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Haiti sun

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00163

Full Text
". .* ,- .- _".."- '. :




Weekly
Every -I
Sunday
PORT-AU-PRICE, HAITI Aee arie-Jea CITE U SS ST Phone 2061 Vol VDAY JUNE 196 No. .
PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI Avenue Marie-Jeanne CITE DUMARSAIS ESTIME Phone 2061 Vol XIV TUESDAY JUNE Oth, 1961 No, 32 -
..I.-~--r~ m .^.. .r: ~r~_ FI IMbbQ EFP -PnnlnI_~~~ MT~CI Irmhu-r


NATION DE'PROPHYLAXIE" AT CUSTOMS Skyline High-


tom--House Shake-Up WayTo-Jacmel


Techint Engineer's
Visit Noted
Jacmel June 19-The two-day
visit to this Weste~p coastal town
of Techint engineer Mario Sis-
mondo has gladdened the hearts
of Jacmelians whose ultimate
.dream is to have a mountain
road connect them with the Ca-
pital and so do..away with' the
old tortuous river-bed road that
keeps their town in partial .isol-
ation. % .
NMr Sismondo- spent .two day
here checking the mountain
highway route which has been
surveyed at least twice during
the past decade and -r-team is
(Continued on page 16)


IQperation de Prophylaxie"
Been undenray in the Cust-
l-ouse of the Capital since
1 e 14th according to a report
;ilished over the 'weekend in
Matin.

l'Te clean-up was called for
?businessmen, fiscal authori-
and by public opinion for a
Time, the morning daily




!icef Benefits;By.
Haitian Art


At First Montreal
Exhibit
n-Wednesday,' June 14th, the
it .hibillon' of,Haitian art
-held in' lontreal openred":un-
theausEioes.ef i.t `nlIeig',
er es' ifrkthe beneit"df -the
ie'd' Nations Children's Fund:
-visitors are required to make
onatioi of $1.00.

.The Wotks of the first four art-
it':' ho participated in the col-
ction -made. for Vanleigh by
n' Marini and 'Kitty Baer are
-display in the eiiibit. -They
e':.Tebo, Bauvoir, Clesca and
o coeur. The collection 'consists
Itwenty-six pictures, all repre-
eihitive of thie-"Haitian scene.
on the sale of these works,
second collection will be' sent
Vhleigh who also have galle-
im.Nel "v York and Paris, as.
.as in Morntreal.


"The Minister of Finance Mr
Herve Boyer-on the instructions
of the President of the Republic,
having learned of the abnormal
activities unfavorable to e'very-
one went to the institution on
'the Rue du Quai to begin a thor-
ough clean-up. The clean-up is
still going on."'
The daily stated that the di-
rector of the custom-House Mr.
Pieire Pompee who has never
ceased to point out these irre-
gularities to the authorities was
invested- with the necessary pow-
er to make a deep reform, in.all
levels of his administration.

"Certain parts of this' admin-
istration were functioning in a
disorganized manner, far; from
the prescribed phofosophy -of
Dr Francois Duvalier-honesty
and efficiency' If -this delicate'
task is given to a gentleman of
the. mora standing of Mr Pom.
pea, .we can best, -.ongratulate.
*Mr ..Boyer. for -his choice. We
should also add for the good ,o
the administration that the in-
conveniences of the double ma-
nagement established by the
Anierican Occupation should dis-
appear. On June 15 alsb t\en-
ty employees were fired. (17 in
handling and 3 in taxation),:
the newspaper stated.


.Staw Hats For
School Children

CONGRESS ACTS-
Beginning in .October school
children will .be obliged to wear
-Port Salut" stray hats.
Monday morning the legislati-
ve' chambers voted the report.of
the parliamentary -con ,si.'
charged (o-.fitdy_.l C bran,
school-bat 'project 'of law. -
To ensure that there is no .pro-
fiteering at the expenses of the-
S (Continued on page 16):


Sugar 31


Arcahaj

Plans to construct a four and
a half million dollar Sugar Mill
-to absorb the cane production.
on the 'verdant Arcahaie plain
were discussed at a conference
held June 13 in the Town-of-The
Flag.
Arcahaie's youthful Legislati-
ve Representative, L u c k n e r
Cambronde, recently returned
from Europe presided over 'tie
town Hall conflab with contract-


What Nationality .ls
Choucoune?

'" The popular, timeless Haitian
ballad, "Choucouie". i number
one on' the -Hit Parade, in the
United States,.with,.a nev, recor-
ling made by the- A'thur Lyman
.Group,- but it- is always. ann-
ounced. as a:.Jamailtan-song had
is called : "Yellow' Bird'", The-
.ame tune is..popular i- Jamaicam
under .th, name:-of tDesti .
Spie eq,- o clai b; original
eiter, m, '& ii n ii.-i
deloipe. '
-It is true that present-day Hai-
(. Continued; o- page :16),


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Municipal Theatre

Provisional Committee

FormedA tHoteldeV lle

A municipal theatre that could provisional committee was for-
lead to the formation of a Port med at.a city.hall meeting;
au, Prince symphony orchestra On the initiative oft-.he- Mayor
and give the 'right impetus to of the Capital, "MR~ ea~? Deeb,-
the atts moved a step closer to a nixed group of- artistsrild
realization last week when a writers were invited to.the--City
-Hall to dipuss the. possibilities
of building such a Municipal
T.h.. e Theatre... .
.'. '.: i 'The lout-come of -the meeting
.' was the formation of a .provision
S. al committee headed by music
"lover-Valerio Canez .who is Gen-
-eral Electrid distributor on Haiti.
'Committee members are.. I.Ms.-
.. ... Fortunat Guery, Poet. ean Bri
erre, Y\in Miichel and -Raymond
(Coqntinued on page 16)

Garvey To Speak At
St. Louis de Gonzague
RODE THE MOONLIGHT


On President's Orders


Red Cross Man H
Alter D.R JaiCh.- "
''.1 a Ae
: Mr; Pierre Jaquier, ;i;a dele
gate ,qf the I-nternatibnal 'Re
.Cgoss arrived here this. -,e
hater nsi g r eonsTfin
political prisoners in ais in.tn;
Dominican Rpublic.:,
'-- .
During his weelk-long .sejour.
in the neighboring Republic tle-
Swiss Red- Cross man ~isitedj
the fanned La Victoria prisorv
which is set,in rolling pasture.
land. some hventy miles fr.om3
Ciudad Trujillo.
Following. private talks with
prisoners within. the white. wa-l'
ed prison Mr. .Jequier made ouf:
his report to the Red Cross-P
headquarters in Geneva.'-:' '.'

The control of this Dominican
prison was taken. out- of .the-;
hands' of the Militaii last week
by Presidential 'decree "and p]i-'i
ced under the jurisdiction of, tl eid.
civil justice. ..-;;
Mr Jequier has been. with tie
Red Cross since thepSpan.ish T*
(Continued on page 16
... ~, ;.#


- -- -- ---.


:e P

or Gerard Theard ard the'note.
)les of- the 'region attending. :
Representative" .Camb.r.o h n
stressed the need -tdo.:dvelop ti
he fullest this po6tentially i
agricultural region,- reducing- t)
employment -anid -raising. ithb,
standard .of .living: for )i p6 peg.
ple. today .and'- their -descendaints
of tomorrow. .- ..'
Haitian 'Corporation '.:"
lHe revealed 'that plans hd
already' been 'drawn'. up'. with: a,
group.of 'Ameri an i eijnstrs Ab it
stock in 'tth-.' ait&af Siigar .Milt
corporation would "be:-,availabli
m "te locai market. Mr iThea r
Sighted ult.,hat farmers--nd,
and -owners- i .the region would
et preferential treatment" -w '.
he-stock Was'placed-on thb-
ket 'and t: hey couldd" uras
shares with' either' thir :;ca
:rop .of cash.. ....*,:
Ta. T17o De idp Rel#, n
Guaiantee'u at:'.ipetus 6fo
levolopment .of -tij: .-regs.. h
erection of the ugr
tl.? mean complete'eiiec


e m- -a-,. t" ",". 7
bn, f'tor Ar iaie~t.he i0ett;

2rninmnt- -- ta~h.^ a'^ a'efr
the- -p.lann l '. e ''thes, i is- on"
of a ,"hrf for the' coasial townit
Caling for -sacrifices durig
the i:'ni t i-a l.:st a'g esof est
abolishment. -off. the 'sugar: nl.
speaker :fambrolnni pbiint.ed:'-oput
.that this region .'stands. to;';gin
a nmpre'-prosperous' life-io'r., gen-
.erations to come;.- .-'." 4=;-


-Famed Amnerican Shakes-
peafean actor Arnold Moss
arrived here Monday and du-
ring a week-long visit will
make a series of TV and
stage appearances. See Pro-
gram and profile page 3.


EXPRESS FROM .CAP.
SI" r WiIlia{;P. Garvey, Presi-
dent of the Lay Teachers of
.Pittsburg, speaks Thursday on
.'The Educational Program of a
Roman ,Catholic Diocese in the
United States" at the Institute
St.' Louis de Gonzague.
FT PARADED at the National Palace are these three Volkswagen. ambulances and five auto- Mr Garvey'who is completing
his doctorate -at the University
-' The autobuses to serve the Haitian conmi unity darry .the following Inscription in German of Pittsburg, is spending a wePk
Firech on their bodies: "Gift of the German- People to the Haitian {Continued on.page 16J in Haiti -- (Cont'd on page 16)
-. !


