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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00155


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PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI Avenue Marig-Jeanne CITE DUMARSAIS ESTIME Phone 2061 -Vol XIV SUNDAY APRIL 23th, 1961 No. 24



$12.000 CANCER DRIVE
STarget For Support Of
h' ,c Cancer Treatment Center


$12,000 has been set as the
target by fund raisers of the
Cancer League this year. Wo.

Jamaica-Haiti Bridge
Underway.
A bridge tournament between
Jamaica and Haiti opened last
night in the Club-rooms of Cer-
cle Bellevue.
The team of the Jamaican
Bridge Association arrived by
Pan Am clipper Friday and was
composed of the following play-
ers of note: Mrs Ruby Lyons,
Leslie Ashenheim, Oscar Honi-
ball, Rudolphe Deleon. George
Desnoes and D. G. Farquharson.
,(Continued on page 20)

Old Candidates Get
i Rocky Reception
(A Political Reporter)
Several former congressmen
who returned to stamp 'their
constituency for election to the
Legislative Chamber this past
week were given anything but
a rousing welcome from their
old voters. In several instances
the candidates (especially in the
North) were the target of rock-
throwing constituents who, it is
said, had been in training since
(Continued on page 15)


men are canvassing the busin--
ess and residential districts in.
an endeavor to collect the mon-
ey needed to maintain the Pu-
blic Cancer treatment. Center
and complete payment of the
Deep Radiation Therapy unit.
$5,000 is 'still outstanding on the ,'
$18,000 machine.
The six year old "Ligue-.Con-
tre le Cancer", must rely inore
than even now on the generous
support of the community ds the
U.S. Public Welfare foundation
has terminated its financial sip-
port that amounted to $10,0L0 I
(Continued on page 18)

Hasco Sugar
Up To '57
Output

US Quota 26,572 Tons
The 1961 sugar harvest which
will, continue through to June
at the Haitian American Sugpr' ,
Mill is expected to produce
64,000 short tons equalling thb e
good year of 1957.
Of the Hasco production 33,000
tons will go to supply the local
demand and company officials
believe they will have an 8,000 .
surplus after filling the United
States sugar quota along with ..
the Dessalines Sugar Mills in
(Continued ma page 9)


Haiti Fashions To Be Featured In

U.S. Maternity Fall Showing


Pregnant women in the United States this fall will be given a
chance to discover the talent of Haitian Couturieres.

Maternity fashion expert Elsie Frankfurt the boss' of Page-Boy,
a famed design and manufacture House of Houston and New
York, has acquired a selection of dresses from leading Haitian
Couturieres and intends to feature them in a fall fashion show
that will be televised Coast-to-Coast from New York.
The Haitian creations included the handwoven fabric dress by
Madame Jean Claude Armand, modelled at the right'by Yolande
Toussaint.

Mrs Elsie Frankfurt (at left) models at Hotel Olo'ffson one
of the Haitian hand-embroidered dresses she selected. It was
Frankfurt who designed the maternity skirt with a hole in the
center that has become fashionable throughout the United
States.

The televised fall show is expected to influence a new line uo
Maternity wear and also plug Haiti as a tourist resort. Yolande
Toussaint has been invited to model for the TV showing in New
York.


Has T.V. Modelling
Date
r -':1 t;:Cl'~P~~~~


Mile Yolande Toussaint models
an Armand maternity number


I I





T PAG t


S-, ,
Ti-teR


AmCo




INTERNATIONAL .
.BALANCE SUPPLY

by JOAO OLIF

Fifteen Latin American coffee-
growing countries -six of which
4-depend on the bean for more
than half their export .revenue-
gre working with African prod-
cers, in a, stop-gap, but so far
effective, system for keeping the
'.i"cffee problem" within bounds.
;' The' have *joined forces' iri the
'International Coffee Agreement.
.,Although. the world's annual
co(ffee'crop is not nearly so val-
1-Ufable as the total production of
wheat, sugar or rice, coffee
rankss. firtr among the agricul-
tural commodities in internation-
: al trade, and !s second only to
petroleum- and' petroleum pro-
ducts when- all commodities are
:. considered, It plays a vital, role
Sin the economic life of the pro-
,', ducinmg countries, ard .therefore
i'.the state, of the trade in this
:ite m has profound social and
.political implications.
S For:bpth the producer and the
'consumer, the basic problem is
"the fickleness of the price of a
'-pound of coffee. Shortage has
been : the difficulty in some
S.yeaf; when frost or drought cut,
Sie crop. In 1954, the retail price
.n the United States (which ac-
-counts for .more than balf of
totall world consumption) soar-
i vd to over one'dollar a pound
Sas a result of lov world stocks
and frost damage.
i,, .
^iu4We, .yuHRi


11


eight


t. Of


fee


COOPERATION TO
Y AND DEMAND'
EImA SANTOS
rEIf.A S&NtTOS ,. ,


/Coffee has been an equally
troublesome commodity when in
oversupply. In an attempt to ba-
lance supply and demand and
to stabilize the price. Brazil.
which produces roughly half the
coffee in the world, was forced
.to destroy. seventy'-eight million
132-pound bags (the standard
unit in the trade) between 1931,
and 1944. This "was coffee that
could not be stored any longer
ard for which there was no mar-
ket. In the past few years over-
production and consequent fal-
ling prices have again brought
great difficulties to all the cof-
fee-growing nations in the world.
At the end of 'the 1960-61 crop
year wofld carry-over stocks
are expected to be equal to al-
most two yhars' world trade re-
quirements.
Here is how the surplus is.
piling up: In the crop year that
ended last September, more
than seventy-five million bags
were produced, a jump of thir-
ty-six million over the 1953 lev-
el. In the last crop year only
fifty-three million bags were
consumed, 'an increase of .just
eleven million from 1953. Two
principal factors boosting con-
sumption are population increa-
se and rise of incomes in the
consuming countries. But in
some countries, mostly in -West-


I I


CRP-HRTIEN AND THE CITADEL
ONE WAY BY PLANE ONE WAY BY.LIiMOUSINE

SALL
4 A3t e- INCLUDED.
OP-RATED BSY Cd STOPAETOUuRS
AVENUE PAN AMERICAINE
IS-'- t PETION-VILLE HAITI
P.o.sx 312 Phone: 7761 R.


, 1


'"HAL I\ SIJsN "


'. SUNDAY


ern Europe, taxes on coffee are
so steep that the greatly reduce
consumption. .
Now 'the latin Amer.ican
countries a'e getting roughly
40 per cent less money for-each
bag of their coffee than they
did in 1953, the last so-called
"normal" year when there were
no excessive.stocks and no over-
'prodution. But now they: must
pay about 10 per cent more than
they did then for their imports
of other things from the United
States and Europe. This disad-
vantageous' trend of the terms
of trade means that the count-
ries, that count on coffee as a
major 'foreign-exchange earner
must curtail imports just
when development plans call for
purchasing new equipment or
watch gold reserves dwindle.
Conditions in the coffee trade
have a direct impact on large
numbers of peopleL Millions of
people are involved as the. farm-
er-owners ,of small coffee. plan-
tations covering less than five
acres. They account for'15 per
cent. of, world production. Midd-
le-sized farms and large planta-
tions, such as, those( character-
istics of Brazilian coffee-grow-'
ing, employ rmiy 'hid. hands,
and" serious consequences could
ifolow if they wete left' without
employment..
Prices have leveled off since
the International' Coffee. Agree-
merit started to function, .qd
this is the best indicalioi of 'its
success' .If they had continued
to drop, before long plantations
would have been. abandoned, and
when output.was cut enough for
stocks' to become depleted, pric-
es would have skyrocketed
again. The shortage would have
remained acute for some time.
because of the long growing
cycle of coffee. Everyone would
then have started planting to
cash in on .the high prices, but
it takes fiVe years. before pew
trees .start bearing. And then
low prices would start the roller-
coaster cycle all over again.
JThis problem has been tackled
through .-international cooerat-
ion, -aiahd the approach taken
could serve as an example in
dealing with the problems of
Other basic commodities, such
as, cacao, although' its problems
are somewhat different.

