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Haiti sun ( June 13, 1961 )

Digital Library of the Caribbean Duke University Libraries
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AA00015023_00162--scan pg 11


Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: June 13, 1961

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00162

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001

Material Information

Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date: June 13, 1961

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00162

Full Text

.,1-.': -- .. -



Weekly
Every
Sunday


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P.ORT-AU-PRINCE, -AITI Avenue Marie-Jeanne CITE DUIABSAIS ESTIME -- Phone 2061 Vol XIV TUESDAY JUNE th, 1961 No 31


s- Message, To Congress


SAND OUR NEW NEIGHBOR Duvalier Outlines Program

And Projects For Deputies


9 ub-Cpmmission collecting evidence of conditions 'in neigh-
ig- Dominican Republic meet with Lieut-General Rafael L.
to, Jr. Chief, of Staff of the Armed force'si at the San. Isidro
se. From'Jeft to right: U.S. Ambassador Gerald Drew, Dr.
6o .Angel Zuleta, Colombia, President of the Commission,
isaidor Augusto "'j. Arango of Panama, Gen. Trujillo and


2 Cuban Survivors Win
Freedomw From R. D.

t .the foreign Press con- Slight soft-spoken Ochoa was
-'on. 'iudad Trujillo last sentenced to thirty years in jail
to.-orover the assassination two years ago while his mas-
ne.Adissimo Trtiillo it was cot 15-year-old Pablo Miraval
p' day for 29/year old De- was sent to a catholic reform
}iez Ochoa a Command- school after their capture in a
m th' Cuba; Army. The state of starvation in the sparse-
t: leader of an invasion ly inhabited mountains around
that landed in central Do- Constanza.
in June 195y won-his
m; q (Continued on page 2)


and Pahlito only survivors of Constanza invasion win
from thirty year sentence In the Dominican Republic and
return to Cuba via Port au Prince Wednesday.


Oh the threshold of this Par-
liamentary session, which w-.wi
.be' characterized- by. a loyal and
sincere collaboration between the
Executive and the Legislative
branches and. by an ever more
conscientious awareness of the
true fiational interest, I take
lileasure in recalling, the identity
of the origin of the two great
Powers of the State and in stres-
sing the extent of the engage-
mentg-,that .they have contracted
with the totality of the popula-
tion of the country.
The work of national renova-
tion and the modernization of the
nation's human forces will be
the result of the -common efforts
of the great Powers ofsthe State,
with a clear vision of the super-
ior irtcrests of the nation.

.fne .. ancient of
progress' by a .methodical policy
of stabilization-'pursued without
respite in the different fields of
national activity should necess-
arily form the balance sheet of
this session, for the happiness
and-prosperity of the people-who
have just overwhelmingly' re-
newed their confidence in the
Regime of September 22, 1957.
The Foundations of The
New Community
The Haitian community, which
is in the process of freeing it-
self from selfishness and indi-
vidualism in order to seek poli-
tical and social peace, which the
Government is offering it for
its evolution and development
through work taking place in



Scouts, Gui

Haiti's boys Scouts and girl
guides won a round of applause
for their recent civic action and
public recognition -as a worthy
youth movement that helps to
mold up-right citizens.


On Mother's day over a thou-
sand Scout and guide leaders
canvased homes in the city and
urban districts for cast-off clo-
thing that they are now clean-
ing and repairing in preparation
to be handed over to charitable
institutions for distribution to
the poor.

Under the theme of God, Fa-
therland* aind help, the National
committees of both the Scouts
and Guides decided to make this
nation wide clothing collection
(Continued on page 3)


order and& in a new-fourd disci-
pline, has strengthened 'me in my
determination to maintain that
beneficial peace which has al-
ways guided our actions and in-
spired every -decision taken
since the birth of this Gover'n-
ment.
With the cooperation ,of the
people and the' young Army, the
Government of October 22, 1957
has overcome the crisis clever-
ly veiled by the claims of stud-
ents. With greater firmness and
greater energy it" is accelerating
the realization of a bold 'social
and economic, program to which
the future of the nation is link-


-" Lasting Victories
Despite the jolts of the terrible
years 1958, 1959, 1960, despite.
'the :hostility- of the'
gression which have ieve dis-
armed, the Government of yes-
terday and of today remains un-
changeably determined to safe-
guard the peace and to maintain
order, the sole beneficial ele-
ments for the prosperity of 'hon-
est laborers.
Also the Government of May
22, 1961, in taking stock of the
civic comportment of the nation,
has called on it to be aware of
the national discipline necessary
to achieve progress and general
welfare.
Economic and Financial Policy
of- The Government
The posture of the Political
Power is reinforced by the eco-
nomic and financial policy of


the State, an open pocy defined,''
as the systematic/encourage '-a
ment of new. and existing indusj,-
trial activities and the. rational. '..'
iiation -and modernization of the -.
financial .machinery of-the state. -..
It has already come to grips
with the different" economic and.,
fiseal measures which have been ,',ti
put into effect since last year
and which tend either.. to san-,i
itize, consolidate, or enlarge ,the.
fiscal picture, or to create- the ;k
necessary conditions for combat
ti.ig liquidity preference with .a':;
view to inducing a normal rateTI'.
of investment.
Much remains to.be.done. An4.. '
i is to--the new task. of setting

tional; finance that the- Goven
ment of the Republic is goeng to .
devote. itself. without re t'.;

the ac' of, the Executive-vWill .
fouow two paths: the one Jnstitu-.
tional, the other legislative. '.
On the institutional plane, the
Government of- the Republic .lias .
considered that it was urgent
and .necessary. to endow the 6
country with. a solid and modem
financial administr.a ti o n. The
present I r a m.e w. o r k-., ei-aer
springs from the period of the,
American Occuaon; with .the -
orientation'"wich is undirstbod
by that, or has deteriorated to --.
the point where it no longer has
any significance. Prodf of this
has Uln revealed J rik? ie
past three years, when ite fi.b-,f-
ahcial administration was- obvi- ,^'l
(Continued on page 16);


des Make -Clothing
.. -. --: ri.-fe ,


Boy S


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couts collecting clothing at Marttissant. -
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OCHOA AND
SPABLITO FRfEED
(Continued from page 1)
W 'An early follower of Fidel
Castro, Ochoa was leader of Co-
r" lumn number, 32 .in the Sierra
Maestra and in .this capacity
he met photographer Andrew St.
George who distinguished him-
self covering the Castro revolt
fromithe early days in the hills.
One of the flock of newsmen
and photographers to descend
on Ciudad Trujillo last week St
i' George and several other vete-
rans of the Castro campaign
asked and saw Ochoa. Follow-
ing an interview with the man
condemned to thirty years in
prison these newsmen made re-
peated suggestive inquiries of
Dominican Officials including
President Joaquin Balaguer as
to whether the amnesty freeing
political prisoners included
Ochoa.
Last Tuesday evening while
St. George and fellow newsmen
were dining at Mario's I"estau-
rant in downtown Ciudad they
were confronted by a free Ochoa
and young Pablito. They had
been brought before Ramfis
that day and told by him that
they were now free.

Ochoa says that his 15 year
old adopted son Pablito was not
included in the Invasion force
although as a tot he had fought
in the Sierra Maestra. Accord-
ing to Ochoa he stowed away on
their C-47 in which they braz-
enly landed in the saucer-shap-
ed Constanza valley and drove
into the 7,000 foot mountains
that rims it. The forces' Domi-
nican leader Maj. Enrique Jime-
nez Moya arid the other mem-
bers of the invasion were wiped
out.


FLORISTN.AVE; TO :BROW
: : -. -* r


Red roses and gladiol rust- -days, funerals and all the va-
ling in the cool interior of a new rious list of anniversaries "Art
neat yellow-brick shop presents de Paris" has a home delivery.
an idyllic scene as near 'to the service and is optimistically
deep forests of Arcadia as one awaiting a telephone connec-


can get to on the sun scorched
Avenue John Brown.
"Art de Paris" is the name
of the newest Florist shop in
Port au Prince located next. to
Iderl's Beauty Salon.
Youthful Betty Drouin, Paris
trained floral expert, assisted
by Jeanine Elie has launched
her shop with beautiful red
roses from -the Safico's Diquini
rose gardens and popular flow-


tion.
Flowers and verdgre grace
the interior of the shop and a.
large Westinghouse cool storage
room. Small statuettes and
flower vases for first Holy Cam-
munion presents -are also dis-
played.


TRAILER FOR SALE


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Catering to weddings, birth- body, 1000 pounds capacity boat
springs with frame and tarpau-
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Covered in smiles the 29 year light, directional signals, trailer
old major and Pablito took the hitch. $175.
first Panam clipper out Wednes-
day morning. They flew to Ha- See E. UHarding USOM
vana, Cuba via Port au Prince
and Kingston. Tel. 4195---Cite de lExposition.


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iD1 JUNE; IStli, 1961 --.0 A 1 TiS N


.- PAGE 8


OFF THE TELEDIOL ,
HAPPEST. news of the week was that Maj. Duane Redallen
Received his( olonelcy Charlie Perez of HAMPCO -had the bad
:ortune tb ITe aving-C. T. on the night the Benefactor got it. He
happened' to pass "the spot" just fifteen minutes ahead ,of the
?\enkHe -was picked up two towns further on by thfb Police, re
turn .C-'.. and detained for 3 days; then he.-was allowed I
[ly bel i us his car A NUMJBER of Reople are woxidering
if Mrs tMellon managed to unscramble the notice last Sunda;
Sthe H -r-of- the engagement of her daughter LOURDES DE
CASTRO wyas one of the prettiest gals in one of the prettiest dress
s at'Bacoulou last week THE OPENING of Leclerc as a nite
iiib Tstaurant' didiit get 'enough publicity-free or otherwise. -
r-E. 'ALLin front of the' new Candlelight. restaurant' is half de
,,olished..1R1ain? Car crash? Or the.beginning of the enlarg,-meni
,i the parking space and kitchen? THE THREE brothers Pen
:er, Lou, Milt and Phil, of Pompano Lake, Flo., expert vegetable
Towers and exporters, who were recently forced out of Castro
eria, are about to cultivate 400 acres in the Artiborute,. an
n,ore next year if they make a go of it here THE RENE MAR
;IS extended "another while and returned home Friday. Miriell
as been relieved of her brace and everyone is happy for her. She'
brave one A LOCAL B.UTCHER, when asked if he beefstea
,as really good, replied: "Good? Mrs. Williams uses it all th
ane.''. -, NEW-MOWN,.grass made Harry Truman Blvd. swyee
mnelU eek, atd-'that was a pleasant ch&qge.---THE U.
rim.y -,i'orce Arista-Craft was "sold to the- newly arrived kin,
,,n al'edt d'Haiti_ (can't spell his namel- THE CARLOS Sho
\i ensionwas' begun: three, .years ago and stopped fr- obvious
._asons -- NOUCHE. DEGENER writes that she is going to r
.ian' in St. Thomas :after listening to -recent radio reports
laitian doings SOMEBODY reported that Skippy Colby is pco
ig back to Haiti. Dr.' Assad wil probably padlock the doors
'ilia Creole.. The vacation plans around town are booming. TI
can Boltes take off on, J'ly first. Yours truly is" taking, off f~
ie weekend to go crabbing off the old Ace Corben dock.
Kay Major..


