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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001
 Material Information
Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."
 Record Information
Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00160

Full Text



Weekly
S Every
4,Sunday


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S, OR.: OkT-iAU-#RINCE, BAITI Avenue Marie-Jeanne CITI DUMARSAIS ESTIME Phone 2061 Vol XIV SUNDAY MAY 28th, 1961 No. 29
. f . . *'./- . . "


Largest Contingent

Of Country People

See Inauguration
From every commune and ru- by seasonal rains the lumbering ing the Capital city-for.the first
al section front lSaltadere to camions lent 'a Mardi 'iras at- time. The traffic lights and ithe'
loustjqus. habitantss -'poured mosphere Itc the countryside as planes .landing at Bowen Field
nto .hie Capital last week by those passengers with liberty pl were among the attractions the
anfion and -.boat for President movement expanded their Lungs visitors viewed with amaze-
lr Francoii s Duvalier's swear- in song old political ditles. meut.
Ing i for a second term. Once in the Capital the coun-
Aide.d by their Chef de See- try people were installed in the In the school yards 'giant
lon, p efect. and other rural various public schools, the Uni- "chaudieres" were set up-and
tuthb i4ls,:.the coun.t-rym a n ver-sity,,. large Regie du .Tabae fired providing communal meals
prouit along .his, weathered hangers and. Shada buildings. of 'Bouillon Doe" and "mais
'tar our and vaccine", and 'It wihs a conmion sight--to see .Moulin".
sonme ld. -bcolorful ritual. lags, small gradps of these country- Typical drum and vaccine Ra-
Tri6lling over roads '-middied men playing tourist and observ- ra bands introduced to. the Po-
:i; L ,pular will theme song "DUVA-
Pf SIDENT DUVALIER TAKES OATH LER PAPA, OUA FOURRE
BEFORE THE 'LEGISLATURE. rFIEO PLI FOND" "apa Du-
r' elher' dlir or f t in d'pn\


I'""'"_ -, cu your. ee i n eep)
. ed their parties of shuffling
S(Continued on page 16)
New Depifits -Receiv


A.puty .Mmn Ulrick Paul Blanc


Mane Jerome Monvert, a mere- !
be*' of "iL'Avenir Club" of Ai u
Cayes, composer of the Ma) 22 8
theme song "Duvaller Papa
Oua fourre pie on pl1 fond"
BOAC TO CONNECT
NASSAU TO HAITI
The second team of BOAC
specialists arrived here this %-
week to investigate the possibi-
lities of opening a feeder air
service between Nassau and
S(center) one of the first women .n-


Eptipsn t -ptryy o.Haf ti pclred above with ro. rnc


M 1iii~c ra ss -o Caribbean Ca tpitaes Nioa
: .. -bost tourist inter-ig.c fktravia,. ,i
t..u n.. ."s a subsidiary
her PalaCe Monday. of the British Overseas Airways
.Corporation would have an hour
SS Laroche and fifty minute flight between
.,. t" t. wt o Caribbean Ca'pitas iaxia

Exc.le't c esS' e s."'the' Represertatives -of the Friendly,Nations, Coast Guard ENGLISH COUPLE WED AT ST. TRINITY -
,r.-.President of the National Assembly, I Letenant-Coldnel Jacques La- ..
Seeople' epresentaies roche,, received his third Star
and, Lmansfer dirm of
: 'Bothers'', "the '"uartier- tre d -
Called before Your High Assembly, Messrs. the People's Rdpre- pin s Fo ees
to Cornmand u
.enitivesto answer to the soelmn decision, of the Haitian People t i
.pressed.Jy- the universal vote on April .30, '1961 a heie mly i, a v n
S .Col... o'iel Laroche, a veteran in-
as a JNATIONA. REFEREE,. devoted, tqpygovern, since April 30, vestigpor for more' than a dec-
P61 by the sole and powerful virtue of the GENERAL CONSENT, ade in- the Criminal Research
Mithithe ,ful Athprity given AMe.:by the. Nation in Ithe supreme Burea of the Port au Prince
interest. olwhich repap .the Trustee -. P~ce. Department, is a gradu-
S ..- 7 'ate lawyer and' now in his see-
On -thi''histoi-nC day' f ,ApriI'30, 1961, lie that oa;Septe~ibe;22, ond 'ar at the Faculty of Eth-
957,, the Haitian people closely associated; wi'jIh.theu r as ryIol- ogs
dedicated, in its 'way'of making its desbiny,: hdf "ia, to e igd ge sently Joseh Lamarre re-
,., i so-the ITS. has been' post-
ia e 'efod i without 1"oing through 'the'-rtificial anid uqe es ed t0replace Col. Laroche and
tensions, creatdis of .bitter internal 'cor~i~'v whih always arise, 'will succeeded as Cmdr. of
hehn tri *efue to face .cdurageously .their -ro.l ai Jehi e th rvice des Transports by
n the solutions. Ca- Catta Nerva Staco. ,
The National .Sovereignty las .'expressed itself in electng./its 'ong 'to anechanlal diffl,
presentatives, on.April 30.At .the same time, :'it chose ohce-more I,.cl the 'Haiti Sun has had -
elect. Me as PRESIDENT THE'REPUBLIC. -' tO cartall this .idtlon froQm .LOVELY .RUTH OWE and MICHAEL BUCKMASTER i et and
L.th leep beUe 'of.spaiing the Natoti-i.f. aihgss 'fights i llstomary 2' pages to 1 fell in love In Scotl&nd and were,married here at the St. Trli:.ty'
f;-'le e belte. _._spamng teN,_ a__l._, _o__:_ _e__i_ _ss-__ghs _! I. (Continued oPn page 1) *':
,:, ;.. .(CQ i dnu'ed nn .page )
F-
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Drive

Poor
ast off clothing and shoes
d today are destined to
r.
iposer of May 22
Theme Song
25s/ n FM .


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Mother's Day Good Deed

Scouts C

Clothing.

IFor The
In a Mother's Day drive to help The c
cloth the poor, Boy Scouts and collected
girl guides, are making a door the poo
to door collection of used cloth-
ing and shoes today. Con
The Boy Scouts and Guides
launched their appeal io Tele-
Haiti viewers Friday night with
a sketch of a visit to a home
asking for cast off clothing and i'
shoes. The Boy Scouts Choir
gave a edition of Creole songs
after the sketch.
In their Mother's Day good
deed the Scouts and Guides are
canvasing all the ,residential
Sections of the Capital and Pe-
tionville using the door knock-
ing technic.
ed At National Palace


I~- ;: --!S






.. -SUNDAY. MA Y -21ST,-19


"'HAIT-I SUN" ,


I '


r PlR8T IN A SERIES OF ARTICI

SPublic Opinionln 1

STHE' FORMATION
JUDGMENT (
y.


In the Federal Republic of
SGermany, the Basic Law guar-
antees every citizen the "'right
freely to express one's opinion."
In order to be able to put for-
ward a definite opinion, one
must have the opportunity of in-
forming oneself in detail, so far
as possible on all sides.
S/
As everywhere in the Free
World, the Press. plays a decis-
ive part in the formation of the
individual citizen's opinion. If
one compares the quantity of
this sort of material in the Fe-
deral Republic with that in the
neighboring countries, one can
at once' say that the West Ger-
man Is a "zealous reader of
newspapers". In the Federal Re-
public- there are approximately
1,500 daily newspapers with a
total circulation of about 20 mil-
lion. In addition, there are the
weekly and monthly periodicals,-
which are, above all, important
for the forming of opinion in
matters of domestic policy.

Foreigners are interested in
the fact that, ,with a total cer-
culation of all types of periodic-
als of more than 120 million,
nearly 16 million copies are of
''.a religious character a factor
not to be underestimated in the
. moulding of public opinion in
West Germany. Of the great
groups of periodicals with a cir-
culation of millions, the trade
uruon organs are likewise im-
portant in formizig public opin-
ion.

The young people's periodicals,
which as tools of the youth or-
ganizations ceaselessly make it


NEW
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BETTER


-. BETTE&/RF*


BETTER.
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.2. 'A BETTER TEXatL
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i ,.Wil"4 ;lM' .* " . 4

f t "TROPICAL GAS COMPANY,. INC;
SM, Makes. everyd-a a "Holiday" in your kitchen... Use
Stthe "Gold Star Award" wiiner 'the'TROPIGAS range.
Si No finer range anywhere today.
S '/EFFLEX-TOP BURNER A single- flame with
S 'countless accurate stages of adjustment for every .cook
S ing need from fast boiling or.frying, down togentl
.'VL -.tboiling. ,
.. EQUAFLO OVEN BURNER Makes .possible new
Serfection. Heat is spread hi, atectaafgular ptteirn, the
S ., "- shape of the oven and broiler. No hot center. no.;:old
S. owners. :.
.' :PIN POINT PILOTS Cool ecbnomatic fin pointt
'- 'ots are only one'th~ird- the size of ordinary pilots -
a flame so tiny itkeeps range cool in aiy weather rand
S saves you moeR,' too.-
".' '- r -'' HUGE OVEN ith visualite, window.
.w LIFT TOP BilJRNER and PULL-OUT BROIL. l.for
easier, more thorough cleaning.
S. ~ T o ECO OQ L BUNEB R, snakes every ustensils. au-
i ~tomatic., .' -'
Lifetime. guratee of anll bo ners.. .
Too many features to list here..You must,see it to