= .= r= :


15


.


i -





i., t' '. IH A TI S-UI N TUlESibAY, iJNt 20, 1961 .-

. IN A. TI THIS WEEK WOODWARD PROFILE
i ;: J f--' J. :; ., --* -, .' ..... ."
YouingPirre' Lkssegue, 19. cine .lac here, last eek in NEW U.S.
i" with his step mothe 'Ms Adrienrienne' tassegue dbd his :" L.A. SECRETARY .
ister Michaell' 3. Pierro a graduate of Greer Technical Univer- O
From 1939 to 1942 Mr Wood-
,ityof Chicago where Andre P.agqqot,.actuial President of the Asso ..r .
S a,*o- .aa r s o t o ward served as Assiskant .Chief
aafiondes .Qhauffeurs Guides..d'Haiti., graduated ix years ago,: of the Division of American Re- -FROM
kalso a'Dioctor- of nritor aha .technician In Diesel.- publics in the Departmrent ,of
SCadihan inustrialists Arthur M. Jamlies and Donald :H ..Mc .State'. Following an assignment.V ''
frp;,rTi .mToronto arrived F 1 ry-I lt week to discuss tome pro- to L Paz as second secretary
pts -;Fwit 0F...Geotge Reinbbld and Tonxy Drow~l, respectively of Embassy, he returned to the
.p, ..y.. ..? Departrinent- of State in 19-J4 as
oe-a d Gpneral Manager d the SAFICO.-- Assistant Chief of the: DiviSioin
E-eonqits lQbert MIiller Mcy;and Miiton-yinn .ossi o -fthe of North and West Coast, Aaf-
udget Depairent' of the State department stopped, here last- fairs. Onions of 6rst -qaility' are 'available at.' fl
oeek.tbo have a consultation..with the fligh Staff of.b e US-; Em- During the period from 194h t.
o their way. toCaracas-. ; 1- sered aS eput -aChief as counter of t the corer of
l-io"b.eL:Duvert, an Inspeci6r for the. Department du Tourisme. subsequently havana. In.1947 he
d iast-'. eek frori 'a- nine. month study at. Cornell Univer-. was named Deputy Director, of des Cesare and Rue,'du Centre, at the .fo
yIthaca, Niw. York. He :g6t, a 'scholarship froin the. United Na- ,te Office of' American Repub '.
1 g-t stusij'otel A nistration- ics Affaits in the DIarfment 'of '.
r-'Y'i-i.-'- d. .d-n-liciel few to -- ashingo, State.' -lh 1949- he attended the pices:'
.- iebHein J,.aids6n- Michael flew to Washingto, National War ollege.- -
t 'dni.esday.-Bcike is to .entr;a 'Vermont Camp foi twoo months. In .1950 he was 'assigned -as
d Mr Nancy Hein w as joined-JAst -Friday in Washington b. Dbeput Chiefof Mission to Stoc-s
-e ihter Paela whoflew -back fromn Paris where she was kholm where he remained' until 1 b ags 1 Ople
S rb e.Pgmela occupied in Paris -the-same 1952 'when he returned;to the 50bs.-Bags- 15 Gur
..-,.--,,. ..... 6- .,01.. t. -. ..ols.--Bags 15 Gourde s'
tr ool.atacqueneBout rs Jon Kenne- Department of State and wab -
Iodi-d awheft. -he 'a s .d-ennte -, there .. J n named Chief of.the Division of -
., Foreign Sersice--Personnel. I Wholesale drs will be. filed othe
,"NAncy Heinl shelping Paela im 44 .prepana.atiorof her 1953 he became .Special Assist- -. .',. -,
tingt or July; 1 th John Burdick,-of the Care Foundation ant to the Assistant. Secretary
SCu bi .. am a d in bt ",here 'hen hen helatter f6r iter-Ameiicai- Affairs -a 1 of Gourdes: 2.7. per l0rlb-. bag- -.
i.Hai ti..cohe:Pcl wi ive inCali after the wed- m 1953 Deput. Assistant Secre ,
creole auttful Dont wor I tary. for .Ite'-American Affairs. '
...tlk Imysf d he were afraid he ,In 9541 he wa appointed .A '- 10 -bags) and- Gourdes: 1 per 501bs( Mi
I.. .. -J "ee.' .L- ..-. I_ i. I
ie. "his. cl bssadoi to 'Costa Rica;. in 195$ uLn 10 bag.)
"his. or; to 'b ':t s '*' *.-" :'" -.. i "
e- Ae )VIe oThe dPoint s V a the-rwe. Field Wed mbasador to Urugua. aod .i .
es.." mpM -hv .: Earl-O ..a Finie tHead of the Point 191 nbassador to Chil. Mr. ... ..
e --:'' -l o-' e, :c e -- ,n AVoodiard is mared and has a .
afm dhisFhench o wifp and a ,daughter: .He is a ..
ft &ughtrathleen Genen G e, bi 1 ar eer .minister.in the foreign ..*, .

SrsiA S...N.
-, .... ."t_ ..d- ws ere kc e ,...

att E- "Rnoq... 'o have seen on TV. ~,unwi
aer-ak n aRussel .ar th.. o theB.. t... Co.er b of Ma bthe bobks, of at
S ffaai eetd aa, t irnadl.e ib rs Francek Simon,
W '- .: V 4 ,7.- 1te!4 (*Pen~ d- de Chgg-) Mr
i"iiinio~'. eives -studens- ar -
Co ntinu n .page)i works daily. In the mornlni,
-44
-frouns to'T oon'anbd pin to Cpru.
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IjESiDAY, JUNE 20, 1961

FAMOUS SHAKESPEAREAN ACTC


- a


-Actor Ai


r-producer and writer-will re-
in here six days.
Ii-ingual in French,- Mr Moss
'pipresent several public lect-
rs and readings including:
Tuesday, 8 p.m.-a television
pearance with Miss Adeline
erigord discussing "Le Thea-
-"des. Etats-Unis depuis la
Serre."

dnesday, 8:30 p.m.-a see-
d television appearance with
i'. Jacqueline Scott, in a dis-
ssidn of "Shakespeare dans la
e de Classe et dans le Thea-
Es

ursday, 5 p.m.-performan-
f "The Seven Ages of Man"
Habitation Leclerc.
riday, 7:30 p.m.-a lecture
the Haitian-American Instit-
on "Le -Theatre comee moy-
du progress social" which' in-
es a survey of the Negro in
American theatre.
r Moss 'will also meet bifor-
lly wvith local theatrical and
groups.'

ARNOLD MOSS, FAMOUS
MINTERPIRETER OF
SHAKESPEARE
Since his Broadway debut 21
s ago Mr Moss has played
jor roles in such outstanding
as as Mazwell Anderson's
urne to Jerusalehm,' Chris-
er Fry's "The Dark Is Light
ugh", and William Saroy-


mnold Moss -

It is his interpretal
Shakespearean drama, h
Which have earned him t
.extravagant praise.

"There is probably '1no
the American theatre .
speak the lines of Shal
as Well as Arnold Moss,
Elliot Norton, dean of IN
gland's drama .critics.
Of memorable quality
his Gloucester in 'King
his Malvolio in "Tv, elfth
and his Prospero in "Tt
pest." Of the latter, tl
York Times wrote:
Moss is superb.., He ha
ity, humor... he is winn
human."
Equally applauded w
directing of several Sha
rean plays, among them
Lear,' Meas'ue for lM
and "Love's Labour Lo
the Washington Daily
wiote, "Arnold Moss is
congratulated for maldi
kespeare live again, as I
have lived for his contend
audiences."
ARNOLD MOSS, ACT
LECTURER, PRODU(
CRITICS
As a producer and pla
he has presented an ad
of George Bernard
"Back to Methuselah" t
ences in more than I40 A
cities before its New Y
ening in 1958.


rn old Moss
nold Moss. to many critics an's "The Time of Your
rca's foremost Shakespear- A frequent visitor to
actor, arrived in Port au wood NLr Moss has also
ce Monday late afternoon. ed importantly in a sc
sthe hrst leg of a three- films including "The Le
h 'tour of Latin America, Carmen,' "'Viva Zapata
nternationally acclaimed ac- "Salome."


9 i~~- Ar8 i;9:,'


~p~g~B~~


"HAITI SUN' PAGE '
)R
Appearing ere U.S. Taxpayers Note' .
Appearing Here "e s 3 e
A'shipment of empty fins for
.Life." A one-time college instructor, liyn, New York January 28, 1909. canning arrived by Pan Ameri-
Holly- Mr Moss has endeared himself He received a Masters Degree can Airways Wednesday from
appear- to college, university and club in Old French anld Education Puerto Rico, together with can- "
core of audiences throughout the U.S. from Columbia University in covers and empty cartons. The .
oves of by way of his popular reading 1935. shipment amounted t"' 24,000'"'
," and concert "The Seven Ages of pounds and the air-freight bill.
Man." FRENCH VET was $1.680. Three trucks trans-', .
In it he re-enacts scenes, stor- ASSIGNED TO ported the tins from the airport'
to the Pole Cole pr6ject in-Cap"'
ies and poems that trace man's HAITI to the ole prject Cap
growth from "the infant, mew- Dr Jacques Crosnier, French aite
ling and puking in his nurse's veterinary, arrived late this
arms," through manhood and week on assignment by the
maturity,' don to the "last French Government to teach STEPHEN BRDOS '
scene of all, that ends this stiwan- modem practices in his field in .
ge'eventful history." His read- this country,. ..V. HAI TRADER .
wings, which range from passa- Dr'Crosnier is a graduate o[f
ges of tragic grandeur ib those the Faculty of Medicine of Paris M. V, .HT
of romping comedy including Mof the Veterinary School o.
the writings of Shakespeare, Alfort. He is aguest at t he PERSON S
Whitman, Leies Carroll, Dick- French Embassy while he and LOADn _4a1" uNLODIm G
ens and Ring Lardner. his wife aie house-hunting. SERVE H4Ft AND LOBD i .'.
Besides his teaching at Brook- The Haitian Government has forthnightly. sallings of the
lyn Colege Mr Moss has lect- temporarily assigned him to the fiami--Port an Prince -Miami
ured or conducted seminars on HAlIPCO abattoir'both to teach MIAMI ADDRESS:
the theatre, the classic drama, its employees modern methods
.ani Shakespeare at several 'lea- as well as' to supervise proper Telephone: Highland 617817
ding, American universities. handling of meats in accordance
AMr Moss was born in Brook- \ith exrusmg laws. Franklin 9-7888 "





:Katfherine Dunham.

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t io n s o f -Ts.-
however,.. .
he most

d 1 .
man in ,
ivho can .
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wrote
hew En- J

were
Lear,"; "
Night" 4 o'
ie Tem- 4
he New
"An old RAN EE -
as "dign- GRAND SPECACLE
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,ere his 4 SA .'
akespea- 4 DILETTE --- LENWOOD
"King Masters of Ballet Moderne
easture,l
)t." As ISRAEL SOARES
News Exciting Brazilian Songs
to be
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ng Sha-
he must 4 CICERON, MAURICE, IIMACULA, ANTONIO, NOKA
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"


;What is True Happiness?

L wonder how seriously one and ruin, that happiness cannot
should take Samuel Johnson's stand four-square again. In this
remark that "he had never pas- sombre world- we are all expo-
ed that week in his life which sed to such visitation. But apart
he would" wish to repeat, were from such catastrophe surely
an angel to, make the proposal the final balance of good and ill
to him." is more kind. to us than the En-
Goethe,. to be sure, quoted in g Ii s li m a n, the German. the
a brief anthology of misery in Frenchman and the Ru ssian
one of Mr F. L. Lucas' recent would have us believe.
essays, claimed never to have Scott, surely, is closer to the
enjoyed four weeks of genuine .common truth. "Did I ever pass
.well-being in his 75 years of life. unhappy years anywhere?" he
Anatole France, in similar asked. "I have had unhappy
gloom, said that he had never days, unhappy weeks, even. on
been happy for a day or an one or two occasions, unhappy
hour' while Tolstoy denied that months, but Fortune's finger has
lie' had had'-a fortnight's happi- never been able to play a dirge'
ness. on me for a quarter of a year
.. "" _t3 _- ="


The rego
: sing, aid
men 6f lite
truth. Ther
whelming
crash into


rd iRcertainly depres-
I doubi whether the
feature are telling the
e are, of course, over-
sorrows which can
S1 liT Il a rd h ri


together."
, There, I think, lies the exper-
ience of most of us. If a benefi-
cent angel would care to give
me the chance to repeat some
,. ... e -... i.. ..i i v ,


j._- me, anau so clua]llcnppy) \\eeKS, 1 could gl\ie him a




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", ..*..y_.... .--.. ,
li t _'- .,.-:


-'r > '-, .. ; =, : .. '*:, :.


list as long as my arm...
Curoiusly enough, for -life's
most biting unhappiness I must
go back to childhood, and I
strongly suspect that many peo-
ple would find fellowship in that
experience. It is part of the po-
pular mythology that childhood
is carefree, light-hearted and
glad. My recollection is that it
was full of "anxieties, injustice
and manifold pain. I remember
fear and utter loneliness.