SCOUTS & GUIDES
(Continued from page -)
for the poor on Mother's Day.
They proceeded their action
with a radio,. press. and televi-
sion campaign to-,'acquaint the
public with their clothing drive ,
fn- thp n'Sr .I I


EVELYNE'S BEAUTY SALON STYLISH


AND NEW IN BOIS VERNA


g Friday more than.1,000 atten-
ded a special, mass at the Ca-
thedral.' and on Sat-rday the
Scout d'Haiti anod Guides, Cubs
and brownies marched to Mili-.
tary and school bands through
the city and placed wreaths on
the statues of ithe Four founding
fathers n the Cho mp de Mars.
it The boys 'in short pants, : as
trim and smart as'any inilitary
e marchers, were led by Chief
o- Scout Emmanuel Lafond Inter-
national Commissioner Kurt A.
d Fisher and Commissioner Gene-
ral Dr. Jean Max Beauge.
e The mile long parade was the
's first 'in many ,years for the
Tk Scout d'Haiti that now. have a A pretty brunette who obtained her diploma in beau-
total membership of 3,400 trou- ty culture from the Marinello Beauty School in the U.S.
e ghou the country. I last year has launched her career here with the open-
t- Recognized internationally in ing of a chic Salon in residential Bois Verna.
S. 1941 .the Scout d'Haiti plan more
g- civic action drtes such as the Evelyne Cham -now Mrs Frantz Heraux- with

collection of clothing for the two trained assistants, a well equipped salon, and a
us Invited to attend the 1963 Jam. workable telephone is prepared to cater to the beauty
e- boree by His Roya) Highness needs of hef countrywomen and fo r e i g n residents.
on Constantine, the Crown Prince Training in the United States gives Evelyne the advan-
m. of Greece, Duke of Sparta and tage of speaking fluent English and iknoung the re-
at iti hope to have thean ipos- quirements of the American woman.
ing delegation at the Jamboree.
or The Scouts are reported to be "Evelyne's Studio" is neat and compact. There is a
contemplating the organization ecqnfortable waiting-room that leads into the modern
of a tree planting campaign to equipped beauty Salon. It is located near the Pharma-
assist the country fight erosion eie du Bois Verna.
--o- enemy number one.
Hours are from 8am to noon and 1pm to 4pm. For
HERTZ AIDS IN appointnient the telephone number is 5127.
PROMOTING CAP

Hertz Rent-a-Car.S ervic e,
which offers visitors so many O N I O N
facilities in Port au Princie, has
appointed the Hostellerie du Roi N N i O
Christophe in Cap Haitien as. its
Ssub-agent; thus extending- its.
3 manifold services as well as aid- FROM
ing and abetting traffic to the
historical old metropolis in the
North.
Thi car rental agencies in
Port-ah Prince can be of real
benefit to the promotion of tour-
ism in general and to tourism
in Cap Haitien in particular, as Onions of first quality are available at the
we4 as furthering their own bu-
siness by providing, as Hertz has.
pioneered,- agents in the North sale cOunt'er of ODVA at the corner of Rue
to facilitate visits to that histor-
ical city and the world-famed des Cesare and Rue du Centre, at the following
Citadel and Sans -Souci Palace
ruins. '

The Hostellerie Rol Christophe pices:
in Cap Haitien Hertz' sub-agent
in Cap is the answer to the ques-
tion "when does a hotel become 10lbs.'Bags 15 Gdurdes
a hostellerie, and Vige versa?"
It is a matter of location and 5Olbs.--Bags. 15 Gourdes
service. The Roi -Christophe, lo-
cated in downtowli Cap Raitien, Wholesale orders will be filled on the basis
provides easy access to all the
sites of interest, the beaches,
shopping, and. gives. its, guests of Gourdes: 2.75- per 10lbs. bags (Minimum
particular personal attention.
.The fine Noiwegian hand of '
o Marina de Catalogne, its owner- .0 ba ) and Gourdes:14 per 0lbs. ( m
mangeress, is seen and. felt ins ..ourdes:.per..... .
the atmos here, the, d cor, .the umlo10 bags.) '
.'fingoubsJtropial gardens and.
(Continued- on page ,)
7, " r '" : ,. , .;. m .' , " i .- -
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' r SUN"


TUESDAY JUNE 13th, 196J- 'T


Two Trujillo Assa

.Dictator's Son Made

S.From EDWIN TETLOW,
^D Eele h .Special OCprr

,/. CI1tTRI441i ;. Monday

S LE TRUJLI.L
ndld suqce sp o.tl
4Rep4ic GoeRerallsh
Sassassbiunated 6 da;
o w d I .a'told, as h
|h b was copunittI ,
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the. 6a6e.l.he_.wquld,-ilot :xe








hbehveen50 a
aer ourcesput' te igure 'i




*.. .Leaders ,aped' "
i Shot k i to o'Deth.-

it. w as said officially dur.n
whi chief conspiratoreen we0 an
.6peop'le ere heain prion,udadTr
eodr sources 'put' the figure
Anything belween 1,000 and 2,100
Leader g ?Prap .ed '
Shqt..-to'Deih." .
e'n. Di 'and Antonio d.
hischief conspirator. we
i "d death la.stm night ,by s
-..t. '.,olie agents who. trapp.
eT.i;nt he :heart of Ciudad-Tr

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ssins-killed In- Street which. Generalissimo Trujillo that Diaz and-De Ia Mlaza had It carried the marks of well
had tried to, save his life in the been taken alive. over 50 bullets and the rear
ambush on Tuesday. night. De' la Instantly he ordered that they window had been completely
e A Vow Of Vengeance Maza's own pistol had been should be brought before him. blown out.
blasted from his hand by a shot Then it was learned that Diaz -
committed against the dictator. from the doomed dictator, had been so riddled with bullets .
r. I ,as in the restaurant only that he had died immediately
about 100 yards away. 'When the assassination was and that 'De la Maza had survi- t -__
y. Cars suddenly began, teaiing over, De la Maza had picked up ved him by only a few mo- O I
by. The. atmosphere grew tense the victim's gun from beside the ments. .
0, although 2no words were .spoken body and taken it away with Bodies On Show
he by. the stAf' or guests.. .. him. His owE,, which he had not Bullet-Ridden Car
i,- Then- the lights went out and been able to locate in the dark- When the Government learned
ys. the entrance door. was close l ness, had incriminated him im- today that doubts were, being
is and. looked. The proprietor and mediately when it was picked voiced about whether the dead '
toi staff were .takig' no chances up by the secret police next mor- men were in fact the assassinI
st, Plea FVo wiShelter. ing.e leaders, it showed the bodies to
ill i-. PoHeqJInformeI., :' people who visited the military
Diaz and. D, a.Ma ahag ..After last night's bloody epi- mortuary just outside the cap-
at to a.house in a streetrukid 1the isode the police -thoroughly sear- ital.
e- corner and, asked- 'the:.o..'.ier for' ched the apartment house above
Shelter. ..This-was:.refse .aud *,the ironmongery, in the hope of There w'as no doubt that the C yA"q'
Sthe. ar -eviden-ly- ,t fobhl6ed finding %,here Diaz and D' la two bodies were those of the
ho the 'secret .police. ,Agents,.,raced .Maza had been seeking help in men whose photographs had been dI
y round. in.cars.and.,begah-;earo'y .their final e, trendity. More than blazoned across the newspapers p U
er ing 'he. neighbourbood., '. 50 people wet;e brought out with for the last six days. Also put
At last; in a street near Inde- their hands in the air. pn show was the car in which JOSEPH NADAL & ( o.
penderice 'Square, .they caught 'up .Crowd Gathers' the Generalissimo was riding Agents.
ig with-,a 'car--with the. two ;Agit- Machetes and Bricks when he was ambushed. ,
id ives inside it. Cornered, the two' A-big crowd, inflamed by the ..
Liut men -ran for the,. shelter of a. shooting, but. only half aware of
at 'b ock of' flats over an iuonmoiJ- what .hbd-.happened; swarmed 'in 1
0. gery. the area of the ironmongery. "
Both fired widly at their r, ir- 'Several brandished machete-s
suers, but missed with eve.-y 'and even bricks in slings as they'
la shot, 4I,n a matter: .of moments demonstrated.
he .Diaz had fallen depd from a
;e- stream of machine-gun bullets For a few. minutes the crowd
ed and seconds later De la Maza were wild and noisy, then, as the
u- was dying along-side him. security agents ordered them;
- Dictator's un away, the 'habits of 31 years o .':
'k- Assassin Changel Pi'stols obedience under dictatorshipp re
se. Then the agents, found that.,.D asserted themselves. They walk '.:
in, la, Myaza had.:been defene-ng ed.away like lambs. -
eY. hiinself' 'with the pistol h . .
: 'While the shooting' was going
"*'- ,on,'Gen. Trujillo, -now controlling. ~H..
the country as. Chief of all' the i
.. A.med. Forces,A .as di M with This is th6 car in which neighbor Generali"Imo Ratael Trujill
friendsjust 'oFtde the od city. iet his death on May 30th. The rear window was compel
S* .& st -.epdrts to' reachhim- 'aid shattered by bullets.


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I" 42'






Y JUNE 13th, 1961


HAITI SUN
THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
t Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
ditor-Publilsher BERNARD DIEDERICH
Gerant-Responsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE
MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1950
t The New York Times

$ LATIN-AMERICAN SECRETARY

,resident Kennedy has at last found someone willing and able
assume the important post of Assistant Secretary of State for
hr-American affairs. Carl B. Spaeth, Dean of the Law School
Vtanford University, is to be congratulated on his courage and
iotism.
It. is essential that the shocking dispersion of authority in the
eldLof Latin-American relations should come to an end. Too many
oks have been spoiling the hemispheric broth. A task force of
white House advisers has been making a confusion of policy while
e 'career staff in the State Department has been understandably
emoralized.