I 'appreciate it.. Easy terms .too. .
. -.'.,-" : . . -TRIOPIICAL GAS :MPANY, INGC -::
':'" . . .. ..'I . . ,I , L ., ,i'.- -"
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LES ON GERMANY of thd Individual newspaper mn ENGLISH COUPLE WED...
Small parts of the world, the real Cathedral iby the Rev. Henry. S rrows Jr May l6th. The. nglsh
supplying of ,inforpnation-lies in
rhe Federal Rel blic ppin ofInf ation-lies ia couple decided on Haiti. as the ideal place for their marriage and
S the hands of a central newspa-
OF ONE'S OWN "er agency, thq German Press honeymoon after Michael spoke in such glowing terms of his tie
tARANTJEED Agency (dpa), the shares in visits here as a freelancewriter.- After honeymooning at th& IMon.
GUAR EE which are restricted to German tagne Noire, Mon Reve and visiting the Citadel the young couple
h h newspaper publishers or publi- will continue their-trip around the Caribbean, where Tim is con-
their concern to strengthen the siers' rganiza s With ts . .
cooperation of young people in she rs'e o rgaizations. ne Wh tacting prospective clients for the International Press Service that
cooperation of young people in source of inWormation'.alone no .
democracy have, it is true, only publishing house in the Federal does promotional work throughout Europe for Caribbean tourist
a small circulation but their Republic can any longer do with- islands.
tasks are important. However, out. Usually, 'every editor also. '
here as in the whole of the Press receives for hi particular pro- U.S. AMBASSADOR RETURNe8
one must be careful not to stamp vine material fom the greatU.S Ambassador Robert New-
this solicitation of active coop- international P.r ess agencies creasing activities of the public begin returned from Washington
,_is solictao iOP' international i P.ress agencies
eration as "State propaganda', (Reuter's Havas,- AP., UP, etc.) opinion institutes, which, in the Saturday afternoon.
since genuine propaganda would Some information is handled by Federal Republic, on a private *
be sharply rejected by the very about 500 private, smaller offi- level. carry out public opinion NEW CANADIAN ENVOY
critical and -in questions of a ces which mostly describe them- polls in a way that is similar ARRIVES
'guided" formation of opinion- selves -as "correspondence bu- to the American Gallup poll sys- Peter R. Jennings"6 the new
very vigilant population, espe- reaux". tem. The Federal Government Canadian Charge d'Affair arriv-
cially the young people. also makes use of these services e'd on. the 23rd from Canada
For the Joreign newspaper ex- in order to estimate the trends aboard the Santa Margareta.
pert, the small number of gen- Apart from the Press and the of public opinion in impertdnt Mr. Jennings was accompanied
uine -that is, above all, fin- -not to-be underestimated- ra- matters.,. by-his wife. -.
ancial- political party newspa- dio, the political parties, televi-
pers is worthy of note. Almost sion and a whole number of
all newspapers are privately- free democratic institutions con-. 00
owned At most it might with cern themselves with informing T TIME i
reseh'ation be added that many the population on their vested FO THE RST T E AT
publishers have shown that they rights in being Aept instructed .LAVINIA WILLIAMS
are members of a democratic on all essential matters. Presents the Ballet
party and have found a chief .
editor who is likewise a memb- In conclusion, there is still to q TTHE SLEEPING ,BEAUTY"
er of this party or at least iri be mentioned the. continually in- .
timately connected with it. AN.ORIGINAL .INTERPRETATION
That, however, in no way in- 3 Acts 2 Scen
dicates that such newspapers -
always and in every case sup- WILSON Moe Than 50.Stude ts-45
port every decision of "their . E iday 9th June at 1 i45 -.. -
party. In point of fact the oppo- & :-AT THE REX THEA-L'E -;
site is often the case, ..since if Tickets on.al.e .]tt Rex Theatre, ILA Caravelle-:"
one happens to speak with mem- ILfrary. and .Lavinia Williams' 'Dane School..:
bers of the Bundestag one hears Fred. PEiRY th :. -ttie Champ de Mars.
that they allow themselves to o B n
be impressed more by the .often rA.. CE: J1 20.UU .--U
unexpected, realistic criticism of NE". W" li e;
the newspapers "on-.their sidb" SPO TSIOP .. '.'
than by the expected conftover- +- '
sial criticism of the Opposition. J NE. -:.
This interplay between the po- I
Litical parties and the Press is 137 Crlshrem St.
naturally related only iL6 the .. : ,-
newspapers, since, in spite of. A ,
the large number of reporters. A E : ll
- *^***.* 1* I *" r r n n u n r tS''*^*.i&.B^ *''K.'L* ~ **]'


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_TIA AY2T;i91" AT S1J-


Needy May Go
t,-. 4"

To Latin Parley
.u1ly Trip to Economic Talks in Uruguav Is Expected

Wa 7hinglon, May 23.- summit session of Western-He- N. Oribe, Minister Counsellor of
misphere leaders. the Uruguayan Embassy.
President Kennedy is expected A formal invitation to the Pre. The conference, to be held at
o attend the opening session of sident will be delivered at the ihe resort town of Punta del
he i n t er-American economic White House tomorrow afternoon Este, will open President Kenn-
oriference in Uruguay July 15. by Carlos A. Clulow, Uruguay's edy's Alliance for Progress pro-
There were signs that the Ambassador to the Organization gram for inter-American econ-
neeting might develop into a of American States, and Emilion ornic cooperation.
Earlier this month Congress
approved the expenditure of
5500,000,000 to back economic de-
,..- v.elopment in Latin America.
M Quadro Parley Possible
On his way to the conferences,
'' President Kennedy is expected
o.. stop at the new Brazilian ca-
O pital of Brasilia for a meeting
re mO --I t ith President Janio Quadros.
(e iSipa P' > -' The Administration has been
--ff 1i ( disturbed by Brazil's failure to
J e'!L0 -4O 4 F iend full backing to Washing-
SI on's position on Cuba and the
S l L.lfe Castro regime. This has been
l' specially disappointing in view
v I.1 of extensive United States eCo-
Le fi .n ric iomic assistance to Brhzil.


The growing "neutralist" fla-
'or in recent statements by Pre-
sident Quadros and other Bra-
zilians has raised questions here.
These and other matters of mut-
ual interest are expected to be
raise at any Kennedy-Quadros
meetings.
There have been rumors that
the President* right also visit
Buenos Aires for a talk with
Argentina's President Dr. Ar-
turo Frondizi. Sources here con-
sidered this unlikely.


-. Frondizi May Attend
There was a possibility, how-
ever, that President Frondizi
might attend the economic con-
S' ference in Uruguay. There were
i indications that the subject had
been raised with the Argentine
President and with the leaders
lof Peru, Chile, Ecuador and
Other Latin-Ainerican states.
-~~~ '


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S . .. .. , -' o. . . .,, . .
ail's '"Gingerbread, Palace" and.J-amed- hos elry- the ^aid Botel Oloton,, shoW pure a
l ._' -t , s_ ..'-. and c i p'.ltt h :- , ,"

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Thus, what had been planned
as a mi ministerial meeting, may
develop into a gathering of
heads of governments.
After his talk with the Uru-
juayan diplomats tomorrow, Mr
Kennedy is scheduled to confer
with Adlai E. Stevenson, chief
United States delegate to the
United Nations. Mr Stevenson
vill leave next month on a spe-
cial goodwill mission to Latin
America for the President.
In'part, the Stevenson mission


will prepare the way for .t
economic' conference in Uruguay''
the following month. Mr Stev'*- r
enson's trip is also intended.-to'"?
promote hemispheric unity, ,
which has been weakened as a
result of differences over'deve-
lopmonts in Cuba. ;
The economic conference was
originally scheduled to be held
in Montevideo. It was moved to.`- '
Punta del Este for security reas-
ons, sources here said. .
(New York Times May 2i, 1961)


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DISCOVER THE FASCINATION


OF HAITI

Through Its Postage Stamps

For complete information in Haiti

Stamps and other details which will be "

furnished you free of charge, write to

P.O. Box 723 PORT-AU-PRINCE









''
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"u, iiAY iMAY 28TH," 1961
A`.... .: "


" HAITIV S'UN "


iw



ElpD










12th ANNIVER S.
4_-4







FREE-PORT SHOPPING CENTER
P. O. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI




AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS'
W -i' t MINTON, WEDGWOOD, 0 1W EGA, I&TE iTIEP S GEISaUTw MTa
S ROYAL CROWN DARBY, JVENIA TISSOT, BOREL, .CARON, CHANEL'
ROYAL COPENHAGEN, AUDEMAR PIGUET RAPHAEL, PATOU.
R Aw OYAL WORCESTER, JAEGER LE COULTRE, **^ff^^H BALMAIN, WORTH,
ROYAL DOULTON, ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO, b-REVILLON, VIGNY,
ROSENTHALE, SPODE, ATLANTA, STUDIO, CARVEN, LE GALLION.
AYNSLEE, COALPORT, VULCAIN. FABERGE OF PARIS,
GUSTAlBERG. / JEAN D'ALBEBT, '
V JACQUES GRIFE
V, FATH,.PIGUET.. -:
KISLAV, CORDAY,
GEORGE JENSEN, ENGLISH DOESKIN' "
HANS HANSENJ, GERO, ITALIAN ANTELOPE. I .5 INOX, CANNON
DRAGSTEII. ,ENS.

S, P PRINGLE, BALLANTYNE, ROYAL COPENHAGEN, .
The Finest 4pf FRANCE, BERN HARD ALTMAN, ROYAL DOUJLTON, -::-.; '
ITALY, AUSTRIA. LUISA SPAGNOLI. HUMMEL. .;'

-r LALIQUE, BACCARAT; .
.' TORREFORS. EARVEY'S BRISTOL ,
SWEBB & CORBETT, DANISH SILVER, CEAM, AllE'FRENCH. R
SP VAL SOLAMBERT, GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY AI DANISH and .
SSTUART, LEERMAN. and-BRAZILAN GEMS. SPANISH LIQUIEURS.

HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS

IVooDoo Inspired SCULPTURES A AG
JEWELRY S OES





SThe Best



S ,World Famous RUGS DhAPB .Y .
RHai anUDMAPGRRBAAbPIHAE P
Ea E ; a s send gifts o TI: friends in h il.S. A.

Sithdut affetin. your quta Se fo-r 'orA ei DeriBn .
HA S A GE..IIT N .AEL C






AI
4 Na~ue-I silr









overseas woqld have us believe.
H AIT I SUN .Rather, we believe that the
TE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER biggest' shortcoming is a show
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning of humility where none is felt
Editor-Publisher BERNARD DIEDEEBIOiH or called for. We encounter the
Gerant-Besponsable MAUCLAIR IABE E i J"When in Rome" attitude among
"o American businessmen operating
MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN. Amer bus en ng
in Japan fairly often, which
ESTABLISHED IN 1950 May 22, 1961 brings this subject up.
S i ' Dear Bernard: The American who criticizes
"Kicked Upstairs" is by far the Japanese customs of taking
LARGE-SCALE LITERACY CAMPAIGN one of the most clever pieces off their shoes before entering
CAL D FOR of writing to have ever appear- the home, their style of dress,
CALLED R ed in the Haiti Sun. We congra- eating with chopsticks, etc. is,
tulate the author, yet at the of course, a complete boor. In
Thousands_ of Haitians saw their Capital City and same time wish he were part of the presence o such Japanese
seat of Government for the first time this week whan our staff here. Our paper, "The ws, te Ameican should "do
they were brought to the inauguration ceremony. Centurion" would welcome his as the Romans do."
Ironically it was also the first time most had been work any time. However, one thing'should be
in a school but it was as a.temporary lodger and not ,As'-for Mr Jones, the "go.il- set straight. The American who
Sa hool but was as a temporary ger an n la", we are .awed and amazed shows humility and a "hen in
as a student. by his unusual intellect but are shows humilityude in attes of
Seeing these respectful and kindly Haitian peasar.ts happy to leave him.to Harviard, businesss. marketing and ad-
away from their "Ti Cailles" and "jardins" in the e President Kennedy, the McBur- 'ertising for example... when x-
schools and University faculties dramatized -the coun- ney School, and Leni Bogat. perience and logic tell him that
try's most urgent need education for its four milli n We also hope that Mr Jones lie is right and his Japanese
mtry e -'s o r e.nu lis only head of men's schools counterpart is wrong, is doing
habitants". and colleges throughout the Sta- a great sris wrong, is doing
Could not a leaf be taken:from recent Cuban history tes. a great disservice both to his
and bring a truck load of these countr men in for a Sincerely, Japanese associates and his. own
month at a time and let the brightest ones go out a-id Marie Helene Fisher. The biggest reason,that Ame-
teach their fellow, couttrymen to read and .,rite. Manhattanville College i.cans lack respect overseas, in
To read and w to nable them to absorb some f Of The Sacred Heart our opinion, is that they are un-
Purchase, New, York. willing to assert themselves
the vital knowledge for Haiti to get off the ground. purchase New or willing to assert themselves
- To read and write' to be able to understand the u e een when the ow themsel-
if simple ferteizer,'soil conservation. To better wi:-h Deac Editor: the matter under discussion is
.stand the exploitation of the Country "speculator"; i an a American doing bus- of considerable importance. We
to improve their ph6ronal hygiene and most important mess raith Haiti and I thought have the reputation of being
to. learn the advatages Of education which can be your newspaper as of interest tin ergrown, self-indulgent child-
hopefully passed on to their children. the Commercial worsl. ten who wil not or ar on any-
'op. -l Psd .thing important for fear of rock-