-SYMBOLS


Sharp and vivid is
ry of a day. I sat on
covered slope with
swamp below. It was


tne memo.
a manuka-
a raupo
scrub land


on our little farm. The sky was
grey and a searching wind was
slapping the flax by the water's
edge. ily little dog was with me
nuzzling under my left arm. and
I remarked to lumn that he alone
Imne~i about it all, cared and un-
derstood.

1I cannot remember what the
theme of sorrow was,,but in the
cellar of the mind that scene is
stored away as the very symbol
of despair, the Styx-like brown
water, the sunless, hopeless sky,
the searching cruelty ot the
wind.
I can remember, too, the
blank despair of early morning.
One occasion is a vivid memory.
It was full moon and a winter's
dawn. There was deep cold mud
in the gateways to the paddocks,
with a crackle of frost on top of
it. I can remember how the
grim misery .of it all stirred me
to something like poetry. and
my small wits began to put
Lines together about "a cruel
moon" which "sndered down"
from "a cold and ~icke:: sky."
If there was ever a poc..c gift


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PAGE'4 .


in me% it came nearest to awak-
ening in the savage wretched-
ness of that moment. Most of the
word's most poignant verse has
been written from the darkness
of the heart, after all. Happiness
tends to stifle the tragic power.
But I cannot remember greater
unhappiness in life, than on
those two occasions.
-PASSING EPISODE

But even then there were inter-
ludes of joy, the bliss of books,
and- the inarticulate loveliness
of bush and sea. And childhood,
however melancholy, is a pass-
ing episode. So too is adolescen-
ce, that uncertain, anxious, pla-
gue-ridden era. If luge was right
in his contention that happiness
requires three ingredients, wis-
doth, domestic calm and the ap-
proval of one's fellows, how can
youth-be happy. It cannot be
wise, it can scarcely be the ar-
biter of its domestic circums-
lances, and the approval of fel-
low youths can only be, won by
the sporly breed good at kicking


There were those delec
days when the boys were y
and I gave myself to prese
them from "cruel moons"
"sneering wicked skies,"
I was passing on an heritage
fortune. There was the bls
domestic happiness and su
in authorship... so much,
much... -Grammaticus.

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TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 196


leather 'nd such trivialities, and
such types know only happiness
of the more simple kind.,
It is later years which have
multiplied happiness for me. r


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TESDA, JUNE 20, 1961
^ .TT ESDAY, JUNE 20, 1961


"HAITI SUN'"


t HAITI SUN -
STHE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
Editor-Publisher BERNARD DIEDERICH
Gerant-Responsable AIAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.


ESTABLISHED IN 1950


SLA SALINE DWELLERS TOLD TO GET
OUT WITHIN 48 HOURS OR ELSE
COMMUNIQUE
FROM THE TOURISM DEPARTMENT
(dated June 14th 1961)

'Concerned about keeping the engagements towards
hh less fortunate sections of the Nation, constantly
making the most tenacious efforts to rid the Capital
the slums that impair the natural beauty of the sea
hore by which the foreign visitors enter our country
t is inhabited by an ethnic group traditionally and
exorably decried, the Government of His Excellency
r. Francois Duvalier, President of the Republic, has
bne-its best, in spite of the extremely scarcity of avail-
le finance, to promote the moving of the La Saline
a-Croix des Bossales people to a zone, beyond HAS-
that is being progressively cleaned up.
lris new zone has already been justly named "CITE
.NE O. DUVALIER" because of the spirit of
ignity.and humanity that -has prompted its creation
'd le 0 tp its development.

i t ui;,':thus, understood at the beginning of the
li f populations that the vacated lots of La
i 1'Croix. des Bossales should remain at the
i pos~-f_ the State that would put them to use
hin the planned extension of -the Commercial zone
SPort, pu Prince, in conformity- with modern require-
ts and the Country's dignity.
o clarify, moreover, this situation and to underline
Js determination to transform La Saline and Croix,
SBossales, the President issued a decree dated Jan-
o 13, 1961, of which article One reads: "The Port
Prince sea shore, from the Place de I'Hotel de
-le to Martissant which was used as the bi-centen-
*I international exposition ground and the northern
e of this sea shore, from the Port Bureau to HAS-
', ~"ill be placed under the direction of the Tourism
department which will turn it into a modern com-
ercial center."
-onsequently, the Tourism Dept. declines the res-
nsibility of certain authorizations and encourage-
1t. to rebuild the slums in the zones mentioned
*e. The Tourism Dept. invites the beneficiaries of
e4.illegal and fishy authorizations and encourage-
ent, to move their shacks outside the zones placed
der its direction.
i move will have to be made within 18 hours,
r which time all legal nieasures will be taken
Sist those not complying on time.
S -("Le-Nouvelliste", June 15th, 1961).
.-There was no visible change in La Saline to date.

vy. PRESIDENT DECLINES
orWN MONUMENT BUT ENDORSES
ONE FOR ESTIME
e President of the Republic "When the history of this cen-
reply to members of the tur, is recorded in words of
S meral Legislature declined deeds accomplished by the coun-
proposal of erecting a sta- try's leaders and forever pre-
of hunself but endorsed one served in the Archives of Haiti-
is predecessor the late Du- an history; then and only then
s Estime. shall be the proper time for the
declining the honor, Presi- leaders of the country, to make
Dri'Francois Duvalier. said such a decision."
personally approved of this
Station erecting a statue to "Let the record of a man's
nr Dumarsais Estime but lifetime show his contribution to
d that future generations his people," President Duvalier
he judge for any such honor declared in his reply to the de
himself. puties.


;-


S.A.
June 13, 1961
The Editor
Port au Prince.
Haiti Sun,
Cite de l'Exposition,
TRANS-WORLD TRADING CO.
Dear Su':
It was with much pleasure we
iead on page 14 Monday June
5th. 1961 issue of the Haiti Sun
under the columns "Off the Te-
lediol" the happy experience of
your reporter using Dunlop Gbld
Seal Tires on his car.
We are much obliged for his
spontaneous advertising in your
columns. As agent for Dunlop
Tyres we will be glad to receive
his visit in our office next time
he is on the market for a
replacement, and will see to it
that he gets a "good break".
Yours sincerely,
SERGE S. GAILLARD.

Dbar Mr Editor:.
I spoke to Mrs Barrie who still
lihes at the Riviera. She and a
friend and dogs are the sole
occupants and have rented a
small generator to provide them-
selves with light.


Haiti's "Gingerbread Palace"
Haitian architecture, exquisite c


PAGE a-
I am told that it was Bi- of the National Bank came later :
chara who had the necessary to straighten out the matter, and--
papers to the furniture, etc. out assured the sole occupant that
for non-payment of bills, but that she will be safe in remaining
the place was over-run by 150 there. Now there are police cars
people, in the dark, and ,much on patrol every night.
that was confiscated will have Jo
be returned. It is said the Pres. (S) Informative.

Caribbean Construction Co. S A.

Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD

Phone: 3955. P. O. BO.. 284


CONSULT

sacha thebaud

architect U. of M.

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construction

at castelhaidti.

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and aned hostelery the Grand Hotel Oloffon, show place o.
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and gardens the Oloffson, complete with milnt ted living. Set amongst a myriad 0o iropieali ree



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SPAGIc 6 "HAITI S U


Bonn Foreign Aid Until 63 Will to 5mnt aid tus (h
to 5 Illion narks (:
SAmount To $1,2 Billion 'o ich million
so far been allotted
jects.
(Special to the Sun) latecohier in the field of gov- This is purely p
ernment aid although many raised by taxes, In
By SEBASTIAN .HAFFNER of the long-term private credits sale of public prop
placed abroad in recent years kes no account ot
BERLIN, May 22. West Ger- by German industry were made ,its, even wlere th
many has finally emerged as a possible by government guaran- en under public gu
provider of. foreign aid in a ties. of federal bank loan
big way and has done so with Germany 'also has 'substantial- It is estimated ti
.characteristic thoroughness. ly contributed t6 World Bank transactions, another
loans add other development ac- marks will flow tro
A development budget, has tivities through intei-national ag- into the underdevel
.been worked out through 1962, encies, tries within the next
ah interministerial development But up to now there .was no Among the principle
committee has been set up, the governmental aid program of ing dispensation of t
Principles under \which it is to any great dimension. If nothing preference for bila
,work have been officially ann- else, this was bad public 'rela- the most striking. 0
i .'bupced, and German Ambassad- tons. Germany,- it seemed, was lion marks only 750
o ors from the Southern Hemisph- behaving like an egotistical rich be allotted to multil
e,e have been assembled at man, unmoved by the needs of ited Nations, Comn
,Bonn to be briefed on the- new others arouLd him. Whether or World Bank- sci
policy. true of false, the impression will
tFor several years, Germany now have to be corrected. The bulk of 4.25 b
ha- been a capital-exportinrg 1 8 Projects Approved will be allotted bilat
country, but she is a relative The funds provided for deve- dividual government
.. ; .. '.


N "


1962 amount
1,250,000,0001,
marks have
Sto 18 pro-

iblic money,
ans, or the
ertes. It td-
private cre-
ese are giv-
aranties, or
s. ,
hat by such
er 2 billion
m Germany
oped coun-
19 months.
pies -govern-
his aid, the
teralisni is
if the 5 bil-
million will
ateral -Un-
non Market
themes.

million marks
rally to irn-
s which ex-


press a clear desire for "deve-
lopment partnership" with Ger-
many.

The aid will not be tied to
pohtical conditions, but all pro-
iects willl be carefully examined
from an economic point of view.
Financial aid will take the form
of long-term low-interest credits,
not gifts, while technical aid will
be provided as an outright grant.

No 'Buy Geriman' Clause
Credit. w.ill not be tied to a
"buy German" clause, but there
will be a clause barritig the use
of the money for purchases from
the Eastern bloc.

