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 Material Information
Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."
 Record Information
Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00161

Full Text


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SbSUaday


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DUMARSAIS ESTIME Phoe 2061 Vol XIV MONDAY JUNE 5th, 1961 No. 30


F


'econ ciliation


S. General Rafael Trujillo Jr.-(seated %without mustache but with
sun-glasses during first press conference at San Isidore.
(Porfirio Rubiiosa is at extreme-left).


lu- l u 10 e t1 Gen. Trujillo's
STrujllo, D.-R., .Tune 3- First- Interview
%ailing of humble women
*pgled taps at 10.32 a. m. CIUDAD T.RUJILLO, -Domi'ti-
iay, sounded the. finale to can -Republic, June S LiUut;
S -":a a Gel.RA~aela1Trujillo .Jr -ared
.- Saturday thathe a w n au-
.- authorities -were holding fewer
uies:1 afer his son, Rafael, than sixty, suspects -in connec-
rls) -came up -from -th. tion with the assassihatidn dofhis
were the coffin was seal- father, Generalissimo Rafael Le-
allked between an honor onidas Trujillo .Molina.
I-assed' in front of San General Trujillo, whq now
)b~litiiChurch and stood'-at holds the key'.position in the
ion -hldl the crowd paqk- country as commander" of the ar-
the: ilaza across the street, med forces, said that the whole
bh 'a brief ovatio'l.' country was calm and there was
no disorder anywhere. He said
iattly, after : receiving he had accepted command of the
eiE- .allegiance, -khaki- armed services to help keep or-
-er"hu"into his er. -
,. He pledged the full support of
ntinued on page 1U) .. (Continued on'page 3)
,
[lie ijDue a1valier Boarding PAA
ip r iiturinTo Studies In England .
4- W .....


- With remarkable clairvoyance,
Mr. Boileau Mehu outlined his
program in an address to the
Nation last week on assuming
the direction of the Ministry
of Interior and Nationnal Defen-
ce.
'The main points of Interior
Minister Mehu's program as sta-
ted in his address are: to help
the President suppress embezz-
lenient. present e\lortion, pro-
teet the less fortunate, impose
respect of the ja intor the safe-
guard of commoii interest, prac-
tice justice regardless of the in-
dividual and offer guarantees to
all those acting according to the
laws.


Gen. Trujillo with Senor Leland Rosenberg who was. Domin ican
_Envoy to Iran' and is now attached to his staff.


Chauffeur


Jefe Fou
CIUD.,t .TRUJILLO Thdy'
".o fnm ,like he wab an ani-

Tiiis was the way the chauf-
er of dictator Rafael Trujillo
sesribd the assassination of
b:DorWiican strongman during '
an exclusive i n t e rv ie w last Ky
iThursda" night. 'nu
The 'hauffeur,' acarias de la the
Crur, is recuperating From nu- the
,h-erous bulllet wound$ he suffer- ViS
w-ed w" the attackers "feiledwit
Trujill. Tuesday night. ha
s .goeo: .He was interviewed ib the sec- ri
." nd'fl.r:' room of the green-wal- He
t..6 'I (coatinu6e aon page 16) talc

.., '~l.3.P~.i~ ;~.- ... '. '-.-',. -- ,


eills How


ght Back


KYRA MARKHAM

EXHIBITS HERE
Last Saturday at cocktail time,
ra Markham displayed a
mber of her Haitian works at
SReservoir Restaurant under
e auspices of Carole Holland.
iting guests were'; delight'
*h the variety of Miss .Mark.
m's pictures, all painted du-
g her- present visit to Haiti..
r's. is a sure and'developed
ett. --(Contipued on' pige, 2)
'" ". .. .' i:


Here is a translation of the
full text of Minister Mehu's ad,
dress:
Mr. the Secretary of State,
You have just presented me
quite favorably. It could not
have been different because of
our old friendship. But I am'
certain that those who have care-
fully listened will take the cir-
cumstances into consideration to
justly establish my personal
merit.
Mr. the Secretary of State,
Ladies and Gentlemen:
You will allow me first to ex-
press my most sincere thanks
and my deep gratitude to His
Excellency the President of the
Republic, the Honorable Dr.
Francois buvalier, who has ho-
nored me with his high solicit-
ude .in entrusting to me the di-
rection of his Government's in-
tetnal policy.
I do not under estimate the
A4ica~t~Ja~.wi-Lwil ar have. to as-
(Continued on page 16)

KATHERINE DUNHAM LOOKS
CONFIDENTLY TO HAITI'S
FUTURE' WITH OPENING OF

Geisha Bar


__


After years of travelling the
world over, Katherine 'Dunbar
has. returned to the home that -
has inspired much of her stage
work. The famous dancer whose :'
troupe gathered international ac-
claim during, 'two, decades 'of
touring capitals' of! the world,
has return not to roost'But to.fi-
dulge in'more work at a 'more .'
relaxed pce.e .
Miss Dunhains decision to re-
main in Haiti and set up a dance
school in the city and a nighl ;
club.. In the original setting pf
her tropical plantation, "Habita- .'
tion Leclerc", the former home .
of Napoleon's pet sister, Pauline'
the wife of General Leclerc,















"

(Coontinued on page 9)
: . ./


Neighbor
Yaal C inrEI


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PAGE 2




I:' 1
(Continued from page 1)
Kyra Marham was born in
Chicago Illinois, one of the mid-
kddle-west's great prairie states


I' and named Elaine Hyman. As
soon as she was able to hold
a tool of any sort she began to
Sdraw and paint and when she
Flunked out of High School e.n-
rolled at the Chicago Art Ins-
titute. She did not know what
she aanled to do, actually, and
When she was not-satisfied with
what her art instructors were
giving her she stopped attend-
ing classes and was spending
her time sitting in the public,
galleries, writing a poetic dra-
ma, when her father heard of it
and withdrew her from the
school and took her on a cruise
to the West Indies and Venezue-


That was the first time she
ever saw Haiti and made up
her mind that eventually, she
did not know when, she would
return to it.

K.ra, or Elaine as she was
then, had been cursed all her
childhood by the fact that she
%%as ugl.. Her father would take
her on his knee and quote from
Tennyson's "Idyls of the King",
"Elaine the fair, Elaine the
lovable, Elaine the lily Maid of
Astolot". She knew that ''lil.
maid" did not fit her, particu-
larily as her riother about the
same time, -herself a famous


BUILDING fV
DECORATIN(
MODERN ST(

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CHINESt

', NIGHT;...
195451[},~ej 5


yra Markham s ,
blond beauty, would say "My, There followed several years tied onto a qui dofmstic
but your an ugly little black as art'director for the movies, life with. painting her whole ac-
brat!" Fox Film being the only firm tivity. 'She a.d been marn.ed.be-
How she had .the- courage to still, existent, pfter which she fdre, byt' this was "a marriage
go on the stage, what with her quit the commercial theatre to that -brought her real cbnte t-
father's opposition and her ug- work with that now almost' leg- ment. 'Be6icue David said "You
lines, is hard to tell, but she endary -organization, '!The Pro- are t&do'.ythig you want td
promptly looked through many vincetown Players": Those were do," she spread .er interests,
books until she found a name happy years, when the group over several feld: the paying
that sounded dark and roman- introduced to the would such always coming first,- but thie*e.
tic, "Kyra",.and picking a last playwrights as Susan Glaspell, was a wfeaying room "a pottery,
name that was euphonius with Djuna Barnes and Eugene O' and a,.bi:; kitchen ; .bheri she
it, '.Markham," has been Kira Niel], directors like Stark-Young', eventually .learned to .butcher
Markham ever since. James Light, Wenneth McGowan her- owri-venison .for the deep
and Robert Edmond Jones, who freeze in the Vermont home to
It was several years bef~.e had been known previously only which -they moved in'1946. This
she learned that "Kyra" me;nis as a stage .designer, .thqugh'a. had. een.. preceedd' by many
"light", and also that "Ma.k- great one. ,.s . .,, in w.Yori: o wc-
ham" was a family name. Ed- b'' .. i' ha b.' :...nPupAr by large
win Markham, the poet, being When the organization begar Wscales Fpaiw
a third or fourth cousin. to die, having fulf i he, d e dn "t
no die, having fuld th- .need .,,. "',,i -':con.eritted.
There were twelve years in of it, Kyra complained to., 'Fit- p eid o lithograhy,.". and r
theromweretwelvepenOfo .it a y and.h
the theatre, some of which she zi", the wonderful red-headed hrst and'only Hoiorable Men-
loved but too often having to woman who managed-the busi- tion in an exhibition at te';Na-
earn her living in the. indepen- ness end, "The trouble with us tional Academy. :'
dence she had demanded by is our overhead is so low we -
playing in inferior plays, .ie can't quit!" ." '
was forced back on her br; She tqo 'te atina Awaar
and pencil to u ait for that .rie But .Kyra quit and married f'~,itfhoraphy at: thaeP.ladel -
thing, "a good play".' David Stoner Gaither aind set- phia Print Club in 'iTi, and'her
'etchings "afid lithographs have
been purchased by -the New
Caribbean Construction Co. SA. York Public Library, theMetro-
politan. Museum, thie Library of
Congress ana'the ,&Smithsonian
Builders Of The Military City Instittiion, 'etc:
Her only'training was that
Gen. Manager: Getard THEARD rst'er iod at Chiago At Is-ta
titute and a special course many
Phone: 3955. P..O..BO.. 284 -years faier at .the Art Students
League in New York," learning-
the technique of the old mas-
ters under Alexander Abels.
MATERIAL, PAINTS, HARDWARE,-,
;, ETC. CALL FIRST .AT HAITI'S, MOST ..
ORE, M & S RUE, AMERICAINE.

S'% M :*im -
.._ :A. .` .0


$3.00


*. :

S -,


Candlelght

Restaurant /


the Petionvillee
/


Road


'"


"H A~1'Z' I;jS.S U'N


- .. .D -- M WY .JUNE 5TH,


TUESDAY

; '
Egg ~oll ().

Won toni soq!.





..4
Choice .. .

Sweet & Sowr',





-lostr* th6 #

.tea o.rco*4,
. . .'; :, -






S6"HAITI SUN"


RAMFIS GIVES FIRST PRESS CONF.


(Continued from page 1)
j1 armed services to the Gov-
irnient of President Joaquin
,,laguer and its pro-Western
,ocines. He promised to keep
he military services out of poli-
ics. o
Denies Hostility To U.S.
He repudiated the suggestion
hat lie might personal. be hos-
id tio the United States. General
rijillo said, "I would like to
:suie you that this is a lie
p -id bl reactionary persons."
pRpoits pubhshed in the Unit-
i States have said that he re-
,nt:ld the refusal ot the United
l;utC Army Command and Ge-
etai Stali School at" Fort Lea-
,n i,)rth to graduate him be-
ausei of his repeated absences
He was asked whether the Do-
iinican Republic would like to
rsoume diplomatic relations with
he United States. He replied
as a question for President Ba-
guert and not for the armed
\ ces to answer.
Giieral Trujillo was cool and
i,.d as lie received thilty-five
,itrin press representatives at
. country's" nain airbase at
in Isidoru, tweiie miles past of
id.iad Trujillo. He was dressed
an immaculate suntan Air
riIe unifoirmn without decora-
Otins.
The General said about 200
rsons had been arrested as
aspects before he arrived here
orn Paris Wednesday y night at-
r lIs father's assassination
uesday night.
"As soon as I arrived I order-
Sthe release of all those for
hose detention there was not
me logical reason," he said.
M present onl, persons invol-
d n the plot and some near
Jat;ies are still'being held and
mir- near relatives of the fugi-

\Wen the alleged plotters are
I rounded up, he said, "they
lM be handed over to civil


anywhere in the Dominican Re-
public, both of them in Ciudad
Trujillo. No injuries were re-
ported in either case. One was
an attempted attack on a church.
where one plotter was said to
have been hidden. The other was
on the headquarters of the oppo-
sition Dominican Democraic Mo-
tement of the People.
No damage was evident today
at the church and little at the
political headquarters.
Personal Grudge Blamed
General Trujillo dismissed the
idea that any political plot was
behind his father's assassination.
The authorities, he said, believe
only seven men were directly
involved and possibly a total of


fifty
wi th
what
He
sible'
Juan
leader


or sixty closely connected
them had some idea of
was going on..
asserted it was "impos-
" that retired Brig. Gen.
Thomas Diaz, accused as
er of the assassins, had hop-


ed to overthrow the Govern-.
ment.
He said that "according to pri-
soners' statements" Gen. Diaz
had acted because he had a per-
sonal grudge at having been
forced to retire last year, partly
on the basis of seniority and
part. because ot his personal
habits.
"His personal conduct was
sometimes lacking in good or-
der," General Trujillo said "He
drank heavily all- his hfe."
General Trujillo said General
Diaz could not have hoped to
stage a coup d'etat because he
had no following in the armed


Gabdn Destination Of
Fred Quinn
The two year old Republic of
Gabon may be the new post of
Fred Quinn of the U.S. Inform-
ation Service here.