How did the coffee-producing
countries get together to find a
solution to the problerh? During
World War II, an Inter-Ameri-
can 'Coffee Agreement between
the United States and fourteen
Latin American countries provi-
ded for dividing the U.S. mark-
et, the only. principal one re-
maining at the time. First steps
in the direction of a peacetime
international agreement were ta-
ken in 1954 at a meeting in Bra-
zil of Ministers of Finance or
Economy, convoked by the OAS
Inter-American Economic and
Social Council. The meeting cal-
led upon the IA-ECOSOC's Spe-
cial Committee on Coffee to stu-
dy the world coffee situation
and, if it seemed feasible, pro-
pose cooperative measures that
could limit fluctuations of cof-
fee prices and maintain them


within leels, satisfactoryy to
producers. and consiaiers.".,
SThe OAS Secreta- r preparetl
detailed studies' for the ,Special
Committee, incidding two pro.-
posals: one.for an agreement'in.
volving price-stabilizing device;
and the other for 'bne 'without
them, An agreeinent, within the
OAS could not, behneggotia:tdy
mainly because to be ffectivc
it. would have. had!'to involve
countries that do not belong to
the OAS. But the.need for some
kind of international cooperatio-
remained. '

*h e huge coffee crop of 1957-
1958 threatened to depress the
market sejlously. Temporary re-
lief from the price pinch was
sought'in the Mexico City Agree-
ment of October 1957, Under tha:
pact, Brazil, .Colombia;, Costa
Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala,
Mexico and Nicaragua, ite sev-
en leadingg Latin'-American cof-
fee producers, fixed expert' quo-
tas for themselves on a.quarter
ly. basis in: an attempt to balan-
ce supply aid .demhnd. Partially
because not 'all the 'producing
countries participated in this,
the problem worsened.
The United States,. reversing
its policy of not participating in
such agreements,-. invied repre-
sentatives. of all. coffee-exporting
countries and the principal cof-
fee-importing countries to' come
to Washington 'to discuss the
holee problem. By the summer
of 1958, studies by this thirty-
nation Coffee Study Group re-
sulted in adoption of the 1,atin
Ameiican Coffee Agreement.,
signed by fifteen coffee-produc-
ing nations as a top-gap meas-


HAITI AIRWAYS( O

P. 0. BOX 671
S .- NTER. AT :O N AL AIRDOt1
'PORT 'AU PRINCE, HAITI
ANNOUNCES -

THREE, NEW AIR SERVICES
FOR THE REPUBLIC




Welcomes you to visit our new airways count,
4inigual personnel are on duty Monday through
Saturday from 9 A.M. to 3 P.M. ready 'to pr
ide you with

4 INTERNATIONAL AIR TAXI

AIR AMBULANCE SERVICE
.in oxygen equipped aircraft

AIR SHOPPERS SERVICE

PORT AU PRINCE
AIRPORT TERMINAL
,-
'V V WV

ire to: gain for a more comp
hensive study-of the world cot
Situation. Quotas establish
-percentages of .the exportal
crops to be retained by the p
during nationss .were set' by I
agreemriit. and took 6ffe'ct
October 1958., A committee
the Coffe'r. Study: Group: ,dr4
up Vpropo~ls 'for- .neqw 'agr
i,:' ( tnued.0 on r

Zo Back From Anotfh
Jamaicar;T p "
-'.- ': .4 c


"T


LA


APRIL 23, 19


Rd sp~ ak o. h. Salna
returned lat e ek b anoth
trip to Kingstdon ton. -Zo
ports: J' .broadcast to- 'the
glish-speaking. world -over J.R.
.in Jarhaida on a special h.
hour show in 'ivich he took
imaginary, rp 'to Haiti on. i
air with a gamaican Radio cor
mentator Morrison. "A Ii g
from Heaven" is his new.play
English Which Zo presented
a church in Jamaica,






" HAITI SUN"


Guy Celestin And Iva Rose Bryan Wed


leaving the acre Coeur altar are Guy and Iva Rose Celestin.

CI TEW



Ba coulou



Club
,1bO EXuTINGiLY DIFFERENT. FOUR WORDS,
tIHE


FAMOUS BACOULOU
VOODOO DANCERS
S WEDNESDAY EVENINGS



i VISIT TO Sand Cay


IE WORLD'S MOST SPECTACULAR
Al CORAL REEF
IS A MUST

.The BARRACUDA II leaves the Casino
Pier daily at 10am and returns at 1pm.


The chimes of Sacre Coeur
Roman Catholic Church, Tun
geau, announced the wed.
cling, Saturday evening, April 8
of Mr Guy L. Celestin and Miss
Iva Rose Bryan, popular young
Port au Prince couple. The
groom is a son of Mr and Mrs
Ludovic Celestin, an,,.the bride
is a daughter of Mr and Mrs
Allan Bryan.

The dotble-ring ceremony took
place before a large gathering
of friends and relatives.

Presenting a charming picture
as she entered the church on
the arm of Bestman Pierre Ce-
lestin, a cousin of the groom,
the bride wore a gown by lead-
ing Jamaican couturiere, Flos-
sie Thomas of Kingston.

Her ensemble consisted of a
shoit-sleeved gown of white ny-
lon over slipper satin with a
scooping neckline, on which was
appliqued floral motifs and
seq iins; a finger-tip veil of tulle
suspended from a tiara of dia-
maltes; full-length lace gloves
hand-made shoes, and a bouquet
of orchids from Miami.

Bridesmaid was Miss Thelma
Bryan, the bride's younger sis-
ter, who wore a lavender outfit.
The other attendants were Mirna
Thomas. Magalie Baussan, San-
dra Renoud, Maxime Giordani,
Jocelyne Pierre and Jessie Gra-
ham.

Nearly two hundred relatives,
friends and other well-wishers
attended the reception at the
home of the bride's parents in
Ruelle Mme Ganot, Martissant.
Several of them came from
overseas especially for the nup-
tials.


Highlight of the occasion was
a strikingly artistic wedding
cake, designed like an ancient
castle, complete with turrets
drawbridge, the work of Mrs.
Carmen Carvalho.


Off the Telediol
(a new weekly column on important-social happenings
during the week.)

THAT the Kenscoff Road is getting its share of attention from
the road repair teams at work all over suburbia. THAT the voice
behind one of those portable loudspeakers slopped in mid-sentence
he other day when the driver spotted and picked up a girl friend
.n Grand'Rue (JJD Drive to you). She was "that way", too. THAT
F'ouad Mourra's big Universal Geneve clock out iront says 3:20
all day and all night, The sign above it reads "The Best Swiss
Watches". THAT the jazziest tap-tap in town is bright while
tummed in red, with the words M.W. White, Carlton St., Brook-
lyn, painted on the side; on top "Here Comes Bill" and below
that "Buen Amigo". Nothing like being prepared. THAT one of
the little vagabond regulars approached a tourist for "h cents"
the other day, only to be told the lady had no money. He promptly
told her, "You got plenty money. Give me a Thousand Dollars".
She remarked it would almost be worth it. THAT Helen Martin's
jaochial pneumonia and Claude's flu were the price they paid
or watching the Fifth Ave. Easter Parade with the temperature
at one-above freezing. THAT Jacques Torchon, legal bright light.
in the market for an English legal dictionary. THAT Haiti is
listed as one of the few remaining countries for which the Ameri-
can Bank Note Co. prints stamp issues. It appeared in a feature
article in a recent SEP. THAT the double taxi crash in JJD
Drive at Portail St. Joseph on Monday a.m. tied up half the,
street. THAT the Statute of Limitations in Haiti is five years.
Wonder if the Talamas Boys can stay away that long? THAT'
Jerry and Ray Shaw. sons of U.S. Ail Force Sgt. Shaw, recom-
mend that the Russies try another 2-headed dog experiment, put-
t;ng the heads of Castro and Khrutschev each on a. dog's body.
Only trouble with that would be they'd make the news. Man
Eats Dog! THAT Marie Francoise Sterlin, high-powered secretary
at N.Y.U., has decided to come home to live next year. Can't
take another N.Y. winter. Her papa is Franck Sterlin of OACO.
THAT the Lieutenant of the Civil Militia who announced over
Radio Haiti on Wednesday a.m. his candidacy for Deputy is a sure
thing to bet on. THAT Maitre Albert returned to the clink on
Monday morning on a different charge. THAT R. C. Borde is
thumbing his nose, at the calorie counters with double sundaes
mid afternoon at Rendez-Vous. THAT the U.S. Embassy's translat-
ion of one of the newer laws omitted an important paragraph.
Oops. THAT Tuesday nite's blackout made the dancing at Mon-
tana extra special romantic. THAT Raoul Dupoux is making the
stage sets for the Lavinia Williams ballet. THAT Hampco didn't
influence the new decree regarding cattle; it was the other way
'round. They have been turned down to ship meat to the U.S.
by the -U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. THAT new little building at
Lalue will house the Arti de Paris flower shop where pretty Betty
iouin makes those pretty table arrangements. THAT when you.
visit Auto, S.A.'s upstairs office and no one is there, you can
help yourself to coffee and enjoy the art exhibit in air conditioned
comfort. The pictures are the work of'Maj. Maurice Martin of
the Coast Guard, who apperi-s to be a "comer". THAT the slack
season is here and vacationing is in the air. The Rene Marinis
leave for the States early in May; Jackie Balthazar goes in June,
and Gerard follows in July. THAT Claudinette Fouchard Fischel
will be back in late June to wait for, baby. THAT'S ALL.