Only literate people can be responsive to posters
lectures- pamphlets and educational movies and the
many other inexpensive things that could be done
fo improve the lot of the Haitian farmer.
There is even merit: in the':expeermenit of Cuba in
making urban students 4.Yo.te..seyi'eal months of their
own careers to the iirsti itiond of illitirates in the
Countryside.
The material used in any large-scale literacy camp-
aign is easily come by and it has the additional value


I remain


L.T.

American importers we. have
met are probaibly-the.least prozie
to "do as 'the'Ronmrn- do." When
a contriict .is :..boFen .delivery
late, or business performance
is 'otherwise "different" than
what they require, they can't
merely infor themselves that


1


. ..... they are in different country
of instilling civic-pride, loyalty, patriotism etc. in ey are th difperh nt countrJap
the new pupil. c n and that perhaps the JapaneseI
Sw pup are just as right as they, just
"different." The'problem is that
,A., 5.. .the .importer is- trying to sell
S' _. .-to American. offers in competi-
SI ll tion 'with American manufactur-
SI ers who ire not: "different" in
This respect. And 'he can hardly
Sr .. go to his American customer
IDENTITY PHOTOS with excuses for failure to live
PASSPORT PI'OTOS up to his promises because when
.s EL' y he was in Japan he was "doing
:- as the Romans do."
SLA ES We don't think it a crime, as
RREPRODUCTIONS, many Americans apparently do,
Fastest Service In Town to proclainf loud and long that
Fastest Service ame on there is a proven right way for
ie arie-eanne, No. 5 certain business objectives to be
SCite de Exposition .; accomplished, and. that Japanese
Businessmen will continue to
~ ~",- ~-- 1~, i'- ignore this proven method to
their own detriment, as well as
to that of, their foreign custom-
Sers. -
'Prosably the biggest fault of
Ainericai s-doing business with
S- TIN A T Cithe JaNpanesejs, hot :Jabk of hu-
P- HIAR EN AND THE CITADEL mility, as so many. modern day
ONE WAY BY PLANE ,ONE WAY BY LIMOUSINE apologists.;. for the' American

SL TO RENT
S -' INCLUEOD Benltiful Iargh'h house in Bour-
PE- OR ED 4 0 ,LnE D 'don. Partly furnished. Four lar-
OPERATED BY dC ITO'P ETouiaa ge bedrooms,- large living and
WVENUE PAN AMERICAINE dining room. Two bathrbooms,
PETION-/VILE iE. AIl : hot water in baths and kitchen.
S'PO 3oabx 31. hoe swimming Poo1 and patio water
~ "' "o R ... '. '" : '""776 24 hours a day., Nice view.
ta..'c. r' "e- ner_


9 -~ contact 1fr Stecher,
tag it, '
.'* """;/, "', ::'t : -/ : '. ; :,' .;. = .* ,=. ', . " ', ": .. ," "" '


~i Y l, s~ s r p ta s~r ~ ~ :,i-


in the boat, but who are all "hot
to go" when a party and females
are mentioned.
To assume that one should not
attempt to change Japanese bus-
ness methods "just because
they are different" is tant-
amount to asserting, that there
is no 16gidal basis -upon which
business methods may be eva-
luated. To get down to a basic
example, there is a pronounced
tendency in Japan to treat con-
tracts very tightly. Adherence to
contracts is of vital importance
to the growth of confidence upon
which all business,'.particularly
international business, is built.
Therefore, the Japanese 'shotild
be criticized and pressure
brought to bear upon them to
recognize the importance of
social critics.
Our Americla friends who ad-
vise us to go along with Japan-
ese business customs are irres-
ponsible, in our opinion. A man
who will do things in a way
which his logic, education and
experience tell him are wrong
just to please his Japanese ass-
ociates is 'a very shallow type
of individual.


__


.

' Caribbean Construction Co. SA.
Builders Of The Military. Citv
Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD" :.,
Phone: 3955.P.. O.-BO. 284
._ ,: =' ., ...,. ., .p ..''... .,, .., ,-
""h iM: 7 '.. ," '% .,.'.""? '' '" ' ,, '.f-.'


L--- ---' .

This person's only interest is:
making money, regardless of
ethical considerations. His ac-
tions show him to assume that
as long as a certain activity is :
profitable, there is really no rea-
son to question whether, or not
this activity is worthwhile. Un-. '
fortunately (or fortunately, de-.:
pending upon the viewpoint) an
activity which is not really '
worthwhile is rarely profitable
on more than a short-range bas-
is.
Further, the person who advo-
cates going along with local cust-
omers without attempting to
evaluate them logically, or who
goes along with custom even
when he knows it to b eillogical
and even harmful to the ultim-
ate development of a healthy
Japanese society, shows a com-
plete lact of interest in and res-
pect for his Japanese associates.
The Japanese are a sensitive
people, and this type of condes-
cension does not escape them.
The blatant insincerity in this
approach tb the Japanese is,
sooner or later bound to leave
the American without the coop-'
eration he requires for a sue-.
cessful business operation.
Then there is always the char-
acter who, at this point, brings
up the statement, "American bu-
sinessmen aren't perfect either."
Of course they are not. But the
fund of knowledge concerning
how business can be most eff-
ectively conducted is much
greater in the United States
than in Japan simply because
there has been so much more
study of and experience in most
business fields. And the natter
of importance is how business.
should be conducted, not how'
it is currently conducted by
many or must American buain-
essmen.
American business methods
are currently reciMving their
share of criticism 'from the au-
thors of "The- Organization
Man", "Executive Suite," "The '
Waste Makers," and several
other writers, businessmen rl ahndi'
We Americans involved in the
Japanese business world becau-.'
se we buy here or sell here'
must take an interest in Japan"!
over "and above .what It can
offer us as a meal ticket. To.
gain the genuine respect of the
Japanese, we must endeavor to it
raise the. standards .of business"',
practice here. We must make-;
some effort to contribute what.'
knowledge and experience we,,'
possess and the Japanese busln-.- :
ess world lacks. And we can't..
do this by "doing as the Ron'-.
ans do." 'i


'J.
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2 VsMen In The New" in The New York Times

2 Victorious Texans


John Dabney Murchison And Clint Williams Murchison Jr.
Owners Of The Flour Mill Here'
The two unassuming, soft easily. John and Clint are sons Partnership Branches Out
spoken multi-millibnaires from of- the aging and ailing Texas Mr Murchison bought in for
Texas who took control of tihe oil man Clint W. Murchison Sr. his sons, and in 1947 both young
multibillion-dollar Alleghany who made a fortune in oil forty men became directors of the
Corporation empire yesterday years ago and multiplied it in .company. In a' few years, the
have become masters of the a variety of other fields. Murchison Brothers' partnership
technique of the "iron hand n hey conduct their financial Branched into many ventures
the velvet glove." conduct hrintanciafrom John Murchison overseeing
operations, which run into nine ,
finance, banking ,insurance and
figures, under a partnership ar-. ir a
Men In The News a p a-insurance to building, with allied
rangement, Murchison Brothers. interest s.
This entity was created for Clint Jr. was a top student at
The victory of the two youth- them by their father in 1942, Lawrenceville Sclop stuent c
ful brothers, John Dabney, 39, when John became of age. ville, Nce J.e tool hisB S. at
and Clint Williams Murchisson The two brothers got their feet uke University and received a
Jr., 37 (pronounced Mqrkiss-un), wet in finance in' 1945, when ahis M.S. from the Massachusetts
not only resolved the biggest friend of Clint Murchison Sr. Istie of Technology
corporate struggle in history suggested that the book publish- Institute of Technolog
but also represented an amaz- Ing firm of Henry Holt & Co. Johp is. a graduate of the Hot-
ing upset. As late as last month, represented a good business pos- chkiss School. He did not finish
Wall Street sources were betting sibility for the two boys, then his studies at Yale until after
that Allan P. Kirby would win in military service. .the war. In his own words, he


escaped frdm the dean's descen- Street, both meh i are Ui"o9ough
ding axe into the- Air. Force in. Southwesterner. in speeci6 then
1942. .referring to'Robert'i'.: ieg's
Despite ther E n widow, they speak of her as
Despite their Eastern. school- .. '
ing and familiarity with Wall (Continued on pagD 12)


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'SUNDAY MAY 28THi, 1961


" HA II SUN"


t.AG ji.."


President s
(Continued from page 1)
of which it has been periodically exposed in the pr
des,. especially in 1957, when the nation was on the \
war and when the Fatherland neared disaster, the
ereignty has deliberately substituted to the 1957 Mar
which has sealed off the collapse with desirable ene
date to. carry on the Revolution of Peace, Order,
that of the National Reconstruction.
STherefore,- the National Sovereignty, by its April
has substituted to the current Mandate of the Chie
other imperative Mandate of which the High Asse
on May 14 instant has set May 15, 1961 as its start.
My people's mystical and intellectual forces are
uther peoples'! I know it: The Haitian people unde
portant Act which gave it back, on, April 30, the
up so as to start reestablishing the Nation Represen
formity wiiii the Constitution.
It did it thoughtfully and fully conscious of its rig
I, personally want to remember and emphasize I
and ideologically, and by the people's will, the cor
revolutionary order of September 22, -1957 is still
(in with the April 30, 1961 Event.
Doctrinally, the Revolution thai put Me in Power
22, 1957 had for basis: the return to Unity of' the
.too"ipdich divided within itself.