Bonn also will be sensitive
about any steps .tending to re-
cognize German division. Preli-
minary talks with the 'United
Arab Republic about ..German
financing of a large project for
a Euphrates dani received a
bad jolt last week when Presid-


TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 1961


ent Gamal Abdel Nasser agreed
to the establishment of an East
German consulate at Damascus.
Just as United States aid has
tended to concentrate on some
exposed allies, British aid on
Commonwealth members, and
French aid on French-speak-
ing Africa, Germany might find
a field of special interest in ne-
glected southern Europe. Even
in the past, Greece and Turkey-
have betn centers of German
private investment on publicly
guaranteed, long-term credits.
Last week, Economics Minister
Ludwig Erhard .paid an often-
postponed visit to Spain and Por-
tugal, and the possibility of Ger-
man development aid was a top-
iC of discussion. One of the vi-
sit's first fruits wag a German
long-term credit of 200 million
marks ($15 million) for irriga-
tion works in southern Spain.

Sicily and southern Italy might
also sooner or later come within
the compass of German aid.


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TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 1961 HA TI SUN' -AG




12 th ANNIVERSARY


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'iEOLE SIMILAR IN HAITI


i~ r i '
r~ 1: ~r~ I~ C
I .' r


language And Societ


S In St. Lucia
,


-.. N


in

11
'i


I-r. AyIeyne is Assistant Led- Mervin C. ALLEYNE.
rer ;in- Romance Philology at the central range on both sidps
he University College of the and dissect the island into fertile
Vest .Indies.- He received -his. Valleys. The population, predo-
loctoratqtr om the Universite de mirnntly an agricultural one,
.yon, jid spent theilsunmmer'ol inhabits these \alleys and earns
960 in St.: Luciaon a grant-from its Ii\elihood on large sugar and
Institute of Caribbean Stu- banana estates, or from small-
.-- of holdings in. bananas, a recent
-" feature .of the agricultural eco-
.Sf Lucia. is a small island- of nomy of the island.
33 -square miles' belonging to -Of a population of.aboyt 90,000,
Lesser. Antilles group of the one; third lives in three "towns.
iest-ndies. It is a- unit' member (including the capital, Catfries:
f.the embry:oniic .Federation of 17,500) and 7 villages,, situated
iyest Indies (formerly the at the outlets of \alleys, on.the
i'tish West Indies), and lies 25 sea, and very often bull on the
,ues south of _the French depar- beach itself at the .-mouths o[
mient of Martinique and 26 rivers. It is suggested that, due
tiles ribrth of its-sister federaT to :the scarcity of, aralile 'ldnd
nit St.-Vinicent. Because of its in St. Lticia, only rather swam:
aibcular* political shistotr and py or beach land could be spar-
..ebgraphical 'proximity to ed fo. housing the black-_popu-
irtihigue, St. Lutcia- as.-had, lation..
lidl-nmaitains -vey crdse 'ties Thle plhysi.caL. nature..of the is-
~ft-.tHle Frenli.ifsland ': com- 'land makds internal conimunica-
i .rce,:i-and'ourii..t-i.'iYhee-1rnd t tiftis very difficult. There is one
filete-. identfty of Frernch-cre main road which follows the pe-.
asig:spokeri "in St.-. LEci and riphery. of the islarid connecting
tiniq.ug has preserved strong -the-10 towns and villages. It fre-
.ltuial sikjs between the two .'quently happen' during-the hur-
4'which at -one period in,' ricane season' that road bridges
f 'eie~uttj fell, unddr- one over. rivers are destroyedd .,by
j-ieni -aiistraion. rains and floods, leaving some
towns or, villages without any
.i s]and ,'ery. mountain- access by larid. The peripheral
S:e"ain_. rang runs -fairly .rodi itself is of only very recent
I 'd i-j'.ts ,length- while completion. Seven' Seats ago,
if ver~a1 nd.s "'thave from thait part- of 'the roa- along _ie










..'," ,:-" -. y'.
V,









AT TO
-I


:

r69,RUt DI


(I ~ WKAT' TO'


east coast between the. capital
and the village of Canaries '-a
distance of 10 miles- was not
asphalted.. There is no asphalted
road leading from the -coastal
road. ,to the mountainous inter-
ioir. Tlhis has profoundly influen-
ced the linguistic .situation i,
*St. Lucia by' impeding.the pro-
gress of English into the coun-
try. There is one village in par-
ticular -Aux Lyons- .which one
can see nestling in the hills as
one drives along the West coast
road. where the inhabitants have
-preserved a fair 'degree of inter-
nat autonomy and independence
from the- laws -and adminustra.
tion obtainiiig inSt. Lucia.
At" the. time' of the discovery
of St. Lucia at the turn of the
15th-16th centuries, the island
was inhabited by the Caribs Who
seem to have.defeated and re-
placed the Arawaks there as
well as in other islands of the
Lesser Antillds. There exists to-
day in St. Lucia no traceable
descendant of these original Am-
erindian inhabitants; on the
other- hand, evidence of their
former occupation -is found in
the preservation of archeologic-
a] artifacts and in the preser-
vation of -several Amerindian
lexical items in the vocabulary
of.the average St. Lucian.
'No attempt was riade by any
Eurdpean power to settle in' the
"',.


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'i-i--
".. :. -


island before 1639 when a small
group of European settlers land-
ed. Within a year they were kil-
led or driven off the island by
the Ca ibs. In 1650, occupational
rights to the island were sold to
the shareholders of the French
West India Company and this
led to the'arrival of some 40
French colonists in the following
year.

There followed 150 1'ears -of
struggles for the possession' of
the island by the English -and
French,. during which time it
changed hands 14 'inimes. The
settled European population was
quite predominantly French; the
English seem to have been in-
terested in St. Lucia fo? its stra-
tegic importance: its geographi-
cal position and its natural deep
wa~er harbour at Castries. So
that when finally the island was
captured. by the English Nara,
'and ceded definitively to Eug-
land by the Treaty of Paris in
1814, it was French in 'language.
manners and feeling.'

The broad outlines of the de,-
velopment of North America and
the West Indies in the 1Stl and
19th centuries dre too weUl
known to need much recounting
here. St. Lucia was not unlike
any other -West Indian .island in
that the need for a certain type
of labour on the sugar-cane
plantations was met by the im-
portation of Africans as slaves.
The practice.'of miscegenation'
produced a segment of poptla-
tion usually described-as col-"
oured.'
SIn the -contact situation cre-


-. -z.
,,t.%--- -'.


1


ated by the presence of Africans
of different languages and ori-
gins and Europeans (French)' a
new language was also bornfas
the need arose for a vehicle of
communication, not only .Be-
tween Africans and Europeans,
but also between Africans
themselves, because slave trad-,
ers and owners had systematic-.
ally scattered their slaves so..
that Africans speaking the .-
same language 'should'4
not find themselves -on
the same plantations. Scholars
are divided as to the exact gen-
esis of French creole. Thisis
really part of the much larger .
problem of linguistic creoliza- 'i
tion, and it is not intended here,4
to attempt to deal with it.-ilt.-
seems, however, that -.whether'-
creole is a purely African slave
invention, i.e. the vocabulary 'of -
French subjected to the syntac- '
tical patterns of African lang
uages, or,a pidgin used by 'Eu-''
ropeans to render their langua-".:
ge more intelligible to the Afri-!4
cans, it sdon became, as a form '"
of expression, very .typical --of
the African slave and was-as-
cribed the negative evaluation i
given to all items of slave cul-
ture.'
Up to 1803, French, and Frehch :
creole (6fo 'patois' as it is caT '
led- in St. Lucia) were exchisi-'
rely spoken in St. Lucia. -The -
situatioi may be described as
follows: the entire population "
was able to, speak French ere-
ole;. the; uneducated -including
black slaYve ::9l- the; majority
of coloured, people-: could ex-
press themselves dnly- in Creole.
YThe island aristocracy of plan- .
station owners and businessmeni,-
together with their clerks, Tc- -
ountants, etc. /of French origin
were, for the most part,-bulin-:
gual, ..
During the era of slavery, .
there seems to have been .no
objection to the use of Creole
by the French inhabitants. Chil-
dren of French parents were yal-
lowed to speak Creole in the.:
.colonies, but were sent to Fran- i
ce for their education in French.
In that type of society, visible
marks of social identification
-such as language- are not
held to be as important as in
seemingly .free and democratic
societies. The demarcation lines
between .classes ilt a slave -so-
ciety are not at all fluid: they
are inflexible and with a low.
degree of permeability. In a ,
slave society with its fixity and .
rigidity, the cultivation of 'the
speech habits of the ruling class j
does not bring the same social
rewards as in present-day free
societies. Similarly, in a slave
society, the practice of 'sub-cul-
tural' forms of speech by per-
sons belonging to the dominant
culture would not be as socially .
harmful to them as today.
lMoreo\ver, Creole was, more
than any other 'factor, the unify-
ing symbol of the overseas unit
vis-a-\ is tie continental govern-
ment. It is very probable that
the creole language has ever
.known moments of great prest-
ige, especially at the Lime of the
Revolution and later at the time
of the abolition of slavery and
the emancipation of slaves, when
it was one of the most distinct-


J _* *.-- J


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I-.. -
I u) I "' "-. "'' '


H A I







TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 1961


ive means of identification for
the colonist in his hostility to-
wards the metropolitan.
Evidence of the wide use of
Creole even after the hand-over
of St. Lucia to England is found
in Breen's History of St. Lucia,
when he regrets that 'patois has
superseded the use of the beau-
tiful French language even in
the highest circles of French
colonial society.'

The situation today is much
different French has 'almost
-completely disappeared, as- a
vehicle for communication. Only
a very few old descendants of
original Frendh families express
themselves, in French in parti-
cularly nostalgic moods. The
change. in the structure pf the
society is reflected in the new
*language situation. The advent
of English-speaking people as a
political elite and their Iatbr de-
-velopment into a cultural and
economic elite have been attend-
ed-.by the introduction of Eng-
lish -as the "language of social,
cultural and economic prestige.
The amicable- relations .between
*French add French. Creole in a
slave-society gave way to ex-
treme hostility between English
and Creole -nr the newly free
society. Creole has,, of couPte,
been. the looser in this language
conflict. The present 'situation


may be described as follows:
the vast majority of people who
were born and have grown up
in St. Lucia can speak French
creole; the 1946 census shows
that less than, .02 per cent of
the population spoke only Eng-
lish, while as high a percentage
as 43.4 spoke only Creole. How-
ever, linguistic practice does not
coincide with linguistic ability
and only a rather small percent-
age of those who have ability in
English and Creole do make use
of the latter. The general atti-
tude towards Creole"may _be
summed up in one word; host-
ility. When one then considers
that the percentage of the po-
pulation wlich cannot express it-
self in English and for whom
Creole is the only means pf self-
expression ranged, in 1946, from
9 percent Ln the capital to 56.5
percent in the North East dist-
ricts, with an all-island average
of43.4 percent, one immediately.
realizes the problems which the
language situation creates.