"HAITI SUN"


lowing his election, did not he offer a friend
his adversaries of yesterday? Who does not
pressing and reiterate calls to the sons
fatherland in vew of reconciling the nation v
To govern does not only mean manage, it
during the permanence of the social Body b
all its members under a same ideal, this
President DUVALIER las given himself u
his rise to power."


a .'c..v. assurancessafari, the Hotel provides its:-:
Senator Morse spoke words of wisdom when he said recently t ownguide who makes all arrand
g,.'We need a clear line of command from the President to the gements for the horses, attend-
St afa i, r uo ants, etc. fornehrclimbhas".I
taary of State to the Assistant Secretary of State and people ants, etc. for climb, as we
lig affairs under hi'e." as-or the trip to and from Milot
1ros 'n4) 1.' ,"an relatio s wil a owse it ats e c briadfuion tid"hand
su ly ean Spaeth has received assurances that this is where the ascent begins .Ti
I eliminates cbnfitsion -aid and,
ayour Latin-American relations %ill now be handled. Let Interior and National Defence. Minister BileauMel. ling details, as well ng
i'.e .gMir. Spaet h.succeeds one of the best career offers in sit the SUN. over price withhe oca
tin-Amnrican field, 'Thomas Mann, who is now our Ambass- I a knd make Pbor nothing but
'to iieidc. (photoDi etz) ant memo e- 'for
'MJ- 1 COR N. ,ER S O R, BON.E . .-:.
e ne. Assistant Secretary needs the good wishes that will "U I .'. .
A6 be enrdd 'to him.. The United States faces the most critical B
-cideeretichbed' t .he ispleric affairs. The post of Assistant
cretary in the I nter'ithe ican Bureau cal be of keyimportance
Ijlhwacipcg and dirqeci.g. our,.glijs toward Latin America.



MINISTER BOILEAU MEHUT- VISITS' SUN

On taking over the reins of the Interiorand National Ai
fence .Ministry last week the new cabinet Minister
eoi'au Mehu visited the editorial offtees of the news-
pers in the Capital. '
Minister Mehu during his visit pointed out that his' :
fide door was open to the.press and he called for
eir frank cooperation during his tenure of office.
reiterated the major points of his address to the . .
tion as: "to help President of the Republic to sup- .:
embezzlements, prevent extortions, protect the
fortunates, impose the respect of the -law for the Haul, "Gingerbread Palace" and famed hoste lery --'the Grand Hotel Oloffsoun,. .Show0 pla
guard of common interest, practice justice regard- Haltian architecture, exquisite, cuisine and conteziure pool, is the haven for the unlnilblted.
F of individuals, offer guarantees to' all those acting and gardens the Oloffson, complete with minlat ted living. Set amongst a. myriad of.tropleat trees
ridingg to laws. .

their excerpts from Ministei Mehu highly Interest .
speech are as follows: "Of course, "the State is F IS E SP'
erybody's friend, and everyone's enemy", as they. Fai'
y. The biggest problems it faces in its relations with '
societies is the conciliation of collective interest HAITI'S LARGEST FREE PORT PRICE SHOPS
h individual. interest.'
1) THE CORNER SHOP RUE BONNE FOL
bw-ecan justice be ensured without harming liberty, 2) ART & CURIO SHOP FISHERS ACROSS FROM .U
t is, the leading tendency, the individual's assertion
ds power. "A Statesman s biggest crime against AND. BUY HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS
blic .interest is to .be indulgent towards those violat-
them." ieSTRAIGHT FROM 'THE FACTORY
ile allowing the individual to expand, we will take
scores so that liberty does not degenerate into lic- ON THE RUE DU QUAI .
e which weakens the city and disturbs its found
uns. There again, I give the assurance that the law(am. a NDDNERS CLB a)
ch determines the limits between justice and liberty,
be my decision's motive. SAVE UP TO 60 Per Cent ON IMPORTS
ondly, I will constantly converge my efforts to- SHOPS AND MAHOGANY FACTORY'Z
rds Ils Excellency the Presidept of the Republic's STOMS
st dream: Peace and Unity. Even on the day fol- .l'.

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ly hand to HERT AIDS IN .
t recall his PROMOTING CAP .
of a, same (Continued from page 3) '4
with itself? above all, in the fine cuisine and
-also is in- service. Mrs de Catalogne uses
y grouping local foodlstuffs almost'exclusi- A.
is to what vely in her kitchen, but with. that
p to sin touch of genius, imagniation-and
European background that lifts .
it from the ordinary to the gour-..
met's delight. The .- necessary .
alert service that is so necessary .'
-7- .-^ to enjoyable dining is due to'-!
her high standards and omni-'
present supervision.
As sub-agents lor Hertz, the .-
Rol Christophe staff, particular- '-".
ly 'Mr Hyppolite at the .front
desk, is ready, willing, and able.
to .Supply Hertz drive-yourself' A
guests with road information;4
suggestions for getting the most'
out of their visit, and goes all
out in arranging trips td the Ci-..;
tadel. At no additional fee over ,j
the ordinary price of such a






TUESDAY JUNE.13th, 1961i


ffiington May 27-President
ehnedy's "Alliance for Prog-
s" took a giant step forward
atitrday .when the United. States
liel 'executive signed into law
&. ; dollars 500 million social
eVeloprment fund for Latin -Ame-I
ca. The-Latin American aid
il,-" passed b1y the Congress
i'hyrday, provides for an addi-
toaL dollars 100 million to .help
bles earthquake relief and re-
Ditrucction program, bringing
a'total to dollars 600 million.
EPore signing the bill, in his
(te House Office in the pre-
e of Vice-President Lyndon
r .!Johnson,- former president
y S.-:Truman, ,members of
.onress, and representatives of
.e Organization.- of Anmejrean
tdter '(OAS), President KMnne-
\',ad the.Alliance for Progress
.an "effort of the people of the
rwed Stater to promote better-
entPof. ther.life of" the people
-."e :hemisphere.


"I believe that in the upcom-
ing months and years we can
build a stronger and more pros-
perous hemisphere," the Presid-
ent said. He cited the traditional
cooperation between the Ameri-
can. nations and the "willing-
ness to advance, their common
willingness to take the necessary
steps .which Will insure a 'more
fruitful existence. -

"All these are essential;" the
PresideAt added, ".'if this hemi-
sphere is to move forward in a
true alliance for progress. Pre-
sidefit Kennedy had previously.
described the fund as -"only q
first step". in this ten-year,., ten-
point program to bring better
living conditions to the people of
Latin America.
The social .development fund,
to be administered principallV
by the Intier-Ameriqan Develop-
ment Bank (IDB), has also been


described by US Government of-
ficials as a means of helping
"the common man" in Latin
America. Vice-President John-
son called the social fund -"one
of the most substantial funds
in history for the development,
enrichment, and betterment of
our neighbors in this hemi-
sphere. He recalled that, "we,
through out our national History,
have had a deep concern for
brotherhood" and this will make
brotherhood and progress a
reality." Former President Tru-
man, who had called at the
White House to pay his respects
to President .Kennedy, said of
the Alliance for Progress. "I
think it is one of the best things
that has been done."


Senator Wayne Morse, Chair-
man of the senate sub-commit7
tee on Latin America said, "this
is'.truly a new frontier for all
of Latin America, and the United


Alliance For Progress" Moving.
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States. I think it opens a new va a poner toda la fuerza a este`
era of cooperation, not only be- programa"
tween the Government of the Uruguayan- Ambassador DonW
United States and the Govern- Carlos Clulow, chairman of the
ments of Latin America, but, Inter-American Economic and,
what is even more important, Social Council of the OAS, cal-;.
between the people of the United led the program "el primer acto.
States and the people of Latin de ]a America en marcha"
America."- Brazilian Ambassador Fernan-'
do Lobo, Chairman of the Coiun-.
Dr. Jose A. Mora, Secretary cil of Theoas, said the fund.-"re-
of the OAS, said: "Este acto es present otra prueba. de la nue-':
la expression de la firm' volun- va obientacion del gobierno nor-'.
tad del president Kennedy de teamericano, relative al desarr-..
flevar adelante con todo vigor rollo economic -y social de la-...
uin plan acelerado para el de- America Latina." He said thed.
sarrollo social y economic de aid plan should "levantar el ni-...
los pueblos de la America La- vel social de los pueblos Latino-'
tina. El Presidente Kennedy le Americanos."


Caribbean Construction Co. SA.


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"HAITI SUN"


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PAGE 8 .J


Status. Of The Church


i St. Domingue During Last


Years Of French Monarchy


e.r. Trembley is Research As- royal edicts from the king, by registered either by the prefect properly in their .parishes a
eociate with the Institute of Car- ,proclamations issued -by minist- or. by those priests subject to with the support and encourage
Mbbean Studies, Uiiversity of erial departments In Paris which his administration. However, this ment of the general governme
Puerto Rico, and teaches in the had jurisdiction over the speci- registration was in no way in- One can conclude that the au
university's Department of His- fic controversy that had arisen tended to give the High Councds drity, seemingly arbitrary a
Wory-nIn 19A6-57 be held a Buenos and by ordinances issued in St. iiuwer of approval of the romi- excessive which rested with 0
iresq Fellowship from the Fniti- Domihngue by the governors and nation itself. cinil authorities was somewl
miGovernment. intendants. lessened by a final nrovisi,


WILLIAM A. TREMBLEY
.rhe .governments in Saint Do-
mn1gue which resulted from the
eh Revolution,, even though
t ,signed' concordats with the
ih, tended towards' the prin-
le of imposing their. own 'so-
,reignty in religious matters.
e,. traditional concept which
revolutionary France had for
Christian State died with the
solution in SainL: Domingue
and ,as never revived in the
l[tian period' of -the church's
r i.o -d' o

pA the. French colonies eccle-
asticpl.1government came to. be
iaegJated- by an 'ordinance pro-
iged very late in the colon-
..eriod, 1781. Up to- this time
t.)-elations of the colonial cler-
with the civil -uthorities,
general and local,, and with
;"colonists had been fixed byT
co n agreement:as each .pro-1
bem. arose, by letters- patent-., or