InauguralSpeech

'eceeding deca- cribable, unspeakable energy faced the ups and downs of a
'erge of a civil Power fought with an unprecedented violence and inexhaustible
National Sov- variety of means. Remember it, yourselves, Haitians, my bro-
ndate of Power tigers, without my calling it to your attention! Remember this
ergy, the Man- courageous people of the South and of the capital.
discipline and
diipline and Duiing 4 years almost, and again yesterday in the North-West
of the country, the Government of October 22, 1957, issued from
30, 1961- vote
So your conquest and from your taking Power on September 22,
ef of State an
mblSs c 1957, dreamed of happiness for the masses of My Haitian bro-
thers, while fighting and suffering for the salvation of the dis-
liessed fatherland for social pe.ce and for national prosperity.
as strong a1
But, this Government of October 22, 1957 has been hurt, doubted.
stood the im-
cd te ontested, confronted- with im -noprehensiuns of all kinds; this
right to speak
with all the villanies.
station, in con

Fortunately! Yes. 3 times .fortunately. Victory has never bet-
ha t doctrinally stayed Me. It has assisted the Government of October 22. '95'i
that doctrinally
t in all its fights and struggles against the repression. forces be-
nstitutional and
cause PEOPLE-ARMY, ARMY-PEOPLE have courageously
being carried
fought with Me.
on September
epember The no historical day of April 30, 1961 is again the VICTORY
Haitian nation
S non :f People-,A my, Army-People. It detinitel. convinces Me of the
essential and transcendent value of My actions of ystetiday as


JEAN-LEON DESTINE AND
COMPANY INVITED TO
PERFORM IN THE CARBIBB
The internationally renowned
Haitian dancer-choreogra p h e r
Jean-eon Destine and his Com-
pany leave/June 21 for a con-
cert tour of the Caribbean.
Included in the itinerary will
be Jamaica, Trinidad, Puerto
Rico, British Guiana, Martini-,
que, Barbados.
Mr Destine and Company
have been acclaimed in Europe,
the Far East and throughout the
United States as the foremost
interpreters of the Haitian folk-
lore.


o'.y- cb- le of de the responsible Chief of State of September 22, 1357. '
.IdeoFogically; create a Regime capable of developing a need
for order, peace, work, discipline and continuity.,
-laitians. My brothers,
.Conaiderintg the nation's political realities within the internal r n
I wI We are living the most staggering period of the" History of the
tioial -scope at a time difficult for all Countries, during My dan-
S.. country's masses and middle class which we synthesize .in the
gerou: and. hard years'in" the "maquis", I had worked out and P LE-AR RY-EOPLE.
diptych: PEOPLE-ARMY, ARMY-PEOPLE.
ri heitated the qitalities and, the instruments of the institutions sus-
ceptib.le. to.contiibte in the future t start towards ne My acts of yesterday, with time and space, through this vote
ceptible to.contribute in the future to the start towards new '&e?-
of the people and the army have been heightened, to the level
times of the Haitian community. United.in thought \with Me, you ac acui a a
where human acts acquire the approval of value necessary for
have realized, Haitians, My brothers, that it is urgent, that it and uo a o h r P J o
marking present History, and suffeient to be part of the great atm
is necessary for Haiti to have a Chief in which the majority of.
: .... d i.impartial -History, of tomorrow. .
the nation can find, in spiite of parties', factions', or small groups' .t. l I .
quarrels, a Chief, chosen by the people, who will be the Manager .Ma hisor meet ith the ery st tfl
.. May this,- approval.And. this ,obvious fervor meet with the very -
of its essential interests and the dependable Trustee of its des- '. t ou er ouriao t buoni#
best which, during the troubled days of yesterday's Government, tb (ouI. tra
-i. gave Me new energy and stamina and kept Me from falling f', 'd'[
tinder the extensive problems and under the load of the aspira 1....'* '*
The people, the Army and You have chosen-Me.
The pe te A y ad ou he e*tion of-the masses and middle classes who have been so magni- i* t..L
For insuring the "res public's" salvation, and-recalling the and middle classes ho he been so
,.. ,-, :* .' ficeut of patience, courage and devotion in their wait for better "
necessity of National Unity;.' for restoring Order' and legality; for ". Lo a
courageously undertakirig the Economy's regeneration and theConnued on page 14)
expansion of Social. Justice; ,'ith an overwhelming yearning,
the tremendous feelingg of' adhesion to My acts as the September ,
22, N957 Chief of State, showed in the massive rise of men andR a I t
women from all over the Country, who joined the Young and 'ri
loyal Army to signify, to Me the sovereign will of continuing the
September 22, 1957 Power.
FARE -FOR HAITI
Because I have better established the State's Authority to serve
the interests df the deprived masses and those of the middle One C
NEW YORK PORT-AU-PRINCE (DEPARTURE
classes without economic organization, and even to protect the. NEW YORK -AU-P IN (DE
more- privileged social classes;, because the State, therefrom,' :- .EVERY FRIDAY):
proved to be the guide and the 'shield, you have, all, decided .
to join the State headed by Me. ARGO SHIPS: (12 PASSENGERS) $135 ALL YEAR

S My -own destiny has been confronted and solicited by the Masses'.. COMBO-SHIPS (52 PASSENGERS) FROM $155
:destiny whose passive era is definitely cldsed.'The .unlimited t
destiny of the masses of My People, of My country has chosen POR: AU PRINCE NE YORK(DEPARTEVERY SUNDAY)
the extent of My capacity to serve them. Backed up by this behav-' .-
i iour, nmy will hasalready taken and will take -all the historical Y SHIPS: SANTA ROSA SANTA PAULA -
Itesponsiblities 'susceptible 1o arise from this confrontation of SP FARE 'FROM S195 00P
Ithe people and the Army with' Me, and of all my actioiis, past,T 300 PASEN E S FARE 'FROM $195.00.
present and future in direct function with this destiny' to be.pro- '
Soted. . INFORMATION
-"4ii, .:.
SI am facing history. I am facing .the Nation head high, with a '4. .
'~erene soul, a clear conscience, and a'firm cause...
Before Septe.ber 22, 1957, Haiti and the Haitian- nation neared
byss. The people and the 'Army put Me Jo :the:.Stte'gs firsl ma -,
-istratf to v'.Ha~e it aiad' the .Hatian _nation' f-ihr disaster.' OR YOUR TRAVEL AGENT '.
GThe. woiernment of October ..22, :1957, with in-neasurable, .indes. %.!S"" t % A#% 4'44.$' .'
The ", ,. ; '4""
,'. ,- .',
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_













HyGOO Ap~i1 it~d I ~luaqr hibIeneoprns14tia htrs;adteeoin zuihri oer h e o cnie~rabe'copitipti~on, thedn4d miih o crilcaeHi
Fr~c op ate ndpedec, ermnylogve, ee intk~ndpesonygsal es an4 fth savs Nw owTSkotsdJth om. h piniledpa a'swodintinAmrianrlaios O ti
a renc eu o paper go b.alaa, aidc I- *. I o a work c !; m o h r rm b 5t1 a h l I I Iecia mention
Fo slklere ascl, the pa stildys not 9puilgatoryli Rtomao pr -u e ohtr cton h ir ig s tcaly tea4 io ene tmie tt--ent w c c to n n e I, `s -eff ad o thde ef-,



ofeFesictlitratieyan hitorW.thoicIdctait. $ al.Chi gg tea oftheheadp uscalid b og the mieteg otth speededup b Amelea exa-edoiticl a air, lcd ben pobthoe fom te thted tate ha
,havebeer/ivengreatpromn proent ir thp eli~qst habir, 'nd th pxtetiveiess feiehiand:theedr2cnsnonatpwillndAmercaI- olicy Theerifi symols anongmany n in akin Haitan there icons
aeas lote as songs, talestma- inst ac bo aa e1reo b u ntdh t;_ e te ot ii te Io e i eed the Neali zaton that Ie or had a a n u


~ aTiis paperc owas a of folk- giatloni h norm las, and vodu t th ons ocure inJnay,14L h nemxu* ofA'cntegnet fHael trhsht fifshan ex alya ctdb t here~ gaago Tee ws moeirdom o pua adlond twere ins1.ffcient Ameicae dtitudg te accntuate
oan Fo[klor locetye xateiuiana Cpaptrys no topeetndiin, trywee cnticrfti qr 3tlie Cau4aitii tsse ete reig -oaplgr fnvsiatosi eoth c itiis o governenale du poin ski eiwere needed~. Th old 1du cL~eedingl dificut theSC tassoo
11 11-111, M 1. 7n the- , 17 -11171 ace 1'_11W Tru I ed$1_








b ~ar ultur raheartodsus sob e as at 1aio r ambtiit e adrst v u Irth ftro oe udrd h thestne f 4icn uln riae b P oeso Hry iey rc cutreafer1s5ptolog lebeedadtt ilte-clsial raiio, eme ottcntnu ndexan hechn
Tofc1at m1 etint e ,n cm t ii-cfcl e loiin e Ieed of moded,_ ad teo id:-o!t;c" of t egets :intiate du rin g thed cuat
of s a i "orc o o- -a tion of the another pr of the1 'u.ally, ad either e te w r o e -, h, vi te c a 7` c n tof be cking treqion v by frm President


loe. Mch vlube ae ea country. al qii~1 m it~erests Byoethe Ateia Jage~ of Pakisap e, ixte Avr oeso dzn Dhm tid hsd differ trom Frnc 3th UniedSt tes ndo f thb ~fewd'y eraeddrn iW snpmod dr trairnig t1A oartsial .ateine. 19 .U ESO.to
ha bee ctlicte by M. J. On the sreace mIo Haio a O-. cIat on s dtl nha C g os o o .Ir O t wee us te shiet fr th e fomer thy ef ea Jacmto init s 'Pilot H t



-e skv th,,P e Mars Harold~ cultu oe tppears jit-ofb a Inodifi- wa the'lativel e 4asyt nlita theu Saitsand at easiesx orelis thentine tcntiseen tfids he erianusae o thn aontryt Tenfro t1hChrch waenoloeer he nlylif toa oredemthemi tl jcatimoreda entl eucaio
$11l4du aine 4 omai- days r e ptieins id seen sin thei iP n av b d i r 1934tthe forica n tOcu va tale sg'wete inedcoun- bile irrstatng to ,a;g e eueedb 7-ormtIe on7 -Ipe side
;:" , e .n % Ba ti n, a 11-unc of the meIca I i A. 'ea I a- ,avluio wa- Ii nin of th ee oy n nyrmne rf eita, r"a I aten whc -lce Tlaiti' deeomn was shpe In about_,`"111 thr wer ,te co elpmn of the pep Ihme .ea -ame so-,e Iat
, es bu ther is uniie h -, rench Ieolti ,, butvrsion hearpeasat datatios:oIN,'tio,.. TI -l ej -of you, etlture in,_l ifsIssenta",by this ntu]on, bt so-_o, -quencs of he Ocup"tin,,,e. Th Inoain Ihisle Iovne the- -h more I IIha1
1 I - ,- 1 , 1. ,.. __-:










i- %,t to 'e oband clsi das rem is This rs seen n the coloia, eio have dia, .r the Pa,:ose, the:." Cied Ae o" th man 'A$,li ".i take Iv alm:, in -t Iec Ia Iep for""- ..w....tLyiveI.