Quinn who has interested him-
self in the study of Africa during
a two year assignment in Mo-
rocco has found his interest sti-
mulated by his two years in
Haiti.

Gabon, a member of the
French community is on the
equator bounded by the Congo,
Chad and Nigeria. The Capital
is Libreville with a population
of 21,000. Tropical fruit is
amongst its main export.



EDUCATED ON
PUBLIC AND
INTERNATIONAL
AFFAIRS CALLS

Dr. Gardner Patterson, direct-
or of the Woodrow Wilson school
of Public and International Af-
fairs, Princeton University, vi-
sited Haiti last week.


during the search for the fugi-
tixes.

General Trujillo said he sup-
ported a decree published ear-
lier this week offering amnesty
to all Dominican citizens living
abroad who had political char-
ges against them. The Govern-
ment said this move was design-
ed to let all Dominicans vote in


forces. He called General Diaz elections here next year.
"a traitor."
The General smiled at a sug-
General Tru]illo said that gestion of a possible invasion
there had not been any military fiom Cuba. He recalled that his
mobilization moves because of father once said that if Premier


the assassination. He said the
country has an armed force of
15.000'to 20,000 on active duty
and that with reserves the total


ults to be dealt with under the force was about 100,000. He said
ws of the Dominican Repub- the Air Force had a little more
than 100 airplanes.
General Trujillo said two in- There has been no confirma-.
dents already reported were tion here of foreign reports that
e only ones that had occurred torture and killings had occurred


Fidel Castro's forces tried to in-
vade the Dominican Republic
"beards would fly like butter-
flies."

The General said, "Castro did
try an invasion and the beards
did fly like butterflies."
By SAM POPE BREWER
Special to The New York Times


Haiti's "Gingerbread Palace" and famed haste lery the Grand Hotel Oloffson, show place o
illan Architecture, exquisite cuisine and contented living. Set amongst a myriad of tropical trees
gardens the Oloffson, complete with ntulat ure pool, Is the haven for the uninhibited.


*. ^li"K&;.^!&-^ l .: "i .


New Ministerial Cabinet


The formation of the new Mi- Paul Blanchet, Minister of Co-
nisterial Cabinet was made pu- ordination and Information;
blic in a Presidential decree is- Bolleau Mehu, Minister of In-
sued from the National Palace terior and National Defence;
May 30th. Rene 'Chalmers, Minister of
Five menlbers of the old Ca- Foreign Affairs and Religion;
bmet retained their portfolios Herve Boyer, Minister of Fin-
and three new under-Minister ance;
posts were filled. Louis R. Leaeque, Minister of
Members of President Dr. Public Works, Transport and
Francois Duvalier's new Cabinet Communications;
are: Leonce Vlaud, Minister of Na-
tional Education;
Clolis Desinor, Minister of
FARMER FELLED Commerce and Industry;
FOR STEALING Dr. Aurele Joseph, Minister of
CHICKEN Public Health and Population;
Gasner Kersaint, Minister of
A peasant worker at Freres Labor and Social Welfare;
paid a high price for reportedly Simon Desvarleux, Minister of
stealing a chicken from a neigh- Justice;
bor this past week. Andre Theard, Minister of
Farmer Mizarre, the father of Agriculture. Natural Resources


five children dropped dead on
the main road two miles from
his home after being soundly
beaten by his captor, the assist-
ant of the Chef de Section.
Felled at the roadside at 11:00
a.m. Mizarre's body was undis-
tributed until that evening when
the Justice of Peace when
through the legal formalities.
The rural policeman's in
whose custody he was when he
died has been arrested.


and Rural Development;
Victor Nevers Constant, Minis-
ter of Tourism.
Lucien Chauvet, Under-Minist-
er of Interior and National De-
fence;
Max A. Antoine, Under-Minist-
er of Labor and Social Welfare;
Georges G. Figaro, Under-Mi-
nister of Information;
Lucien Daumec, Under-Minist-
er of Public Health and Popu-
lation.


ONIONS


FROM


V


A


Onions of first quality are available at the

sales counter of ODVA at the corner of Rue

des Cesare and Rue du Centre, at the following

prices:



10lbs.-Bags 15 Gourdes

50lbs.-Bags 15 Gourdes

Wholesale orders will be filled on -the basis

of Gourdes: 2.75 per 10lbs..bags (Minimum


10 bags) and Gourdes: 14 per 50lbs. (Minim-
im 10 bags.)





tobacco tastes best
when the filter's recessed


~I!II


I-


JOSEPH NADAL. AGENTS


.:;;::..:...~ ; .~:i:-:;;riE~.::~~i~::::::~D-~Ii ~i~4j~ rt.


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PAGoE


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M .n-D,'- J-. :E 3-1-, 1961


11


- I







PAGE 1


PAGE "H~l SL


nlhNDAY JUNE .Yj', ,9GI


Statement On Stevensonys Trip

WASHINGTON. May '"8.- for about three weeks. \e are of great potential significance
Following i. lth'e text of a sla- consulting. the governments con- and promise for stiengiherding


cementt by President Keined)
today on the special mission by
Adlai E. Steiensoin to Latill
America:

I lhai'. ankcd ,Ambassaldor Ad-
Jai E.. Stet ,ncion to undertake
a sl'-tial rrmi.sion onl my Ibelia!f
to thll coitittics of South Anme
lica tHe *.ill consult with ofh-
cials o[ the -,ooi.ernments of thi-
South ,\lAerian continent about
wvhlt c-in be done to perfect and
aclI'.-i rl'. -i our int-r-Anmetican
lpoi ;i;mi for social :.ind economic
d(ltLlJipm'et as 4ell as our co-
oipc-ition in other re'picts. I am
delgrhtl'd that Gnveirnur Stceen-
son hAs agreed to undertake
this missiSo.ll

Gt;,,rrnior Ste'.eiisoin plans to
icatI '- .eiy boon and v.ill 1)- away


corned and our embassies,
the itinerary has not yet h
finally worked out. But I
sa. that Go\ernor Ste\'en
hopes to visit all the count
in South America. lHe regi
and I do also. that lie will
be able to \,sit all the ot
.\mierican republics .!t'i wh
i, haive diplomatic relation

It seems to us that this is
spli: ll;:l a, appropriate lime
GU. ei nor Stevenson to
South Amerlca again. The At
rican tioernnients ale prcpai
lot the nmnistetial mneetlriig
thel Initetr-Ammurican Econ'l
ilnd SuliI:.I Council, v. lflch iS
be held ht'eging on July '15
Urug i.u.iy.
The LlUnited Slates Got
mnifr iC'\e this meeting as


Iaitte. Qiya~iC ihe F~dwve.


S WITH A







SBESSAMATIC

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ets.
not
her
which
s.

rill
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the frc- and independent nations


destroying, the human rights
and the dignity of the individual.
In this effort each country
needs first of all to help itself.
But we must also help each
other and mo\e together.


plore methods of obtaining clos-
er relationships in the cultural
field as well between our
schools 'and universities. our
teachers and students, in our
scientists and artists, out writ-
ers and thinkers-in short, each


Sthi hmphre ad both na ernor Stevenson will be manifestation of the dJiersity of
Goteriona iStevelnson w.aill be
tional and inter-Am erican instst- ready to explain our ideas as to the culture and tradition cof our
utibnIs forI social ptrogiess and6
how \we believe this can be done. peoples.
economic development.
.N tA. nd lie will seek the ideas of
Oi. N La inks trnessedii ur -good neighbors. These ex- I think there are few people

bors and art also ,und t- changes of ideas about out' new in the United States better qual-
ether ndwder the United Nadtis plans and responsibilities will be ified than. Adlai Stevenson to
Cate t ie a useful part of the preparations examine and discuss all these
.rharte fr pein wacrldwi. for our meeting in Uruguay. possibilities. I am sure that his
nlllt'[ U I" p 'l_ lld ;-ClJIL',1
lmns coorue coperatond .e and In my statement of March 13 journey will contribute immeas-
lor oconrinue cooperalon. and -'
:or the protection of huma,, I al,. emphasized that our co- urably to our preparations for
,1-iis. iperatioin in this hemisphere the Ivontevideo confei-nce and
should lnot be only in economic to the strengthcening ot the inltr-
.- -i ... -, .,1 i^i. '.W .-. in .. ex- Am rican .rsystem.


IinL' .\s the1- United States repris- a
of ent:attive in the lnitnd Nations
n1i.' Gt',villnoli Stc'.einson is in an ex-
in ..ellent po-ition to canvas with
in our South American friends the
relationship between our hemns
eirn- pheric a iraniienerits and our
one conmmoni iii'te'iLst inI an effet-l'.e
United Niii'.ns He wil.'[ acss rd-
1, speral; fi:r rne as well .is for
himself in expressing adnira-
-- inn for the mniagidicent ii:cclid
.,i hlib'rA..l liiadirslhip which the
Lt~li-An'i it Jn goveirnmi e i t s
S'- ...itrnue to cle? in th.: .ork
.. the" Uniltd Nationu

i On Ml -tli 11 I suceesticd to
f ime pci'pl,: :,of this hemispuleri
n "Ailiin'e for Procrss, a.
','ast ir,.i;jeirati.e effort Io sa-
lisfy the basic needs of the Ame-
jian people, for homes, \wirk
lid land, health and schools."
While the name. Alliance for
Progress, might be new. the
ideas I put forward are not, the
nmonopcl.\ of any single Ameri-
can state, but flow natiIrally.
from our long tradition of inter-
American cooperation.

On Agril 11 I staled thdt "our
common purpose today is to har-
ness these new aspirations and
these new tools in a great inter-
American effort an effort to
hift all the peoples in the Ajne-
S ricas into a new era of economic
progress and social justice." I

said that the OAS tOrganization
if American Statesl, the oldest
S organization of nations in exist-
ence, should move ahead to
meet tlus new challenge.
Asked Joint Effort
'I asked all the free republics
of the hemisphere tp join this
cooperative :undertaking to eli-
minate hunger.,and poverty, ig-
norance and disease from our
hemisphere. \T believe these as-
pirations are common to the
Americas and that there exists:
a firm will and. determination
to move ahead with this great
work.

Inler-Ar'erican machi n er r
must be strengthened.' We need c.
to outline base development
S goals.. It is essential that each
government, individually and co-
oreilannn with others, define ob-
jecti.es in the key areas of eco-
nomic and social betterment
such as erliliction, land use and
lenire, education, public health.
And we must db it while. enlarg-
ing, not restricting, the area of
freedom, while guaranteeing, not


- DJ.tu PERRIER I, iL. Lazarc
DiA .Di MANCHE J. ~rabriel
N. iI


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ORLIN: 0!"


