira~(oa nd),.. i W rsinvrteterise nis thf chcig o i .Al11 eetrfet n e mvmn







oC a Moo ib e ground. Poweredbyiials also foredee use of the
with he v ghenra twi-j hydrogen peroxeyd e devi e by men in future mo ont
aa ronudss sstem, rocket aandi g
investiiationsth artist seek abnd theme Theyr tllbin
Former fooe Buffalb, New Yorkte Th cBelnenldon m
erfotit hi usemlylwrs--e -Raymoke d Bt eauolie is. thRet w~i 'assistanth e prset dfeet.clue eth s a mn sed o
no f h w o f Econaoed c A ffaker s. al Fru e in Affirs Depa' F rt Va ridsein, n oiliain Arsse s o p n hr a b u'0A 3 ,kh .S
at sthe D b r dayso .fe his Io Ie If IriIhI eI teamb
e f o e o r i a o _f P t C oI a n i l k If s I- 1 .h11 - I I u d r e e op e taeoln i s i e c e o arnh ,,r u d

copent"... Th~e eari t o 1 Timho ofBrutturis -ourad liteges



SteI .Vmn s ee 4 o Int... ofst Sat ord
nd pMinstr at Sth Diere ctourhn- ofPotcerplaclg.s Isa hantoldBi i.I.r6 w e eletr rvd
di ,tdai~l I -hss -e teheho waste afolerlvng hrfr
10exc., Monay ate ouse the firs CInsltayo C~ r SueJui ,hebsfontedvc ars h io otospthadr
VV4






Hlie oi represent; -Hioyl at -th anlht- m e ri Moetany-Fu
gohateg distance upnsm r toste f6 inaapig h

ateic feor. useow
in Ven (As ria adthe- Ine rnatilona Maetn-o F it S erinith, 6or Hypoiey ondl 60 e
ances ~ ~ e a-W ra ,,(o and). 'Mrsi in fte Buareau, fth e i'n-men --,pret
h ~~ ~ ~ c SOe :the otf four whn hwee et erS9 Os
a i I oel I r enemy oeaervueile Company of-





dVd pn a a"' t Cr in feo(.
oner of etC asp bait in, M 1owntt Hotel Wa,revitr thie s swee inPr ad herh yfiisa










t uaio epe rdb Si gror Pore






C" a- su to use ow tha





ieItn a.pdi m ot cndeed :a a ilr
tR4herop lar el teacghers Mr th oan schoo eand t fe fa rmily p sho e ad'. to 80tar g ove gAon engin-es, hyrgnd 10 oxd deiebtoni utr on
tha anumerest h O t izn s thereT a llt d',n e P olic etfrq' t7 saityes very othe. propuls io thyt equir te rcktI adig
invstiatinsthi w~k nd~omeof eil re til'binghe d-.,.inls
Forin-e-. .ooe.Bab Has report in yousgmet some thrfcs ndslet h

ers~. C of Engm e besty-er convoke to beour needs!t
no Jch T ho aaeda BaeryS t EGGS FpnsFot wa s se ue sne~as
iiid efre e. Coe ad 694.bl~f





condhit"...IATIA TheTO &al EoIPEN Co.leo S..ru ismurig h
th~Murc Boreil Manager denist hihancereloolpaceate
ea- I And'V ~

Ste AneVhrc 7desa_$ 4 ococ 4., at atra a
6:2kp~m. atSt ierr Ccrch n44






j"rm l f AL IL Ia U I -----. --.-.. .
OFFICIAL OPENING OF LYCEE DOCTEUR FRANCOIS -DUVALIER -
!


Education Minister Leonce Viaud receives first hand report on
construction of Jeremie's neiv high-school from builder G. Theard.


- Letter To The Editor
(Continued from naage 5)
or by taxi. I didn't sample the
buses, which I found to be ex.
cellent methods in many otl'ei
countries, for obvious I e iso;is
taxis are all .ery well bIlt thi.'
cut one off from the pro,, e tn.
much. the people. altio' zih nbj.
viously very poor we-re happil
uninterested in the tourist ar.'
very friendly. and t:ie resta:ir
ants sampled were vei\ good.
So there you havu somin,- nbs-
ervations, I would niot di'aIIddL'
any acquainlance- forom ii lIin -
Port au Prince, .onr the ol iee
hand I wouldn't encoujroi.-e hiiii
to do s0. mainly due to th, p.o
first impressions I adrnit. h il
also to the lack of an., rril in-
terest in or near the cit.. arid
for a larger holiday the inacces-
ibility of beaches would be a
very important point to be con-
sidered. ,
I will close by wishing you
well and hoping that in the near
future some steps are taken to
remove the irritations to Ithe
tourist for the ber.efri of Hait;
and everyone else.
Yours sincerely
Peter Wm. Ellson.


Education Minister Viaud inspecting Jeremie Militia' Honor-Guard


Haitian Born In Space William McIntosh of Pan Am.
(Continued from page 1) A cablogram was sent to her
husband telling him that he was
d. i.'.r.. M-s '.'aniea M. Tho- t.ie father -of the first space
rr.-is, her n.w boln child and born child. And 'this child, ac-
Glenda Patrice were taken to cordine to the Haitian Law, tht-
Canape Verl Hospital by Mr. "Jus terntori" is a Haitian.


FISHER 'S

HAITI'S LARGEST FREE PORT PRICE SHOPS
1) TilHE CORNER SHOP RUE BONNE FOL
2) ART & CURIO SHOP FISHERS ACROSS FROM CL
STOMS

AND BUY HAI41TIAN HANDICRAFTS
STRAIGHT- FROM THE FACTORY

ON THE RUE DU QUAj
(AM. E.XPR. AND DINERS CLUB &Attit'lb.I


SAVE UP I0 60 i'
SHOPS AND M141


'er Cent ON IMPORTS
HIO)GANY FACTORY


education Minister Vianud, speaking
,*


CONSUL IN N. Y.
CURDY MEHU

Mr Curdy B. Mehu who was
attache at the Haitian Consulate
in New York has been promoted
Consul in the same city. The
new Consul is a well-known
member of the young generi-
tiod.



Drive CINE

Thursday September 7th.

ANOTHER ENGLISH

VERSION MOVIE


of Lyece dedication in Jeren'ie


FAMOUS

OVER

The World


SHOES



FOR. EVERY OCCASION



. .

At "TIN