G ,n 0 lyzed. Th BIrIau the arrogance, cnttmp, and- ear economic e is st I A M_ 'ia- IL IL an s we, as th Ld i e r s a r o re_
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aiiis carrying on a program of, th~e htes as they de pol~iti- th' etosofcltvtngtl hceatpeuir ovou ayprihos;Grr '-mE iah irlhso acltrtonfrc ih icilnd n tan
research, an une o call itf~h rtheIas hetcn-sdto h pesn-ondfrm nldeeeetso ahoi e patcs 2'rra, ii r our hi terpesnaiese fi'fl-n fiintsse
hlars~ from the United Stts u o evlwhcuwsusds hv rnt hnedaprcabr ie.Th onertinofscrdsecfcal -fian t otr ohiwhoecutrs liveen f pblicaccuntng ad a ee
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progam eetng o th Am ri-uals Th pupos of he resnt andon ay,10,1195. ,n,'a 'ounw,_ '. 'an fxni-n rine6Wlt ,



I I -r C
'I an Foklre Soiey f ndan ppe i nt o reen adiio-,tr w er,'~cf ,rm ,a~e,_ ,I rgin~o iiqlir .- '; II '4 I .1- ,I
e onrdicre o, "I __ ,H iti is bestseen itrthe-: I e hisinveti t rh- I , I citicsm o govrri

,, .F:9
Th are pesn pplain et o hepocs f ciltr-iiiaea-eelinaninien- od.whc urltris a e osevd t ,I. II sltin ati-.'
I ,,.an fft-to ounI IS,-J1 Oly on nsane n ede i sme. difi ut o liint
of ait i a ic sorceoffol- tio inth nothrn pat o th. lly,'adva~n6,ther own- I I ---the 44 es, cjatcieisics,n quesbn. f II ,t' 'th ..
.~
._,prsn te-wite 'otane nar he vi- 1. I o Aficnims i ogh thre- er cnt ,wi exresin ntrey

, has d;' A 'them Nigerian,: and Cogo, gods.
bee coleted by O th srf-ce mos ofHatia Ocup tio iarm I I o viosl th n mes of:'C th;jc, e'of- sk vis; n te ort oher co nties fo -a litl, m -reth Ocupaio, be
-:~i

c h -drivd- e nd:to 934c' I

I - I ,, 'A r ri m i 'i n a n c i n g s a c~ ffl c e s:jg .
)V sns"J.J,- uai n E alprod f epliialfrs l t oe,.ndsmthn mgt of onsan ryesatavdu tecop .Hrkois e ea Hata If. ti nt to f e ies
:it Ipbs ssib lirin . I 1
-A ,6d eraux Lrime arediffrent duein prt t I spn o
dfi gaied b miitar. opratons,, ,and n d; 9Qe-Is';that in A/ireblai "t6 -hgtogihe
11 srvieesecill a th~bgmi I .1. cler to wht xtet hi

on ,y I .o~ea ~att rnas sape in


I I .






PAGE 10


Acculturation


(Continued from page 9)
education was needed, and assis-
Lunce was sought from the
World Health Organization and
the Food and Agriculture Orga-
nization. The program subsequ-
ently drawn up for the valley
included plans for primary
schooling for children and gene-
ral adult education for men and
women; agricultural and veter-
inary education; a rudimentary
library, museum, and arts cen-
ter: the establishment of small
industries and rural crafts; and
the organization of cooperatives.
Dr Alfred Metreaux, an Ameri-


can anthropologist on UNESCO's
staff, and his team of field work-
ers, began work in April 1948.
Despite formid able problems,
the project is succeeding. Various
experts, including a Health Ser-
vice technician, a fundamental
education expert, a museum and
library specialists, and a Creole
linguist have participated in the
program.

In July 1948, the Haitian gov-
ernment asked the United Na-
tions to organize a Technical
Mission to piovide assistance in
planning for the economic deve-


S


'HArT1 SUN "*


lopment of Haiti. The Secretary
General acceded to this request,
and a team of experts, prepared
a report covering education, pu-
blic health, agriculture, industry,
transport, trade, foreign invest-
ment, credit organization, and
public finance.

If any significant alterations
in Haitian life are to occur in
the latter half of the twentieth
century, the economic situation
will have to change materially.
We shall not outline here what
wouldd seem to be the most pro-
mising economic developments,
but it is clear that developments
of any magnitude will be condi-
tioned by the ability of the gov-
ernment to attract foreign cap-
ital fbr industrial development
and to finance agricultural pro-
grams. The 3-man military junta
which took over the government
on May 10, 1950 announced that
it would guarantee any contract
made by outside financial inter-
erests. Presumably Colonel Paul
Magloire, the president who was
elected in October. 1950, will do
likewise. Such guarantees 'may
or may not be convincing to for-
eign investors.


In their endorsement (
cioti, cunning, and lies,
of discretion, politness, a
esty,' the stories accura
flect the mbres of the
peasant, Eoiklore also
important part in the
tion process as the chil
his roles and develops
tions of himself. Interest
cial attitudes are reveal
example, in suen c
games as "Rich and
"The Little Birds," ai
Him Marry Who Wishes
ry," in the "Bouqui"


Malice" tales, in store
loup garous and zombi
quality, kings and prince
many other themes.

It is a question whet
Haitian elite favors the
ing of class lines. The


_~_~~__~ ~ ---- --


It is-futile to anticipate any _I
serious expansion or,"bducation-
al or health services unless the
National income can be raised

"f AL a afar above its present level, and,
until economic and educational O
MO RDEA changes occur there will be no
noticeable changes in social
structure, family life, politics,
or religion. If changes do not
WITH A occur in these aspects of Haitian
peasant culture, the country y
man will cling to his lore, that
---- is, his knowledge, art, medicine, Ref. 7317 vNec Plus Ul.tra" ofselfwinding
is, his knowledge, ar t, medicine^ watches 39 Jewels Gyrotron powered.
religion, philosophy. As long as Se .the supceb 96o GirOrd-Perregaux
nearly 90 p.c. of the rural po- Selectionh siodels at foremost jewellers.
~ASSEIAD puation is illiterate; as longs
BESSA MATIC as th., mass ekes out a bare
subsistence; as long as there is
only a handful of physicians .(26.
in 1948) to care for the or'dina' ay
9 C A M E R A 5 AT FMiT:l: I'lli[ I'l1:. medical needs of more than
2.500,000 people living in the
a/ smaller towns and the rural
S t en 4 areas, the stockpile of tales, rid-
a ( a ( -dies, games, proverbs, songs;
Y9 jCai./ n. and magical formitis" w%-ill have
meaning and Utility for -the peas- O N S A L E A T T H E
RUE BONE F, ant, and these aspects' ob his
Phone 2350 Multure will function 'o support B E T T E R S T O R E S
.m KHN AIR-CONDITIONEC o l existing economic, political, and
social -structures. '

Elsewhere I have suggested
as the mairi social fubedtons of
the vodun cult:' enhandemerit bt
family sohdarity;,, giving super;
L natural sanction to such mores
as the taboos on mnurder, incest. .
theft, and the showing of. dis- i
h You knOW respect for the old; contributing
'r it's a really fin. to the perpetuation. of existing
Sa retehnolog; affording opportun- H ITI
ScotC when it= ites for the release of aggress- G.LY.

JOHNNIE i ainment and recreation; meet-
ing esthetic needs: ald furnish- Or, ue du Q ua'
W ALKER ing a world viw. Many of the .' .
tales are ddiTo h ot com- td ures tbh P"ANrNS
plex, oth!Lrs have 'some -of the S lptures b
i* 4,,* same fuunction i.gjs the nmagicq- R..FRANCOIS eedor
OHNN3E: W ALKER religious ristitutions.. ,.RANiER
HNNIE W WALKER, J.. DU DtRRI ER .que
'IR" iU n. P gAoing stro I ngChi en games, songs, nd O.DuPERre R L. Lazar'c
dies, proeibs, and tales are im. J. G abPiel
"h '""... "- "n' port'Ant -in the enculturation df A.D IMANCHE
because they define
PK-,EE 'TZMAN-AG"-ER flOM situa onsm .'n his. social' world. : .A, :,
N --
-,. .. L - .:,.. ."? .. "- "
0. s*,,,, '.' '" t' '-:I "". ". '% ,"=" ,' : .' =.I:.'-;:? ,' '.;'b' '". '=:. .. );"' "':" "l '. .- ? =,"" Ti ;." .?'! .


VT


SUN AY AY Y 28111, 1901


of suspi- sion of education would'increase
but also the number of competitors tor
and mod- desirable positions. Now, as in
lately re- the past, the sharp distinction
Haitian between uppei and lower classes
plays an means that a man must belong
socializa- to one or the other. The general
d learns improvement of economic and
concep- educational conditions w o u I d
sting so- give more opportunity for mem-
aled, for bers of the lower groups to em-
hdldren's erge because there would be
Poor," more possible avenues of dist-
nd "Let inaction. To achieve prominence
to Mar- now one must belong to a lead-
and "Ti ing family, which is impossible
as about for all but a few, or become
es, sex- powerful politically. This situa-
:es, and tion is the result of a colonial
system in which there were few
paths that led to recognition.
other the The great gap of economic and
loosen-
expan- (Continued on page 14)

-
.,. .

REAT DISTINCTION
WEAR WITH PRIDE
i 2


I


k~L4i~e






1,i L 1 2I U 'iN


S .. '. N ew .. J" t"I ie' *... .

t forecasted For The'Artibonife


S.Accompanied by Mr Charles
B. Wiggins, technical Director
Sof: the ODVA and Mr Bernard
I*mmerdauer, Economist of the
Point IV, Messrs. Karl 'Kohler,
Engineer, and George Christo-
pher, Attorney for the Develop-
ment Loan Fund paid a visit -to
the, Artibonite Valley.

T They were heartily welcome at
Borel by Mr Roger K. Cantave;
Directeur-Administrateur of the
ODVA, some' of the members of


the 'staff .of the organization,.
and the Ainerican Technicians of
the International Engineering
Company, in charge of the deve-
lopnrent projects of the Artibp-
nite Valley. (-
I' '. : .
After, having exchanged, their
viewpoints. on several matters
pertaining -to the im'p.o rtant
works in progress' in the-.valley,
Messrs.. Kohler; ;nd Chrisopher,
along with Director Cantave' and
with other' qualified technicians


- NV ` 5


IN PETIONV LE IT'S
; "-*, ..

OA t
MOMTA


1.. IOfeet altitude .yet only minutes
.- from the heart o- PORT-AU-PRINdE .

Silhe rnost exquisite Oiev~i,oeelooking Ihedity
i a bay. e plains, the mountains .