The Ordinance of 1781 recog-
nized two apostolic prefects as
the heads of the clergy- in the
colony through powers invested
directly by the Vatican. This re-
cognition did not, however, ad-
mit to an exercise of any- papal
*jurisdiction of a local or person-
al nature, but only simple au-
thority and discipline over the
missionaries. Before being allow-
ed to exercise the office of pre.
fect in Saint. Domingue all lett-
ers patent granted to the nomi-
nee from the king had to be re-
gistered as provided in letters
patent, dated .July 31.. 1763, in
addition to the order of appoint-
ment from the superior of the.
order and the papal bull or brief
of nomination, with the High
Councils at Cap Francais and
Port au Prince. This formality
was felt necessary- to establish-
hrmly the powers of the prefec.:
ixl matters of marriage so that
the colonists 'would recognize a!;
valid the contracts of marriage


Articles 11 and III of the 1.81
Ordinance contained strict reg-'
ulations for the prefect in the
choice and admission of priests
to the colony, the qualifications
being established under the Sa-
cred Congregation- of Propagan-
da in Rome, The prefect was
given the power of sitting as
judge over infractions and mis-
demeanors committed by the
clergy, and lie could order the
guilty one back to France; how-
ever, the Ordinance provided
that the governor and intendant
might intervene if they felt that
the case had been exaggerated.
Further provision %%as made in
later ardicres of the Ordinance
for inspection and authority of
the governor and intendant over
the personal life of the prefect
and the priests as well as over
the. conduct of their parishes,'
alth6ugli Article III qualified
this son.ewhat by impressing
upon these chief officials that
the prefect and the missionaries
were to be allowed to function


nd
ge-
nt..
th-
and
the
hat
inn


which gave to the 'prefect the
last decision on disputed appoint-
ments for the prefecture par-
ishes. Supervisory prerogatives,
therefore, were apparently put
in the hands of the governor and
intendant as general -police pow-
er for the purpose of maintain.
ing the peace of the colony.
The Final article of the Ordin-
ance required the prefect to file
a written report each month on
the state of the missions, parish-
es, religious communities and
the conduct of the clergy with
the Navy Ministry in Paris and
with the governor, the ijeuLe:
nant-general and the intendant
in Port au Prince. This require-
ment did not' seem to have been
the cause 'of much complaint
from the clergy in Saint Domin-
gue. The other provisions, how--
ever, were less popular. Most
critical was Prefect Charles Da-
mien-Duguet of the Dominican
prefecture in the South. He com-
plained that the Ordinance of


* S U


on




. *.


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tTUESDAY JUNE 13th, 1961


1781 had raised the already ex-
cessive police liower of the gov-
ernor and intendant to "the last
degree of despotism." In prac-
tice, however, the prefects in
Saint-Domingue, prior to the Re-
volution, could not complain
about the attitude toward their .
authority shown by the colonial
administrators. Nevertheless, a .
change of attitude can, perhaps,
be considered as a factor in the
more arbitrary regulation of the.
Church by the civil government
in the last years prior to the
end of French colonial rule in
Saint Domingue.

There was. one aspect of the
colonial church il Saint Domin-
gue which was entirely divorced
from any control by either the-
royal government or the colon-
ists, namely the maintainance
of the missions. Income for the
Capuchin missions came direct--.
ly from the Ministry of the Na-
vy while that for the Dominican
missions in the South was ob-
tained by a direct tax against
the planters of the towns of Leo- -
gane and Cavaiilon. Although
the prefects constantly lamented
the inadequate support which
came for the French authorities,
they appreciated the freedom and..
lack of local regulation in this
field of evangelical work.

If one examines closely the
role of the ci4vl power, one con--*
eludes that indhr the ancien .re-
ghue' church iilations in Saint
Domingue ii 'conducted' as a
collaborative undertaking- on ,the ":
part of, the clergy and the secul- '
ar authorities. After the promul-
gation of the Ordihnance in 1781
the principle of the entente, be--'
came less and less adhered to,
for where the ecclesiastical au-
thority was not clearly defined
the secular authority always pre-.
vailed. In the metropolis the at-
taining of accord was easy. The
bishops possessed well-defired
prerogatives under canon law
which were. recognized by the
civil courts; in the colonies this
was less true, for the power of
the apostolic prefects was insuf- j
ficient. A slight increase in pres-
tige did occur in 1780 when the
prefects received the power to
administer the sacrement of con- -
firmation and were given seats,
.on: the High Councils of Cap
Francais and. Port. au Prince.
Both the Vatican and Louis XVI
realized the disadvantages in 4
the arrangement which was con- -
tinued under the 1781 Ordinance,
and they had been in agreement ,
that it should -be modified .by
replacing the prefects with 'T
Bishops. .However, events in
France prevented the realiza-
tion of this proposal and the
prefectures endured until 1792.
By 1789 the religious adminis-
tration had succeeded in overco- :.
ming most of the objections and
criticism of the planters, and un-
der the administration of two
of the most successful of the pre- |
fects sent to Saint Domingue,
Charles Darmien-Duguet in the -
South and Jean Arnould Saintin
de Cruxaus in the North, the pre-
fectures were enjoying a period J
of peace and accomplishment
never before experienced. The ,
events in France following the "
1188 announcement of the calling-i..


op/






es-Genera had, how- leadership of the colonel oU th shed some lght on the stru

tates-General had, how-1 leadership of the colonel of the i shed some light on the stru


mediate and disastrous
or Saint Domingue du-
ch the successes of the
.which had been obtain-
r almost incredible cir-
ces, were erased.
time of the upheaval in
Saint Domingue had
,.a change of governors,
in 1789, the Comte de
iea respected soldier but
'a ,i :ineffectual- as a colon-
administrator. The strong
a Saint Domingue at the
.,as the intendant, Fran-
SBarbe-Marbois, one of
J t celebrated administra-
inhe colony's history, until
norations against him at
au ';Prince in October, 1789,
Sinrto return to France in
l,:leaving the colony in the
of the planters %who had
feeling lor France, loyal
ublican. On April 14, 1790,
delegates nominated by the
planters met at Saint
not as a colonial assem-
ut as the General Assem-
orthe French -part of Saint
ue, manifesting obvious-
lutionary tendencies. By
er 1790, de Peynier had
replaced by the Comte de
linde, a man of little
r.r ho did nothing to stop
sg anarchy'in the colony.
gaining loyal troops at-
to crush the revolt in
ing of 11,91 under- the


Port au Prince regiment,, Antoi-
ne Mauduit du Plessis. On
March 21, 1791, the weak and
undisciplined governor, in a fit
of paluc, ordered the evacuation
of Port au Prince. With the
flight of de Blanchelande to Cap
Francais the last prop was
knocked from under the authori-
ty of the metropolitan govern-
ment, and the colony lost direct
contact with France until three
commissioners arrived from Pa-
ris late in November, 1791.

The late of the two apostolic
prefectures was much in -doubt
at the beginning of the Revolu-
tion. That of the North was
threatened from the trouble of
1791 and by a slave insurrection
which occurred in the same
year. Revolutionary activities
were always more numerous at
the Cap, and the excesses of
Jacobinism worked their influ-
ences in destroying the 'church
organization. In the South, for
the Dominicans, these disrupt-
ions had less effect and the cu-
res in Port au Prince and its
neighborhood succeeded in hold-
ing their posts until the inter-
vention of an English fleet in
1794, when they were to surren-
der their missions.
The final history of the Capu-
chins in the North is somewhat
confused Pere Cabon, who exa-
mined documents in Rome which


during their last years in S
Domingue, believes the cha
of their critics to be true,
they collaborated with the p
ters and later with the Jaco
in order to maintain their
in that section of the county
Prefect Jean Saintin had I
appointed around 1780 and
recently had been appointed
a second seven year term as
religious superior in the N
when he became embroiled
dispute with the intendant,
Marbois, over the suppression
the High Council of Cap F
cais. In this dispute the pre
backed the objections of
planters against the intend
'As a result of this disagree
de Marbois brought enough p
sure at the Court and in R
to have SaEntin removed f
his post. The prefect was fo
by3 the intendant to appoint
vice-prefect who would event


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ggle ly succeed him. The choice, too, ernment of the northern city.
;aint was dictated by de Marbois who The High Council had been re-
rges chose Jean Guillaume Guerrier, established upon the resignation
that known in Saint Domingue as Pe- of Intendant Barbe-Marbois who
plan- re Constantin de Luxembourg. had left the island the previous
)bins The validity of this nomination October. Still at the Cap wps
role was always contested by the non- Saintin who had remained be-
.y. during clergy of the North on hind particularly, in view of the -
been the grounds both that it was im- departure of de Marbols, to
only posed upon Saintin by the inten- await the arrival of his ieplace-
d to dant and that Constantin was not ment,
the eJigiple for the appointment be- When Constantin assumed his
forth cause he had not come from duties early in 1790 another corn-
in a the province of Champagne, a plication was joined to the unfor.-
de provision in the letter's patent tunate circumstances surround-
n of granting the Capuchins the mis- ing his nomination. This was the I
*ran- sions of' the North. Ro'me inter- fact that he had begun steps in
effect vened, perhaps under pressure the process leading to the re-
the from de Marbois again, and the bouncing of his clerical vows in
plant. Sacred Congregation for the the weeks- just prior to. the an-
lent, Propagation approved the ap- 'nouncement of his appointment'
pres- pointment by decree on April in Saint-Domingue. He was 'pro- -'
ome 20, 1789. Constantin arrived in bably unaware of the negotia-
rom Cap Francais in December; on tions which were being coniduct-
rced the seventh of that month, his ed between de Marbois and the e'
the appointment received the neces- Sacred Congregation for' Propa-
tual- sary registration with the gov- (Continued on page 12)



























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"Nassau Celebrates Bloickad P