DISCOVER THE. FASCINATION


OF HAITI


Through Its Postage Stamps

For complete information in Haiti

Stamps and other details which will be

furnished you free of charge, write to


P.O. Box 723 PORT-AU-PRINCE


LY APRIL 23, 1961






.- S 4_


Strong Sp


SUHAITI





SUN"'


eec.h


Kennedy Says U.S. Will Not Per


Communism Take Over Cuba


mit


Washington Following. is a
full text, as issued by the White
House, of President Kennedy's
speech Wednesday before the
American Society of Newspaper
Editors:

S'The. President of a great de-
ipiocrcy such as ours, and the
e'ditor of great newspapers such
Sias yours, owe a common oblig-
iiation to the people: An obliga-
'tion to present the facts, to pre-
sent them with candor, and to
Present them in perspective. It
i7.s with that obligation in mind
afthat I have decided in the last
4 hours to discuss briefly at
."this time the recent events in
Cba,
i: -' -


On that unhappy island, as in
so many other areas of the con-
test for freedom, the news has
grown worse instead of better.
I have emphasized before that
this was a struggle of Cuban
patriots against a Cuban dicta-
tor.

While we 'could not be expect-
ed to hide our sympathies, we
have made it repeatedly clear
that the armed forces of this
country would not intervene in
any way..
Our Restraint Not Unlimited
ANY UNILATERAL American
intervention, in the absence 'of
an external attack upon oursel-
ves or any ally, would have


SModern haitian

S -' Paintings

By MAX PFINCHINAT

On Show Now At'

SGALERIE PINCHINAT

106, BOIS VERNA

SJust before you reach the "PONT MORIN" bridge


SThis is an ART GALLERY, not a picture shop, ex-
ihibiting over 100 of the most attractive FRAM1ED
:*PAINTINGS made both in Port an Prince and Paris by
..FAMOUS HAITIAN PAINTER MAX PINCHINAT
noww ini France.


The artist WHO HAS EXHIBITED BOTH HERE
AND ABROAD for the past 15 years. comes back to
:"Haiti every five years and for ,15 to 18 months renews
Sthe contact with his people and his source of inspira-
tion. .


I In the GALLERY PINCHINAT are grouped
some paintings of the 15 years of work by MAX PIN-
C HINAT, from 1945 to 1960. Prices have not been ar-
bitrarily based on beauty of the painting, but on its
size, Just like Paris Fashion for MAX PINCHINAT
and OTHER WELL KNOWN ARTISTS. Visitors can
consult the paintings price list if they wish to.


All the taxi drivers know GALLERY PINCHINAT
AND don't let anybody tell you that the GALLERY is
closed. It is not.

The GALLERY PINGHINAT, sole represen-
tative and sales agent of PINCHINAT's paintings, has
exhibited a few samples only at "Foyer des Arts Plas
'tiques", "Galerie Brochette" and Galerie Suisse".

Open from 10 AM to 5 PM, and on appointment in
the evening. ADMISSION FREE.


been contrary to our traditions has engaged the armor of total-
and to our international obliga- itarianism.
tions. But let the recprd show
that our restraint is not inex- It is not the' first. time that
haustible. Communist tanks hive rolled
over gallant'Cmen, and .women
Should it ever appear that the fighting to redeem. the indepen-
inter-American doctrine of non- dence of their homeland. Nor is
interference merely, conceals or it by any, mepans the -final epi-
excuses a policy of non-action sode in th eternql struggle of
-if the nation's of this hemi- liberty, 'gains.'- tyranny, any-
sphere should fail to meet their where on the face of the globe,
commitments against outside including Cuba itself


Communist penetration- then I
want it clearly understood that
this government will not hesit-
ate in meeting its primary obli-
gations, which are to the secur-
ity of our own nation.


Rebel Commander
No Mercenary


Mr. CASTRO has said that
these were mercenaries. Accor-
ding to press reports, the final


Should that time ever come, message to be relayed from the
we do not Intend to be lectured refugee forces on the island
on "Intervention" by t h ose came front the rebel command-
whose character was stamped er when'asked if he wished to
for al time on the bloody be evacuated, His answer was:
streets of Budapest. Nor would "I will never leave this coun-
we expect or accept the same try."
.outcome which this small band
of gallant Cuban refugees must That is not the reply of a
have known they 'were chancing, mercenary. He has'gone now
determined as they'were against to join in the mountains..count-
heavy odds to pursue their cou- less other guerrilla fighters, who
rageous attempt to regain their are equally determined that the


Island's -freedom.


But Cuba is not an island unto
itself; and our concern is not
ended, by mere expressions of
nonintervention and regret. This
is not the first time in either
ancient or recent history that a
small band of freedom fighters


dedication of those 'who gave
their lives shall not, be forgotten,
and that Cuba must not be aban-
doned to the Communists. And
we do not intend to abandon it
-either.
No doubt that they and the
Revqlutionary Council led by
Dr Cardona -and members of


the. families of the Revolution-
ary Council, I am informed by
the doctor yesterday, are involv-
ed themselves in the island-


will continue to speak up.
The Cuban people have not'
yet spoken their final piece -
and I have no doubt'that they
wilt continue to speak up. for a
free and. independent Cuba.
SWe will not accept Mr Cas-.
'tro's attempts to blame this .na-
tion for the hatred with which
his'onetime supporters now re-
gard his repression.. Bqt there
are.from this sobering episode
useful lessons for all .to learn.
Some may still be obscure, and
await fu-ther information. Some
are clear today.

FIRST, it is clear that, the
forces of. communism are not to
be underestimated, ih Cuba or
anywhere, in the;,world: The ad-
vantage of a police state -its
hse of mass terror and arrests
to prevent the .spread of fee
dissbnt- cannot be overlooked
by those who, expect the fall of
every fanatic tyrant.

If the self-dlsipline of ihe
free mind cannot match the iron
discipline of the mailed fist -in
economic, political Scientific
an dall other kinds of struggles'-
as well as military-, then thd
peril to freedom will continue
to rise.

:(Continued on page 17)


( Do You Want The Best In Nutrition For Your Baby

1 And The Fanmily?
YOURt BEST BET IS:
'5' MOLINOS"

"- DUTCH POWDERED WHOLE MILK
WITH ADDED
......VITAMIN D3

You Can't Beat It t



MARCos TALAMAS 8 co..
BOULANGERIE ST. MARC,
ALPHONSE MARRA,
Boulevard Jean-Jacques Dessalines
E NA. ap oOwo oEPICERIE REX, Lalue
GEORGES COLES, Lalue
-._R HENRI RIGAUD, Petionvlle.