'!D elbiocls don inenlal du'Isne and superb
S1-- - .

d (afed attentiorvtA eqy u te.

) Svimmring Po6l: ui}h Lundheon Lounge
and Bar PanoramaTerrade A .
Air-dqndic;oned de-luxe rooms



WEEKLYY ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM

irTUDA ,thrormal d e uIL banding rom
:..' -. 7:30 P.M to midnit ,
i.e Jveiingue infsruchon and dntest
Sal9:3o .dosual dress. No adm~ib5on fee
WEDNES~pAL): Cemplihentar g et-tgilherPunc~loi )
SParty jrom 7pm to 8pm.
FRIDAy : alc Dirner-'Dande from 7:3oPm to
S :3o a.m. 6uperb SAov) at I0:.o
Sadmossion fee
I. LL OTHR .i4I4ty d ocktail lour- from 7to9 vli
nti)e dombo .
.


took an investigation trip
through the Valley. The first
point of interest visited was
Passe-Caneau where the TECO
is building a one-kilometer-dike
alongside the right bank of the
Artibonite River, in order to
prevent the overflowing of wat-
ers into the old bed of the river
and keep them, in stead, flow-
ing through the lateral drain
established six,;years ago' by the
Brown & Root Company.


-'They went nextt 'o, Labadie
and Mirault'to inspect th. :roads
built by IECO for access: to the
quarries -of rocks and gravel
used in the construction of the
dike.

La VerduriA Damn
From there ley drove through
the road built 'alongside the B ,. .
right bank canal, checking the
conditions of 'the tuin-outs per-
mitting the watering of all lands
downwards .from the canal.
They crossed .~e Petite-Riviere.
de I'Artibonite to reach' La. Ver-
dure' on the Estefe River where
a thorough cleaning out of the l i. r
river is being completed by the .rs.1 hI.paulSaritreicO",,'
IECO. At Pont-Benoit, they not- P'rtcu.prlac')""'
iced also the cleaning olt ex-
ecuted by the IECO in the main B
irrigation canal. The inspection
was extended to the drainage -
works of Fosse -Naboth and the
roads giving access to the dif-
ferent plantations of the Valley.
The technicians of the IECO
had shown their interests in the Served exc uIs vaE at Haiti's Leading
new project for the construction
of a big dam across the Estere HOTELS & RESTAURANTS & BY CONNOISSEURS
River at La Verdure, which will T uTHROUGHOUT THE WORLD
serve to facilitate the natural
drainage of the lands along the -o--..--- .a-
river and also' the arrosage of I&e--. QFwUa4 t e- e
the dry lands east of Petite-fi-l
viere de l'Artboite and La
Crete-A-Pierrot, and to furnish
electric light and power to the 5CSNES5
right bank of the Artibonite Ri-
ver.
According to estimates made 'FIRE CAR ERSONL TRAVEL o
by IECO technicians, a sum ol
$1,500,000 will be necessary to
undertake the achievement of
this project Which will be finan-
ced by dLF as soon after'"the
results of the investigations are
submitted to them.


(Translated from LE MATIN


GIVE YOUR ROOMS THE

FRESH NEW La

,

,: ~. ,,. ",.


on the label


* -


_I I ~lil_~_~l _~ _li


I 1.















According to some rumors,
Cap Haitien may receive in June
the visit of a cruiseship. It's a
new line which intends to inclu-
de the historic city on its itin-
erary. If the six airlines that
'have made application for the
right to call at Capjucceed to
have the required authorization,
Capois see the realization of a
longtime dream tourists.
xxx


in
ca
gi
to


tthe pretty town after Chou-
chouBay), farmers, an laughing
a big campaign of cocoa plan-
ting. The soil of that part of
the Republic is idea for this
crop. The movement is in con-
nection, it seems, with HAMA-
SACO manufacturing soon of
sweet chocolate.
xxx
The future headquarters for
different offices of POTE COLE


Inspectors of SNEM were seen is growing up very fast and will
SCap last week. Their 'visit be an appreciable "contribution
caused great interest in a re- to urbanism in Au Cap. POTE
ion where "moustiques" are COLE will also help to improve
irmenting all families. sanitary conditions throughout
x x x the city, which -appears to be
In the region of Le Borgn3 abandoned by Health Service.


I------------------

"Soaping" dulls hair.

Halo glorifies it!


t
ik




; .
5 .. [

.'K .


' Not a soap, not a
cream--Halo cannot
leave dulling, dirt-
catching soap film!


2 Victorious Texans


Cap-Haitien


News


ec
to
in


Gives fragrant
"soft-water" lather
-needd no special rinsel .


Halo leaves hair soft,
manageable-shining with
colorful natural highlights!
dpamo


Yes, "soapng" your hair with
even finest liquid or oily cream
shampoos leaves'dullin largest
:. dirt.catching film. 'Halo7 naeage
eith a new ingredient, contains sellin
S "no soap, no sticky oils.
Thus Halo gorifies your hair shampoO
the verfirst time you use it.
I' ;. k fior Halo-America's
f.d '~' ariMeshampoo-today. AmeriCiE


a1-o reveals the hidden beauty of
, t .. ,
,." : ,' ,. . .- . .. .. ,. ../., = -.


.kA 'eO


children, but, for all his wealth, Bahamas. (He doesn't like q
he hasn't gotten around to en- weather.) He is married'to'!
larging his three-bedroom home former Jane Coleman of S
in Dallas. He skin-dives off the Antonio.


(Continued from page 8)
"Miz" Young. They- are not pro-
vincial, however. They maintain
a suite in the Carlyle Hotel as
their New York residence. The
suite is only a couple of floors
away from the one occupied by
Joseph P. Kennedy and-also by
President Kennedy when he vis-
its New York.

John Murchison is more out-
going than his brother Clint.
Both men are practically inse-
parable when working on a bus-
iness .deal.

Beatings Are Admitted
Both readily admit that they
have taken quite a few beatings
in their shart business careers.
John Murchison recalled recent-
ly that "we missed on a lot of
things." We lest our shirts in
uranium. And-in electronics -
.* we haven't done anything at all.
We missed tht boat completely
on that one."
John MuRlchison, who piloted
a fighter plane in two overseas
theatres in Wold/ War TI, says
he shot af'spme enemy planes,
but never downed any.
Both brothers devote themsel-
ves largely to business. Unlike
some other inheritors of large
Sfottunes, they have, no- interest
in politics or .high society.
Last year John and his wife,
the former Lucille. Gannon of
-Dallas, their son and three
daughters, aged 5 to 13, moved
into a large home outside Dallas,
uilt hb his faith ftr fr a rpnnrt-


d $150,000 in 1936. John likes
o-swim and ride, and he skis ON SALE AT MAISON ORIENTALLh
n Aspen, Cold.
Clint Murchison also has four .AND LITTLE EUROPE

*'L4 a a a aa


Hotel Sans Sonci

EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT .VERY INFORMAL
"'COOKED TO' ORDER"

BARBECUE DINNER 7:00 to 9:00 PM

WITH -THE SANS SOUCI COMBO
DINNER $2.50 Per Person

--EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT 8:OOPM To Midnight
PUNCH BOWL, DINNER DANCE,
FOOR SHOW AN PRIZES


; WITH TlHE SANS SOUCI ORCHESTRA' AND
THE FAMOUS. HAITIAN ARTIST
; 'ROM: PARIS


TO T BISSAIN HE
T N -:.. '.:...


j
I.


I


K IN' HER UNIQUE INTERPRETATION
h'..a., .OF FRENCH, MARTINIQUE AND .
th-e . a.. HAITIAN SONGS. .
.-: ,:..--' ;'iJ^= / t, v;~ a .':^' :**f;l .;.,. '- ;^ l =;..^ v rl- J :'- :7:i:, .:. '^.-'v .;, ,'.; :.. ;'^,. -%' ':^ .^.


MOVADO7-
/: ''/ f.fW>7lu ^





; H A ,TS U N"


.". .'A MAY ,'28TH. 196f


IAN RAWSON
Hi ^:ENGAGED '
'nd'.iMrs John Stephan Na-
gel of Lake Forest, Illinois an-
nounce the engagement of their
Daughter Diane Elizabeth Nagel
to.. M_ .an Grant Rawson. Mr.
Rawson is the son of Mrs Wil-
, liamn-Larimer Mellon of Descha-
pelles, Haiti and Mr John Raw-
son of Westport. Connecticut.
Mtsi Nagel attends Smith Col-
lege at.: Northampton, Massachu-
setts.: Mr Rawson will graduate
this' Jine from Trinity College
in Hartford, Connecticut and will
teach this coming year in thie
Philippines.


Mr, Rawson and Miss Nagel
plan _to be married after Diane
graduates from Smith in June,
1962. ,
This summer Diane will be in
Haiti .for two months assisting
in community development work
in the.area of the Albert
Schweitzer hospital founded and
directed by Dr. William Lari-
mer Mellon.


.. ..^'**^^A^AA"'


Presided

.(Continued from page 9)
f1 the universal suffrage of April 30, l161 is the decision of
;.'y People and of the Young Army which I am heading to the
:mit of my capacity, with the same will, the same tenacity.
e same wisdom, and the same courage, which have character-
i:ed the Work. of national regeneration through..continuous social
and economical resurrection, then I will tell you once more:
I AM READY.
I know their needs much better than they do or as much as
they do, these masses of people and the young army. And, they.
confide in Me.'
So, 1 adjuie you.to understand. Messrs. the Representatives of
the People, you must, with Me, people and army, make more
than a Revolution that transforms this corner of earth and the
men who live in it. You must, with Me, procreate, give birth
to the New Haiti &nd make her live all the Great Dreams of
which She has for too long been frustrated.
SThe uphill roads are difficult, think of that ceaselessly. To keep
you from reaching the summits, there will still and always be
those, either inside, or outside, who-meditate only the ovetturn-
.ng of the Power in .our hands. The same way they have been
luring the September 22 Power, they will again be suppressed.
All that has been done and that will be done, will have been
done to give you back to yourselves, Haitians my brothers, with


SUMMERTIME IN HAITI

SPRINGTIME AT THE


C hatelet de la Montagne Noire

--.' -- P6tlon-Ville -- Haiti (W. 1) .
BEYOND WORDS BUT NOT BEYOND
YOUR BUDGET -
From may 1st to Dec. 1st: S 15.00' A DAY
BREAKFAST & DINNER, INCLUDING A CAR
EVERYTHING WONDERFUL ABOUT HAITI'
is more so at
THE CHATELET DE LA MONTAGNE NOIRE
EVERY ROOM' ITH A VIEW
EVERY ROOM. WITH A PRIVATE TERRACE
Mon'tly Accomodatrons. At Reasonable Prices


PR SHO
PRICE SHOPS


S2)- ART & CURIO SHOP FISHERS ACROSS FROM OU
STOMS

AND. BOY HAITIAN, HANDICRAFTS

STRAIGHT- FROM THE FACTORY

ON THE-RUE DU QUAl |
: *. ,, (A.. EXPR. AND DINERS CLUB. ACC0 TED,


SAVE UP TO60. Per Cent ON IMPORTS

SHOPS NVDI MAHOG Y ACTOR
-, *


. .- .


it~~ -cc


pride and effort to beautify, to enrich, to ennoble the sacred .
heritage.
As Chief of the October 22, 1957 Government, My responsibility
1 proclaimed to you, is to give you all back to the eminent
dignity of the human being; My responsibility is to give back'
to My country, Peace prosperity, and greatness, in function 'of
its his historical origins. My responsibility Is to reconcile the
nation with itself, to reconcile you with your true history. All
those responsibilities are to serve NMy people which is the sole
aim of My life. These responsibilities are the perennial source
ind inexhaustible nourrishment of My historic mission which,
unfailing, is to reconstitute and organize the economy by putting
back the nation to conscious and productive work; by feeding
Ihe people who are hungry; by wiping out ilhteracy; by giving
education and health to the people; by increasing the standard
Af living to a decent human level in a proper home. My Mission
I. to load you on all the roads in need of necessary rupaiLs for
a century and a half. Haitians, My brothers.