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.EINE~~~~~~~ 5TI 91-rIU' A1


HAITI SUN
IHE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published'Sunday Morning
Editor-Publisher BERNARD DIEDERICH
Gera;nt.-sponsable MAUCLAIR LABISSIERE,
MEMBER OF THE LNTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1950


HAITIAN NEWSMAN FREEDOM

FIGHTER HONORED ON

25th ANNIVERSARY OF DEATH
Joseph Jolibois Jr...the' Haitian newsman who oppos-
ed the Marine Occupation of his homeland and defend-
ed the rights of his fellow citizens was honored this
ipast week by the Haitian press on the twenty-fifth an-
nisersary of his death.
This old snap-shit was taken on the newsman during
a period ot imprisonment in 1921. Wearing the prison
garb. "Rade-inacaque", Jolibois is seen breaking stones
hIefare the National Penitencier on the Rue du Centre.
The freedom champion knew the hardships of prison


Ii .1
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.


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.. .. i. k


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during.his journalistic career which finally ended in
a prison cell. He died in the National Prison 25 years
ago last week.
The solitary confinement cell in the National Prison
that had Jolibois as a principal inmate was later nam-
ed after him.
ADLAI STEVENSON'S TRIP
ri The New York Times
riorth Americans must not think of Adlai Stevenson's forthcoming
rip to South America simply as a "goodwill mission." In the
sent state of Latin-American ferment and of disturbed rela-
'ins between that region and the United States such a voyage
s as much of a gamble as Vice President Nixon's ill-fated visit
o South America in the spring of 1958.
But this time Ambassador Stevenson will be forewarned, which
Ir Nixon was not. Moreover, Mr. Stevenson knows something
about Latin America, which Mr Nixon did not. The United Na-
ions Ambassador made a triumphal two-month trip to the area
year ago. He has a great reputation in Latin America, as else-
,here abroad.
President Kennedy's letter on hMr Stevenson's mission explains
he hope behind the journey. It is to help prepare tlie groundwork
or the economic meeting in Uruguay on July 15. There will be
n exchange of ideas during the trip, whose importance will pro-
,bly lie more in the Kennedy Administration's acquiring some
understandingg of how Latin Americans. feel than vice versa. Ignor-
ice about Latin America ir the United States is one of the reas-


OUR NEIGHBOR LAID TO REST
(Continued from page 14) tired from the room. They in
After this crisis females among eluded widow Maria De Los An
the Trujillo family mourners re- geles Martinez de Trujillo, sister
ons why our relations with the area are not good: we did not
.\en know how the Cubans, ninety miles off our shore, felt prior
ir. the disastrous invasion of April 1:.
Under Secretary Bowles spoke a good deal of sense, as usual
on Sunday when he said: "The biggest thing we should do is
stop being obsessed with Mr Castro and really move on to the bi,
questions that involve us all." He listed these as povertyy and
injustice and the insecurity of people who just feel there is no
much to live for." When Mr. Stevenson came back from his trij
to Latin America last year he said: "If the tree way of lIe does
not help the man.\ poor of this world, it will never save the few
rich." Mr Kennedy thought so much of the idea that lie paraphra
sed if for his inaugural. It is the philosophy at the heart of the
*"Alliance for Progress" plan and the idea above all others tha
the American envoy must emphasize.
Latin Americans will have relatively little interest in the '!.;ted
States, negative plans to combat Fidelismc and communism. They
will want to know what positive plans we have to foster economic
development and social justice. Faith in the United States has
been badly shaken by the ill-advised Cuban adventure. Mr Steven
son is trusted and respected. If there is any North American who
will be listened to today by intellectuals, by politicians and by
the people, his name is Adlai E Stevenson.


LIBERTY-F



SUMMER

M.ousES







FREE PORT- SHOPPING CENTER
53.5ss.1ue duQuai
SDvsses and. Shirt made on order
and deliOerfd In 24 hours..
SWe ship tolhe Statles t1I


Marina Trujillo de Garcia; niece
Lidia Ruiz de Bergez.
About 7:40 a.m. the honor
guard returned the coffin about
halfway to the center" of the
t foyer and soon hysteria began
r to build up again among mourn-
ers. At 8:00 a.m. guards remov-
ed a man-sized sunflower floral
piece leaning against bust of
s Trujillo, that loomed down upon
g the coffin. Shortly after, the cof-
d fin was carried out and placed
Sin the. hearse.

p While on display, the coffin
s was flanked at four corners by
Sfive-foot-high silver candlesticks
. with burning candles. Behind his
closed coffin was placed an up-
right, handsome, silver stand
with a plain, wooden crucifix.
The huge crowd was remark-
Sably homogenous of the humble
Class.

Well-dressed persons were ei-
s their in uniform or had the sleek
-look of ranking politicos. Com-
o pletely absent were banners or
other signs indicating the towns
of origin, or sections of Ciudad
Trujillo.
Demonstration appeared com-
pletely spontaneous, with no
signs of supervision. Similarly,
on the 31-kilometer drive from
the National Palace to the town
of San Cristobal clusters of per-
sons were gathered at every
hamlet.

Among the abundant flower
displays were at least two fire
trucks loaded with flowers.
These included huge. grey, me-
talli-floral pieces.
Shouts of the hysterical men
and women repeatedly included
the phrase "Papa Trujillo, ay
Papa Trujillo."
Another phrase heard was
"while Trujillo is here we are
all right."

According to priests at the San
Cristobal, the crypt where Tru-
jillo was placed is plain, with
no marble. His coffin was placed
on one ledge of a section built
to accommodate two coffins. But
space is available in the crypt
for additional coffins. The mili-
tary blocked all entry to the
crypt.
By HAROLD J. LIDIN
STAB Staff Writer


F1S HER'S


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1) THE CORNER SHOP RUE BONNE FOL

2) ART & CURIO SHOP FISHERS ACROSS FROM CU

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PAGEok4


l1I'4cul'' t.J i V~~' >.)y..


-The line San''Juan Ciud- conclusion that, opening Cap R. P. Real Charlebois, csc,, Eco-
Trujillo -- Cap Haitien Haitien to an international air nome, N-D-du-P.S. College;
t au Prince is not; at the pre--traffic,''is Of an absolite- ieed. Dr.' Charles Leconte, M. D.;
t time operated by any air The city is already an open Leo Schomiberg, Troupe Guidi,
npany;" seaport-that receive's boats.and Manager; .
-Caribair's scale of prices cruises from the United States Yvette 'Bussenius, 'Owner Mont-
Ild be higher than the -ones, and Europe. Inthe name of what Joli Hotel;
PAA and Delta. economico concept could anybody Rene Calisti, Manager Societe
ly taking the numbers at their defend that city -to receive dir- Industrielle Capoise;
dmum, with its three, times ect flights.--The'law of progress John Laroche, TEXACO Ageht;
reek service, Caribair could must be applied both to big and F. M. Altieri & Co., Cie. Gene-
isport no. more than 56 per- small countries, and to commer- rale Transatlantique agents;
s per\ voyage, be it so, 168 cial companies, however impor- Jean Luciani, Ford Dealer;
peek, 672 a month and 8,064 tant they may be. There is also Otto Schutt, Hamburg American
year. Suppose that half of an aspect of "Point IV" on Line Agent;
se passengers instead of tak- which we draw the kind atten- Raymond Nazon, Manufacturer;
PAA or "Delta Lines to get tion of the Civil" Aeronautics Luc Laratte, Merchant;
ectly from Ciudad Trujillo. to Board. Edouard Laroche, Radio Philips
Sau Prince prefer taking Agent;
ibair for the circuit Ciudad The question is, in the occur- Allan Miller; Cie d'Eclairage
llo Cap Haitien Port ence, to know whether Cap Hal- Electrique Director;
Prince, such a service would tien, with its -immense tourist N. Montreuil, Citadelle Shop;
sent for PAA a loss ol pro- potential, will be refused the au- Bmile Boutros, Merchant;
Imanque a gagner) of 4,032 thorization ,f being placed on Salers Biter; Merchant;
sengers at $20.00 or $80,000 the American serial map; whe- Nonce Novelia,-Merchant;
par. their that city with its historic-Henri P. Dugue, Lawyer;
and natural resources, is deem- ALMONACY Printing;,
.e loss, as shown above, ed,to remain in poverty and in Mario Capolo, Mechanician;


d be very small; on the
hand, 8,000 persons stay-
at Cap Haitien are liable to
Id a yearly average of one
ion dollars. Such an afflux
noney in a modest agglomer-
n and for only one commer-
branch, would .constitute
best technical help given to.
under-developped country.
Iter a thorough examination
Ihe problem, we draw the


a perpetual state of stagnation;
it is the question that we ask
Members of the Civil Aeronaut-
ics Board to answer, appealing
to their spirit of fairness and
cooperation.
The present Petition has been
signed by the following Persons:
Mgr Albert Cousineau, Cap Hai-
tien and North Dept. Bishop;
R. P. J. Duchesne, c.s.c., Sup-
erior, Notre Dame du P.S. Coll


on the label


S ' rI- a'X,.l l r. *C I*









Srved excwsmr at aWts Leading',
Ir HeLS&.RESTAURiANTSf at YCi lSG ~
\i:; *.if:^ . -i.'!- -.: y- ft Tgq:. ; orL6 il Ci.' },":-;;'..":i--i'. ',,
T ROUGHOUT AH -WoRLSj -''!,:' +ly
Iti


West India Fruit (Banana Plan-
tation) ;
MASCOTTE Atelier'(Jh. Ed. D.)
Mgr. A. Jamier, General Vicar,
Bishop; ..
R. P. W. Prouix, csc., Cure at
Pilate;
R. P. Jean-Paul Gladu, Semi-
naire Ste-Therese Director;
Kuno Beck, Owner of Beck Hotel
Louis Newbold, Driver;
Marina de Catalogne, Owner,
Hostellerie du Roi Christophe;
Adrien Laroche, Merchant;
Mrs. Defendini, Hotel Mont Jo-
li, Manager;
Felix Angelucci, Royal Nether-
lands, SS Co. Agent;
Louis Schomberg, Coffee Expor-
ter;
Gerard de Catalogne, Le Nou-
veau Monde Newspaper Director
Frank Larreur, Merchant;
Cianciulli & o., Merchants;
Constant Ferrara, Merchant;
Louis Mompoint, Cafe Colomb
Owner;
A. Vitiello, Merchant;


Salers Marzouka, Merchant;
Kalil Marzouka, Merchant;
Edouard Schettini, Merchant;
Gaston Sam, Lawyer;
Roland Sanchez, Lawyer;
Mario Cianciulli, Merchant;
Germain Michel, Esso Standard
Oil;
H. Lucchessi, Shell Agent;
Drivers Syndic Committee:
President: A. Maisonneuve,
Vice-President: E. Manigat,
Secretaries: F. ,Dugue, Louis
Moline;
A. Pierre, Industrial;
Riot, Driver;
Jacques Valbrun, Driver;
Gerard Julmice, Driver;
Luc Fidele, Driver;
Dr. Roger Mallebranche, M.D.;
Jacques Leon, Driver;
Georges Duval, Driver Mecha-
nician;
Paul Jasmin, Driver:
Gracin Jn-Francois, Driver;
Urbain Eleazard, Driver;
and many other drivers whose
signature could not be read.