AGENTS AND DISTRIBUTORS:


.Hispano-America Trading Co. Of Haiti S.A
.9, RUE DU QUAI
..
i' BOIB~EBE ST BEC


SUNDAY APRIL 23, 1961


I --- ---- ---~--~'- -


I


B


t


I






AY APRIL 23, .1961


"HAITI SUN"


__ __ ml


. / HA'Ia SU N .:
THE BAITIAN ENGLISH 'L.N. E NEWSPAPER
SCommunity Weely PubiUshedStOiday Morning \
-Editor-Publlser BERNARD DIEDEBIOB
SGerant-Responsable MAUCLAIB LAISSIERE
I4BER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
ESTABLISHED IN 1050


To Encourage National Effort Is A Civic Duty

'iThe everlasting under prodlution is one of the most'crucial
aramas our community has to face. Objectively, we should agree
hat a great effort has. been made during the past -years to
gIncrease our production. However, it is far from being sufficient.
iTo. obtain tangible results, those who have capital should under-
iand that many fields are still unexploited, that initiative, imag-
ination 'and creativeness are all it would take to considerably
increase profits while promoting .our community's industrialization.
For the past few years, all those who have goAe into industry
Aive, not only increased their profits, but have also contributed
increasing labor erpployment,I allowing many fellow citizens to
their living. It is in thesp instances that well understood
personal interest' coincides with the Vital needs of the nation. It
to be desired that more and! more fellow citizens understand
s fact and' get 'started in a progressive and clean competition
th the already established Haitian as well as foreign industrial-



.Bu all efforts 'to irfuse a new blood in our embryonic industry
remain in vain as long as the consumer does not consider it a
duty to encourage the different initiatives leading to de-
S se imports. The World over, even in the less fortunate places,
.e people at this cross-road concentrate their efforts to save
S'temselves. It is our duty to understand that it is stupid to keep
Sot waiting; let us repeat after Mr Max A. Antoine, Chief 6f
bor Department, "we must not expect everything from this
miurge,' with millions of arms and eyes, that is called 'l'ETAT'."
'aivation Fepends. on industry without which we will remain
NiuQdering in underdevelopment :and parasitism. In this instance,
lis imperative that- the consumer recognizes his duties. Through-
hu. the country, citizens, without being conceited, know that it
ain their interests to contribute, in decreasing our currency's
export by buying national, goods. Therefore, local industries are
gresqing more and more. With the help of our import statistics,
considering the' fabulous amounts that are drained out of the
country, we would belter comprehend the patriotic and salutary
.age of the consumer's education cainpaign we have been car-
g on.


.As a matter of fact, the -consumer must spontaneously encour-
age the' national,effort, in his own interest.
:Prosperous industries help to decrease unemployment, and are
finite 'steps towards a higher standard of living. The Govern-
nent of His Excellency Doctor Francois Duvalier has established
favorable climate of stability for the exploitation of our num-
Iais resources. However, the successful tries of our industrialists
1nd businessmen, must not meet with the indifference of consum-
ers who automatically underestimate any and all national efforts.
Haiti Journal, April 6, 1961


UItorial in LE NOVLLISTE April 17, 19#1


CUBA INVADED


; jVe were sure of it. Especially since the Government of the
lhited States authorized or tolerated on its soil on the one hand
t formation by the Cuban exiles a veritable provisional govern-
Cnt and on the other hand the training in Florida of Anti-Castro
Guerilla forces.
,The bombing of three Cuban airbases -by planes coming from
Guatemala according to Havana authorities- by aviators who
.eft the Cuban soil and chose to join the Cuban counter-revolution
according -to Cuban'exiles was the warning signal.
duringg the night landings in different places in Cuba took place
ihei&Cuban in exile groups were parachuted in different points
n 'Cuba.
:.W. has then started again on the martyr soil of Cuba. That
S(Continued on page 16)



'I -i,- .


-I


I remain
Believer In Peace Corps.
qTo the Editor,
HAITI SUN,
En Ville.
Dear Sir:
I took pleasure 'in 'the Haiti
Sun story of the birth of a new
enterprise, "Ile des Fleurs, S.
.A.," which will be a Haitian
entity to process Haitian surplus
fruits and other food products
and market them abroad.
The new company has great
possibilities of bringing earned
income to the small farmers in
the provinces, and to work for
processing the fruits.-

An' important line in Miss
Baer's statement is the coopera-
tion given to the new enterprise
by the.Haitian Government. To
those who disparage the Gov-
ernment, .it might be said, "It
all depends upon the approach".
We bespeak further, such co-
qperation to all private enter-
prise, not only from the Haitian
Government. but from other
agencies here. And we wish le
des Fleurs great success, -not
only their own success, but for
the earned incomes they will
initiate.
Payrolls of private enterprise
are self-perpetuating: hand-out
money, no matter from what


WHAT ROLE FOR PEACE
CORPS HERE?
Haiti Sun,
En, Ville.
DeLr Editor:
It is too early to speculate on
the role that the projected Peace
Corps of the United States can
have on Haiti. The 'news is to
the effect that enrollments are
already being made in Washing-
ton.
I have often met young people
in foreign 'countries, represent-
atives of the "Friends Society"'
and of the "Latter Day Saints"
from Utah. They have usually
been quiet, well-mannered dedi-
cated persons giving one or sev-
eral years .of their lives in the
service of their organizations.
They eschew ostentatious auto-
mobiles living standards, work
long hours, have pedestrians ha-
bits.
If the Peace Corps will ba
modelled after these young peo-
ple we can give them strong
confident support, no matter
their function. As yet their func"
tions have not been well clari-
fied. One can expect them to
be concerned certainly with edu-
cation, food distribution possib-
ly with forestry and conserva-
tion, possibly with financial aid!
They are the people who could
help Haitians put forward new,
small industries.
To a large extent probably
their functions will depend upon
what we request from them. It
merits- us' to request, them with
some indication as to where
their participation is most need-
ed.


democratic


countries, seem to


government, eventually must
dry up.
I call to the attention of our
various foreign aid and loan
agencies this basic principle
which has been so neglected:
The Western Democracies are
based on private enterprises
which, in turn, are based on
"the profit motive", a very
strong motivation 'which has
brought unbelievable standards
of living to Western Europe and
North America. Yet our foreign-
aid agencies, originating in such


*........e '.....a.' '

JOHNNIE WALKER.'
--.
A Mr 1020-m-l ,ring a -'


DISTRIBUTOR PREETZMAN-APGERHOLM i




ajhoK o/or i
f-
*l *umnm'e j 11 R f \


itAGE 6


- Served exa smI ay at Haiti's Leading
HOTELS & RESTAURANTS & BY CONNOISSEURS -
S"THROUGHOUT THI WORLD


__


have disregarded private enter-
prise. A tremendous tool for for-
eign aid, -developed by the Con- '
gress of the United States, the
Development Loan Fund, seeks '
to lave been neglected.
Attention to this one factor
might turn -the' present dubious
accomplishments ,of foreign-aid. ':
agencies into industries, empl-
oyment, payrolls and improved ,
standards of living of Democra-,i
cy ;the ultimate objective of',:
foreign-aid.
(s) Private Enterprise. ,
o Avocate)


r .
~*r~.,


;:





r.... a rA. ... a '' *
.AG .




Tele-He
?> MONDAY APRIL 24, 1961: "Lolsirs du Lundi Soir"
S6:30-Evening' general program schedule
6:33-Comedy Show: "I Love Lucy"
S.'7:00-Evening Ge eral Program Schedule
,,7:03-Weather Report '
7:06-:Children's Program: Cartoons
7:45--Telenews (1st edition) Review of the .day's events
8:100-"The Frmnkie Laine Shaw", sponsored by "Banque Com-
merciale d'Haiti" i
S8:30-The United Shoe Association, S.A., the most modern shoe
.; factory in the Caribbean presents its program: "Highway
':- Patrol", starring Broderick Crawford.
-9;00-Telenews (2nd edition) 'Summary of the late news, present-
ed by the tsso Reporter.
'ig:05-The Voice of Firestone .presents "TV Concert Hall", pro-
i' gram sponsored by the Firestone Interamerican Co.
.ff9:i5-Haitian History, with Ernst Trouillot
"i10:00-Close off program National Anthem
i.ESDAY APRIL 26, 1961: "Tele-Journal, Derniere Edition"
:.0-Test pattern Music (Records)
30-Evening general program schedule
33--Science Fiction Theater '
S. .03 Weather Report
O 6--C dren's program: a) A Children's story b) Cartoons
-c) A Western ,

7.i45-iTelenvws (1st edition) Review of the, day's events
.8 -00-Raynmond Massey presents "I Spy"
*f .:'3Q--releclnelna
'9 00-Telenews (2nd edition) Summary of the late news, present-
r ed'by the' Esso Reporter
:05-Telecineima (Cont d)
00--Close of .program National Anthem
'.EDNESDAY-APRIL 26/, i961:_ "Voulej-vous Jouer avec uous?"
.6:00-Test pattern Music (Records)
6 '.630-E-veniig general program schedule
6' ., 3-Music for all ,
7 :.7i06--Documentary ,
Si-7:45-Telenews (1st edition) Review of the days events,
S4;0---Program sponsored by "La Maison Victor Saliba";: Harbor
Command (5th Episode)
: ;i3&O-Man of the Week
.r;,i9:00--Telenews (2nd edition) Summary of the late news, present-
; -: ed by the Esso Reporter.
!.9 35--Commonwealth
'0:00--Close- of program National Anthem
JTifHURDAY APRIL 27, 1961: "Le Pavilion 'des Varietes"
6:00-Test pattern Music (Records)
6:33-Th Honey Mooners
,l; 03--Weather Report
7:06-Children's program: a) A Children's story b) Cartoons

J,". .