Prosperity's 100th Birthdy
/ .- .* woSld"r bi ..u..l..
NASSAU, Bahamas Money Imports .ahd exports skyrpck- gle of civil ar. England al. C esto li
flowed like water, and cotton eted, carrying up with them the Europe .ad 'the .North wanted Sadnah .,' ito
and munitions were lords of the affluence of the commercial po- the. cotfn that .was.: rbtan' i- -:.-.:; theSouth::3.?.stu
day a century ago in this-friend- place. In a single year annual the docks' of South&rn- cities. The 'Therthe dcks woiul' ibe pi The bloclside .run
S resort city only a short dist- imports of. 234,029 pounds ster- South, was hungry for .munitions, ed -gh with' cotton at dishes* ar rini .ard
tjAce off the Florida coast. ling and exports of 157;350 lbs. machinery, medicit~es ,and Igod prices u l e So a" pound" oe.":-ii[.
Huge fortunes were made in jumped to 5,346,112 pounds .and to carry onaihe wai.. .'" -
a few days. Commerce was on 4,672,398 pounds. But the export- .., ' "' ;: .'":'
an "always win never lose" ed goods, once they left Nassau Despite ,the. p-oclariation o : "; /f/O////////O
basis. The buy-for-a-penny, sell- Harbour often'increased a hun- *neutrality issued -by QueenV R '"I :-
: for-a-dollar prosperity that beg- dred-fold in value if they were toria, Nassau became the head- ,'. .. ...
.an. here in the waning days of successfully carried through the quarters for blockade ..runts -.'*n. ,q-4.
1861 lasted four years and made blockades. who. kept both sikes- happy .by'
.Nassau -for the nonce-one of The United States was torn supplying'-the needed, gods. -
s.-, the greatest shipping ports of asunder .and North and South N.. .. .. ,. ', 4 H
the Atlantic. 1-were in a life and death strug- With Civil War "buffs' and
..a teur historians, scheduling -.
Chtennial. -Year viisfit' o. Lmpo- im: -
tant sites where battffles *ere .- A -.
r,! i, k .won or lost, Nassau, too, -is ex-
C IN PETIONVILLE IT" pecting to get a larger thafi usu-' 7 wn 'crr.
S al. share. of visitors.: Pan' Amerli.- .
can Airways- which.- connects I it
*' ii 0 14 A^ [ r Nassau with New York and 1M9i- .-
ami by jetliners, is: adding to o
H O tt T A h the summer schedules. An ex- ..
OA' tra jet Clipper flight weekly in "'
: i : each direction starts June&. 1 `6n S'.'
I.10ofee altitude.ye only 7ninues the New York route. Forty si -
:from the heart of PoRT-AU-PRMNdE flights, weekly, will-be flow .- -:
e. tween 'Miamri andi sau; r '
A Tie most exquisite OievOs lookingg he. di them. in. hge passed
p1 1 h e .... .....t-. ...., : L5
habay,e plain, he mountamns.. *.
Not too much liied.-i ee
SDelidious dontinenlal duisine andisuperb '61 is the Royal Vitbria Hotel.
g r .t- .., '< '-r^IThen it was 'blra4. new-. ad .fi'th&e : .
;serv.d. .. .i
-S e..slafods. area. Kept -..new--
PersonalLed attention to eer gest. condition f* a Centuat.- --
Smas first clas- luxury hotel :
I S immin Pool wilh Lunedeon une 7 trig-e'e e .. .-.
and Bar Panoram Ter:radi. :E .-"."- "
-Ai-ondil;onedg-luxe room e a
*ewas the only cceted ur-
m;..;t._ 4" r No one -usted tihe ohes
k 'banlibates,; ard, -havi y b ags- .
WEEKLY ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM j eirxs web piasse-t acr,.t: t:_-. .ENT Pf:-
S" bar, the _dining tables-and. in te.- ....- "..
TUESDA4l :Inommalo dveo ( , nd,'ngom plush high-ceilngesdfa i. ---
S7:36 PM to midn :. 'E,".-- .
J-Ieirngque mtrucion and ntesat Still stand g, too. 're many
1 9:3o0.dsual dess.6 admision fee .the athouses t .*ir.
-o fED1il) l ment 9e ernb o the lauded gen
f- Pa .:from7p. to p4. t fa in-6.Oi neo1 of-
FRIa. 7:3m to .. t uenat"a'Znow
FRIA : A iinerqnd fom gs mall hot, l.d'-" what
:3o a.m. Super So t) IQ' 10.,o
No adn.ssion .fei .'4. '" ".
LLot"ER ddckUAil jbo fv 7-to 9 -l - - -.- --
Snoti 4e dombo; 66- 'w ,"ditack" n-"-- '
<"= : > g


A, o. ,K. .... ..- .. ; :.
* . . ;h~t.-.. ... ... =.+ ,'.=. ; ,...;... -..... .


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.-td i-Ars:
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p =. ""f -' '- 4'e-, p
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-13.






f'u r S13th, 1 61


Nassau Celebrates...

(Continued from page 10) Small coves
haMdlorking group of- get-rich- er harbors, n
quick adventurers who scorned tidal banks
danger -nd sailed blithely under throughout th(
the guns of the heavily, armed ipelago had be
blockade .cutters. The rule of pirates of- an
thumb .. for setting- a delivery now many of
fee was A f rice equal to the as rendezvous
value :o'-a :neW boat, .plus $2,500 -ment of cargo
for- the captain and $,000*a mtan runners. ..
-for trips of. 48 to 72 hours.
Green Turtle
When asked; on their return rite rendezvous
to Nassau, about their last voy- ish Wells, Ha
age, it -,was commoul to repeat Bimini. All o
the joke of the day-that they quiet havens
had stopped for fresh water at prefer fishing
"Gideon Welles." Welles was tions to the bi
the Union secretary of the Navy sau.
and had 'hundreds of blockade
patrol boats. The inference was Nassau, ho
that they had passed so close principal port
to the Union boats they were runners. Fro
able to steal water casks from 1861, when
the deck. runner came


Sa:.A T I


and shallow wat-
arrow inlets, and
which are. found
e Bahamas arch-
en utilized by the
earlier day and.
them. were used
-for the trans-ship-
s to the blockade

Cay was "a favo-
s, as were Span-
rbour Island and
ff these are- now
for tourists who
and loafing vaca-
ight lights of Nas-

owever, was the
for the blockade
im December.. 5,'
the first blockade
through with 144


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S


bales of cotton, to the- end of
the war, almost 1,000 blockade
runners entered or left the port
with forbidden cargos. One ship,
the Syren, made 18 successful
trips and was captured on the
19th. The Navy patrols captur-
ed but 42 and 22 were2 run
ashore and wrecked on the
reefs. 'tQissing in action" was
the report, op 56 vessels that
cleared away from Nassau and
were never again heard from.
Throughout the war Nassau
was probably the only place in
the world to get reliable news
of the activities from both sides
and there were hundreds of
spies on duty to pick the brains


au
'b POItD






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_C-E-N-T-R-E O-U-V-E-R-T,
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entoilage 3T "Triple Tempered", une exclu-
sivitd de Goodyear! .1




GOODAFEAR

* IL Y A DES PNEUS GOODYEAR POUR CHAQUE ROUE DE LA FERME
2-59-"F


U.N" PAGE .1.

of each crew over a bottle of the Gulf Stream, and many are
rum and relay the information ileturning to tread the ground
to the War Office back home. and sip a-cocktail in the very
* It was a glorious era in this places patronized by the Rhett -"
tiny little bit of Britain across Butlers of 100 years ago.

INSURE WITH SURE INSURANCE
CALEDONIAN INSURANCE COMPANY

Founded In 1805
INCORPORATED BY SPECIAL ACT OF
THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT

RONY CHENET & SONS
AGENTS FOR HAITI
Address Rue des Miracles Opposite National Bank.







"HAITI SUN"


TUESDAY JUi, rith, 1961?


./ ing the whereabouts of Sulpice, tr
-tatus Of Church In name. Urbain de Tours as vice- cit
S Status Of Church In... prefect and left the Cap on June ins
6, 1792, with the promise that of
(Continued from page 9) the two parties in the struggle. he would return to Saint Domin- wI
randa. The prefect-designate's Many joined the blacks and fol- gue with new and sympathetic sic
tppliation .for secularization lowed the bands in revolt; recruits. Constantin never retur- thi
Mad been made to' the Capuchins among them were the recently- ned to the West Indies, nor did sq
-ii June 16,. 1789, and he did not arrived Pere Sulpice, Pere Mau- he renounce his vows. He died 24,
kiceive word of the appointment rice Philippe and the Abbe de in 1807 as cure of a parish in for
ibtil July 6. The new prefect la Haye. Cambrai. With the departure of to
ioped he would not.have to en- Three months later, at the end Constantin four Capuehin priests Th
lure. the-condemnation of 'his of November, 1791, the first ci- were given the administration of of
yellow. Capuchins for long. His vil commission- arrived from clerical affairs at the Cap, Peres at
request, for secularization was .France. Its mission was clear, Corneille, Brelle, Dubucq and re]
approved on July 23, 1791; to add although to the planters of Saint Antheaume. The religious _com-, th
i& the delicate, situation, Const- Domingue it must1-have appeared munity there had lost- sixteen dis
n6fri had agreed to. take the oath chimerical. Their object was to missionaries in the slave upris- So
n support of the Civil 'Constitu- reestablish the union of the ing of August, and the work of ly3
ion: of the ,Clergy in .the last white colonists to-France, and the missions and parishes was ba
iotlhs -of-.1791. This legislation, to enforce the laws enacted by seriously impaired. On Septem- 'in
'omiingated in July, 1790," by the' Constituent Assembly, parti- ber '21, 1792, Brelle welcomed ly
e National -Constituent Assem- cularly the oath to the civil con- the second commission sent by pic
ih Paris, reduced the nuri- slitution of the clergy. Under the the Paris assembly. The first thi
.o--o bishops and -priests and pressure of, Constantin, the Ca- commission had achieved no- the
d hed .as a civil body. pichins submitted and. took the thing -other ,than an unsteady Soi
,he.ywere to be elected by .the; oath.. In a letter t6 Pope' Pius truce arranged by one of its the
,o, 1.paid.. by. the state, and VII, Constantin notified him of members, Saint Leger, with the brn
-n ominally associated with this event: slave chiefs Jean Francois and the
p. japacy- It was..subsequently Biassou. Like the first commis- of
ondeined by Pope Pius ~V, We hive all, as a group, sworn
e forbade the French clergyV, to the following provisions of sion its successor consisted of
pfq forbade the French clergy three members, two of whom, C
6:take".the required o~m- obedience and loyalty, as the three members, two of whom, C
takeherequired oa obedience ad lolt as the Ebenne Polverel and Leger Fe- tha
'-. _.. people have asked it: 'I swear
ndfidpating the resignation ;o and promise loyalty to the na- liciteSonthonax were to play
nstntih ,'te -Sa.red Congre- tion, to the law and to' the king.' consequential roles in the last
.ti.Propagnda ntbminated In his defense he supported this days of the French colony. The
1S .l'es Slpice .-deFi-ibourg, .a action..by putting forth the prin- day of their arrival in Saint Do-
iwf.~o'. td place hi"i, 'but be- ciple that the laws cme from mingue preceded the date of the
ore .he could be invested with God and that when one resisted abolition of the French monar.-
e.duities of the. office. the slave the power of the Assembly 'one chy by three days.
yolt "o" 1791 'broke out in the was -resisting God. '
i "d threw the prefecture While the city of Cap Fran- Commissioner Snthon er
K- I id'-..-..soonheros arrival, began to
nAtco-fusion. T'ie-'cures divid- cais was still under attack 'by soon af
Le' 'ersympathes .between the blacks,. Constantin. not :know- show an unfavorable attitude to-
S. ard the clergy. Among- the Jaws
.: .' .. voted by the Constituent Assem-
'bly was one which suppressed
S"the apostolic prefectures in the
French colonies. On- Sonthonax'
t'il" tak"es-'." rosy hil -, order this legislation was publi-
Sthrough the sapphire crystal shed at Cap Francais on Decem-
ber 30. 1792. This proved to be
Of yorMovado," Firmament" watch a rather meaningless move, how-
ever, a6 religious activity was
-- "not completely interrupted at the
Cap. The church was later des-
it
.' ,.. ,.. a a
? V =....:' ", ','