In trying to understand the
general attitude Jo French cre-
ole in St. Lucia, "ve must situate
the question in the wider' con-
itxt of the system .of 'values
Which'Wesf Indian societies have
-inherited from the slave society.
We have seen that the origins
of Creole are intimately bound


,1






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I


up with slavery, that although
it must have become an impor-
tant identification mark of the
overseas territory, it had quite
definitely close associations with
the slave culture. Creole fell into
the general depreciation of all
-the general depreciation of all
the ethic characteristics iden-
tifiable with the .black African
slave. Ascription became the
basis of the system of values.
And so today in the West Indies,
'a good complexion' is said of
one ranging from lght brown
to fair; similarly "good hair' de-
scribes a type of hair ressemb-
ling the-European type-and dif-
fering from the wooly texture of
the negro's. 'Flat nose' or 'thick
lips' .are both very opprobrious
and abusive terms. French Cre-
ole was also ascribed a very
negative evaluation, arid, with
the general despiritualization of
the African negro in the Ameri--
cas, expressed in inferiority


complexes and self debasements,
Creole was despised even- by
people who could speak -no other
language. That explains the dis-
crediting of creoli2ed languages
throughout the Caribbean. In the
particular context of St. Lucia,
attitudes to 'patois' were consi-
derably influenced by the course
of the history of education in the
island.

* Education in St. Lucia really
starts with the Mico Schools in
183S. Until 1842 these were the
only public schools in existence.
They continued until 1891 when
the schools were handed over to
religious denominations which,
however, retained the majority
of Mico-trained teachers. The in-
terest for us is that Mico-train-
ed educationalists were protest-
ant English speakers. They were
trained in the Mico Training Col-
leges in Jamaica and Antigua
where French Creole, was never


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spoken. Their complete is1 14
ance of Credle made theme
it as an' unintelligible gibbe_.
and associate it with backwv
ness. English became the sy-
1o of light and. Creole of diaA
ness. The influence of these 1e,
co teachers, and of others wh'b
came from Jamaica, AnM~ig
and other English-speaking i.
lands (i.e. Barbados and St. V.lh
cent), affected the language ,4
tuation immensely.--En 1904,
the 43 Head Teachers thro
out St. Lucia, 30 .were born.ari-
had grown up in exclusively'En,
glish-speaking islands; 7 of .t.
others were. Irish. Their .inft
ence is still alive today'ankd.S;
Lucians relate that the-- MIdc
Head Teacher in the villag.e'-
Mon Regos would' wlt,-iehe
lagd by night and flog any/ 'ohil
whom he heard palking paWtol
Today, people of Morn- Repi
take strong exception ayeirto
S (Contimued on paieT:
7' f


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'ii' ItA~ SON" --


TUESDAY, JUNE 20,1 49G1 .


Language And...

:'(Continued from page 9) origin and'speak French creole.
) ng addressed in Creole. Noti- At the apex of the pyramid, one
.s were displayed prominently finds.a small minority of expa-
r '-schools to the effect that triate Englishmen, headed by
chodll children were forbidden the Governor, whose numbers
p.speak Creole at school or in are .diminishing. As one- des-
. playground. cends from the apex towards
the base, one meets. the class
In..'St." Lucia, society, educa- of professionalmen -lawyers,
)a' differentiation r a p i d y doctors, engineers and some high
fught about. the creation of civil servants- who possess re-
-different scale of values and markable linguistic abillty. They
e :prevalence of a new' set of can speak' Standard English,
attitude imposed from outs e. some even with an imitated or
ii .a static society like St. Lu- acquired Oxford (sic) intonation
ils. there will always be some which the:, use on 'occasions of
passes; of elites, the standards great importance' and gravity,
f-whidh .will become represent- such as. giving public lectures
i.'e aand will. be silently .impos- to audiences unfamiliar with
Coupon' and'saccepted' even 'by Standard English or speaking
oups' which are essentially with members of _the group at
iijugated by these evaluations, the apex. They can also speak
Sis. only when the society is St. Lucian English, as for ex-
. comirig. dynamic,_ when quick ample on occasions of great
aknges. in stratification' take conviviality among themselves.
ace, when the-sudden 'rise and Although many.of this group will
ill of individuals in the social not be prepared to admit it, the
oale become a, matter of, course, vast .majority can express itself
t-the, prevalence and pirest- in-'French ,Creole. The two im-
;: af ei, groups. will"be chal- portant situations which can
egd,' .' provoke" uterance in Creole are
.i 1) when--addressing domestics
...,St. Lucia the scale of lan- and other, menial, workers and
ig#'.ivalues is' arranged- in 2) when it is desired to display
Is ai" polar distinction be- very popular add democraticc
W .eeb4S. Zg iand French'i cre- attitudes. Further 'towards -the
i me n-'.d;iion' and relations base of the pyramid is a'group
een the .fferent linguistict corhprised of'persons who have
bt..ay berepresented in .had a good primary .or second-
noX .a pyrTamjid, at the base' ary education and are how ,enm-
iwlii.ch 'y situated' the'rural played as civil servants, teach-
P eA ..:ii'. t:he :pbor uneducat- ers, and in-the offices of private
jpepleof. th'Q ... towvis ahd vi-l- firms and' banks. They speak
rs. These -are.for 'the most St. Lucian English. i.e. 'they
i.o.A.frican Jb' Epst. Indiari', make user'6f characteristic inton-
; .. _


ation patterns, and certain
grammatical forms, a phonetic
anr semantic structure-that dib
fer somewhat from Standard En-
glish, yet allowing people of this
group to be easily intelligible
to an Englishman. Between -this
group and the base les a large
number of people with only the
rudiments of primary education.
It includes domestics, labour-
ers, people of miscellaneous em-
ployment and the unemployed.
all belonging to the towns and
capital. They. can be grouped
together with the base in that
Creole is their most fluent and
successful means -of self-expres-
sion. This. group is developing
a distinctive English vernacular
which is strongly influenced by
Creole' phonetic, semantic and
syntactical patterns.

Language differences, it is
seen from the above, are social
and cultural markers; the ling-
uistic grouping coincides with a
high degree of' exactness with
the grouping based on other so-
cial and cultural criteria.
It is very difficult and dang-
erous to try to speak of the nt-
titude of any one social group,
tAking it as a coherent whole,
towards Creole. As I 'have said
before, the general attitude is
dissociative;, but language -prac-
tice..does -not fall, into a. precise
pattern according to social grou-
ping and it is perhaps safer and
more interesting to examine the
different. psychological or social
situations in \which a particular
speech style depends on a psy-
chological situation which stirm-
ulates. a subjective impulse in
aln individual.

Neverthe les s, identification,
real or imagined, with a parti-
,ular social group invites a par-
ticular fundamental attitude to-
wai'ds Creole arid an examinat-
ion 6f this is rnot without inter-
est. There are two important
groups d-e f i n e d prinmrily by.
their group attitude towards Cre-
ole and which cut--across social
divisions based on traditional
criteria: [birthh, wealth, educa-
tion. The .fyst comprises descen-
dants of French creole families
with cons; o u s ness of .their
French origins and traditions
who have not become fully re
conciled to English as- the offi
ciaI I Lon ai p in tC I kTn'iJ.


-. .- --.- -



TOa




JOHNNIE
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....S0 00** @O *'
o ti ,e ..,,


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1JONNIE WALKER

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D (.STU,"pR,. .PREETZMAN-AGGEI
'' '

'.. ., -
''i, .. =-* .' ,.' ; '- ..


.- ik tMed gtooids art W&
int9e^o^ ~te~la^ Stbres in-teU.8.


ed from. exclusively English- die class group of professionals,..
speaking islands. These persons etc., is rather homogeneous. 'As
have retained the original shock a rule they reject Creole as the


they must have felt on hearing
Creole for the first time; and
even in cases -the majority--
where they have acquired a
knowledge of Creole, their,host-
ibty to that form ot expression
has remained most intense.
The attitude of the upper rmd-


crude, ungrammatical, corrupt
speech of men without culture
and education. There' are, how-.
ever, cases of persons of this
group who feel so socially se-
cure in every respect and whose .
identification 'with the group, is
(Continued on page 11)


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" 1AIT SU N "






DESDAY, JUNE 20, 1961


Language And...


(Continued from page 10)
so clearly established by other
criteria that they can permit
tItemselves to be heard using
S.French creole.
In the lower classes, in the lin-
guistic group immediately above
he base, there exists a vetr am-
iguous attitude to the use of
Creole. Very formal, serious
communication among themsel-
'es and with people of the
groups above, demands the use
of English. This policy has dis-
astrous results in the Law Court


where very often the services of
an English-Creole interpreter,
always available are refused
because the person testifying is
afraid of revealing his ignor-
ance of Enghsh. The same situa-
tion arises in banks, where re-
luctance to take advantage of a
Creole interpreter has prevented
persons of the group in question
from understanding the full im-
plications of their transactions.
\\'hat is interesting is that this
class not only has repugnance to
speaking in Creole but considers


". HAITI SUN"


itself gravely insulted and dis-
honoured if a person who nor-
mally expresses himself in En-
glish condescends to address
them in Creole. For the mem-
bers of this group, the image
which each has of himself stim-
ulates the psychological impulse
which determines the linguistic
style used in everyday, informal
conversation. And so there are
conversations carried on by
members of.this group in which
some speak Creole and others
English. In a particular conver-
sation group which met at the
street corner near to my hotel,
the only persons whom I never


overhead speaking Creole,
though, as I afterwards fo
out, they had the ability to
so, turned out to be a prim
school teacher and a police
-both having a higher sti
bracketing than the others: p
time chauffeurs, carwashers
unemployed. In addition, the
,rents of the policeman had cc
to St. Lucia from neighbour
St. Vincent, an English-speak
island. The ambiguity is tl
generally speaking, people
this class have a very deep
section for Creole, an affect
which -they are forced to s
press by the demands of the
Lucian society, but which ev
so often impels them to re
against these demands. Whe
mentioned at an Adult Educa
Lecture in Castries that front
purely linguistic point of v
there is no reason why Cri
could not become an official
erary language by the, sa
light as French and Engl
whose beginnings were just
humble as those of Creole, th
was enthusiastic applause fr
the significant section of the
dience. On another occasion,
master of ceremonies at
wedding reception of a cas
worker and his bride. after-
ing through the initial forr
ities in English, felt the co.
viality and, I might say, the
nuineness of the occasion
remarked that he was going
continue in langue mama mz
'the language of my mother
The language situation is
ustrative of a very interest
form of social distantiation.
nerally, the democratic char.
'o.


--

.. fS.i... I :.