I" L
-.." .l


1


HAITI SUN "


.45-Telenews (1st edition)
8:00-"Have Gun Will Travel
tion Co., S.A.
8:30-Telecinema
9:00-Telenews t2nd edition)
ed by the Esso Report
9:05--Telecinema .(Cont'd)
10:00-Close of program I
FRIDAY APRIL 28, 1961: "J
6:00-Test pattern Music
6:30-Evening general progr
6:33-Our Miss Br6oks
7.03-Weather Report
7:06-Children's program: a
7:45-Telenews (1st edition)
8:30-"Les Femmes' parmi
8:30-Pour vous Mesdames -
line and. her hosts
9:00-Telenews (2nd edition)
ed by the Esso Reportt
J:05-Musical Show
:00a-Cose.of program' I
SATURDAY APRIL 29, 1961;
5:30-Test Pattern
6:00-Presentation of evening
6:05-Junior Magazine
6:30-Children Feature
7:00--Weather Report
'7:06-Education Nationale pr
7:45-Telengws (1st edition),
8:00-Ford Show
8:15-Tele-Sport (1st part)
8:45-Tele-Sport (1st part)
9:00-Telenews (2nd edition)
ed by the Esso Reporti
9:05---Tele-Sport (2nd part)
10:00--Sign off National A

SUNDAY APRIL 30, 1961: "I
12:30-Test Pattern Music
l:0'-Program Schedule
1:05-Views of our World
1:40--Irprove your'knowled
2:03-Children Hour.
2:30--Adventures of Robinhoc
J:00--Ping-Pong Tournament
(Henri Fabien vs Jean
3:30LAdventurbs of Champic
4:00-Telecinema
5:45--Telenews
6:00-Sign off National 'A


Haiti's "Gingerbread Palace" and famed hostelery the Grand Hotel Oloffson, show place
Haitian architecture, exquisite cuisine and contented living. Set amongst a mn iarT nf tropical t
and gardens the Oloffson, complete with minia ure pool, is the haven for the nninhibited-and
eeca for the Caribbean tourist.



.l...-
t.. "';i .. = ., '. .. -


rrogi


S a O


p = __ I .


ram


Review of the day's eventIsw .
' sponsored by the M & S Construe-
The Right Amount
Of Coffee '
(Continued 'from page 2)
Summary of the late news, present- ,
er. ment -even broader i memb-
ership- to come into force the
following October. -
National Anthem Negotiations in Washington,
oyeux Week End!" culminated on September 24,'
(Records) 1959, in the sighing- of the Inter-
ram schedule national-Coffee Agreement. Sign-
atories included not only the if--
teen nations that had belonged
to the Latin Americart Agree-.
) A Children's story b) Cartoons ment, but France and Portugal'
Review of the day's'events on behalf of their' territories and
nous" "Le Bohheur" the semi-autonomous states in
SCooking Show, presented by Miche- Africa that were te emerging .
as independent 'nations. Last-
year it gained as individual',
Summary of the late news, present- members the newly independent.
er. African states formerly repre-
sented by France, .and -Great
atibnal Anthem Britain signed oh behalf of its.
territories of' Kenr,.. Tangany-
"Les Petites Fantalsies" ika; and Uganda, Satisfactin
Si, with the iew agreement's effect'
Program iveness resulted in its extension ,
for a second year, so it will now>.
run until this September.

The International Agreement's:,"
'ograrrt'Presented by Ludovic, Madet stated- objectives are, to adapt
Review of the dlay's events the''supply of; coffee to the ,de-,.
S mand, to assurer: the 'orderly
S. I p placement of, the: product .ih' in '
ternatlonal markets, and to sti-,-
mutlate the, consumption of cofl-
Summary of the late news, .pesent- fee. How does.'.t work Quotas
er. for' exports to traditional con-
sumiig countries werese,t in
them o an appendix to the Agreement.
itself,' takidg\l'into account, (a)
90 Iper cent of .ithe -amount ex ;.
I etalt une fois" ported 'by the country in its best
year of the period 19491958- and'
(b) a maximum of 88 per cent
of the U.S. Department of Agri'-
ge (Documentary) culture's estimate of its export;
able production.
od Presented by La Belle Cteoie The agreement operates. fleld,
- Presented by Nobbe & Bondel ibly, and q larterly quotas ar'.
Auguste) determined to correspond to
n (renh s ) sedasbnal demand. "Gentlemen'"
on (French series) ". .. -
agreements" between signator-
fes,', within the spirit of the agrp'
Segment, compensate for termpori
them' ary fluctuations. .

SCAtOUE ISLAND' The Board of Directors,. ow
Headed by Sergio Armando Fra
".TiO BEACH" zao of Brazil, meets in Washii.
S' ton at least once every threb
months. All twenty-eight of thei
nl.\T,. 30 NINUTES Coffee Agreement members-a
represented on it, and its dec
r)M PORT-A -PRINCE sons are not binding on an
)M.PORT-A PR l s'gnator' that ,declines to ac
N'' capt them: Udanimity is the
goal, 'and 'it ha usually be
S achieved.
ROIrND-TRIP
I;iAT Exports' to" 'ouintries specifi
ally -listed as "'new markets
rRANSPORTATION) may be made over and abo
the members' quotas. The ne
'VLY V-1.00 markets include all tle Sovi
Children 50 Ccnt bloc nations and Ceylon, Form,
sa, the Philippines, Iraq. Japa
Private Drea ing Raim s South Viet Nam. South, Kore
Sand Thailand. Fifteen Afric
White Sand Beach and Near Eastern country
8i ,', are added to the list' last Sep
rees Fine Restaurant and Snack Bar ember.
the WATER SKIING An assessment of twenty-fi
SKIN-DIVING cents per bag of the previp
SNORKELING (Continued on page


'4-c 2&iLm


SUNDAY APRIL :; 1961.





SUNDAY APRIL 23, 196.1 H A ITI SUN" AGE T




12 th ANNIVERSARY









FREE-PORT SHOPPING CENTER
P. O. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI




AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS
MINTON1 WEDGWOOD. __EI A. P. SiU mUVL klanV,
ROYAL CROWN DARBY, = H JUVENIA TISSOT, BOREL, CARON, CHANEL,
S ROYAL COPENHAGEN, AUDEMAR PIGUET, RAPHAEL, PATOU,
ROYAL WORCESTER, JAEGER LE COULTRE, BALMAIN, WORTH,
ROYAL DOULTON, -ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO. REVIELON, VIGNYT
ROSENTHALE, SPODE, I ATLANTA, STUDIO, CARVEN, LE GALLION,
AYNSLEE, COALPORT, VULCAIN. FABERGE OF PARIS.
SGUSTAUBERG. JEAN D'ALBERT,
VJACQUES GRIFFE
KISA--FATH, .PIGUET.
KISLAV, .CORDAY,
GEORGE JENSEN, ENGLISH DOESKIN,
HANS HANSEN, GERO' ITALIAN ANTELOPE. lMINOX,. CANNON
DRAGSTER, GENSE.

SPRINGLE, BALLANTYNE, ROYAL COPENHAGEN,
S. The Finest 9f FRANCE, BERN HARD ALTMAN, ROYAL DOULTON,
ITALY, AUSTRIA, LUISA SPAGNOLI. HUMMEL.

LALIQUE, BACCARRAT;
ORREFORS, HARVEY'S BRISTOL
SWEBB & CORBETT, DANISH SILVER, CREAM, All FRENCH.
VAL SOLAMBERT, GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY DANISH and
STUART, LEERMAN. and BRAZILAN GEMS. SPANISH LIQUIEURS.

SHAITIAN HANDICRAFTS

VooDoo Inspired SCULPTURES RAFFIA BAGS
JEWELRY & SHOES



N ative-Insp r. Factory OuUet HAITIAN MUSIC
SPORT SHIRTS MAHOGANY Collector's Items
fa"- The Best.


Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS
I World Famous RUGS & DRAPzRY
Haitian RUM BARBANCOURT

Hat. is send gifts to your friends in the U. S. A.
i without affecting your quota.- See us for more information.



|AL x ,\^ ^ ^.o^^ ^ >^^















A group of leading business
men and educators called upon
the U.S. Congress last week to
appropriate "now and in one
lump stlm" the $500,000,000 it
authorized last year for an In-
ter-American social progress
fund.
The group, comprising the Re-
search and Policy Committee of
the Committee for Economic
Development, reminded Co n-
gress that the United States pro-
posed the establishment of this
fund at the economic confer-
ence in' Bogota, Columbia, Jast
September.
In a report issued today after
nearly two years of study, the


committee said that "the way
the Act of Bogota is carried out
will have great significance not
only for the Western Hemisphere
but for the whole world."
'.Model tor Relations'
"The attitudes and policies
that guide relations between the
United States and Latin Ameri-
ca. in furtherance of the Act of
Bogota, can be a model for the
relations between the economi-
cally advanced and the under-
developed worlds," the report
stated.
For this reason, the commit-
tee said. failure to achieve the
economic and social progress
envisaged in the Act of Bogota


".would be a bitter and ominous
disappointment."
The premises underlying the
Act of Bogota are as follows:
First, that development de-
pends upon social as well as
economic progress.
Second, thai social and econ-
omic progress is necessary tor
the maintenance of stable demo-
cratic governments.
Third, that the ruling groups
in Latin America must provide
the climate for progress by con-
senting to long-overdue reforms
in taxation, land management,
government administration and
fiscal and monetary pracitces.
Cooperation Stressed
On tlus last point the com-


..E 8" HAII S UN" sv


U.S. Group Urges


Speedy Latin Aid


mittee's report laid great stress.
"Economic cooperation with La-
Un America," the committee
said, "is not a one-way street
in which we give and they take.'
In particular the report, which
was 'entitled "Cooperation for
Progress in Latin America,"
told Latin-American businessmen
that they must mend their ways
if private enterprise was to sur-
\ive.

There are modern business
men in Latin America, the re-
port stated, who see the need
for sharing the fruits of their
efforts with customers and work-
ers, and for plowing back a sub-
stantial share of profits into
their enterprises. But these busi-
ness men are "not as typical
as they should be," the report
asserted.
Business Methods Criticized
"The private enterprise that


of 200 of the nation's leading
business men and educators who
seek through research and dis-
cussion to focus public attention
on policies and measures desi-
gned to preserve a free society,
maintain high employment andl
productivity and improve livinJ
standards.


In-


tvarSOfc

Ir EI ON IL


Away Or At Home A Car


Of Your Own


Ofiei
..u-PRNC
I
//?m i
NETTR *but~~
Op,.. YL XN* SPAO

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EXPRESS AND DINERS CLUB CREDIT CARD HONORED


EEKLY RATE Ul
$35,-perp Week -
Plus 8 pep Mile

ALL RATES INCLUDE
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Road Maps,



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from hotels, airport


and pier


FOR RESERVAIfONS, ROAD MAPS AND SUGGESTED ITINERARIES, WRITE OR CABLE

AVIS CAR RENTALS
P.O. Box 602 PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI.


NDAY APRIL 23, 1961

is being tested in Latin Amerlea
is still, unfortunately, in too
large degree the pri\'ate enter-
prise of the nineteenth century,"
the report declared.
"The Latin-American business
man must not only serve his so-
ciety in his role of business man.
He must also participate as a
citizen and member of society,
ii the search for ways to achie-
ve the objectives of the society
the most urgent of which is
to improve. the conditions of life
of the neglected millions."
The Committee for' Economic
Development is an organization


AMERICAN


Car


Available


Opel

(4 DOOR)


Hillman Minx

MG (On Application)


'I


ss-






.SLUNlDAAV APRIL 23,


"HAITI T SUN"


Hasco Sugar Up To' 57 Out Put

U.S. Quota 26,572 Tons


- (Continued from page 1)
Cayes that expects to have a
14,000 ton output this year.
The regular U.S. sugar quota
for Haiti is 8.268. This year the
U.S 'Government allocated 26,572
.of the former Cuban share to
Haiti.

Last week the United States
announced that 1,263,776 tons of
sugar which normally would
have been obtained trom Cuba
during the last nine months of
this year will be purchased
from sixteen other countries.
The big supplies under a new
allocation will be Peru, Mexico,
the Philippines Republic and
Brazil.

The share of the United States
market which otherwise would
have been allotted to Cuba'under
a sugar control program is be-
ing withheld because of the dis-
pute with the Cuban Govern-
ment.
.This allocation was announced


'i "


by Secretary of Agriculture Or-
\vile L. Freeman with the con-
curreuce of Department of
State.
The action specifically author-
ized the purchase by importers
of the amount allotted each
country.
On April 1, the department
set quotas of 6,702,805 tons for
domestic and foreign areas -
other than Cuba- for sTpplying
the United States market dur-
ing the last nine months of the
year.

The allocation of the former
Cuban share by countries in-
c u ded : Philippines, 218,048
tons; Peru, 329,870; Mexico,
339.775; Nicaragua, 9,897: Haiti,
26,572; Taiwan, 97,765; Panama,
4,515; Costa Rica, 14,774; Hong
Kong, 11; British West Indies
and British Guiana, 65,549; El
Salvador. 10.000; Gqatemala,
10,000; Brazil, 100,000: Ecuador,
15,000; Colombia, 15,000 and the
French West Indies, 25,000.


Dear Mario Doogoode:
Bachelor Asks: What 7:

Are The Principal

Ingredients In Really :

Happy Marriage?


There is a humorist in our:::
m'dst, or, at least, we've reas-i ::
on lo suspect there it, for ai
letter we received during the :..:
week from a gentleman signe ;i':
"In The Marriage Market,':::
starts off: "Dear Mario, if you"
were the marrying kind..."
But in this letter -too long
to be published in full and con-.
taining many "wise saws and
modern instances"- there is a
vein of seriousness.


Sculptures b PAINTINIS b-


R .TPNCO'15
T. Du ERRIER,
O.DU PERRLER
;lA .DiMANCHE


Cedor
J. E.Gourgue
V.Denis
L. Lazarc
J. GCabriel
N. C.Teart


The writer, who is 34 and
single ("fond of reading, a very 'O****e*********************************
occasional ball, liquor and gam-9 *
bling in moderation, and his
p"pe"), wants to know what I NOu c n
regard as the major ingredients NO W .. .You can take
in a happy marriage. *
"Love?" he asks "Passion?"
"Security?" "Possition?" i :dvanto ge OT
"Wealth?" an'a w
Wittingly or unwittingly, "In
the Marriage Market" has pos-
ed a question that pens much6
abler than mine have been try-
ing to answer for centuries. But .
for better or for worse, here's W orld w ide shopping
our view:- World-wide shopping

An abiding affection for the at FRT pr
person you are about to marry F
based upon, if possible, a fairly .
lengthy association and subject- W while you're in Haiti
ed to a number of tests is ab-., w '
solutely essential. i
Loyalty, mutual trust and For example, if you live in New York, you can
tolerance there must always be, 0 buy JOHNNIE WALKER RED LABEL
of course. I
for $2.90
But the factor contributing f w
more than anything else to a delivered at our brokers New York warehouse
more than anything else to as
"happy marriage" as distinct
'from a "successful marriage" for $3.40 :
(and there is a subtle distinc--' d eliee i ,
tion)-.is a sense of humor. If a delivered in your home
husband and wife have the abil-
ity to see humour in even the If you live in New Jersey, Illinois, Connecticut,
gravest domestic disturbances... Massachusetts, Idaho, North Dakota, West
if they can see themselves ass Virginia, or the District of Columbia,
comic characters and appreciate :
what they see... if they can see for 3.40 delivered inyour home
humor together in unexpected 0
circumstances, and if they can:
really laugh at themselves then j. /
theirs will be the happiest mar- NO LUGGING
riage of all. *

o4. / NO OVERWEIGHT
all mean something, but if these:
are present without affection,
loyalty, and humor, then there 5
can be dangers as we see it, NO CUSTOMS PROBLEMS
anyway. *
NO BOTHER
So there you have it. The hap- *
piest marriages are those in ,
which husband and wife cain While you're in Haiti, come to'La Belle Creole and
laugh together at themselves as inquire about this convenient service.
.well as at the passing parade. When you get back home, you may request
information from-
And the unhappiest? Prabably e
those in which either the wife Representatives of La Bele Creole %
of the husband, with a single- 366 Broadway
mindedness of purpose, is trying New York 13, N.Y.
to keep up with the Jones's. En- aBelle Creole's WORLD-WIDE SHOPPING
vy has no place in a happy mar- T
riage. Why try to be something AT FREE PORT PRICES
you're not? .. sseeesee*****************************fee


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,PAGE 12


. HA "HAITI SUN"


. I',-.