.. .-"'6e'.ado sapphlre crystal
S.- leag with'.a rare brilliance.
Al arde'ss'is surpassed
S. -'.only Ythatbfihe diamond.
": . "You wlFherish your
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gold ligure dial


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miniature move.
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MOVAD$

ON' SALE AT MAISON ORIENT
: AND LITTLE EUROPE
.N- . - :
S ..', -"'*


JOHNNIE WALKER
oBrn i Awts- Mil gping_ strong


DISTRIBUTOR PREETZMAN-AGGERHOLM

^t ^^ .'"


1 Hotel Sans Sonci

EVERY, TUESDAY NIGHT VERY INFORMAL
"COOKED TO ORDER"

BARBECUE DINNER 7:00 to 9:00 PM

WITH THE SANS SOUCI COMBO"
DINNER $2.50 Per Person

EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT 8:00PM To Midnight
PUNCH BOWL, DINNER DANCE,
FLOOR SHOW AND PRIZES

WITH THE SANS SOUCI ORCHESTRA AND
THE FAMOUS HAITIAN 'ARTIST
^ FROM PARIS


STO TTO BISSAINTE



ALE OF FRENCH, .MARTINIQUE AND
-L HHAITIAN SONGS.
-"- . .."U '. U ."


12


I I


)yed during the sack of the unrestrained-in Saint Domingu,
ty in June, 1793, by the black in the short period it existed
Iurrectionists, but the chapel there under the French monar-
a convent was used by the chy. Never very prosperous,
dite population while the mis- ignored by the colonists, even
naries gathered two to three arousing great 'suspicion among,
ousand blacks on; the city them because of their attempts
uare for services. On October to educate the blacks, and lack- j
1793, Sonthonax left the Cap ing attraction for ,a large num-
r the South and did not return her of missionaries, it remained
the North until May of 1796. a small scale operation in com-
his renioved the chief source prison with other parts-of the
irritation against the clergy, French empire. particularly Ca-'
least as far as the new French nada. In the period before the .c,
public was concerned. Al- promulgation of the 1781 Ordi- '
ough Sonthonax attempted to nance it established its roots in
place the Dominicans in the the two principal cities of the co-
uth he was unsuccessful, part- lony with missionary centers in
because the order had the neighboring towns and military
king of the planters in leav- posts with little interference,
the missions alone and part- but at the same time, with little
because of the general sus- enthusiastic encouragement from
:ions of the colonists towards the civil and military authorities.
e- Commissioner. In general, After 1781, although the spirit
e religious establishment in the of the Ordinance brought the
uth remained unchanged until church under closer scrutiny of
e British occupation in 1794 'the government, it also gave the
ought about the dissolution of clergy membership in the Figh -
e missions and the beginning Councils' of the colony so that
a schismatic church there, they had means of defense
against the first attempts of the -
On the whole it is safe to say Republican government to des-,-j
it the church was relatively troy them."- ,. ''



0 S .'
You know
It. a really fine
^Scoth when it's
JOHNNIE A
WALKER -


14






JESDAY JUNE 13th, 1961


' HA I


iTruji1fo's Heirs


(Continued from page 14) cnated all restrictions on these
turning. for the Generalissimo I products and has issued a call
,.recalled his lavish gifts to for free enterprise. This may
Ibirchbes. The charges of terror- mean that producers and handl-
It,. conspiracy that were .re- ers can hold on to profits hither-
Ne&Wdly flung against Bishop to siphoned off. The rains have
pilly-. and Bishop Francisco been plentiful and crops look
?anal'thave been silenced. The promising.
4islops have retrained from cri-
ism; the regime and the An Organization of American
urch appear to have made States subcommittee envoys
ece. from Panama, Colombia, the
I.resident- Balaguer has de- United States and Uruguay -
d that an amnisty proclaim- has arrived with a Government
4d last September for political welcome. The subcommittee is
offenders should now be exten- acting under a resolution of last
ed .to exiles who have never August that condemned the Do-


Dominicans ready
openly. But the p
ce is a deterrent
ses and a likely
bringing the Dom
blic back into go(
The Trujillo far
4nd has long exch
General TrujWilo Ji
have matured and
pression of compe
suredness. He has
of his time abroad
be as aware of all


power as was his father. I
Intimates say he has told
them he does not intend to run
for President next year.
lls younger brother, polo-
playing Capt. Leonidas Rhada-
-- --. .' , '


een tripc nere. rmican Repuouc as a danger NATIONAL FOLK FESTIVAL
to hemispheric peace and set up IN WASHINGTON
This is an agricultural coun- diplomatic and limited economic
ry. An .effort has been made to sanctions. A highlight of the National
onciliate producers and handl- Lasting Presence Folk festival in Washington-was
rs of coffee, cacao and bana- The committee is in effect a Haitan Music and dances by the
as-who have complained of res- watchdog. Some think it may troupe ,Languichatte of Port au
Ictipns requiring them to sell evolye into an. inter-American Prince according to a report on
|,tj fixed prices and, of controls presence that may last until the the festival published in the Wa-
Sprtoduction, distribution and Presidential elections on May shington,Daily News, a clipping
sport. 1 161 1962. of which was received here this
,c'Prsident Balaguer has elimi- The envoys may not find many week.

Commenting under the itle
'"Variety is the spice of Folk
SFestival", the News stated: "The
,BY POPULAR DEMAND folk dancers and singers from
LAVINIA WILLIAMS 25 States and Haiti gave their
Best. The program ranged from
.. Presents the Ballet the horse thief dance by Okla-
r r homa Indians and Crow Indians
E SLEEPING BEAUTY" i music through a variety ocplqr-
;. i .QI.GNAL INTERPRETATION ,, Jul numbers highDghted -by: Hai-
S tian music and dances by the
S .'' 3 ts ,- 2 Scenes troupe Languichatte of Port au
,i i. iS'f: 50. Students Prince."
Friday AJune 16th at. 7:45 p.m.
,, AT REX THEATRE Languichatte. Haiti's top co-
i nets :q salWe .at Rex Theatre, La Caravelle media who became known as
aryad Lavini Williams' Dance SchooI the Haitian Moliere when he
on the Champ de M rs. 4. became a Telbvision star was
S-4 invited to Washington and will
S ,ENTRANCE: $2'00 $1.50 $1.00 perform in. New York before re-
V '000 0900 *. ooq '- turning home.


I


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AiLPHOI]SE MARRA,W .
Boulevard JeanJacques Dessallnes ,
fPICERIE REX, Lalue
OGORGES COLES,' Ialue
'iiNRI RIGAUD, Petionvlle.

| AGENTS AND DISTRIBUTORS:

1Hispano-America Trading Co. Of Haiti S.A

S49, RUE DU QUAI




.'.., L ;.. . . \ ^ .. .*,'.;. ..*.. : ,; ... -...... .. ... ..-..


i a.z. ". i:, '...



to complain mes Trujillo, 22, is on air force General Jose Arisimendi Trujil-,
anel's presen- duty. He is reported to have lo, founder of La Voz Dominica-
against exces- taken his father's death excep- 'na, a radio operation.
first step in tionally hard.
tinican Repu- Six Brothers The main opposition to the'
od standing. There are six brothers of the Trujillo succession appears to *1.
mily .is large late Generalissimo. Hector B. stem from certain OAS memb,' '
hanged favors. Trujillo, also a Generalissimo, ers like Venezuela and minor
r., appears to who is considered a moderate, Dominican, groups in exile. The
gives an im- served as figurehead President governing coalition is seeking'"
tence and as- until he resigned in-favor of Dr. to undercut -the international-,
spend much Balaguer, then Vice President, pressure Generalissimo Trujildo .
and may not last "'August. Most strong-ridnd- had incurred, and seenis t be
the levers of ed is believed to be Lieutenant working skillfully. .


I -- .. - -


%




- -j'~--- II


S H AITI U .N TU1i AY JUNi 7 lt t, 3g,
.--------- -
rseageRsefnrmge STEPHN BRO

SM.' V. AITI MERCHANT
T .U'JIL LOSM IS STILL POWERFUL IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC PERSONAL SUPERVISED
LOADING AND UNLOADING
By ET ER18. KIHSS hundred militiamen in coun- ers to shelter them for six aga nst a suburban Catholic SERVE HAITI AND FLORIDA
S . try garb and with black..,ami days. IL iL -' ch whose priest -.allgedly forthnightly sailings of St
bands line up in Monserfor Other incidents included 'the sheltered a plotter, and the bur- Miami- Port an Prince --Mlaml
aCiudad Trujillo. D.R. Jane 9. Npuel.."The cocuyos (night owls') violent abduction of Bishop Tho- ning of furnishings at the oppo- MILAMI ADDRESS:
rGeneralssimio Rafael Leonidas of. the Cordillera.will know, how mas F.._Reilly, a North Ameri- sition Dominican Popular Move- Telephone:" Highland 5176M7
.illo Molna ies.-in a crypt.i to. defend this, formidable fot- can, fro.iti a Roman. Catholic mqnt's headquarters.. Frank lin9-7=tS i
..e $250,000. church, he '.erected ress ,of.Bonao to. keep -peace. and school here (he was freed after Nlow, however, the nation's ,
Y"his native-town-of.San -Cis-. tranquility---for-the---Dominiean- 2 hours with apologies, from the Catholic bishops have asked for
ibal The regime he put toge- family," a nehr-by billboard President). a demorsf ration (4oppinpud on page 15) -
r in thiirty-one years as the vows.' CACIOUE ISLAND
s r ng, an. a.'here- runs. on-per- / -IB
.ev~y- iie '"smoothly. Soldiers and policemen .hunt CONSULT O. B ACH"
S- -- down the. assassins .in Ciudad |
tjstead ft.4le- by.' the- '"Jefe" .Trujillo, and. ragged. citizens ..h he baud d.
aAsnf em :ay :30, there is, pick upJoose bricks as wepph aca eau ONLY 30 MINUTES
t;e4'_a.ta.tihon .Pre idenit to hh;l'Ohe g"-tbting fistsh.k- F' FROM PORT-AU-PRINCE
A, -B guei. asi-.aci er' dwts chr. for .shodiig. arhi ed U. of M, .
ronses 11 There i -rboom in this cqu- ENTR (IN LUDING
o tIf 4e^.^t&icbve ,ul- [ for the en w ho killed, Tru-.l T r (ROUND-TRIP
4el.- L. for4 ~' BOAT
. ..U- ..,.. : ,,. .T. .'on RANSPORTATION).
-. .,ON . LY, $1.00
;' COStlC Children 50 Cent" '