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rI! Dt . ...., 19. ..
N[AY JKN.E ;i5l, 1961 H A I TI S U N "rA ,



,12 th ANNI/VERSR Y








FREE-PORT SHOPPING CENTER
-P. O. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI




AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS
MINTON, WEDGWOOD, 0 MWEA,. 'MRIz EIrr.UrANV -.
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ROYAL COPENHAGEN, AUDEAR PIGUET, RAPHAEL, PATOU,
S ROYAL WORCESTER, JAEGER LE COULTRE BALMAIN, WORTH,
ROYAL DOULTON, ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO, REVILLON, VIGNY,
SROSENTHALE, SPODE, ATLANTA, STUDIO, CARVEN, LE GALLON.
AYNSLEE, COALPORT, VULCAIN. FABERGE OF PARIS.
SIGUSTAUBERG. JEAN D'ALBERT,
JACQUES GRIFFE
FATH, PIGUET.
KISLAY CORDAY,
S GEORGE JENSEN, -ENGLISH DOESKIN,
SHANS HANSEN, GERO, ITALIAN ANTELOPE. MINOX, CANNON
DRAGSTEII, GENSE.

SPRINGLE; BALLANTYNE, ROYAL COPENHAGEN,
; KThe Finest of FRANCE. l BERN HARD ALTMAN, ROYAL DOULTON,
S ITALY, AUSTRIA, LUISA SPAGNOLI. HUMMEL.

LALIQUE, BACCARRAT;
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WEBB & CORBETT, DANISH SILVER, CREAM, All FRENCH,
VAL, SOLAMBERT, GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY DANISH ana
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IL:
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~JE5TH~9~*<.F:** i- ~ *.


'Petition


Mr.


' In the matter of an application of
CARIBBEAN ATLANTIC
t AIRLINES, INC.
requesting authorization for ser-
vicing Cap Haitien and Port au
Prince, Haiti.
Docket No. 10103

..
Cap Haitien, Haiti,
March 25, 1961

The merchants, hotelmen. tra-
vel agents, owners of shops,
guides, drivers of Cap Haitien,
learned with great surprise the
decision rendered by the Civil
Aeronautics Board, on March 11,
1959, denying the application
filed by Caribbean Atlantic Air-
lines, Inc. (Caribair), Docket
No. 10103, requesting exemption
authority for air service between
the following towns: San Juan,
Cuidad TrujiUo, Cap Haitien,
Port au Prince.

We present a "firm and cour-
teous protestation against said
denial which is not in conform7
iry, neither with the general in-
terest, nor the interest of the
Haitian people, nor the princip-
les of good neighbour policy.

An attentive study of the do-
cument in which the Civil Ae-
ronautics Board is justifying
its opinion, has convinced us
that the Members of the Comm-


I


To HiLa


John Kenedy


President 'Of United
ittee, for some reasons, no
doubt, independent of their will,
were not acquainted with the
true situation existing in Haiti
and particularly in Cap Haitien.
Therefore, in view to enlighten
them and so that they may jud-
ge in all cognizance, we have
taken the liberty to draw up
following statement:

The CAB is supporting that
Caribair has not justified the
need of an air service for Cap
Haiien, since Port au Prince
is served by the PAA and Delta
Airlines; that a service between
Po-t au Prince and Cap Haitien
is already organized and that
nd particular circumstance is
requiring the establishment of
Caribair in Haiti...

We are going to demonstrate
that said argument is completely
erroneous and does not corres-
pond, neither to the reality of
facts, nor to the eloquence of


numbers.

Can Hait;en is a town of 30


States Of America '
houses in the XVIIIth century
style; that town is located at
proximity of King Henry. Chris-
topher's Citadel, an historic mo-
nument which is considered by
world opinion as the most ex-
traordinary fortress in the Car-
ibbean, area.


Tourists At Port
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954 *
1955
1956
1957


i:. ig'their clientele, borgamize, by
V)l .,.I nds 6of means, a 'propagan-
: o.d9 :-S* 'd spaag4tntet against
SCap 'Haitien. In consideration of
" the above, the hotels .of Cap:
Hagtien are riost often empty
.and:only a little, minority of
SAmiericans accepts'to go there;'
au Prince: 3-Said propaganda of dispar-
13.579- agement s so well organized'
17,708 that even the travellers, having
20,031 reservation in Cap Haitien, often
35,749 send 'elegrant of cancellation;
48,071
'55,007 4-In spite of the excellent re-
65,766 cord of the Haitian airline that
I nver, -recist-rped any accident


it


The above facts have given to 1958 ur- l, s ....
the Haitian Government the idea Tourists At Cap Haitien: American tourists hesitate to use
of rendering Cap Haitien a tour-, 1950 916 "this national airline; certain tra-
istie city; during the last years, 1951 1,075 vel agents in the United. States
more than seven millions dollars 1952 83 even refuse to send their clients
have been spent in town plan- 1953 163 there; others require their cli-
ning and hygienic works; hotels 1954- 2,821 ents to sign an attestation to
have been constructed and- an 1955 3,514. o their responsibility agnst
appropriate publicity was insert- 1956 3,86 possible accidents; and one eas-
ed in the American newspapers 1957 2,681, iy comprehends, that such pro-
in order to make known Cap 1958 1,781 ed terrifies tourists.
Haitien and to incite tourists in Te reasons of security evok-
visiting the Citadel; the ques- This state of things-is not .due The seasons o security evo
tion was, to remedy a precarious to the fact that tourists were e e Hitia n airle fas bth a
economic situation, to give a-not satisfied with their trip to the Haitian airline is both a'
push to business, which would 'Cap Haitien (they all return de- commercial and military line,
bring prosperity and, in this lighted), but to the following lo- depending directly from the Ar-
way, all social classes: (drivers, cal conditions: my of Haiti Headquarters. The
guides, peasants interested in aitan the line for budget
breeding or culture, servants, 1-The tourists who visit Haiti to maintain the line or budget
stores and shops clerks, etc:..) and stop first in Port au Prince reasons, but it is certain that
would find work. stay there no more than an aver- the bad propaganda is prejud-
CIii lU tue 0- UU liC f thU


thousand inhabitants; it is the age of three days; they do not
old metropolis of Haiti, when Unfortunately, the efforts ac- have time to visit Cap Haitien;
Haiti was a French colony complished did not give the hop- .
known under the name of Saint ed results and the contrast be- 2-The travellers who effect a
Doningue. Cap Haitien has kept tween the number of tourists stay of several days in Haiti and
all its colonial charm and has who have visited 'Port au Prince would be capable to visit Cap
numerous historic monuments and those who have visited Cap HLaitien are disheartened in do-
such as old ramparts, ancient Haitien during the last nine ing it, by the hotels of Port au-
forts, fountains and forged iron years shows it amply: rince, who, in the view of keep-


p-E ;6


A tian









. .1 0 -




B JP d r '. SISAL BAGS d n BELT ... "., ;." .'.'. ,'

. FRE-.CHP FU MliE.S L U- .

.106b. d.


.. ...-." ,, -,;.. ... : ..../ ..-RAW G 0 0 '3!. . ..... .
:: .,- : / . .- -v " .. ... -.. :."
:;.:: : .. .,.. : ,..: :. ,:,$:Tn !o ,,, 'r :-, ., -. :

.1:'). ;' ." i " .. "' '


cla to the gooUUu ame o te
Haitian transportation airline.

In addition to the above, the
Haitian. airline, for want of mo-
ney, does not own a ticket sale
organization in the United States
_qr. a'-program of publicity neith-
er' for the newspaijrs nor for
the travel agents; consequently,
not being sufficiently known, it
is used only by local public and
its possibilities, in every res-
-pect, are limited.


For all those reasons, those
-who are interested in the deve-
liprient of tourism in Cap Hai-
tien, have arrived io the con-
clusiol that it 'is absolutely ne-
cessary to establish an air .ser-
vice with foreign. countries, .o
that. Cap .Haitien may receive
tourists di.r'ctly from exteriorr
withoutt stolping over at Port au
Prince or via the Haitian air-


In said intention, Haitian offi-
cials' have bad conversations
and approached the leaders 'of
Pan -American World Airways
and'. Delta Airlines, .to find out
wheth,.heSn'e lines were infer- I
ested (fotly.. to. Cap, Haitien .and
t\vawoud .be their terms; all
reqiestts of this nature have re-,
'na inr d unansweted.

SThen. the Haitian.' government
has been' directed, to 'Caribpir
which, has acceptd to. organize,
threee times, a weekk, an air ser-
Vice i dfiaini San Juan, Ciudad
rnjdl9, :Cap ..HaiMien,. Port au
Prince rodnd trip;, on: condition
,o ,get an..authorization from the.h
4" .' .'."I .' .;..Y'- o. "
V.Me .do not see very *well what
'copehetion, Ooudd 'be'doiene'-.t
I' 'PanAmeians -Worl Aiway '
'to Delta. nes, and' for ,t fo1-


PAG1PE R


I


- -- v g
d t l ears service the


m







M J PAiE 0 '1*A _tI


SUN "


Katherine Dunaam


(Continued from page 1)I
comes from what she describes
as. "one hundred percent con~i
dence in the future of Haiti."
Following the opening of-.her
Dance School on the second stor-:
ey of the Rond Point Restaurant
Miss Dunham this week quietly
put out the "open" sign before
her residence acquired some ten
years ago.
The days of the flashly big
night opening are behind her,
she says. .'
The labor of love and thirty
thousand dollars has resulted in
brnng "Habitation Leclerc"' back
to imaginative St. Domingue
days with Salon Guinee and Bar
Geisha bringing total investment
to $f00,000 since buying in 1951.
The old Plantation, with its
tropical forest-with every known
fruit to this latitude is now
open with restaurant, bar, night-
club, barbacues, swimming, fa-
cilities.
Her decision to remain in
Haiti has brought a number of
her' dance troupe followers to
her side to run the dance school
and perform in the salor Gui-
nee.
'The plantation also has a bud-
ding h historical library that


Modern haitian


lPaintings

GALERIE PINCHINAT

On Show Now At


By MAX PINCHINAT

106, BOIS VERNA
Just before yon reach the "PONT MORIN"


bridge


o-empieteiy urnisned mouse
for Rent located at DESPREZ:
Two (2) bathrooms
Four (4) bedrooms
Two (2) kitchens
Bar Office.
Diningroom Living room
Veranda Swimming pool
Garage.
Formerly residences of Peru-
Mian, Ambassador and Canadian
Charge d'Affaires.