STraffic Adviser Goes


To Cambodia


The big soft-spoken Blancc"
Swho became a familiar figure
:around the Capital in the saddle
of a police Department molor-
cycle, directing traffic down the
i.new one-way streets, and lend-
'.ing a'hand at painting straight
Pedestrian crossings has.return-
Sed home to Aberdeen, Washing-
.ton where he is spending a well
Earned vacation and preping up
on the traffic problems of Cam-
-Mbodia.


pedestrians I saw the same traf-
fic situation in the States 27
years ago,'I' he said, in an in-
terview during, his first six
months here. "People are the
same concerning traffic probl-
erps," he added., "They haven't
surprised me with' these traffic
breaches."
' What amazed Carlson was the
national delusion that coasting
- shutting off the engine and
freewheeling leads to gasol-
ine conservation. Coasting down
hill in neutral gear with the
motor off, same procedure going
uphill at a speed and even-shut-
ing of the motor' at intersec-
tions and stops are a common
sight whiih Carlson condemned
and shed a very interesting light
on.


,Examining ohe of the many new traffic signs posted around the
city and suburbs lIst month ate Roy Carlson and
Traffic Chief Theodore.
drafted by ICA (Point Four) thing about all this economy is
back in 1959, while working on that it is not saving gasoline at
'the Washington State Safety Le- all, but using more than by
S..gislature, to advise' .Port au keeping the engine running.
: iPrince's. Traffic Department.
Working in close cooperation "When a driver restarts his
1.with Captain Christian Theodore, car after stopping at an inter-
.Port au Princd Traffic chief, he section a surge of gasoline is
I;:arissisted in adding; extra traffic necessary to fire the motor.
lights, regulating the flo\m of This surge amounts to more
traffic by the system of one-way gasoline than would have been
.streets, safety campaign and required to sit at the intersec-
education of motorists by televi- tion with the engine running".
sion and handouts, numbering Expensive Wear
Sof streets and erection of road So up goes the gasoline con-
,and street signs, etc. etc. '' sumptin and down comes an


important electrical feature of
Double parking, driving In the the car the batteery-charge.
centre of the road and going Constant stopping and restarting
against lights are all problems of the engine not only drains
which Carlson had encountered the battery, maintained Carlson,
'before coming to Haiti. "With but wears it out,very rapidly.
S.the -exception of donkeys and The first step in the driver

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education movement take was
a manual entitled the "Profess-
ional Driver" both French and
Creole. All driving points are
covered, including coasting, in
the hope that Port au Prince
drivers will become more safety
conscious.

In the Capital City, private
cars examined every three
months and publics vehicles
each month. At these inspec-
tions. pamphlet -"Handouts" as
Carlson calls them- were given
to. each"'driver. These too print-
ed in French and- Creole
gave safety tips and Traffic re-
gulations complete with illust-
rations.


"Handouts are
to the drivers,-
"A manual has


not just given
said Carlson.
been prepared


for traffic cops on point duty
and consists of instruction with
illustrations on the correct sign-
als and gestures.

"The men. in my. division are
very keen and adapt'themSelves
';ery quickly," he said. "Some
of the men ha'e- been trained
in first aid for accident work
and their attitude is very good."
Some, streets at present have
no names and others as many
as three which is not. very help-
ful to anyone. The new signs
are simplicity itself and are
marked Rue... for 'streets run-


of accidents and where "selec- Department motor-cycles speci-
tive enforcement" is.' necessary. al- channel and tuned to.'a trans-.
Many more improvements have mitter-receivr ih th e patrol
been added for Port au Prince cas',' and a machine used, to
traffic including extra traffic paint stripes down the cehtre'of
lights in addition to the existing the roads and mark out pedest-
sets Eight two-way radios for (Continued on page 16'j


Caribbean Construction Co. S A.

Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD


Phone: 3955. P. O. BO. 284


I JI


a









lii

4
3


rung n ast and west and Ave... --535ud
for Atreets running North and 3. uduQua.
South. Ultimate objective -of the Dvresses and. Shirt made on ordenM
Department is with the aid of and deliOerid in 24 hours '
clearly marked streets, to make shiptote St es
spot maps showing various types a.4





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SO
JIM I !ill! i : I I


SUNDAY APRIL 23, 19611






SUNDAY APRIL 23, 1961


"HAITI SUN"


(Continued from page II)
lands seething \with political
discontent; but unfortunately
they do not know about Jean
Jacques Dessalines the great -
the true founder of the Haitian
Independence neither Christ.
opher the warriorr builder of
a citadel, the eighth wond,&r of
the world, neither Capois,-La-
Mort who, on the battlefields of
the great antillais epic, ex\pres.
scd, in the clash of the swords
and the clatter of machine-juns,
the tine quality of the negro
brat cr.. Nor do they know about
Gabart. "the valiant", whose
outstanding strategy completely
demolished the French battal-
ions. '

The history is not all known
because, first, of the linguistic
barriers existing between our
Continents and above all, of the
lack of interest on the part of
the defenders of colonialism. So,
the glorious lustor,' of the Haiti-
an struggle and War of Inde-
pend-ncL- is shadowed b~ the
coloirualist aind their propagan-
da; but, in spite of their efforts
to drive this heroic feat to the
backlines of history, it remains
one of the most authentic and
moving pages in the annals of
world history.

On the onuii hand, the Capioos,
the Fongs. the Mondongs, the
Peuls on the other hand, the


Aradas, the Nagos, the Ibos, structures the application of
the Congos who came from Gui-' which \would hale made Fiance
nea, Ivory-Coast, Dahomey, Ster- the most powerful nation in the
ra-Leone, Gold-Coast, Cape-Pal- world. His ideas for a Common-
mas, ttc, have intermarried wealth were adopted by En-
themsel\es in the melting pot gland many years after, thus
of lhstory to create the Haitian giving birth to the British Corn-
race \iuch thanks to the occi- monwealth. His conception of
dental contributions, to boot re- Associated States wiuch lie pro-
suited in a community with its posed to Napoleon was not to
own peculiarities. However, th tethe liking of the conqueror. In-
old African background has still stead Napoleon preferred to des-
been pieserxed and it has im- troy the bridges and extermin-
pregnated deeply into the whole ate those misguided Africans.
people a stamp of originality. He paid deal. for his tactical
Proud of belonging to Africa, mistake and was thoroughly dis-
Haiti is always looking back illusioned in his dreams of build-
over her past to praise the gen- ing an immense French Empire.
ius of her heroes and martyrs, This blocked his chlanies of an-
who -for more than two centur- nexing Louisiana and the Antil-
ies of allegiance to France laises of the French Empie.
strove to establish a negro per- In the words of Leopold Se-
sonaity in the Caribbean.. dar Sengh at the Cotonou Con-
ference liln Africa) held in
Toussaint Louverture one of 9 Fance is alas lae
the brightest of our geniuses realise a reform". This is one
who lied forty years in slavery of the best observations evCe
is studied'most attentively by made b) a statesman on the
historians fascinated by his ro-socological and international po
mantle personality. He is at the litical fi~ld. The generous ir-
summit of the great historic s that hae al s charac-
past, especially of all that made sed the Fench ntion, he
possible thee the French at on,
possible the, negro miracle in love of ideals, of beauty, of good-
this part of the \world ahvalss\
this part of the world aelwa Nliess, and her entire pltulosoph.
at the crossroads of fiery poli- of e based on beauty did no
tica dm of life based on beauty did not
ncal dogmas.
help her to avoid the errors
The Louverturian conceptions and omissions that she has beer
are. therefore, the boldest and committing
the most original. Throu g h
statesmanship, he had created These contradictions have
one of the most rational political been responsible for all the de


viations, and various unexpect-
ed shift of positions resulting
in the fahure of her best insti-
tutions, and missing the most
advantageous situations which
would have made France a pro-


Haiti Is There...


sperous cowutry. The community
idea conceived by Toussaint
Louverture, slave of Breda who
died on the summit of Jura,
has been finally applied to the
French overseas territories aftei
the failure of the Integration or
assimilation plan and other po-
licies. The community principle
embodied in the Haitian Consti-
tution of 1801 took France one
hundred and fifty-nine t159i
.\eais to appreciate and apply.
Too late! There is a clamour
from everywhere for the serv-
ices of the French Overseas De-
partments with their adninistra-
tive experience and for their
maturity. Can we consider the
Franco-African Community
principles incompatible vith the
Independence fe v e r sweeping
across Africa? Africa awakened
from her lethargic slumber by
the inroads of this distressing
civilisation is caught up in new
doctrines, of state, society, and
human existence.