Populations of the Noith, Fossete, Maribaroux, Bois Caiman,
Bahon, Quartier Morin, of all the communes and rural sections;
Populations of Artibonito, Dezeaux, Fosse Naboth, Rabotheaux,,
Bayonnais, Verrettes, Moreau, Pierre Payon, Charettes, of all the
communes and rural sections;
Populations of Grand'Anse, Beaumont, Duchity, Chambellan, Co-
rail, Pourcine, Irois, Dame Marie, of all the communes and Rural
sections;
Populations of the Southwest, Cayes Jacmel, Marigot, Seguin,
Trouin, Nan Brule, Cochon Gras, Cotes de Fdr, Vallee, and of
all the communes and rural sections;
Popijl:tions of the Center, Marmelade, Grison Garde, Croix Few,
iutfailly, Domond, Thomonde, Madam Joy, Dupray, Terre Rouge,
Tijanon, Maissade, of all the communes and rural sections;
Populations of the North East, Ste. Suzanne,.Cerca Carvajal,
Capotille, Derac, bDsmohd, Bois Lahrence, Saltadere, of all the
commununes and rural sections;
Populations of the North. West, i4are- ouge, Bonneau, Chansol-

(Continued Dm page 14)

-/


ON--IONS

S1 FROM
", FROM '


0 D V


A


Onions of first quality are available at the

sales cbuter. of ODVA at the comer of Rue

des Cesare and Rue du' Centre, at the following


prices:


lOlbs.--Bags
50bs.-Bags


15 Gourdes
15 Gourdes


Wholesale ordes will be filled on the basis

of, Gourdes; 2.75; per .1Olbs, bag minimumm
1 r '

10 bags) and ourdes: 14 per 5lbs. (Minim-
iim 10 bags) " '


F SH ER

HAITI'S LARGEST FREE PORT


THE CORNER SHOP RUE' BONNE FOI


L:






ir tHAIT IS


Acculturation


(Continued from page 10)
' social differences which has ex-
.isted so long cannot be narrow-
ed in a few years, but unless
the elite is willing to see a more
mobile type of society; the laun-
ching of new programs with far-
,reaching implications will be
forestalled.

The trend of events putside
Haiti will have some effect on
her internal development. Now
political alignments in the West-
ern hemisphere and throughout
the world, and the diffusion of
new ideologies will affect Haiti-
an politics. The influence of
ideas from the outside was evi-
dent in the revolution of Janua-
ry, 19416 when the revolt against
the government was engineered
through students and the urban
proletariat of Port au Prince
rather than with the assistance
of peasants from the provinces.

The encouragemeilt of industry
and the further development of
agriculture, the extension of eduj
cation, an increase in urbaniza-
tion a n d secularization, and
greater socio-economic mobility
would bring new stresses and
strains into the life of the Haiti-
an people. Their new problems


r,




































[ *


I':'-ArF GEL4
a,-;
E4.


,On Show Now At P BI
STEP' E
*MA4 lINCHINAT V. AITI MERCY
PERSONAIF~,JSUL%11
106, BOIS VERNA LOADING A ,nr vkfn
SSERVE IMAIT[ AND
". Just before you reach the "PONT MORIN" bridge forthnigh .ifj-jAI
R-Miami- Port, awJ1riWip
MIAMI ADDRESS:
SThis l'DA ART ERY, not a pictumi ehop ex- Telephone: Highland.
b: hbitinglgvr 100 ot. .he mo~,t att lctive .FRAMED Frankin iB-T8
` -P'INt SttG6ade botfWitn Port au Prince and Paris by :
l Mious HAITIAN PAINTER MAX PINCHINAT
le artist WO HAS EXHIBITED BOTH HEREi..
II I',A1ROAD for thp pasbt 15 years, cowes;,backto IB BEAC
H1 'iid every' fite years and for 15 to 18 months renews ..
Contact 'with his people and his..sWrce of. winsp'ir*- NLY3

in the GALLERY PINCHINAT are -goupwl2e PRd P;AT- P
*re paintings of the 15 years of work. by MAX PIN- -
..INAT, from 1945 t6 1960. Prices have not .been ar- INTI$Y (INOLUD
early based on beauty of the--painting, but, on its :- ROUND-TRiP
a just li Bi.s is iFashion' fd ..i. . T . ... BOAT '
OTHI WELL JjNOWN ARTISTS. .iqItors can .R SPRT A
c sult the' paiMiks, price list if 'tiey wish ,"to.- ;SP"
1I the taxi drivers:l knw ,GALL Y ; INQ(lA.T 0' ONLY Too,
i A4 'tIOtyLd Ot Y ttt i GLLERY is Chldren g 0 lC
.is not. ' .' .. .,
& a..Esy, NC IN AT o e iet rer"e-. -'
and sales agent of, NICHIINATs :pai tingsi s andj Ba
itd a few samples oinly.at 'F6yer dog4At Pa ft
fir"ale nii BoehettW'1 ajotA slife S nsise 1n Restaurant aiid S
.n Ifro .St in l E.- SJ4 ,.
,.., ." -." .. "
; .-- . '"Y;.I" A ':- "-- '"."' '".;=' -L ', ; ; '- : -'i'&."' :' .-, ,
::. .7 ." : .';' =.: ".._.::F.- "..-: t."': ,"=/ .-?' ., '.. : /:,-, ', ", ,;", =., -, = '


ING





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IT"Y '.


.,.- ~~- .- .----. .-- -- -,- ;,i-H,.j'T,,!

INSURE WTH SURE INSURANCE; ,

C N-' OaFiINSURANCE CtGOMPANY



AA -
o1
." .*. -_ 1.4 .- . *: .. .

i F .. n ." ~ l -.-
-C,
INCORPORATED BY SP SOCIAL AT OF-''
-- .;.. '.* -,. / . .- ', ': '-- I " ""' '
(: -": !E'EBRITISH PARtLIAMENT -.

..RONTY :GHENET -.; SONS

Ad*5ab MA f l
: .' ' a'a.^. A.L^NN M~ i :':'"', '., ,...;^^,i':/.:a^


would resemble those of other
countries which have made
shifts from feudalism to capital-
ism or socialism, from. agricul-
ture .to industry, from rural
ways to urban ways, except that
those processes probably would
not go as far in Haiti, because
of the size of. the country and
its limited natural resources, as
they have in a country like the
United States. Undoubtedly such
shifts would not appeal to many
members of the elite, and they
may be able to retard them for
some time. However, some chan-
ges along the lines indicated
here would seem to be inevita-
ble sooner or later.

Some are impatient for the
old order to pass, others lament
such changes as have already
occurred because they dislike to
envision the disappearance of
what they regard as a quaint,
picturesque mode of life. Whe-
ther or not one laments the pos-
sibility that there may not be
any beautiful loup garou and
zombie stories in the distant fu-
ture Is irrelevant here.

We have assumed in this pa-
per that it is of some interest
for folklorists to consider the


forces which are cha
life. of. the folk. These
are interesting and s
but in most of rural I
are occurring slowly.
life in the northern pa
country hasn't changed
the past century, and
be no dearth of folk
for many decades.
The viewpoint stress
one that has been expr
others, previously, nanm
the folklorist needs a I
derstanding of the cull
trix' in which tales, so
verbs, riddles, and ri
located. He needs also
sider what social funct
lore has in the life of
people, that is, what
tions it makes to the
tion or the under-mini,
listing institutions.
It is certainly prdpe
phasize the past in the
folklore. But in this
world wars, United Nat
sions, Point Four program
ESCO pilot projects,
da Voices, and satell
tries, it is important
the folk and their lore
[empora-y economic, sc
political developments.
Oberlin College,
Oberlin, Ohio.

Completely furnished,
for Rent located at DI
Two (3) bathrooms
Four (4) bedrooms
Two. () It .. .
Bar -- Offii:&.-'
Diningroom Living
Veranda iSwimming
Garage.
'Formerly residences
Vlan Ambassiidor and i
Charge d'Affalres.


Modern haitian


Paintings

GALERIE PINCHINAT


N" : SUNDAY MAY ZITH 2r ff;91 0 '
JN1

nging the INAUGURAL SPEECH; ': i
Changes (Continued from page 13)
significant, me, Bombardopolis, Moustiques, Fonds Bleu, Mole St. Nicolas,
Haiti they Mahotiere, and of all the communes and. rural sections:
Peasant
art of the Populations of the West Department,. 1'Arcahaie, Cabaret;--Gor-
much in nillon, Grand Bois, Trou d'Enfer, Saut d'Eau, Bellahtpn, Vaudimi,
there will Jijonderie, Ganthier, d'Oriani, Fbrids-Verrettes,.' Kensci~ ff; Prcy,
material lalanga, Gressier, Morne a Chandelle I and II, de M'athieui;':"e-D
'gant, Vialet, Fonds.des Negres, La .Goriave, andof all the com-e.
d here is munes and .rural sections;.
dressed by Haitians, My brothers,
lely, that During the best 25 yeats of My life I have worked to conquer
rough un- your esteem and your affection. During 25 years I have been in
tural ma-
ngs. pro- contact with your physical, spiritual and moral miseries and I
tuals' are have applied Myself to ease them. I have carried them ceaselessly
o to con- in My heart, in My flesh, in My soul; in My thoughts. I live today, i
ions folk- thanks to you and with you, a-thrilling MOMENT of national his-
a given ry...
contribu- t
perpetua- If in your deep intuition you fell that I was you and you were .
ng of ex- Me; if you have understood the necessity to intensify My. revolu-7
tionary destiny to your destiny of conquest of better more human.
r to em- things ; .f of'this siibiosis you have made and are making your!
study of power to fight; the 'energy of your will, the strength of your need,-
area of
ions mis- t survive, the courage to dare and to face all the hardness 'and,
ams, UN- -ll the sacrifices pavig, your existence; if from all your aspira-,'
propagan- tions united in Me you are making your reason to act and your''
ite coun- motive to hope; then I can shout in this solemn minute: "I-HAVE
to relate CONQUERED MY PEOPLE...!" '.
to con- '
So o. Like yesterday, today and tomorrow I want to devote Myself and V
Dcial, and
will devote Myself to enlarge the conquest of My people to the L
heights oL the permanency of its, Revolution. ..