STEPHEN BROS
M.V. HAITI TRADER
M. V. HAITI MERCHANT
PERSONALLY SUPERVISED
LOADING AND UNLOADING


treats especially the Lkclerc pe- Other,-dance, professors include,
riod in Haiti also many-.ethnolo- Israel: Suarez, a Brazilian' sing-
gical -woiks with emphasis on ei' who joined the Dunham com-
ceremonies, dances and cults of pany in Vienna two years ago,
Haiti and South America. Miss Argentinian dancer Ricardo Ava-
Dunham is also working up a los who had his first trip to
Japanese collection. Haiti- eleven years ago instructs
The author of "A Touch of in the tango and. other Latin
Innocence", a book begun in American dances.
Japan and completed here in
1959 is soon to write a second Kathdrine Dunham was born
volume of her autobio- of a Negro father and a French-
graphy. Miss Dunham even con- Canadian mother at Joliet near
templates a third volume which Chicago. As a girl at high school
will deal with her years with the she studied ballet, and when.she
company as it rose to become followed her brother -now a
a world famous dance' troupe distinguished philosophei- into
and be named ."The Insatiable." Chicago University, she decided
Tied to Haiti spiritually since to supplement her income by
her first voyage from the Uni- holding dancing classes. In 1930
versity of Chicago, Ill.; U.S.A. a chance attendance at an eth-
'Miss Dunham turned down off- nological lecture fired her ima-
ers for Mexico, Japan, France, gination with an idea which has
Brasil, Argentine- and. Australia been the guiding impulse of her
to settle down here. career: that in the dances of
Sthe Caribbean Negroes she might
Old troupe member Lenwood find the cultural heritage of
Morris an American Ballet Mas- which their American cousins
ter of.note flew in from Paris had been deprived, although it
with Portugese Dillette Martin, was theirs by right of their Afri-
a classical ballet and character can blood. Could she forge a link
dancer of the Lisbon and Paris with the past, and revive among
Opera to teach at the Dunham
'school which got off to a suc-
cessful beginning last Month. ..., .., .,. ....
*Ul Uil UVU h UID


her people -the culturally de-
prived and scattered Negroes of
the mainland- a sense of their
traditions and history? Soon she
.tas experimenting with African
rhythms and themes. Her pro-
fessors encouraged her to apply
for a Rosenwald fellowship for
research, and this being granted,
she spent the year 1937-38 in the
Caribbean islands. On arrival
she had to overcome a certain
mistrust in local society of any-
one who wanted to explore "nat-
ive" dances; but she won the
confidence of the influential by,
giving a recital of ballet and
"aesthetic" dancing, and after
that -all doors were opened. She
was free to track down and cap-
ture with movie-camera and re-
cording apparatus the rituals
and dances which had survived
three centuries in the forests
and mountains of the Antilles.
Describing in her book "The
Dances of Haiti", how she con-
trived to penetrate the mysteries
pf the island cults, Katherine
Dunham wrote: "Very. early I
learned that there is one set of
activities reserved for the out-
sider, and another set of activi-
ties reserved for those who "be-
long". For me this "belonging"
began by moving into a native
"habitation" (an enclosure of
several plaster huts behind a
wattle fence much resembling
the African compound), solicit-
ing intimate friendships with
members of the community, and
entering into the very minor
hardships and pleasures of


SERVE WHam AND. FLORIDA
This is an ART.GALLERY, not a picture shop, ex. am- Port an Prince
notiami-- Port an Prince --Miami
hibiting over 100 of the most attractive FRAMED MIAMI ADDRESS: g
PAINTINGS made both in Port au Prince and Paris by Telephone: Highland 51767
FAMOUS HAITIAN PAINTER MAX PINCHINAT Franklin 9-s72s,
now.in Franc.
The artist WHO HAS EXHIBITED BOTH HERE
AND ABROAD for the past 15 years, comes- back to CACIOUE ISLAND
Haiti every five years,and for 15 to 18 months renews BEACH"
the-contact with his people and his source of inspira-
tion.
ONLY 30 INUTES "The Movado sapphire crystal Ref 284.
ae ge .GALLERY PINCHINAT se grouped gleams with a rare brilliance. "The Nal look".
A R PN iNAT Itsg hardness is surpass old 18 ct.,
sonme paintings of the 15 years f, work by MAX PIN- FROM PORT-Af-PRINCE nIts hardness is surpassed 0d figuredial
CIIXNAT, from '145 to 1960. Prices have not been ar- only bytt of he diamond .
bitrarily based pn beauty of the painting, but on its ENTRY (INCLUDING Movado which offers you a
si, just.lie 'PL Fashion or MAX PINHINAT 'RO -TP -precision'thrice triumphant Ref. 148,
size, just like Paris Fasion or MAX PINCHINAT BOAT n three years (at the official mlnaure move-
' and OTH.R WELL KNOWN ARTISTS. Visitors, tan Swiss Observatory at mnt gold 18 ct.
consult the paintings -price list if they wish ;- : -' TRANSPORTATION) euchatel. gld ure dial
' OAlI the taxi drivers kmowi GALLERY PINCHINAT '
AND don't let anybody tell you that the GALLERY is ONLY $1.00 LO :
doed.' It is not. ,- Children 50 Cents.
, ,edi .It. '-ot.
..vate DrIessing-"u
-The GALLERY PINCHINAT?, ~le eppsen-,, ~ MOVAD
fatitV and sales agent .of'PCINCJINAT'i painmtigsl;hp White Sand Beancl -.I
exhibited a few samples donly at 'Foer des Art-: Plas '- t d a
tiques", "Galerii Brochelte" andii rie.e Suisse"- it7R S an a .
SOpen front' 110 Mt.15 PM. and-o bi-: iSKI VING I N SALE AT MASON ORIENTAL
the eve.oing. DMISSIOJ : .SNORKEL N AND LITTLE. EUROPE
'- t. ,} / ".. '. : : n 4: : ,' t. -.. .' | . .. ... .. *. .
:. : / ,s ... . K . .._1.r4 ," ' .. %,: .. .. ...j.7. ,"
: Mf / ': '", ,.r "" r "F~,Ma w ",,'. vim ' -.


I ,


I


T, 1061 1


S AI T I


PAGE 0


the people. Much later this was'.j
followed by. formal initiation into -$i
one of their religious cults.. I '"
explained that I was there to
learn dances because L liked to'!
dance; to a people to whom
dancing, was an inte-.
gral, vital expression of daily
living this explanation seemed;'
natural enough. At times, how-
ever, to facilitate inclusions into
the ceremonial life it was neces-
sary to call on a strategy which
had been successful in .the Ma-
roon hill-country of Jamaica. i
That would be the invention of
some ancestral ritual obligation. ',
In Haiti, more than in any of '
the other islands of the Carib-
bean,-there is strong recognition
among the peasant priesthood
of the blood relationship of all
people whose ancestors hailed
from Nan Guinin. When the
stigma of being an American
had worn off, there was great
and protective interest in the re-
cognition of my "Guinea" blood
tie, and great concern for my .
ancestors who had not received
the proper ritual attentoin be-
cause that group of slaves
which had been taken farther 1
north had been cut off from
their brothers in the Caribbean1
and had forgotten these pract- .
ices." Thus was Dunham able
to witness,. record and partici-
pate in both social dances and
religious rituals.
Returning to Chicago with a
mass of raw material, she gave
a demonstration to the Rosen-
(Continued on page 14)






PAGE 12 '


I~~~'AGE~- 12-A TI S N


At the Holy Trinity Cathedral
on Tuesday May 16th, in a sim-
ple ceremony conducted by Rev.
Canon Henry Burrows, Margaret
Ruth Rowe of County Dunham,
England recently of St. An-
drews, Fife, was married to Mi-


Haitien and the Citadelle can in-
dorse it for other young cou-
ples", Mr Buckmaster said
Tuesday as he and his wife took
the Panam clipper to Puerto
Rico where they hope to see
something of the world Golf


on to Dominica, Martinique, An-
tigua and Bermuda before re-
turning to London in July.
Mr Buckmaster said he had
become particularly fond of Haiti
during five freelance writing
trips here over the past tWo
years and that he now hoped to
add a helping hand in promoting
her tourist facilities.


chael Henry Buckmaster of tournament at Dorado Beach. "I have been investigating the
London England formerly of Explaining that they had es- possibilities of tourist and indus-
Bermuda. caped the raw English spring trial promotion in the Uhited
The bride, the daughter of Mr for a reunion in Jamaica and Kingdom and Europe for al of
and Mrs Frank Dyson Rowe of marriage in Haiti the "most ro- all the islands of the West In-
County Dunham, is a graduate, mantic spot in the Caribbean", dies federation." he explained.
master of Arts and Economics, the Buckmasters said their mar- "For this reason I went on a
of St. Andrews' University and rage ceremony in the Episcopal tour of Trinidad, Barbados, Grc-
has recently been teaching. The Cathedral with the primitive nada and St Vincent on a fam-
groom, son of Colonel Maurice mural so recently featured in the iliarisation trip and at the same
Buckmaster O.B.E. of London Geographic magazine around time collecting material. During
and Mrs Buckmaster of Herford- them, was a moving experience. the time that I have been in the
shire, England, is a lawyer and After several delightful days Caribbean, the Company which
writer who is now occupied with honeymoon at the Chatelet de la I represent, the European Press
the Public Relations field. The Montagne Noire they moved clo- Service has become a World.
bride was given away by Father ser to town with lodgings in the wide Press Service "Ser ice
Roger Desire. Mbon Reve. International de Presee" with its
"We came to Haiti endorsing They will continue from Puer- main offices in Paris and Lon-
the Panam Haitian honeymoon to Rico to St. Maarten, Statia,don. Here I have been having
blurb and after a visit to Cap and Saba by schooner and then talks at the Department du Tou-


risme about the possibility of Belgium. I am hoping that the
promoting Haiti through the me- result of discussions will be fav-
dium of the International .Press ourable, and that an early' im--
Service who can give publicity pact can be made upon the tra-


to the Country and its tourist in- veiling public of those European
terests in the Press in England, countries with affluent econo-
France, West Germany, and mies that I have mentioned."


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MONDAY JUNE 5THl, 1961


" HAITI


SUN "






in~~~D~T;AY r~~FUNE 51'.I, 1961


.PIMP. 77


"HAITI SUN"


.PiiAO


Common S M.rket.


For Latins Ready
Formal Inceptio7 Of Trade Group This Week
Will Mark A Milestone: '
.7 COUNTRIES INVOLVED
UDITIONAL NATIONS HAVE. barriers over a twelve-year pi
[DICWTEID THEY PLAN TO riod will come into bding office
10IN ASSOCIATION allUy on June 2. The nations es
Si hlishino' th newr common maP


e-
i-
t-
r-


By.BRENDAN M. JONES ket under the Treaty of Monte:
Formal 'inception thfs week of video signed in February, 1960,
ihe Latin American Free Trade are Argentina,- Brazil, Chile, Pe-
Sssociation will-represent a sig- ru,-Paraguay, Uruguay and Me-
uicant start on the region's xdco..
iwn efforts, to strengthen its lag-
,ng economy. For at least the next six
The. seven-nation association months, the operation of the La-
or mutual elimination of tariff tin American 'trade integration


move will be effective chiefly
ui' psychological terms. This ef
fect should not be under-estim-
ated, however, in providing need-
ed purpose and initiative either
for, the region's own aid efforts
or these recently. begun by the
United States.
Stagnation Noted
.The basic fact about Latin
America in. recent years has
been the virtual stagnation of its
ecoriomic development. This lack
of progress, combined with a ris-
ing population that has necessit-
ated increasing importation of
food, has generated serious so-
cial and political .tensions, which
may be summed up as a general
lack of hope for the future. .
While the new free trade as-
sociation at present consists of
only seven nations, these repre-
sent nearly two-thirds of Latin
American economic production.
Moreover, the action of the sev-


en to implement their agreement
.-, has stimulated moves by other
,nations to join. the association.
S IN PETIO VLLE IT J Colombia and Ecuador as long
ago as December announced de-
S. A finite plans to join, while at the
Same time Venezuela indicated
H rEl IItAE a desire to join as soon as the
-continued, though still uncertain,
progress of Central American
S1t u.Ifeelt altitude yel only 7mlnutes nations toward full domestic eco-
from the.-heart of PoRT-AU-RNdE nomic reorganization was com-
Spleted. Along with economic un-
T ion, regional integration in Latin
The mos exquisite iev3s ,0erlooking he dity America appears to be gaining
the ba h plains,the mountain momentum.
-" Process Is Slow
eidiOus Coni mental cuisine and superb ,, ....
D*elious otneltol uine an ou r As. was the case with similar
S Se-vide. trends in Western Europe, the
Beginning of regional integration
Personalized attention to eery guest. in Latin America has been a
S slow process. Active study of
') imm i ol wih nunbean Lu n both the free-trade association &
SOimminm Poo wi Lundheon Lon9e the Central American economic
I and Bar PanoramaTevrode union started about five years
Sago. The basic needs pointing
Air--ondiiqpned de-luxe rooms toward such development were
recognized much longer ago, as
k tD 4- 4 3 they were also in Western Eu-
rope.
W WEEKLY ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM If there is any parallel to be
l drawn with the Western Europ-
TUESDAgL :Inro'rma ee t. ani rom ean integration trend, it may be
)7:30 P to midnl~i .. expected that, once a formal
SMeringue inasrudson and Cintest start has been made on'such de-
a .9:31diosuald ress.Noa dmission ee- velopment, subsetluent progress
v| EDNE*)pAj : e.mplimnentary get-togelheruneibow) will tend to be rapid. This has
Party from 7p rs to 8pm. been a notable feature of. the
FRI'DA :ac Dinntr-Dande from 7:3o Eu o p e an Comrnon Market,
1- I :.30 am. 6uperb Sov at o10:o which recently .has accelerated
S I.o adm;sson ee : its tariff reduction program.
T 1 Probably one of the most sig-
S LL OT T Ji;4 Ts'ock; ail hour rom 7to 9 Wi nificarit aspects -of the new La-
nate doinmbo .An American Free Trade Asso-
.C citationn is the timeliness of its
active beginning in relation to
(Continued on page 12)


MUIATRESS

Sby EIIf.E S ROUMER (1933)
This blush-white moss rose tint, the pink of the peach,
Suit not weil, your beauty. No' nor velvet I find!
But this amber enchants me, storm-tragic, dusk-heavy and m
Of a body delicious, honey-hue of campeche.