Private Dressing Bpomlr.
at. cFsteliutai i
Whiteq-and DBehh'
p. .- 3p.m. Fine .es,..rant and naga. Bar

11101 Us WATER SKIING
t lit!l ",..: ., .''r ."..- = -:" ".. .. ' i ;..,: .,; ',':: .'i ': ;:- '.'"'" K-IN," ", V""" -":
.... ;' < .. " '. .. '. .. . . ... I ., N L Y $ 1 0 1:-,. ,.- .i 2+ : .. ,' 'f .: ,. : ...; "' : ' '


-.4'


Modern haitian

Paintings


GALERIE PINCHINAT.
On Show Now. At


B y PAX PINtHINAT
'. ,, 106, BOIS VERNA
Just before you reap the- 'PON MOBIN'" bridge
4 ;..f :"'" .i : 'i ', 4 : .
This is ani AiT GAYIEXIY, not a picture shop, ex-
ibiting over 100 of the most attractive FRAMED
'AINTINGS made both in Port au Prince and Paris by
FAMOUS HAITIAN PAINTER MAX PINCHINAT
ow in rance. ,
The artist WHO HAS EXHIBITED BOTH HERE
.'4 a -1n r 'n A s -L __ -I r .-. .,.,..b, in-,


-ry :*ogthdp;dtfciAl .abusesif6 -iAND R A tAD ior the paast 150 years' cuuomes ac
Son4 of~eqnstituti-ai guar- aiti every five years and for 15 to 18 months renews
hantees ;; the contact with his,people and his source of inspira-
tion" -
v-w Tie'R 't.01o jedothat the G Lya o
"C4 Ge"" -i re at
as emtol -Jhn PINCHINAT are grouped
Ab b da a tia a:- the _.ar-.some paintings of the 15 years of work by MAX PIN-
m.y n '1tin.rmid-1960 Coloriedi :Ab- CHINAT, from 1945 to 1960. Prices have not been ar-
AS .~ ofw .heW :utary in" mbitrarily based on beauty of the painting, but on its
ie evt ch size, just like Paris Fashion for MAX PINCHINAT
1me'-go sro .. d .OTHER WELL KNOWN ARTISTS. Visitors can
..Zm "some .:. conkalt the paintings *rice list if they wish to. *
Women. '; eicenM' All the taxi drivers know GALLERY PINCHINAT
improving the ..-A itted incidents of violence AND don't 'let anybody tell you that the GALLERY is
:6i'hd the -Government :S e'- the dictator's -death.-nHave closed. It is not.
: sands are. engaged in bee few:' the killing of treee The GALLERY PINCHINAT, pole represen-
worth.of. public works.! alle.gid principal plotters, in tativb and sales agent of PINCHINAT's paintings, has
Se. those odtside a- paper two. gun battles with the police,. .
vit VillaF Altag-acia pro- 'the suicide of the, uncle of tvo exhibited a few samples only at 'Toyer des Arts u iai.e
a "Anitir enterprise con- brothers, named as plotters, the tiques", GaleriA "Brdchette" and Galerie, Suisse".
11 great .or of Trujil- .suicide. of a physician who said Open from 10 AM to 5 PM, and on appointment in
Sh. .. hehad en forced by plot lead- the evening. ADMISSION FREE.
wor


SKIN-DIVING '.'
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CHINESE

NIGHT


TUESDAYS

Egg Roll (2)

wo tonsop


Choice...

Sweet & Sour pork

'shrimp-Foo Yung

' .'Chicken, chow mein

lobster chow mein.

tea or coffee


$3.00


Candlelight


On the
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Petiouville Road


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--* * A: -


DAY JUNE 13th, 1961


* AI Ti S N "


Assassin Says Aim

Vasn 't to Kill Trujillo


7 Wanted To Capture Him, Oust Regime


t. Speaking to reporters from his
By JOSEPH NEWMAN hospital bed at Air Force head-
quarters outside Ciudad Trujillo,
Of The Herald Tribune Cedeno said the conspirators did
not intend to kill Trujillo. They
udad Trujillo, D.R., June 8. wanted to capture him, turn him
dro Livio Cedeno, one of the over alive to the man who was
fiv- captured survivors of the to head the new government,
conspiracy against Generalissi- and then send him into exile
6noTrujillo, disclosed today the abroad with members of his fa-
rnof the plot was to overthrow mily.
e Trujillo regime. This was the first time a con-

i = *


4.' ~ -
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* 4~Ot 'i- -'****
.*.9~ClC -:


Jhter Cedeno being interviewed at San Irisdro Airbase hospital.
-
e- said the plotters wanted to fessed member of the conspiracy
is ll a new provisional govern- has spoken about it to the press.
let, headed by 'another high Until now all versions of assas-
a*hng army officer, and res- sination of Trujillo, May 30, .on
r. freedom to the Dominican the outskirts of Ciudad Trujillo
reublie. have come from government.


Not Simply a Feud Cedeno, fifty year old admin-. C eteno- said ht in -the.4
Cedeno's account disposed of istrator of the Hercules Battery 1uot :wa c* ar'm
earlier versions that the assas- Manufacturing Co. in Ciudad which Trui6 as ri and's.
sination was simply the result Trujillo, said that he himself force it to a halt by blocking I
of personal feud between Trujil- had been a close associate of the road ahead. : -".
lo and retired Gen. Juan Tomas the Generalissimo, having served Scheme Fouled. Up '
Diaz, previously described as as military commandant in var- He' claimed that the scheme.
leader of the group which am- ious provinces, until he retired went awry because another cJ;?
bushed and killed the Generalis- from the army seventeen years in the conspiracy failed to gi.e,'
simo. ago. the signal which had .been. agre-:;
Diaz himself was killed in a Asked why he had joined the ed upon. The signal was to be:'
gun battle with police when he conspiracy against Trujillo, he three flasheS,'on and off, of the":..
was cornered in a street in the replied "For freedom." lights of 'the car traveling jutt
center of the capital Sunday ahead of his own -and jiit be-'
night. Asked what he meant, he gave hind the Generalissimo's. 'A third -4
the questioner a look of disgust. car df conspirators followed Ce-.
Despite persistent questions by Earlier, commenting on some deno's car. .- '-
the reporters, Cedeno refused to of the questions put by United According to; -Cecdbo, whe.
disclose the name of the high States news and television cor- .his car arrived on the,scene the,-;
ranking officer he said was sup- respondents, he said "You are- first car of-conspiratots had al,-
posed to take over the govern- idiotic." ready opened. ire and th'e i-.:
ment as soon as Trujillo was He said that be .had trained eralissimo iad been .dled.
turned over to him. with the United States 993d Art- .
illery in 1942 at Fort Buchanan, Cedeno said he buped: his'
He claimed -that he himself Puerto Rico. head while .getting, out of his
had been in contact with the -Asked if the country needs car. and was :wounded ,by, ma-
brother of "General X" but not more .liberty, he turned to Am- chine gun fire from.-thMhepne'
with "General X" himself. He bassador Rosenberg, .-who was alissimo's .chauffeur. w*hoab-Wo:
denied that "General X" .was acting as interpreter, and& said survived. L:N .V, .
Juan Tomas Diaz "You answer." Cedeno, suffered poerforatin o
Where Is General X? the large- intestie, .,and-::on.
The great mystery and the There was a brief silence. Ce-. wound,in-the right forearm.-,1,
most intriguing question at the deno then said, "'Of course we He said he reg .tted t..her
moment is: who and where is wanted more liberty. All, the ure'but :not -is:a.tcipU
,"General X?" world knows that." I he.plot.'..,
Government officials refuse to ". .. .. .. .: .
give the answer at present. -. ''
Cedeno intimated that "Gen. '
X" was inside the government '"
and a close friend of (e slain Itobacco t eut bP ,. @ -'-,. 3
Generalissimo. He would give no when ~ filte.?,sreCes ..
further hint. .


"Ask -the doctor," he finally
.replied when foreign correspon-
,dents refused to give up. The
doctor, standing by, refused to
disclose the name.
Correspondents then appealed
io Leland Rosenberg, Dominican
Ambassador to Iran, who is now
acting as special aid and advis-
er to Gen. Trujillo jr., chief of
.the joint chiefs of staff and heir
to the slain ruler Rosenberg also
refused to answer.
-


4..