Peasants, laborers; intellectuals',; artists, industrialists;- 'artisdns, .
House businessmen, educators, .officers,. soldiers, men and women of ad-"
ESBREZf nmmistratiou,. employers, emplbyees..white. collars, magistrates, se-
cretaries of State, representatives, priest -and pastors; lawyers,
doctors, engineers, workers, children of.the Haitian- country, school
children, students, courageous. women of. My. country, Marie Jeanne
room of M~lay 18, 1957. of May 25, 1957, of. July 29, 1958, miliciamen of
pool the 9 geographic departments, all of you issued from the IjNITED
COUNTRY OF. DESSALINES. the GREAT, did you hear Me?... Do
Saaeru.in ou hear Me?.. Did. you understand Me?.,. bo you understand f
Cana dian Me? -
S.I You are living with Me.the greatest.a, the most stirring, hours
S of a period .of your Revolution, of September 22, 1957. It is you.
^V / people, who. are malnghistory, the history which inust beunder-
H 1ANTPq stood and remembered.,by.all that: Haiti and Haitians alone have
VIg8JsD. the right to decide of their destiny:in conformity with the supreme
AUjBN: interest of- the nation' in, the direction. of. true democracy.. -
D A 11iaiians. My, brother; -
-Mtim ,I ask you. only one thing: a spl* bi. national discipline.
The history that you atre making before the' whole wqrld will
B17lm be worth only with the.spirit ofpnational.discipline that ;al of..you
1 !d.I, must follow,, it:l-oder, that. our .bhavioti l is- an- example -for
i' r tre African brothers ,born 'yesteday.: to liberty and national
"dependpnce.1 .
lANn e Pnderstand iweqll ts spirit oftdiseipline. Be worthy of it witl
.Me so that you can. live your "history to the .total extent of its.
S grpatne s .and_ to the genius of the race which is Your Greatness
; and, Youir -Genius.- -. .
. ._ -:... . ...,
1 .'E-A.~Y fFAI. T- :IN YOU.
"'.Dr. Francois UVALE
I -' '. '''. ', '- '"' '-- .V:, "' ,,.: .. C' A "1
~ 5:






U PNDAY MAtI 28Y, ikh-


PA C 4 Ix


SJoseph rp t Drive-In Theatre
Thursday. June 1st, at 7 and 9
p A film in technicolor
PAL JOEY
Starring:
S Rita Hayworth, Frank Sinatra,
Klm Novak
Celebrate the story of Joey
S' (the heel!) and- his bosom pals!
A 7lbert Silera is back from a tour of the U. 8. and iMexlco--pro- Both stat'ked: one rich (the
tintg tourism... Accountant -Mlike liedl returns to New. York doll!-) One ,poor (the mouse!)
day after a month Moarking-at I0C... Elizabeth Roy is flying with y'r P l Joey caught in the
own from t'aphattan fo a two week break forl thq toil... Rene ever loving middle.
Ibjornsen with BOAC in New York arrives today with .his wife
his famil... La Goae has i tele- Thursday June 8, at 7:00 & 9:00
a vacation \it his famil... La Gae has an ficial tele- The Three Stooges' in their
one system. The islands eight telephones and fifty, miles of wire first full length feature comedy.
e in.'fine operating order' and suffice to make the Capital
HAVE ROCKET
alous..; Col. Robert Debs Heinl is recovering from a back injury HA VE ROCKET
d his'book is now at the printers -. it's a history of the Corps...
n Aboudi is returning' to New York and Paris this week... -THE THREE STOOGES... at
Sam-Halper has been appointed Time .Magazine correspondent the height of their grand new
SHaiti and the rest of the Caribbean. Mr Halper has visited popularity... backed by, sensa-
iti on five occasions over the.past two years... The Ceara arriv- tional TV stardom and person-
Sal tours!
here from New Orleans May 21st with a batch of cyprus eggs
d chicago type-writers... Tinesman Max Frankel returns to re- You've heard. of sputnik and
rting-in the U.N.. today.... .mutnik... HERE COME THE
PAA district Sales Manager Dick Albbott departs today with his LAUGHNIKS!
mily for a caravan tour of Europe. The Abbotts'expect:to be
broad for two months... Antoine crard, former Port ail Prince
Slayor who now directs the Haiti Tourist Office in Chicago is inI'
own on'business. He maybe transferred, io the HQ here... Max
aussenhart the warm-hearted first secretary of the German Leg-
tion returned to Bonn yesterday ending four years of creditable r' 3-t
rvice here.. Mr and Rts Baussenhart were the object of numer-
us farewell. parties. over the past moflth...

Sugar Queen Claudinette FouChard Fischel returned from Reg-
uisburg, Germany with her husband Walter Thursday. They are
pecting the stork... Anne Letha Clark of the staff of the Foreign /
ltairs committee in Washington D.C. is vacationing at the Mon-
-agne Noire.. Marie Anne Mongeau is back from Montreal...
The sbcofid group of travel.agents invited by 'Ben Shindler Pre ;
ident of the El Rancho Hotel arrived Thursday for a 3-day \isit.
hey are thirty-t\o- travel agents from all over-Canada. They were
escortedd here by Mr. John Anderson, Sales Manager 'of the East-
n Ailiti.es in Montreal. The party was greeted at the Bowen Field .
the Public Relations of the. Department du Tourisme, and Mr. ." -
jmes ,Cahtriglit of the same office, Mr. Dick Abbott, Manager of JOSEPH NADAL ao 0
ia Ami, AMr Anyj Aidersen, Manager of thd Southerland Tours... :' Agentso
,_- ..- A A



SA The Family .?
OU: BEST BET IS:

,D.UT 5 MOLINOS"
D-UTI ..POWDERED WHOLE E MILK
WITH ADDED '/

Vi VTAMIND 03
,' 7,75P


Dr. Bertram Collins of British Guiana returned (after 7 years)
to give Haiti a. good examination this week enroutb to teach Latin
Ameriean Government at Frisco University...


.4


S* 1^














*1
':*


'.i
I?'




i\
* 4-4

* I,




"I



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.
* -

7


_














( Continue
belly dance
every night
there the t
On Inaugu
Itorn prese
sea of strav
bandeau" b
white Legisl
held flags
with "Papa
They echoed
withinuthe I
ed danced o
cortege to
Basilique NO
swearing in

'President
top Hat and
the red and
entered the
side door as
military cad
my Navy an
the front doi
crowd that v
Le Matin a
York Times.
President


JAL DANCES,


CLASSICAL


' / AND MODERN BALLET


Katherine Dunhham


School


d from page 1) oath of office with is right
rs around the city hand raised in an olym c alute
- some even nea- as the distinguished Ih ds of
torrential rain, diplomatic missions accredited
ration Day the vis- to Uf~i -exept tor U.S. Am.
noted a spectacular bassadmor Robert Newbegin in
v hats and "colorful IH shington- looked down from
before the gleaming the abeoud storey balcony.
lative Palace. Many At the extreme right of the
and others placards diplomatic line-up.. Was United
Dok" Inscriplionq. States Embassy Second Secret-
I the applause from ary David Tomson and at the
A-gislative and snak- other end dressed in his purple
ff behind the official robes the Papal Nuncio His Ex-
the freshly painted cellency Giovani Ferrofino.
Are Dame when the Seated in a high-back maho-
ceremony ended, gany chair President Duvalier
listeAed to die speech of Deputy
Duvaller dressed in Lue Francois, former Justice
d tails and wearing Minister whp is President of the
blue sash of office new unicameral legislature.
legislative by the From the Tribune President
i an honor guard of Duvaller made his forty minute
ets, Units of the Ar- inaugural address which iq print-
id Militia awaited at ed in this issue.
or on the crest of a
vas put at 300,000 by On leaving the legislative Pal-
nd .200,000 by Netv ace by the front door, President
Duvalier received an ovation
Duvalier took the from the crowd and a twenty-one


gun salute as the honor guard
presented. arms.
Escorted by the. crowd of
sqake-danoing countrymen to the
cathedrall Basilique Notre Da-
me. the aPresident attended a Te
Deuam said by Parish Priest of;
Carrefour Father- Albert Dome-
lien. and listened to -a brief ser-
mon by Claudius Angenor, Can-'
non and administrator of the
Arch-dlocese. Father Angenor's
sermon treated the need for
harmony between the 'two pow-
ers so as to work-for the peace
aqd prosperity of the Nation.
4s thousands of countrymen
assembled before the' National
Place. President Duvalier ap-
peared on the left wing balony
and .delivered an impromptu
speech.

The exodus back to the coun-
try began that night amd contin-
ued for the npxt three days with
several camion loads of people
being' delivered to the wrong
towns.
Two additional holiday were
decreed for schbols as the fire-


Julien Reme,- Dr. GeraYd-ReJie
Capqis Telemaque, MaUric a
ziJe, Wesner Georges, MBae Di-
mariche, Antenor Josephi -.
et Fils; Pierre .oseph, .,,
ers.


brigade and cleaning squads set The delegation included: MM. The reception was attende_:iy
about putting the schools back 'poeiil S. Pierre, President of Elie' Duval. President -di. S6-
into order. "L'Avenir Club"; Renel O. Pier- .dicat des Debardeurs, ; Depl'
re, Member of. Honor; Vicior Gasner Kersaint,,DeputY kW -
The day 9olui0 "I js" ig.W Nelion, Secretary; Pierre Jean- ner Kersaint; Michel Aubourg,
action, .'President Duvalier, not, Technical Counselldr, Eug- Chef de Division au Departe-
plqcdd,;wreasts of the-tombs and ene Medard. tounsellor; Mme ment de I'Interieur: MT.,Thibul,
slatuies .qf t.e fouvdiq, fathers. Jerome Monvert, Osias Etienne, comptable' du Departement. -

I. P .;MATERIAL, PAINTS, HARD WARE,
HOMEB .PEC RA'Tp. ETC. CALL FIRST AT HAITI'S MQSI
i. MOEiN STORE, M & S RUE .AMERICAINE'


Minister Aurele Joseph' during
the May 22 manifestations recel-
ved members of the Aux Cayeo
delegation at .his residence in
Turgeau.


- - - 1 1f -- - -- - - -.- Ll





- Dr. Aurele Josiph, Minister of Interior and
National Defence, Fetes. Delegation Froih-tayeis:

.


i