A NEGRESS GOES BY

Night-dark girl of the swaying hips.

LANGSTON HUGUES

Your walk -sacerdotal and slow undulant,
So weary sometimes, with such air nonchalant,
Your grace, my memory long, long, will haunt.
Your loins both supple and fine that sway
Fling to my mind the black panthers way
To leap, to rage, at touch of javelin-tips.
My soul is cradled in moired silk crepe'
To the sensual song of a woman's hips.
S'EMILE ROUMER


'i

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INSURE WITH SURE INSURANCE

CALEDONIAN INSURANCE COMPANY

Founded In 1805

INCORPORATED BY SPECIAL ACT OF

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RONY CHENET & SONS
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ress Rue des Miracles. Opposite National Bank.


U.


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vild




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*'2'.






."







PAUL 1;~ MiMI l..l zs IFIN


Common Market...


i (Continued front page 11)
1 United States aid efforts. The
awakened interest in this coun-
try in a new form of cooperative
k! assistance for Latin America re-
-"sulted just a few months ago in
I. President Kennedy's broad pro-
I posals for an "alliance for pro-
gress" with Latin American na-
tions.

The proposals, together with
approval of $500.000,000 in assist-
S..ance funds as a starting token
Sof larger future financial aid, re-,
*.present a basic change, as well
.as heightened interest, in United
SStates relations with Latin Ame-
rica. They sLicss not only coop-
e ration in such fields as educa-
tional, housing and other social
development along with new in-
dustrialization, but also endorse


tax reform and land redistribu-
tion in Latin America.

Further, the "alliance for pro-
gress" plan includes proposals
for United States assistance in
stabilizing commodity prices,
easing import curbs on Latin
American products, and techni-
cal training of workers.
Conference Slated-
An inter-American economic
conference that is expected to
draft basic projects under the
"alliance for progress" program
will open on July 15 in Punta
del Este, Uruguay- Last week,
the White House indicated that
President Kennedy would add-
ress the opening session of the
conference, which he himself
proposed.
Action on both trade integra-


SYou know
it' ia really fi n

SScotch when it'
JOHNNIE
WALKER




JOHNNIE WALKER
Born iI2o-aU going strong


DISTRIBUTOR PREETZMAN-AGGERHOLM


tion and the President' "alliaj
ce for progress" represents
considerable brightening of pros
pects for Latin America. Bot
moves provide hope for th
great majority of Latin Amen
cans, despite the fornidabl
tasks ahead in effecting basic
improvement.

In' large measure, essential
requirements in Latin Americ
are development of regional sell
sufficiency and an end of depend
dence on single-commodity eco
nomies. In the process of achieve
ing these objectives the evel
more basic change of a redistri
button of wealth is expected t(
be achieved also.

The new free-trade association
is so important for Latin Ame
rica largely because it promise
more rapid progress toward in


dustrial self-sufficiency. No sing- tend to spur improvement of 'lo-
le- Latin-American, country has cal products. .
the resources or a large. nouh .There is evidbnce'that framers'
.local market to develop indivi- 6f the free-trade design are-..
dually the diverse for massive aware of this possibility, so'that.
n- production essential for a mod- future measures'ltb overcome
a ern industrial society without the deficiency, may be. taken
'- sizable exports. once thp program begins to ach-'
i eve its primary objectives.
e Such development might come Greater-regional trade in man- r.
1- eventually for some countries, ufactured products, however, is i
e but'it would be a long and un- only a part of Latin-American
c- certain process. Rising popula- economic requirements. Without
tions and political discontent, expansion of production in food
however, require alternatives to crops, as well as other basic
the pennnmic ovnoitinn that tookfin nlndes the free-trade -n mov '


a




n
D-

a



I-


eittc


JOSEPH NADAL & Co.
Agents.


place in..Western Europe and
North America. These alterna-
tives, therefore, are a pooling of
the Latin-American nations' in-
dustrial and natural resources.
The free-trade association plan
consists essentially of?'-mutual
ehmination of--tariffs on mAnu-
factures: Its main flaw lies in
the possible stifling of competi-
tive industrial imports-from non-
member countries which would


glldrJ Lg I, LJ et!- I I V i-
ment probably would have small
success.

Fundamentally, the projected
general progress at all economic .
and.social levels in Latin Amer-
ica is a 'gigantic undertaking.
Viewed optimistically, it prom-
ises gains for the United .Slates,
economically and in less tangi-
ble form, that may exceed the
'--''


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S. FLOOR SHOW. AND PRIZES
S.: Ye., "soa ping" vour hair with '
. WITH T HEA SANS UCI ORCHESTRA AN .even Enest liquid or oil cream
l-ampoos leaves dulling,-d
STHE FAMIOUS HAITIAN ARTIST di atchis film g m iTheno spia rnse
F ROM -.PARIS -e P __witi_ a new.mgrie ns
.,- Midnight .A.I firqi on use it- u- '.

S' : -PUNCH BOWL, DINNER_ DANCE, .. andrufffrom both h i mpageableshining with
'FLOOR .HER AND PRUNIEUES PT .| -. and scalp orl ntr hihlihts!
6 1N -E





WITH THE: SANS SouI RISTRA. Halo reveal the hidden beauty oof theha'
T FAMOUS HAIT IANARTIST : b roo leaves uin, Thel
S : W ^' **.'* -' TH FAMOUS-H/ iT.I t A RTIST. ^ .'. .... *.' catch".ig f. i m. Halo,mad... ha.. .' *, .* -]-, t. .!
" "FROM '-'PARIS '-- *"" .....-".'"'.w..t a new ingredient, .contai.ns, i i








.. ... .,4,A
'''''"::I'.'' ~~~ ~ : : r,: e~bkea,~ i,::j;.:;+~~~;~~~.:~ the'; id n but ,-


. I I_


PAGE 1Z


SA IT L I ,1 S 11






II..r.JT-' Jt-NE 5TLI, 1961


ii


uacL A


a A -which is a modern choreography r
in which he has created a dance n
ai i Show s which begins with an invocation d
to tile gods and hen proc-eeds
n a s fto tell orf the so'roos of there
slaves and their struggle for h
ances Of Caribbean dh I
freedom. In this work, Destine C
gives primitive movement artis- 'I
Rhythms Of Jungle Add To Colorful Program Church Sponsors tic form while retaining the nat- a
Sive flavor and here as well as ni
in his equally famous "Spider ii
graphed and presented by Des- witchcraft and the black arts. in his equally famous "Spider e
SWAYNE C. SMITH tine. Then there was included aDance Destine shoed hs ex (
group of dances in \which the troordinary range and control of 1
eatrically thrilling and ar- Basically, the Caribbean" cul- dances of African origins are
ly satisfying program of ture is African in origin and combined with the social dances
from the islands of the %as brought there by the slave which the slaves saw danced by,
ean was presented Friday trade. The primitive ceremonial their European masters. Here P
at the Technical High ..Baptism of the Drum," danced there is a dance form which is Se
auditorium. by Noa Cappe, George Mills uniquely Caribbean. The gay
and Jerome Jeffrey; "Yoruba "Festival" which opened the CAP-HRTIE
is beat out thrbbing', Bakas," based upon an African program, "Martinique" danced
ling and m esmeric legend and danced by Jerome by Destine and' Miss Cappe and ONE WAY BY PLANE ,ON
is which had their origins Jer-fey and Mills; the ritualistic "Mazurka Creole" performed
. jungles of Africa. Evil ."Cremony Bembe." danced by by Destine, Miss Cappe and So- --
were exorcised in magic Destine, Miss Cappe and Mills; lange Dupre in the Caribbean '
as of tribal dance rituals. and the awesome Voodoun dance style showed the love of the OPERATED
rs were possessed in of the "Witch Doctor" are right Caribbeans for fun, games and
raft rites Young couples from the jungles of Africa. And flirtations. ;- AVENI
: festivals and flirted. And in these dances Destine has in- PE
were baptized in primi- geniously captured the native Then there was also included .P.O.BOX
,remonies. flavor of primitive ceremonies. Destine's famous "Slave Dance"

dance group was headed
'an-Leon Destine who is, ,
ficially, the cultural am-
lor of the Republic of Haiti D ra i b l e LIQUEUR
its most distinguished dan-
The presence here of this
mny of artists was made INDISPENSABLE FOR ,
le through the courage and


c. selective tastes ot the Lyce- FHE ENJOYABLE PARTY
i Committee of the St. John's
congregational Church. AND

Besides being theatrically en- AGENTES FESTIVITIES
training. the program had a UNICOS
n-.her side -it was also educa- The only sweet LIQUEUR made in Scotland oa
innal, although this never be- the basis or the finest pure old SCOTCH WHISKl.
tame overly apparent. During Indispensable for festivities and for every occa.-
Ie course of the evening, one Sion.
paned an intimate into the
tases of the unique culture of EXCLUSIVE AGENTS:
ihe Caribbean islands, through S L. PREETZMAN-AGGERHOLM & CO.
the selection of dances choreo- s, eJx





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II


nov e m e n t s, his tremendous
muscular energy and his great
trarmatic abilities.
The accompanists were drum-
neris Alphonse Cimber, proba-
bly the greatest drummer in the
:aribbean, and Jacques Succes.
lheir solos and duets were
mong the highlights of the eve-
1mg and were of virtuosic qual-
ties.
Springlield. Mass.,
lie Springlield UIJon, 5-22-61)






N AND THE CITADEL
E WAY BY LIMOUSINE
ALL
!t0-- INCLUDED
BY Bdd iSTOPIE TOUf5
JE PAN AMERICAINE
iTION-VILLE HAITI
312 .Phone: 7761


BI
A the
sicall
inces



D! in

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lniul

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The
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IIJ IS
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I~~i-:;-~-.!:~ ':.~zn; :~ ~ -::.: :- -.' 1..(~~; .;. I-;r ~ _:,i,,. .r-' ~.....;-: ~"'"'







"HAITI SUN"