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men Hi


PAGE 11 I


al- er of a society is evaluated ac-
)und cording to the degree of ininm- .
do acy which the member of ie
ary class are inclined to sanction
nan between themselves and memb-
atus ers of' another less fortunate
art- class. In St. Lucia, people who
or have great facility in speaking -
pa- English pay considerable atten-
ome tion to the preservation of this
ring index of separation from the uin-
king educated poorer masses. Some, ;-
hat, we have seen,.even disclaim any
of linguistic ability in Frenqh cre-
'af-, ole. On the other hand, for the
tion more democratic- members,- -
sup- speaking creole is the primary.
St. means of shortening the social .".
'ery distance between themselves and '.
eact the members of the lower class- '.
n.I es. Among the latter ,there is '
tion of course, the desire to remove .'.1
n a any mark of separation' from :
iew the upper classes; whereas eco-
eole nomic factors prevent them from ,
lit- identifying themselves by. .dresd' .:
%me housing and general, living con-.
ish, editions with the upper -class -
as they attempt to achieve that.
lere identity in speech and in some
rom cases also insist -on being spok-
au- en to in English. One observes
the therefore a movement towards
the the apex of the linguistic pyram-
;ual id; some flatives whose linguist-
go- ic ability places them very near
nal- the apex acquire anr intonation,
nvi- popularly but erroneously call-.
ge-' ed an 'Oxford accent,' to pre-
and serve better the distance from.
Sto people below them on the pyra
wen mid and to'crpate'a new sepa-
.' ration from those at their level.
ill- Here again, it is more. a- ques-
ting tion of individual psychology, of
Ge- the image. each individual has
act- (Continued on. page. 12)


., .,
-4


I .. : l

















WITIH A.






*;PAA6E 1 -




Langua

S (Continued from page 11)
"of himself, because he acquisi-
'~Ttion of certain linguistic habits
does not necessarily mean com-
.plete cultural assimilation with,
.-.and social acceptance by the
class of which these habits are
characteristic. English is cer-
!'tainly a means of social mobil-
ity and a' cultural attainment
such as learning to speak this
Language in its 'uncorrupted'
.form as spoken by the cultured
y'.whites is an important social in-
-.dex; but it is so to a relatively
'small degree in this small com-
*imunity, of St. Lucia, where eve-
xryone is more or less classified
at birth and the classification
welll known to all other memb-
ers. of.the community. /
L':et us examine the psycholog-
4cal situations which permit the
ise o. French creole and also
.the patterns of verbal conduct
iaracteristic of different forms
'ft. social intercourse. Creole is
ncipally the. vehicle for ex-
.;..ressing the more elemental and
-vulgar aspects of life. It is the
language of abuse and insult;
it is used to relate jokes, parti-
'cularly. sputty and obscene ones;
:tK complain about the harshness
tU-life. -i.there is a, cartoon ap-
aring in the leading weekly
neiespaper which always, treats
o tlis aspect of' life, and which
its caption in Creole- the


" HAITI SUN"


TUESDAY, j


more quickly in areas and mocratization is impeded by the
g e among groups in which there is divergence between the two lan-
W least conservative restriction. In guages, and besides, as we have
St. Lucia, the .class in which seen, this divergence leads to
Linguistic innovations are born more conspicious social distant-
only example of Creole figuring tire history of the indigenous does not possess English 'as a nation. The result in St. Lucia
in the press; in moments of people of the island. Conscious- spontaneous means of self-ex-is also that no expression of cul-
gre at emotion (exclamations, ness of this history is achieved pression; it has no facility in ture of the, lower classes is ac-
swearing, etc.). Creole is also through Creole, as this language the familiar, colloquial use of fepted by higher social groups.
a private language, one of inti- is the depository of the folklore English. There is besides little Dramatic productions in Creole
macy, so that confessions are of the people. Creole is the \e- permeabilit in the St. Lucian have been discouraged; there is
done largely in Creole and ser- hide for proverbs; for handing society. On the conh y, in Tri- no movement towards elevating
mons delivered to the same au- down traditional popular cust- nidad, linguistic notations are an expression of folklore to re-
dience in English. Creole ful- oms, ceremonies, rituals. Tradi- born in the cre native strata -present the natural culture.
bils none of the functions of a tional techniques, by which aborn in e create strata -resent the natural culture.
llsta r langge. Attempts by lare percentage of the popula- amongst the lower classes- and Again the contrast is with Tri-
standard language. Attempts by large percentage of the popula- penetrate easily and quickly to rudad where calypsoes, steel
the church and radio to use Cre- tion still lives, are expressed in the upper cases. Some expres-bands. limbo dancing, etc., havee
olehave met with opposin C e O ththe upper classes. Some expres- bands, limbo dancing, etc., have
ole have met with opposition Creole.- On the other hand, En-
le have other had, En- sions reach St. Lucia and give, now become fundamental items
from people of all classes, glish is the vehicle for vet for- to the everyday conversational of the national culture. The lin-
meal and artificial occasions; it language of the English speak- guistici dependence of St. Lucia
Whereas a member of the less is the medium through which all ers its ony.ing d dynamic on Trinidad is further evidence
class ts to o- o l ntio d ers its onlyv.bing and dynamic on Trinidad is further evidence
privileged classes tends to o official, national and inherited foeatures. In Trinidad, this phe- that Trinidad is the political and
ject to being addressed in Cre- institutions function. Creole is nomenon reflects the democrat- cultural hub around which the
e t hS 'e of hi, ^, -d to e l e 1"- wie is. nomenon reflects the democrat- cultural hub around which the
ole except by one of his very used to describe the non-official. ization of society and culture. Eastern Caribbean -graitates.
intimate circle, in a situation private and fundamental mores In St. Lucia, this process of de-
where'he loses his individuality of the people; Creole is, there-
and .freedom before another per- fore, expressive of that is usual-
son such as in the relations be- ly called the 'soul' of the peop-
twepn servant and master or le, It is deeply rooted to the
riistress of a house, Creole is life and the indigenous history
the vehicle normally used. In of the people. As one expects,
general, people in servile and Creole is a more living, more Tobacco tastes best .
domestic employment arq ad- creative and more spontaneous whe the filter's recessed
dressed in Creole. It 'must be means of expression. English as
admitted, however, that this spoken in St. Lucia is very con-
may be a preservation from the servative and particularly among I
time when people in such em- people who have no opportunity
ployment invariably could ,.not ,f speaking it with Standard En:
speak or understand English glish speakers and twhosen cnn


The two languages which face
each other in St. Lucia are clear-
ly different in nature and func-
tion. Creole incorporates the en-


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act with English has been exclu-
sively through the school, it i-
v*ery literary. Among many peo-
ple in St. Lucia, a conversation-
dl Standard English style has
*iot developed. For 'example.
there is no elision of the copul-
'tive verb is or the auxiliarie
do, can, to the negative particle
.or of the subject pronoun t
the copulative to be. Thus he i'..
s never he's and he is not i
never he isn't.- Innovations i
English tend' tb come from Tri
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uistic innovations are produce'
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THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT


RONY CHENET .& SONS
AGENTS FOR HAITI


Address Rue des Miracles Opposite National Bank.


SHotel Sans Souci



EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT VERY INFORMAL


"COOKED TO ORDER"


BARBECUE DINNER 7:00 to 9:00 PM



WITH THE SANS SOUCI COMBO
>.

DINNER $2.50 Per Person



EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT 8:00PM To Midnight


I PUNCH BOWL, DINNER DANCE,

FLOOR SHOW AND PRIZES

WITH THE SANS SOUCI ORCHESTRA
WITH THE SANS SOUCI ORCHESTRA
w


I


at~tr~~w


~


I ,


SUNE 20, 1901


I


I





TUESDAY, .JINE 20, 1961


IN HAITI THIS WEEK
(Continued rrom page 2)

of New York. Mr Macree'is President of Blue-Sky Tours an
Mr. Rieger, in motion pictures, is the Owner of all the Fight films
of Main Event, he is the producer of a Net Work TV Show.-
-Joan Young Darrow, a copywriter from Kansas City, Mo is
currently visiting here. She arrived Sunday June 18. She was
described by Banker Russell Farnworth as a beautiful blue eyes
blonde, a TV Producer. Writer, actress, specially famous because
of her sexy voice as weather girl it Radio and TV.-
-Dr David Yale Levine, and his wife Helena are current guests
at the Chatelet de la Montagne Noire. Dr Levine practices internal
medicine in New Jersey.-
-Industrialist Ambrose J. Hartnett from New. York arrived last
week with Mr. W. Ross Davidson from New Jersey and were greet-
ed by Mr Jean Excellent, Commercial Councellor at the Haitian
Embassy in Washington. They were joined at the El Rancho Sat-
-urday by Engineer Stewart MacFarlane and Businessman Satus-
tiano Garcia. They plan to build a 30 million dollars sugar mill in
the South.-

-Dr. Denis Lazure, Director of the Centre de Psychiatrie de
Port au Prince and Dr. Lamarque Douyon represented Haiti at
the Third World Congress of Psychiatry held in Montreal easily
this month.-
-Ambassador Robert Newbegin Jr. is celebrating his birthday
today, June 20.-
-'Dr Robert Steinmuller, an internal medicine practitioner at
the National Institute of Health in the State of Maryland and li'
wife.Lillian, a teacher are current guests at the Grand Hotel Oln'l
son.-
-Charming Miss' Barabara Ellen Faust, a travelling Stylist for
-the Dress Patern Division of McCall Magazine of New York flew
2: here Sunday from Jamaica where she wasted two weeks of her
vacations, she said. .Miss Faust, full with pleasantery and "joic
de vivre" fits beautifully to the Land of Joie de vivre which is
Haiti. She is staying five- ays at the El Rancho.-
-Mr Tito Balbis, Manager-of the Casino flew to Canada to visit
his family in Montreal.-
-lan Grant Rawson and his fiancee.. Miss Dian Elizabeth Nagel
arrived Sunday for a two month visit here. Ian is the-son of Mrs
Larry Mellon of the. Schweitzer Hospital in Deschapelles. He is
from. Connecticut. Diane is the daughter of Mr and Mrs, John
Nagel from Chicago.-
--Charming Brigitte Ursula G.roehl who is studying in the States
returned for the summer Sunday.-


. 'A 1f TI SU N


Woodward, Career Man
Named Latin Affairs Head

Kennedy Fills State Department Post,
Ending A Search Of Four Months
Two Ambassadors Are Appointed