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H A I T I SUN N"




President s Message

4' (Continued from page 1) It must 'calculate the public out- emanate from a community in
y uprbepared. to meet the lay necessary for a normal rate evolution. In the Government's
-oute, financial crisis. the first of, growth. That is why an effort incessant efforts to obtain these
itdieations of which were mani- will be made to reintroduce into objectives, institutions have been
testingg themselves as early as the budget of the Republic a created with a evew to furnishing
955. Such-kacisis called for an chapter consecrated to the capi- to the entire nation essential
energetic' ad sweeping financial tal account-. In addition, inm view services concerned with nutri-
o Air.y-w^lh -h onl a niodneized of? the - improved perspectives tion, juvenile delinquency, social
cli'H r-erenht- administration open 'to our'national finances, diseases, and the establishment
Suti'npliement. It' is -in this it has been decided to reestablish and equipping of medical-social
ihthat"-'the Government. of in; part the salaries of civil ser- centers.
Pe 'Republic 'has undertaken to lvants, with the other part even- As for the protection of labor,
erganize the' financial services, tually constituting forced' savings the Government is dedicated to
ll soon e stibmifted for credited to the Capital Budget. the task of completing social
Mi"tcqnsilderation- .and vote- of The Government-of the Republic and labor 'legislation so that it
.r 'igh assembly. They- aim. firmlyy. hopes that in following refilets the permanence of the
iprete the"CdiSperisabe--me- .this path and adhering to it demands of the reclamatory and
asm' for-takiig -eare, of the without' deviation there will in reparatory revolution of 1946. A
nerouls'poblem.s posed.by the q few years time be a substant- Labor Code is shaping up which
pBic finances' of- a countryy in- ial increase- in 'the- level' of na- will consecrate honest formulas
i .T.ho~des'.''of-.' ti'asfoirmationp- tional income. rejecting on the one hand the
Goerniient6it' o. f the Repu- 'On the strictly economic plane, tyranny of capital and on the
t 'ustily -considers' that: the substantial. changes are i i pre- other hand anarchy of syndical
-has; dome to. find;solutions paration. Follow'i ng- conserva- action. Soon this code will be
ie often-denohcebeertsn-. tions with' the' Inter-Americar .submitted for 'your study and
c.ich ~weigh- so heavily on Development Bank, a loan. of for the sanction of your high as-
fiacidal- apparatus- of. the $3,500,000 has been accorded to sembly. -
the Republic'of Haiti with a view Educational Policy
't'ffihe" legildatie.ptilane; the to accelerating. the economic de- The educational policy 'of thr,
e' erint.oPF-tlie Republiechas yelopment of the country. With- Government of the Republic,
'-;serious' boost-to.the stu- in the franiework;.ot- this loan that %which must put the H-laitiai
SreIconsideration ..of all fis-' two Haitian. institutions, the IH- people again- on the road of be-
sla princls CAI'and-tbhe Special Investment- coming enlightened human be-
sally approvedd must per- Fund, will disappear and will ings,- is founded 'on a primary
f- tax '.laws. kL is -parti- be fused into a single--organism requiiemnent: the end pf illiter-
s'a'.-- " -the con- with a capitall of $110,000,000..A acy. Nothing durable and per-
t''d of so- whole"* program of investments. manent can be.done if the Haiti-
S. t a' it.4r 4 has been prepared with 'the .tech: ai people mus, remain the vic-
datqe ... itieians. of the f e.r-Americai. tims of old injustices which have
t Dpq Dev.elopmrent Baik,"covering the so- long kept them in ignorance
. .. .ju !pDessa ines Stigar Mill, livestocli A ten-fold effort 'in the field of
IN e o-ent; As for raising, cotton- prod o, the instructing -and educating the
i. ti-taxaiothe -actiorr'of. .textile industry,. coastal sliipp- masses has been undertaken by
e _m s ien t'ierext. g fishing, et Soon the var- the Government. A general re-
".eMI.arIze anr "ous texts -q applieabl laws, as equipment of existing institut-
er.t -.s'dealing. with well' as. the-loan. and ,guaranty- lons, .a, rejuvenatioet and reshuf-
-.1bemb t .ntl.ti; T' submitted for. fling of teachers. with a view. to
a.p ar tly' onprivate. in- your high consideration, cacryi-g out the formation of
hle :..t-t safre time The Government'of tef Repu- elite'groups has been undertaken
| 'e f ftion-" of blic .makes a- point d4-iiiin at .the same time as -the. great
l vr customsoms duties, you t"at .its ecqdonmiQ t61ities national crusade for liquidating
Sig'i(ep iipmRi d -d end. there.. Qaofergtiords illiteracy. These efforts -taken
W$:es.Fnew#.fariff schedule are- i- progress witithq,:ltet- together aim to create a Haitian
ednin -conformit itw.t-the American Develop m're;Babk. in the. unage' bof the. he, -man
clfnlure recommniended by which 'should'. bring about ei- wfcfich- t"ie overiment wishes to
T ?-. ,-. ;" "-. tremely encouragig-. results r project in its fruitful national
Zlty thi liciw of" 6 the fiational economy. I hope to and sociafrVon ff.ff& ben t
Sof. the Republic be able to furnish you pro of of o-.the ne- iti. : '
ress l-itth'e blitd- -h-Vwithin the next ferw months; Governiefi fori h-i"s fSeid
liwiel will' .iitily, the efforts: undertaken' have as their aim the reconquest
,_a &u b 'ti e.-dss aof lat- year" within the- franiiork ;ofSthe Haitian soul by itself and
u blyThe presentation of the economicc policy of. the its. reestablishment in the virtue
.ibud i.etairy-lah, ha .ea- .Government are being pursued and pride of the traditions of the
i.n.. u4ertaE.keitY Gw ov- systematically in an atmosphere race. This soul is already, begin-
e, itd -'rea ,'-too ot--a- 'new-found. .and assured' ning 'to flower;- t 'impregnales
'.N .- atbmw~~ite- peace. The -epahsion aand en- his- way -of thinking and restores
1 ge rar Govern- largement of the foundations of to the Haitian his original'sell.
S to' make it 'a our national" economy should be Public Works
on e .pv ment:. te po6five-b~ c~ o-a rational T6 the permanent mission of
:economic died action. extending and diffusing the pu-
requires e.i.. ist' *Social Poll.". blic good has been added the
-rent ate conlmensi T4. Thel scial- policy 94.a....aodern particular acrion-.of bodies which
ouo.tlay, whether y the itate.- cannot be expressed' in a attempt -to transform nature by
ae S- itdal i'go'vernments, or. few. isotted actIog ons o.the part irrigation, by breeding, by com-
J yrprivate parties. --The State of an organism' lacking any so- munications channels, etc. Agri-
Q ilpone inte ye when, '4a[. philosophyy The gat -'pro- cultural production and access
~r .di&nddal- Initiap.e is in- bfems of social'Pgeuit of-work- to markets go hand in hand
,ip t.. dpvgprWpt. of men's compensation of- assist- Efforts thus deployed are testi-
.-stn re in order to sup- ance, should find their total so- mony to the determined will of
ly1 the indispensable stimulus. lution through the .laI- vWhich the civil service when -it is im-


- TUESDAY JUNE 1 3


To Congress

bued with its professional con- sovereignty which are tU
science. actions of the existence
For while experimentation is nationality.
practiced more and more in the Economic cooperation,
agricultural field and its control- studied with a view to
led results popularized among indispensable 'security
the farmers from the point of peoples, constitutes a
tiew of quality and yield, in the aspect of the general
field of public works the-CGovern- tackling place- in the mee
ment, despite its precarious res- the representatives of
sources, is succeeding in reopen- whether developed or
ing traffic along the great ar- eloped, who are mer
terry between Miragoane and Les these institutions.
Cayes, in repairing and improv- Haiti solicits it Wtth
ing the streets of Port au Prince standing and in the nan
and environs, in reestablishing ternational brotherhood.
communica t i o n s between the Perspectives
centers of production and con- -The Government has
sumption, and, in a word, has the crusade for .public g
maintained in operation those general welfare to the
useful public works which cor- of changing the striictur
r c s po n d to the fundamental institutions in order to
;eeds of the community. Agri- the progress of the cou
cultural policy and policy at- -magnificent work' of f
fecting' public works are com. pressed inr daily battle,
elementary, and that is why the comes amplified with t
creation of the Schbol for Agri- viction that any true r
cultural Agents was one of the is organized on a perrpar
conceptions needed to modify the is. Buttressed:-;iy. ar 'iu
t)ase "of agricultural policy. just will to.win all-batt es f
is the relationship between the ration, the. Goverrment-
disl ibution of income and the 22; your 'Government,-
disappearance of unemployment ready conquered with thi
is beginning to modify policy. of September- 22, 1957;
Smith regarEd to public works. conquer because its vict
Foreign Policy signify r the people t
The great traditions of the Re- of the new Haiti which
public of Haiti's foreign policy, conceived and dreamed-
inspired by rmutial and obliga- where misery arndignora
tory respect' among the states have ceased to be the
of the world, respect for inter- lot of. the greatest numb
national engagements and the Representatives of the
solidarity of peoples remain the you will associate yourself
guide for the Government's "ac- that victory because it
tion. as well. My Governmen'
With the technical and scien. to find in you the uns
tific developments which, elimi- guardians of the dignity.
nate- distances and geographic pect of the nation in.
frontiers, Haiti has not hesitated permit it to safeguard,-
to enter cohipletely into the era cult moments, the natic
of international, interdependence. trimony. The. pact- crel
A new concept, but one which tween us and the peop
destroys none of the intimateva- remain indissoluble.
lues and' the profound. sense of Dr. Francois DU
rlatibns of peoples to peoples, Presideht of the R
and which has engendered the
creation of regional and inter- -
nat.ioni institutions within which .
men of good and lovers of DRIVE-IN 011
peace may unite in' complete
security in order to find the so- Let No Man
lutions to all kinds' of problems' My Epitaph
which confront their nations. ENGLISH VERSION
Haii, in the United Nations,- SIX powerful stars find
the Organization of American feet ptory
States, The World Health Orga- in
niiizalion, UNICEF, The World starring
Bank, The Inter-American De- Burl Yves, Shelley W
development Bank, the Internation- James Darren, Jean S
al Monetary Fund, everywhere Ricardo Montalban
where lhe dialogue between men Ella Fitzgerald
is vital, .participates actively in Here is a- story wit
maintaining and nourishing the knuckles... that pulls no
ideals which are at the base of ...that isn't a afraid to si
(he existence of these institu- life the way some peop
tions. In its relations with these learn to live it! Don't r
institutions the Republic of Haiti story of total emotion
accepts international interdepen- olute love... of people
dence. without ever rejecting nothing to give but them
the principles of freedom and and who gave it all!


rxI .World


ii]


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S SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCASII


tih, loot






he found-
e of- any

actively
offering"
to all
moving
activities
etings of
nations,.
underde-
mbers of.

h under-
ie of in-


related
,ood and
necessity
re of its-
hasten -
ntry. A,
faith ex-
,- it be-
the con-

nent bas-.
idayu

has aP-
e Power."
it will
odry will:-
he:b
I.. haw
of, on-
ice-.wi

rer. -
peopl
lives with
is. yours
t wishes
shakable
and re'
order top
at diffi-
onal pa
ated be-
'le must,

VALIER
Republic."



NE
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a per,:



Vintners,
Seberg,I
and

h bras
punchbi'
how you..
ple musfP?
miss thii
and abs-
who had..
nselves...
-.) -






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