MONDAY JUNE 5TH, 1961


Our Neighbor Laid To Rest Off the Telediol


(Continued from page 1)
black German-made limousine
and sped from town. Behind him
the crowd poured into the empty
church in hopes of reaching the
crypt in the basement under the
main altar. Their entry was bar-
red by the military and the
crowd milled berserkly about the
church stomping against pews
and screaming their sorrow.
The church was decorated with
many floral offerings, mostly
gladiolas. and inscribed to "our
dear chief."
The eulogy for Trujillo was gi-
ven by President Joaquin Bala-
guer, whose speech of glorifica-
tion predicted Trujillo's "works
will last as long as the republic
lasts." But Balaguer also said
Trujillo's'" enthusiasm for the
decorations and his affection for
titles and all that is theatrical
pomp did not basically res-
pond to a simple sentiment of
vanity." The orator thereupon
explained Trujillo's collection of
titles reflected his sure grasp of
mass psychology.
While Balaguer orated, Ramfis
stood directly behind him and to
his left, Ramfis was ranked by
two handsome, youthful, clean-
cut army officers carrying sub-
machines guns at their sides,
with muzzles pointed to the
ground.
Archbishop 0Octavio Beras
sprinkled holy water and chant-
ed the final response after Sol-
emn Requiem High Mass. But
he did not speak, and he arrived
after Mass began.
Mass started about 9:15 a.m.,
an hour ahead of schedule,
while likely accounts for the Ar-
chbishop's late arrival.
Other participants in the Re-


The Papal Nuncio is still, no-
minally, Lino Zanini, but he left
last year under strained condi-
tions. Besides Ramfis Trujillo,
relatives present included broth-
ers Pedro, Virgilio, Romeo, Hec-
tor, and Jose Arizmendi Trujillo.
The later was dressed in a deep
green, bemedaded uniform.
Priests at the church were
cautious about the political' out-
look, profesing not to know if
the death of Trujillo will ease


quiem Mass included sub-Dea- the church's situation. The news-
con Father Joseph Henry, a na- paper El Caribe front-paged and


en bodies and close to the coffin.
The riot was narrowly averted
when the honor guard moved the
coffin to the far right of the dis-
play room. Bemedaled colonels
pitched into the help soldiers
push back the beserk public, and
shut the entry door.
When hysterical women and
men v.ere finally carted on to
ambulances, seven pairs of wo.
men's shoes littered the floor
where a human pyramid had
jammed during the worst of the
hysteria.
(Continued on page 5)


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PAGE 14


NSULT


Iligi:
I sm. Imm


live of Topeka, Kansas, who ar- criticized the alleged protection
rived in Santo Domingo one given by Dominican priest Fath-
month ago after working with er Gabriel Maduro, to alleged
Puerto Ricans in New York for Trujillo assailant Huascar Teje-
three years, da Reina. The priest, who heads
Mass Celebrant was Fray 'Tiudad Trujillo parish is report-
Amalio Fernadez, a Spaniard edly under protective custody, or
from Castilla La Vieja. He is the arrest, since Thursday night.
superior of "recollect Augustin- He reportedly denies compli-
ian order," a community which city, but the newspaper La Na-
operates San Cristobal Church. cion reports the assailant con-
The church was built in 1949 by lesses he got protection from the
Trujillo at a cost of $250,000. It priest.
has murals by artist Vela Za- The whole morning, from 6:00
netti. Fray Amalio got the task a.m'., beginning with the public
of celebrating Mass because he review of the coffin at national
is head of San Cristobal Parish, palace in Cludad Trujillo, was a
not because of any old friend- fantastic and powerful outpour-
ship with Trujillo He has been ing of grief from the poor. They
three years in Santo Domingo crowded the flag-draped coffin,
and describes his relations with on display under the rounded
the deceased as "normal." cupola of the two-story National
The Romanesque Church of Palace. at the rate of SO per
San Cristobal was jammed with minute. Despite prodding to
Trujillo relatives, friends and di- keep the line moving, both men
plomatic corps members. The and women were frequently
U.S. was represented by Consul overcome by h',sterics when
Charles Hodge. who explained nearing he coffin. The crisis oc-
he was following the indication cured at 7.30 a.m when a fat
of the dean of the diplomatic woman fell writhing in hysterics
corps here. U.S. Consul General near the coffin dragging two
Henry Dearborn was absent slighter girls with her.
without explanation. The Vatican
was represented by a Charge Near panic exploded while the
d'Affaires. mob struggled to get past fall-


The voice of the mango is heard in the land as the ripe fruit
hurtles through the tree branches and lands with a thump on the
ground. Its bright orange pulp dots every highway and byway
like bright gold coins Last week the highway to Cap Haitien
was also dotted with stranded trucks which had broken down
while returning the visiting peasantry to their homes after the
inaugural holidays. One, a Regie du Tabac truck, was still keep-
ing its lonely vigil, with the help of a couple of small boys, early
this week Some of those celebrants lost their lives in tumbles
from overloaded camions. In fact, one wonders why more of
them don't capsize as they sway drunkenly along the roads into
Fort au Prince, loaded far beyond capacity with people, produce
and animals Plantation Dauphin held its annual Bowling Ball
last Saturday nite and from all reports from'returning guests in
the wee hours of Sunday morning, it was a real ball complete with
a tremendous barbecue cat-out Don Lungwitz won first plize
and Robby Van Buren won second in the bowling contest (n ith
one arm in a slingi The Becks at Hotel Beck in Cap are in
:hi midst of building terraced gardens leading to a ne\s swimming
pool There's'a stpry that says no barbershop in Cap contains
a mirror. Clients are told to go home and ask their wives if
their haircuts are satisfactory The biggest, sweetest, juciest
pineapples ever are grown in Cap and cost about 10 cents each -
The Gerard Dominiques and the Maurice Laroches, their families
and friends, all gather at the Roi Christophe pool on Sundays in
Cap. As any fool can see, this columnist spent a few days up
there last week Dick Allen and Jis house guest Jim Walsh, who
spent their vacation here with Papa. Dan Allen, had a rough go
last Monday afternoon when they were caught in a squall in
their boat at Sand Cay. There was no one else around io help them
get off the rocks Dick Nault, formerly with the U.S. Army in
Haiti and now with Lobster d'Haiti, is his own best customer.
Eut Cap hotels are complaining that not a lobster is available
in town anymore The Rene Marinis extended their visit to
New York and are due back today That petition to President
kennedy on behalf of Caribbean Atlantic Airlines to service Cap
makes a lot of sense, but the .English left something wanting -
Mlirliton, that delicate squash-like local vegetable, is most deli-
cious when removed from the shell after boiling, mashed, seas-
:ned, returned to the half-shell, sprinkled with cheese and broiled
until golden brown Petionville was crawling Wednesday mor-
ding with tiny tots going to confession in preparation for talng
communion Thursday. They look so innocent-what can they have
o confess? A bouquet to Dunlop Cold Seal tubeless tires: those
)n my car are just a year old and I haven't had a single flat
.et. It was ten months before I even remembered to put the spare
-nto circulation. Must find out who the agent is and give him a
,estimonial-for a small fee, of course It's England that uses
the phrase "bank holiday", but it's Haiti that overdoes them,
ind it's Dan Allen who is swamped with people trying to cash
a check. He's the town's unofficial banker on these many holidays,
ind it's a thankless task. But who's looking for thanks?-



-III







l~i(E 14 "HAITI SUN" MJNtDAY' JUNE 5Ti~, 1901


Katherine Du


(Continued front page 9)
wald foundation andl submitted
her study of the dances of laiti
for her Master's degree In 1939
Sshe acce.pt'ed an engagement as
dance direct.!r of Ne', Yokl's
Labor Stage, and \with her earn-
ings from this \\orl- put on a
concert recital of her )o\h crea;
Sons at the Windsor Theatre in
Fe-bruair.\ 191i. The sillAltioiIi
uc r.. rC f tIi pirfolm..lncee on-
'sured lih-r i iutule. .More reclt.ils
woe l)ll',we(ld 1,. ain ;ppearalnce
un [,ro;iad!wn. as C;i.'rglia' Brown
in Ihi. pla., "Cabin in the Sky"
and work in several films, "Star
Spanil-l-d Ryllhlm". "Pardon my
Saj ong", "Cashah." "Stormy
\\'ealihet" iand -"C('rnirval of
Rlhvthm" w.r,:- Wilim.- in w\hic'l
sli. itller app':arci or' createdd
chei,'ira.pliy. \'V)ork ol this kind .l
' was ni' doclblt of firiunrcul as'sist-
ance' to io-r ill thli fl'oii lding inid .
ni.iit-ni nc '. l, i i c i.P npan',
aind lnwr ch'lool wiih -. iich she i
Ivhas in 'le lii I chi'-'[ c.'iiiill bull.ni
to tlih cn,,l:tnmporary ll.-nlre

IIl thlice iiLccsi'e le\uis -
for vii..," w,'p mus call then
for .i, lt fa better uo i r- in
"C;,rih SinrL". "Bal Nctci-'" aind
the curr.-ri "C.,ribbcan RPlia,-
s-id, ," Irhe fi lit (f Drinham's
rthon'ilio i',..il i.'<-arch has been
combinef:l ith her original gift
lii cliuho ogr'lphic intention to
creakit speraclies of an 'sxtraor-
dirary nroc]lty, wit and bc.auty.
liec \itIks ar: a puzzling mixt-
urc iil ci';it'.e and traditional
n -,\ ..il i. I in "Shango" she
adapl.s ,t'ua;l riluals and events
slIe has n'itnissed to the stage:
in Pitls de Passage" she
paints \ith authentic soiurtii
material thei picture of a primi-
live comniunitil; in "L'Ag'.'a"


.he weaves into a long ballet
or dance-drama several tradi-
tional dances: in "Nostalgia"
she satirizes the dances and he-
ha\iour of the nineteen-t\w ?iries'
'Chidro" is a Brazilian quadrille
In terms of ballet: "Blues" is a
character sketch, more acted
than danced. Moreover the-
speed %ith v.hic.h these ared
number's follow >aich othl.ir, their
slic-kn'-ss of production more ty-
pical of the music-hall than the
concert rccital, are further apt
to be'wlder the thouglhtful spec-
tatoi. The dancers \ho appearH
in these \wrks, are all trained
hI. heri-ell in the "Dunham tech-
niqi'c" v.hlich combines c cissi-
cal l.bllet \ith Central Europe-
an, Caribean and African c-le-
imeniis. lost of the conlpani,
haveu wonrk,-d at her N-ew York
School, v hereP coloured and
. thla: s 'ude:l nl'- 3 ailike- are taught
Inot onl. ho'.'- to dance but wh;,
lihy dliancei. as tle;, do. Miss
Dunh.m has l:knov.in lhow toL dL'a%
enc'h.illing niusit out of at nIiun-
bier of comipo-j-':rs, much of it
i)ein ig airligc'ments of melodies
and ih:,tlims recorded by her
in the, islands. Her admirable
sturincr andi costumes are de--
gned by her husband John Pratt
To some Katherine Dunham
will be more interesting as a
sociological than as an artistic
phenomenon. It comes as a
shock to learn that a Negro
should successfully run the larg-
est unsubsidised company of
da>ncei s in the United States.'
She has lieIn criticized for notr
emplu.,ing her art more directly
as rar al propaganda. This she
has awi'.'.ays been unwiling to do;
lor alth iough she can take a
'irm ,lin' \:hen necessary -
thIere \:as a great occasion in


babies'born to despair; I saw hills. I saw herovercoming her
n crowded tenements in great ci- aversion to snakes in order to
in h amA ties, JIt at exorbitant reins to be initialed in the cult of the
coloured families, long after snake god Dam)alla... Then I
they were unft for habitation: saw her a celebrated performer
Louisville, Kentucky, in 19-5, I saw weary struggle for on the stage of New York, with
when, addressing an audience existence 'of the Negro in a land her company, her school, her
where the black elements were ruled by white men. great reputation, no less than
segregated in the gallery, she Paul Robeson and Marian An-
s\.ore never to return till her Then I saw a young woman derson a symbol of hope to the
race could be accepted as fel- of charm, wit and purpose, and whole Negro race but the
lo.h human beings.- although i, ,th the thoroughness, grasp of curtain had gone up and there
un her life she has been one of detail,* and *determination of a she was on the stage.
the greatest champions of the g.iet.soldier or explorer, pur-
Negro cause, sh-e righlti. believes suing her studies, enlisting aid Richard BUCKLE
that art must be art lst anand ,ad setting forth on a \o.%age Editor of "Ballet and Opera"
propaganda unl.\ incidentally lo disco\ei\. I saw her il the and dance critic of "The Obs-
That her company:, of magnfic. islands asking questions, tram- everr' wrote the above in an
ent dancers and m u s i i a n s pi the scored roads, track- Introducticn to a'book on
should have met with the suc ng doi\n her quarry of dance Katheiine DUNHAM
'-ess it has and that herself as and song among the forests and published in 1919..


explorer, thunkler', inventor, org-
arnizer and dancer' sloulld have
reachi-d so high a place in the
estimation of the world, has
done more than a million pam-
phiets could for the service of
her people.