By E. W. KENWORTHY reason. In the State Depi
IN THE NEW YORK TIMES.- ment, Adolf A. Berle Jr., a 1
Washington President Ken- mer Assistant Secretary of St.
nedy announced Friday that he for Latin America, has a sor
had selected Robert F. Wood- what anomalous position in
ward, Ambassador to Chile, to chain of command as a coorc
be Assistant Secretary of State ator of Latin-American affair
for Inter-American Affairs. theWhite House, Rich
Mr Woodward, 52 years old,
is a career officer who entered
the Foreign Service in 1931. He
has had extensive experience-in
hemispheric affairs. He served I
as Ambassador to Costa Rica
and Uruguay and also as Dep-
uty Assistant Secretary of State
for Inter-American Affairs in
1953-54.'FIRE /CRR E
The selection of Mr Woodward
ends a four-month search for a
successor to Thomas C. Mann,
last assistant secretary for the
area, who is now Ambtassador
to Mexico.
Officials said last week that
Carl B. Spaeth, dean of the Stan
ford University Law School,- had
been chosen. But last Tuesday
Mr Spaeth called the White
House to say that he had decid-
ed he could not take the post.
According, to official sources, Mr
Spaeth said- he tas declining
because of his long absence from
Latin-Amrerican affairs.
Mr Spaeth, the sources said,
assured the White House that
his decision had not been in-
fluenced by any fear that his
authority might be attenuated
because of the number of offi-
cials who have a role in Latin-
American policy.
.It is known that some ,pro-
specti\e candidates for the post
were reluctant to accept for this'


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- '


licy, and Arthur M. Schlesi.ge...
Jr. is also given-specific assgn -..
ments in the arei.
With the appointment of an as.
sistant secretary, officials said
today, the lines of authority will
presumably be clarified. Undet!i-
the over-all authority of Secre-
tary of State Dean Rusk, it was
assumed, Mr Woodward will.
have the same relationship to.
Mr Goodwin in the White House .
as, for example, Foy D. Kohler,,.
Assistant Secrtary of State for'i.
European- Affairs, has to Mc::
(Continued on page 16.5)'






.E-I .H AIT

S, OFF THE. TELEDIOL
".THE BOY SCOUTS deserve a medal for the landscaping job Mr Bernard Diederic
they're doing around their nice building. on the Boulevard AT Directeur Haiti Sun
'LAST the potholes in the Martissant Road just after the Boule- Port nau. Prince
Cher Monsieur Died(
:vard ends are being properly'repaired-gravel AND tar ANDY M'permette m'rin
K HAWhY finally got his visa after a month's wait and is off for version' que m'croi
Vacation in the States. His brother, who is in Nigeria, is taking traduction sonnet 98
Sa trip thru. Europe and will see Andv's sister who lives in Spain. re. Hemistiche in a
i. .That's a widely spread' family INCIDENTALLY, letters from te ban m' en pile
comrme m'te vie rend
Nigeria reach Port au Prince sooner than those sent from Jere- decassyllabes angle.
-"imie! KATHERINE DUNHAMl's five buck minimum is keeping M' espere moune q
:them away in droves I HEARD about a man who paid a -$-0 a langue nous va
','fine fprusing a Cumberland. He was tripped up in the raid on plaisir trA\'ail ca que
nqu' pour monster u
:-.t1em in the Lalue section where eight out of every ten houses qu pour montrer fl
4. -, et facilite adaptation
,ere' guilty. When caught. .users are without current- for four or teller 'o
Swre g Naturellement, mo
.-fiyv. Haas, before reconnection is made. One man who was caught yer n' sou Latin, m
i;-.-ad,.been expecting a certain visitor for. six months. The guest que nous. pour cree
i.-arnived dn the night, the current was cut. Wouldn't you know? -- sodie logique parce
'VI-ITEY WHI'EHURST is threatening to learn Spanish now that frae compete ou
c creole pas susceptible
t.-ii. Venezuelah cutie is in town or' is it because he's' gone to en tinc.
-. Honduras to build aupacket of(tobacco sheds? THE SQUIRE of 'Creole ce oun z'oise
S-Kenscoff sent a bo3 out to get sdme cloudss fines" (small-nailsl, plumes li qui gain pc
'-1e came back with chlorine QUOTE of the week: "I'm not in ler cote' moune pas
a 'hur' for the right man to'come along I'm having too much croue.
Caq interesse'rrL. I
;? with the wrong ones." A LQNG-LOST cousin of Dan Allen Shakespeare 3o ce qI
-:.turned. up here on .a cruise, ship last week. Dan denied having !er traduction a Haiti
ca cosin and you can't blame himn--he hadn't seen her: in 4u ge ranmasser guiol
ears hen he was a-wee baby I HOPE somebody has irescuea com ouue au Cap
hose tbezere.
'at horse, \wit, ,a broken leg who stood on three legs from at bezee.
Nlfoue ac plaisir
,least. monday to at least Wednesday afternoon in front of the S ou ac malt
Sun couvri ac mait
.'iera Hotel MAGIC ISLAND TOURS is in lizz\ with the Im- merits St. Domingue
migrationon Dep't. AT LAST the pile of dirt an1d -debris fiom ou rece\oi bravo de
i.j.oss. the'street in front of the P.O. is being remno\ed. You can Emile Ro
tl how Aong it'd been there. A little foot-high mango tree had 12.6.61
sprung up on it DICK FINCHER, Florida's largest Chewv deal- PS.-Parmi lectern
s t-ce quo pas ta
: r and Gloria de'Haven's husband, is in town to 'look over a busi- pour mdiquec. m' oun
es' -- THE STANLEY WHELPTONS of Windsor, Can., wftb spent prosodie anule? m'l'
e- Spring at HQtel Majestic-Petionville, have niade a, gif of d'avance.
eecnical equipmentt, to the Mellon Hospital at Deschapelles. ,Stan-
ley is 'an electrical contractor and visited the hospital. while in .
giti., Isn't this what's know as'brotherly lqve? Or is it, bands 'C I
'caoross the -sga?: Anyhow, it's great. *' .

B ,,. -NIGH'
KA.MA '- AJOR.


;.' ATCHES OFGREAT DIST ACTION
TUESDA
t I TO GIVE AND WEAR WITI PRIDE -TUESDA


". sEgg Roll (2) .

SWon ton soap :




Choice

: N Sweet .& Sour

shrimp Foo 1

SChicken chow

Ref. 73r7 .,Nec Plus Ultrg ofselfwinding lobster chow I
watches 39 Jewels -'Gyrotron powered bst
ee the superb t9go Giuard-Perregaux
:4 SelecienZ mobdels at foremost jeaeletrs tea or coffee



-
5 $3.00




.A Candlelight
ON S A LE AT THE
Restate
BETTER STORES
On the Petionvil


- .1


I SUN"


TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 1961


SHAKESPEARE XCVIII


ch


erich
voyer ba ou
ue definitif
SShakespea-
II his trim
tete charge
le en creole
yo.
[ui interesse
accuellli ac
e m' fe rien
idite creole.
n.
blige appu-
anman lan-
er oun pro-
que years
s douetes,
e copie tine

;au ac, toute
issibilite \o-
p'm jam'

an sonnets
ue pour epe-
ens va obli-
e yo pour
'di; parler

genre Hadi
rise evene-
yo et prie

oumer

irs ou yo
gain youne
bon auteur
remercie 1'


From you have I been absent in the spring
Wheh proud-pied April, dressed in all his trim
Hath put a spirit of youth in every thing,
That heavy Saturn laugh'd and leap'd with him:
Yet nor the lays of-birds, nor the sweet smell
Of different flowers in odour and in,'hue.
Could make me any summer's story tell,
Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew:
Nor did I wonder at the lily's white,
Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose;
They where but sweet, but figures of delight, .
Drawn after \ou, Nou pattern-of all those.
Yet seemed it winter still, and, you away,
As with your shadow I with these did play.


SHAKESPEARE SONNET 98

m'te trouve nm'absent cole ou lan printemps
lors nchement taclete Avril, an bas toute fion I'
t'ap mete oun souffle jeunesse lan chaque bagaille,
que balourd Saturne t'ap ri et saute ac. ii.
L'heuj' i ni romances z'oiseaux ni douce fragrance
different fleurs Tan sent bon ac nuance
n'importe qui conte d'ete te cab fe m' di
ou a blond giron piend yo cote yap grand
nii m pas t' emerveille gen lys teblanc
ni vante vermilion fonce qu' lan rose.
Ce douce yo te douce, min images delices
qui faite d'apre ou puisqce ou ce modele toute.
Min I' semble'hiver encore, et vu. que ou loin
ce cor ac I'ombrage ou que m' tap joue ac yo.


Modern haitian


Paintings.

GALERIE PINCHINAT

On Show Now At'


SBy MAX PINCHINAT

106, BOIS VERNA
Just before you reach the "PONT MORIN" bridge

SThis is an ART GALLERY, not a picture shop, ex-
hibiting over 100 of the most attractive FRAMED
PAINTINGS made both in Port au Prince and Paris by
FAMOUS HAITIAN PAINTER MAX PINCHINAT
now in France.

The artist WHO HAS EXHIBITED BOTH HERE
AND ABROAD for the past 15 years, comes back to
Haiti every five years and for 15 to 18 month renews
the contact with his people and his source of inspira-
tion. -

SIn the GALLERY PINCHINAT are grouped
some paintings of the 15 years of work by MAX PIN-
CHINAT, from 1945 to 1960. Prices have not been ar-.
bitrarily based on beauty of the painting, htt on its
size, just like Paris Fashion for MAX PINCHINEAT
and OTHER WELL KNOWN ARTISTS. Visitors can
consult the paintings price list if they wish to.
All the taxi drivers know GALLERY PINCHINAT
AND don't let anybody tell you that the GALLERY is
closed. It is not.

The GALLERY PINCHINAT, sole represen-

exhibited a fen samples only at "Foyer des Arts Plas-
tiques", "Galerie Brochette" and Galerie Stisse".
Open from 10 AM to 5 PM, and on appointment in
the evening, ADMISSION FREE.