And whah:.ve- her rating in
.\mLricea mah be. this cdadghtr'
:if .I;t',:s has come as a conquer-
...t' to EuLo'pe.

B;. the end of Dunhanm's season
-let me witie "tier first seas-
.i."- in London I had Ileained
a little about her stury and her
ierhods of wolk, and I had
come to appreciate hi:lr creat-
ive genius and the passionate
aitistij- of her dancers. On the
last night at the "Prince of
\ales", as I sat listening to the
overture and the wailing voices
of four singers behind the curt-
ain, I saw man., pictures in my
nmid's e.e. I saw evil African
clrefhamis selling their people to
\v.ute tradeIs for" rum. and stilnk-
lng ships packed close with sick
and miserable Negroes; I sa.\
slaves working on plantations
b-neathl a burning sky, and gen-
cilation after generation of hiack


sEN AMAZ1NGE







FES TIVAL


Flour


FOR


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BETTER TEXTURE ,

B M~C~~L~ ~ ^


FOR THE FIRST TIME IN HAITI
LAVINIA WILLIAMS
Presents file Ballet

"THE SLEEPING BEAUTY"

AN ORIGINAL INTERPRETATION
3 Acts 2 Scenes
More Than 50 Students
Friday 9th June- at 7:45 p.m.
AT THE REX THEATRE
Ticketb on sale at Rex Theatre, La Caravelie
' Library and Lavinia Williams' Dance School
on the Champ de Mars.
ENTRANCE: $2.00 $1.50 $1.00











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iill I I ilp a I is I i, I = I m I
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MONDAY" JUNE 5Tri, 1901


"HAITI SUN"


A, G E 14






r. I HAI'T T-T S N' "' MONDAY JU'NE- 5iTHr 1f01
b : -... ,,r n r- i = i I 1 .. ..............-- --- '-- -


Interior Minister s


(Continued from page 1) be indulgent towards those viol-
sume to insure real and fruitful eating them."
results to. my mission. And on While allowing the individual
the very eve of my Ministery, I to expand, we will take meas-
would have been facing the ures so that liberty does not de-
worst apprehension if I had not generate into license which wea-
been offered to choose my own kens the city and disturbs its
means of action, in such a way foundations. There again, I give
that they harmonize with this the assurance that'the. law which
philosophy of power prompted determines the limits between
by the justice and conciliation justice and liberty, will be my
policy established by the Sept. decision's motive.


, ..
; I ;-, ;"
",': "-.2 ..
!, ,. ..


unity, so dear to
be accomplished
sincere collaborate
As far as the ar
ed, this' faithful
peace. I count p
her. It will find
and the necessa
.sion to solve the
we will have to d
ther..
Ladies and Gentlr
These demonstr
endship which arE
since yesterday a
atmosphere so full
excitingg cordiality
you are pleased
Director of the 1
Interior and of Na
At this office:.. wh
dent of the Repub
me, I shall impo.
sorts of sacrifices
my utmost though
obtain the Haitian
ity.'
"With you", he s
ling speech," th
dawn will rise,
united. united to a


S" ." authority -that. does not edihie
,A. I a, I ea ity -: 'i o& i ard' the -eAtidg a4-
re lrfld thodrilies' b hav been established
. by God. This is why whoever is
aainrft autriy tis -, ainst or-
my heart, will ense. Let .usa'.fe.=urIrlibbry t 'dei -esabflshed by God, and
thank to their buUd instead to destrpy, .to do those who resist bring .condemn-
on. well instead cf wr'rg.; 'Wy action up6n.themselves. It is .nqt
my is concern- should we waste our .sti~ngths a good deed but a bad one that
guardian of in fratricide low and seless. the.j Magistrates have 'to feap..
particularly, on fights. Furthermoir, why should Do you -want not to fear auth-i-"
in me wisdom shrewd. politicians make the ity? Do well and you will'-have
ry comprehen- grave mistake to systematically its approval. The Magistrate i
great problems refuse any approach with the God's servant for your own good.
leal with toge- Government whose power, which But- if you do wrong, fear; be-
is God's will land history's evo- cause it is not in vain that He
men, lution, is unyielding!... carries a sword,, being God's
rations of fri- It is not my intention to make servant he will revenge and pu-
e taking place a religion course, it is neither nish who does wrong."
afternoon in an the place nor the time; but list- Brothers! Letus beunited ins-
of joy and of en to our benefit what Apostle tead and be lappy together.
are proof that Paul told the Romans in his And tomorrow, when I will
to see me as Epistle titled. "Obedience to retire; my biggest glorious title
Department of Authorities." will lie: to "have. been with Dr.
tional Defense. May all people obey superior Duvalier, the Ministerof the Na-


ere- tne tresi-
6lic has called
se on me al
to accomplish
it which is to
family's un

said in a thiril-
e shuddering
and brotherl.i
attack the has-


authorities because there is notional Reconciliation.





ChaG gil
.
.
c' --~


Lilles, we will burst light, and in (Continued from page 1) Chevrqlet light blue color, 1957
13 our yellow and black hands sym- led Professor Marion hospital, model. .
olically clenched, we will gather military clinic in'CiYdad -Trujillo. Trujillo steadied himself on the
the flows of lights and the spring iZacarias corroborated the sto- right front bumper and blazed
Sf life and plenty.' that the official military, com- away with his reVolver. But it
I.".., In the name of the One you Imunique was incorrect in giving itas side arms against machine
"'.'. .:" ^.'.. have freel> elected to the First the location of the shootirig. The guns.
S'' Magistrature of the State on communique placed the attack Trujillo fell, mortally wouid-
S: :: ept. 22, 1957, and to %thom you at the intersection- of Sanchez, ed. His chauffeur was still id-
just have spontaneously reiter- highway and George Washington side the car, using two light 1
a -'ited" your confidence by your Blvd. The shooting, according to machine guns. The h heavier
Massive vote, I invite y6u all the chauffeur, actually took pra- Thompson su6machirie gun car-
to forget our personal grudges ce two miles closer to the'cap- tied by Trujillo in the rear ne-
and to come, cohndently,, take ital, on a lonely stretch of the er entered action.
pl.. ace around the great table of shoreline drive called Kilometer,
S national reconciliation for the Eight. The chauffeur lost conscious-
.-.. .. .. absolutely necessary dialogue Zacarias, a brown-skidned tlrn .y ss, presumably from his creas-
S between brothers of a same of 55 years, and of rangy but ing, head wound. .Left for dead,,
New Interior and National Defence Minister Boileau Mebu. country. powerful frame, had chauffeured he awoke some minutes later
I call today all my friends Trujillo for'the past 18 years. and-was discovered by Taxi and
22, 1957 "Elu", from the very Secondly. I will -constantly belonging to All social classes They first met in 1921"in 'Zca- .taken to Hospital.
minute of his accession to the converge my efforts towards His and to all political groups. In rias' hore town of Seyp oon',the ,. The bodyof Trujillo was gone,
First Magistrature of the State. Excellency the President of the the name of the Government I eastern tip of t.he.-1 4tr,.-e.,is .so- was'the-Trujillo car,.all that
Here are the main points of Republic's dearest dream: Pea- invite you all to understanding, 31 years service in the Army. -was left was.his bloodied Mili- 1
my program: help the President ce and Unity. Even on the day fraternity and unity. Fiom now VWouned five' tines in-defefis taiy Cap i
of the Republic to suppress em- following his election, did not lie on the doors are opened, come, of "mi jefe" (my chief), he sai :
bezzlements, prevent extortions, offer a friendly hand to\his ad- lets talk and let us br6therl he mariaged to- woundI two as- Zacrad was takento the' hos-
protect the less fortunate, -im- versaries of yesterday? Who agree. Understanding is possible sailants. pital nd, was operated oin.-
pose the respect of the law for does not recall his pressing and as long"as both parties sincerely "I dropped 'the~t dropp~ Dr OscarAdIvarez, 37, who
the safeguard of common inter- reiterate calls to the sons of a desire peace. theimt good," (tumbadb- -biet to'ik post gadriate study and
est, practice -justice regardless' same fatherland 'in xiew of re- tumBiad6) he said. '~ .r:, -. woinat touisville, Ky. General
of individuals, offer guarantees conciling the nation with itself? Like Cardinal Richelieu, the He. :gave this .:bulet1y-$.iPdit[ Hospital and Medical School, has
to all those acting according to To govern does not only mean Honorable Dr. Francois Duva- iaccounf of ,the incident-:. treated him for the past three
Slaws.. manage, itTalso is insuring the lier has for enemies those of The iiiurder, dar came from days. He says -Zacarias ..was
permanence of the social Body the country's. As far as these behind ,with its lights,,oul. "lucid" ,upon arrival.
Of course, "the-State is every- by grouping all its members un- are concerned, we hope to win Its first' warning was, a short
bodyWs"' friend, ind everyone's der a same' ideal, this is to what them back by means of justice blast of. machine gun'ifire that Dr Alvarez said. Zacarias Was
enemy", as they. say. The bigg- President DUVALIE'R has given and persuasion; and even if they hit Thjild WNWUt,1.iWa S~IM A'i Si hrfe*p10l %' b tif' .iS
est prol6 ms it faces in'its,rela- himself up.-to since his rise fo remain indifferent ,and deaf to of-'pain and in good condition.
tions with.:humarrsocieties .is the power, There. agaih theDept our call, we will respect their The murder car,, described. as He listed the chauffeur's wound -
conciliation df collective interest of Interior has a .,predominriant :igt to be of another .opinion a- black, -1958" Clhvr6let, 'tien as' a 'fractiiral left leg, a fr-
with'rdivitaual .Aiterept. part to play. I am in .advancb than ours as long as they- re- swerved' to the right of the Tru- turned right shoulder, left leg
delighted at the. .efficiency.-6f main ..quiet and do not bother jillo .ar and cut.in frdAt of'it. wound'-and superficial,- aadodmi,]
;. Howccan justice be ensured this Departtnent!,. staff. Atnoi. any'bdy'. ', W- enthe murder car ed fal and t&fd wounds,
without htarming liberty, that is,, those,who are to share m Efs.'i People.1 You-are tuis .fr ee',td; 's .".e -"r';if' st ; '
-'1. --:vW,, --- .- rte.-s,
tie tfding, tendency, the. indi- r find friends who Havi t'ioughi nqboc' intends' to 'nmair'! yodr.'- ..ele .. "e .lant shot
idus' asseition towards pow- .with e op August 16,' 1L6 and liberty; but make it e- y for -Buf 'Trrjiin~3jd 'Sto --'kill' a~re upon.-. -
i*-.iatesman's biggest cri-.bJrl Sept. 22, 1957. I bave, thus, us and s pe- i al'i remember we are giwgafght' jloi e-was sf 4at ,' ..
..inat.t public interests is to. good reasons to believe that this that liberty does not mean lic- Truijilo ,jl .E.tft r a ., (Codtflnped' bit
: .a
iIt'"" ". .J. ii

"I A '.M i '''- ' .. '-.. ...'- ....



Yh1.World ,*F .W, ERY -F
-- : d- .----------- C.A,. o.:


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