I'. .t .- '. .-


II-





IESDAY, JITNE 20, 1961


3* c '.~. ,
--.5


"HAITI SUN"


WOODWARD, CAREER MAN, attached to, his Allanc.r
.gres pgrama.
ii Joseph report
Authorities sources said,
(Continued from page 13) pointment because of the state- Secretary Rusk had propbb
ments made by the President Mr. Woodward's nai 6' to
S George Bundy, the President's during the campaign and- be- President following ,Mr.. Spa
assistant on security affairs. cause of the importance he has call
JI L 'IB ^ "- ~Relationship UITclear -
~ But officials said it was not '
SFathers Riou and Blood flew down from Tortuga last week on entirely clear just what Mr. r lu u QUEUR
:.business... Skin specialist Dr Mortimer Harris w'as in from New Woodward's relationship to Mr.
York visiting ftiiends...-Djuka Julius, LA correspondent, for Pol- Berle would be, or Mr. Berle's DIS ENSAB E FO
tiaka" the leading Yugoslav daily newspaper returned to-Cuba to Mr Goodwin. They presumed IN.DISPBN LABL F O..
that Mr Berle would operate-as
Monday after spendulg a week here. The RCA cable men were a consultant to Assistant-Secre HE ENJOYABL
.... a consultant to Assistant-Secre EPART"-
fuzzed by. his- language. Djuka ,will ily hom Havana to Brazil to taryWoodward and through him .- .
.'cover. the, forthcoming visit of his President. Tito... Mrs Corlcy- to Secretary Rusk. AND
"Smith departed for home in England Monday. Husband' British ... .
Ambassador who is going on leave will join her next month... The consensus of older o AGENTES FESTI
Walter M. Pierce Jr. has held posts in Caracas and Kingston since eigu Sevice officers and Latin-
leaving the management of Tropigas here last year... Therd are Air. Woodwaid had been an able : The only Swee L QUEUR mada.b'i SJ
S.to hundred British West India is resident in Haiti.and four thou- career minister arid that he was 4 the lasis o the finest ure old. S OT Hf- IK
Wand In the Dominican Republic... 'Raymond Dreyfuss living .and thoroughly schooled in the pro- Indispensable for festivities and for every -CO
attending University in New Yprk is spending a 'month vacation blems of his. difficult area, .'
in his homeland at Laboule... Mrs Gladys Mercier Bailly (with Senator' Wae M DAemo -"m A
Seriator, Wayne- Morse, Demo "
PAA) has.a Gaby boy... Tele-Haiti director Andre Apaid returning rat of Oregon an chairman of L. P .EEtZMAN 'AGG1RHMi& CQi
ih*fom New- York witnessed the departure of the OAS from C.T. the Subcommittee'on Inter-Aine-
last week. while intransit to Port... rican Affairs of the Foreign Re- -'. -.. '
The Hotel Riviera has- been'jinxed ever since its inception. The lations .Committee, praised the, ..
.-, selection bf Mr Woodward, but .
owner died before he could complete it. as. the Hotel. Roosee' Mr Wood aia r u .
...'.. said:
and this week ;i ran ito a :full fledged typhoon. a grocer fo. .. .. ., .-
closed op its-. mortgage and furniture flew out the windows... D .The question I'm now mosi
SAntoine Julieh, .a young. "Psychiatre..lett for Canada... 'Centi interested in is wehetlr or *not -
d'Arf director DeWitt Peters is driving through Spain to the Soutl he' is going.to:have tle autloti ''
a race in a Peugeot with artist Antonio Joseph. They are.expt necessary o function uLccess-
as -sistant-Secretary Bo'
ed to arrive'in.Cannes on June 2... Artists -Ellis Wilson and Steel. Latih -As ficar ,'air.- BSv.thiar to. .1 j.
2 Latin Amehai i Affai.rs By thiu-
Sarage arrive Sunday ifor- another'-visit,.. (Michaelle Malval and i e raiian. I- onsidei":Jr-.' i rrtanti...
Tony ILO Khawty announced th eir engagement Saturday night... that.the ,administative j.unsdirc! .:
n. ; tjion' over- Latin-American affair:. ',q.
S. : "t" be returned~tb the-State Deparn, ;..ures PAtl
nerit nid taken..from special ad! -'x,|n-7
''. ... visers ii te.White foidse t. R .FRA No.I N :"
'- "^V I*-:" : ".. -:- ,' .. .. .... -'^^ o.!.
Some Latl-American diplh: i D r-R i E'P: V-. i,
,i. ... -- ats -.expressed disappidintmea i :., tr D '.. E RT t,.L.:in.i't
All. ;ts e metM, L- Qlbu:I


I


LktdWl e Mn tiih Of in'WiagAa *
been' edt expct uch-a .ap ,'


a 6... ..ry. 'r-.-
l -- "" .&- ; R





.C '.' ,e 16 -

'. E. V Y ,. ..'.PS S ,_ '.-. 'FRIDAY)

tRGO SHP (12.PASSENGERS 5 rlt-7
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*gMjr00S-HIAPS (52 PASSE ARERStROM^S1
FOR INFORMATION '.,
,-:- FOR INFORMA TI .- ,









r Joseph. Nada


RT OR YOUR RTRAV hEL AGENT M
.- .. 4
,~~~~~~~~~~ ?: ':.-1-:i- M O:HIS(5 .PSE.o. ES FO -:.-1"7+=+. +
'": L" NGIL'5:;.





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....-.... .. ... ... ..... .......- .- ._ ...


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;






TUESDAY, JIUNEit *, it9


HA tt SUN"


- What Nationality
S Is Choucouie?
(Continued 'from.page 11,
ian orchestras consider the 'sbng
'asse and do .not include it in
heiJ'.reiperdire. They play it
ily on speciall request.
"Since :Haiti is .receiving such
floor. press notices in the U.S.
tiw0uld- sedE..that the Tourist
Ju.lu 'or some' other official
office 0ould .- ntercede and see
t 'Haiti-gets at least her share
Stlie.honors.for the source-of
h. sbog which every tourist
ipart and fakes home, either in
deord fli6rm or:in his heart. Let's
aihghteh' the .disc jockeys out;
en if iti: means starting a coTi-
oversy, that's the best form
,.akertis ih g -anyhdw.
.'-L- -
sTAW' HFAT LAW
,'(Continued from page 1)- -
li.do ciicldrqn,-' article two of
eip aw, qalls Ifor- the Ministers
National .Education- and .Conm-
qe"e 'and id-ustry to .take all
cessa'ryi steps to '%assure .-the
frt c execution of the l:aw and
f; recent all speculation tor the
i.lment :of the consumer.


Skyline. Highway
'To -jacmel
(Continued from page 1)
reportedly, coming down next
week ,to begin the preliminary
work.
The highway when complete
will join this pretty coastal town,
with a multitude of untapped
tourist possibilities, with the Ca-
pital. in one hour. Crossihg the
mountains. at an -altitude of
around 'two 'thousarid feet, the
sky-line highway will itself be
.a Caribbean- tourist attraction.

.RED CROSS

DELEGATE HERE

AFTER CHECKING

:" D. R. .AILS
(Cbntinued from .pagq 1)
vil War and wias instrumental in.
arranging. for the evacuation of
some two' hundred .wounded dur-
ing a cease-fire of the Castro
and' Batista-foirces in Cuba. 50
of 'the. men evacuated from thd*
mountains' wre stretcher cases.


KE PTIONVILLE JT'S





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A'. A
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LA- OMPAGNIE
D'ECLAIRAGE
ELECTRIQUE


rappelle aux non-residents de La
Boule et de Kenscoff que le bor-
dereau minimum de VINGT ET
UN DOLLORS ($21.00) payable
d'avance, pour la period de.
DOUZE (12) mois ou fraction
de DOUZE (12) mois allant du
ler Juillet 1961'au 30 Juin 1962,
'doit etre paye integralement au
Bureau de la. Compagie d'Eclai-
'rage Electrique a:.

Port an Prince Angle des
Rues Dantes Destouches et
du Magasin de 1'Eat
avant ou au plus tard le 30 Juin
1961.

Faute par I'abonne de payer'
ces VING'T ET'UN DOLI.[RS
($21.00), le service" electriquc
peut etre supprime, sans pre-
avis, a. n:importe quel moment
apres le 30 Juin 1961.
La Com pa gn i e d'Eclairage
Electrique invite ses aimables
abonnes de La Boule et de Kens-
coff-qui.son.en retard pour le
pavement de leur' bordereau a
se mettre en. regle le plus tot
possible pour eviter la suppres-
-sion du courant et le paiement
de $2.00 pour la, reconne.on.
.or LA DIRECTION 1.
Port au Prince,..-le.20 Juin 1967.


GERMAN GIFT
(Continued from page 1)
'People."' Minister Kurt Luedde-
Neurath .of the Federal German
Republic made the official pre-
sentation to President Duvalier
at the Nitional Palace last week.


Travelling Abroad
Jack Rieger, famous movie
producer of films of the boxing
world, and his friend John Ma-
cree. the travel agent, who did
most to popularize Bermuda, are
guests at Hotel Choucoune.
Ermnt Mariette, New York
born Haitian, is returning to New
York this week after two months
here. His comment: .Nothing for
me to do here.
MVr and Mrs Daniel Sherzer.
newly-weds 'from Philadelphia,
are honeymooning at Choucou-
ne. They .are including a trip'
to .the Citadel on their visit.
Mrs R. Husen and Flo Ben-
son, both of Chicago, are vaca-
tioning at the Choucoune.

DRIVE-IN CINE
THURSDAY JUNE 22 at 7 &9h.
Columbia Pictures present
THE. LINE UP
Eli Wallach, Robert Keith;
Warner Anderson "
The Saga sized' killer hunt
that panicked San. Frdncisco. and
shocked the U.S.... now becomes
the first full length story of THE
LINE UP...
IN ENGLISH


Moonlight Rider
Garvey
(Continued from page 1)
On his return from visiting the
Citadelle Mr Garvey inadver-
tently boarded the wrong ca
mion at 3 am. Tuesday and
ved eight hdurs later on thi
moonlight express in the 'Capi
tal with his cap plumed wit
chicken feathers. 'He shared ibe
camion with. twenty people and
some three dozen'up-side-down
chicken riders and assorted far
produce.
.,* '
Municipal Theatre::
(Continued. from page 1)
Flmbert.
Those who discussed 'the' pro
ject-at the City Hall included:
Pianists' M a r g r e e ou
chard, Micheline. Lauduri. Deni
and Mrs Jules Blanchlet; Infor-
mation Minister Georges Figaro,
Deputy Ulrick St. Louis, Gerard
Rouzier,' Mr Armard- Amisiali
Dupuy :Theano, Carnot' Armand
EdWard McGurk,'P rof e s;s:.o'
Montagutc'li, Arndre Moise; 'Max'
Guerrier, Iphares Blain, Felix.
Neptune, Michel Auguste and"
Josue Jn. Baptiste.' '


DIAL-A-TOUR' INVENTOR 'VISITS

FRIEND RENE MARINE AT CHOUCOUNE'
S. _____... ;'i

Ira Boyar, President and' in- designed, new- and attractive r
mentor of the' famous Dial-A- evolving disk,- you can literally
Tour vacation -package for the dial the trip you. want to take4
Caribbean was .a one-night vi- Don Stewart,, popular Ne
sitor at Choucoune last week York advertsing executive; sen
witth-friend Rene. Marini. Mr. a few- day's at Chqucoune last
Boyar's gimmick is a personally week,


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West German Minister Kurt Ldede-Neurath receives warm greeting from President DuVali~e
during a private meeting at the National Palace at which time he presented the gift- of a fle
of Volkswagen autobuses from the German People to the Haitian People. Three of the vehicle
are ambulances and the other five are to be used in the Government's illiteracy campaign.
4 i


MOUS

IO V Erl

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SHOES


R EVERY OCCASION

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