The old continent, of course.
\\wshes to ban all sorts of colon-
ialism, endeavours to establish.
through her new leaders the best
possible form of state to pro-
mote progress and to preserve
the spiritual and moral values
that lie deep in her, and know-
ledge in furthering her econo-
mic existence. From the Atlas
to the Cape, from the heights of
Fouta-Djalon to the bristling
peaks of the ancient highlands
of East Africa, the watchword
is Independence: and it is man-
ifest in the social and interna-
tional picture, but is divided by
various doctrinal conceptions of
the shape that the new society
should take

Would they establish a vast
Confederacy or Federal Ensem-


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ble? Would it be one imperative
of History?... Or would it be a
positive proclamation of the
United States of Africa river the
10.000,000 square kms. of land,
such as the great African lead-
er N'Krumah dreams of?
The Pan-African mnoement,
since Dr. \. E. Burgardt du
Bois in his "Declaration of the
World" advocated comn plete
equality. of the negroes with the
whites, Marcus Garvey in his
"Declaration of the Rights of
the Negro Peoples of the
world" George Padmore in
"Pan-Africanism and Commun-
ism" and "Revolution of -the
Gold Coast" who are the spi-
ritual leaders and men of ac-
tion. crystallized itself several
decades ago. Dr N. -R Duchein
from Libelia, President Pan-
African Unification Organiza-
Lion. in his suggestive booklet
entitled "The Pan-African Man-
ifesto" published in Accra, in
February 11, 1957 (Guinea Press
Ltd., Accra), has largely con-
tributed to spread the Pan-Afri-
can idea.
It is, of course, the first do-
cument expounding a conception
of Pan-Afri'-ani'sm and submit-
ting to the African elites the
reason why the black race has
to be united and the means to
attain federation.

Vert racial, even racist, Dr
Duchein wants the unification of
Africa south of the Sahara, that
is to say, of black Afrca, in a
mighty black state able to coun-
terbalance the powers of the.
world.
Partisan to a close collabora-
tion \with the North Arab States
with regards to the defence of
the Continent, he is against their
participation within the Federa-
(Continued om page 14)


PAUE IS


PAP-I14-EU








rauii .14 SUNDAY APRIL 23, 1961


" HAITI SUN"


Haiti Is The


(Conlinued from page 13)
tion due to the fact that they
had already embraced Pan-Ara-
bism.
The Pan-African thought has
become not only an intellectual
aspect without connection to the
socio-politic reality but a poli-
tical concept of which N'Kru-
i nah endeavours to be the cham-
pion. This statesman, who hke
Toussaint Louverture, has set
h. himself ip in the Eagle's re-
gion and tries to stana on the
'rock of a large Federation has
;' one aim in his life: realization
of the unity of the Continent.
"It is my unique dream," he
exclaimed, in propounding his
'.;igoitical ideas, "and f shall re-
aze it."
: Will he see this dream mater-


,; And another leader of Africa,
: 'Sekou Toure, Guinean Chief of
State, whose nationalism and
sense of patriotism are above
any question, joins the N'Kru-
Smah's federalistic group. The
Ghana-Guinea Union created on
., November 23, 1958, was an op-
portunity tor him to state sol-
':" emnly in the Constitutional laws
of the State "The Republic of
Guinea supports without any re-
serne any policy promoting the
establishment of the United
States of Africa." This object-
ive throws a light on the pohti-,


differing conceptions, tribalism
and other factors are mere
theories at this stage of politi-
cal realities based upon patriot-
ism and nationalism.
Of the three black leaders on
the present political scene, we
have to look at the position of
W. V. S. Tubman, President of
the Republic of Liberia.

Let us say, first, that he is
a great statesman of remark-
able. clearsightedness. Within a
very short time, he enhanced
the social, moral and economic
status of Liberia and made it.
possible for the black people to
confde more and more in the
future of their race and in their
potentialities. I have compared
him, with regard to his means.
ures, to Toussaint Louverture.
the great negro genius whose
thought symbolizes an eternal
lighthouse. I think I am not
wrong nor am I exaggerating
in stating this. For in politics
Jhe has the sense of moderation
which makes him one of the
most attractive and remarkable
personalities.

President Tubman diverges
where Sekou Toure and N'Kru-
mah adhere to the plan of Pan-
African principles. He is against
the surrender of sovereignties
as a whole. He prefers to pre.-
serve the identity of each count-


cal conception of this statesman, ry in a real Union bounded by
when, at last, to achieve his ob- economic and social ties. In


Sjective he issued a communique
in which he allied himself with
'the example of the "thirteen
America"; he adopted the Union
flag and agreed to surrender
certain subjects with a view to
strengthen this c e n t r e. This
great leader had just come to
.fulfil a historical act of very
great importance6 In laying
down such a principle he accepts
the creation of African Federal
Union. the establishment of fa-
vourable means for the new or-
ganization, and the facilities for
political education in the new
communities that are having
liberty and independence.
All considerations on the inter-
nal stiucti-re of these States,
their linguistic differences, the


fact, he professes Interdepend-
ence that will enable each sister
state of Africa to develop her
own personality, and of civil,-
zation.
WiU he see hls points of view
succeed?
The Tubmanian doctrine of a
Confederation of states that will
preserve, their independence is
sound in every regard. But this
is incompatible vith history
which seems to further the idea
of large unions. The great feud-
al empires are reminders. It
will certainly take a long time
before these States can ever
achieve the ideal due to conflict
of forces. However, with the
present formation of the various
small federations -that of Mali


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dreadful fights, being tormented nent. Thus very soon with the
by his rulers, he died in impri- coming into existence of sever-
&re l sonment. al independent states which will
Why did they not put into ap- restore to the race its dignity
plication this Constitution of 1801 and prestige, the leaders could
in order to prevent th6 secession exclaim as formerly the patriots
comprising Senegal and Sou- of the Overseas territories? Washington, John Adams, Li-
dan (The split of this Federa- Fortu n a te ly the nineteenth vingston, Patrick Henry gather-
tion is but an evolution of His- century has gone by with its ed under the Tree of Liberty
tor;y.)- the Union Ghana- endless martyrdom of the black for securing Union and Victory
Guinea- which is in full activi- race; the second half of the cried out that there are no more
ty since the Joint-Declaration of twentieth century characterized Virginians, no more Pennsylva-
May 1, 1959, issued in Conakry by the launching of interplanet- nians, no more New Yorkers,
and the last Joint-Communique ary rockets, has exploded the etc.. but Americans, so, these
dated June 1, 1960, the basis of rotten myth of the ancient order' African Guineans, no more Ivor-
a new African structure is laid of things. By these recent deve- ians, etc., but there are but
for the realization of the ideals lopments, the sun or fndepen- Africans..
making Africa a great continent- dence shines on the black conti- S. V J R .


al power which, with her 220
millions of inhabitants will make
her voice felt in the internation-
al counsels.
The teaching of the history of
Haiti is very edifying. The phi-
losophy that we draw from it
convinces us of the vacuity of
ideas that spreads over the
world with regard to native in-
feriority of the negro and his
inability to appreciate moral
values. In 1749 was born in Saint
Doningue in the furnace of slav-
ery, a small wretched negro
whose name was Toussaint Bre-
da and later Toussaint Louver-
ture. After reaching the adult
age he became Chief of Army
and then General in Chief. He
recognized the principle of in-
ternal autonomy and proposed
to Napoleon the formula of the
semi-Independent Communities
in the conception of ASSOCIAT-
ED STATES.
The Constitution that he pub-
lished to lay down the basis
of his philosophy is identical to
the Jurido-pohtical formula that
France voted towards 1957 -
one century and a half later-
under the name of "Loi-Cadre."
The slavers at that time protest-
ed bitterly, and after several


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UNDA APRIL 23, 1961 .


SUNDAY APRIL 23, 1961


t'AGE 14


.


L I





AY APRIL 23, 1961
APRIL 23, 1961



"Joseph report

--
6N


I .1
Not to be missed is a Friday night at the Sans Souci starring
Toto Blssainthe... hardly an exile cuban in town to cheer on the
invaders. They had either migrated to the U.S. or drifted to Jam-
aeca... Reports circulated in New York that Mole St. Nicolas was
being 'used as a staging area for Cuban counter-revolutionaries
aunl that Miro Cardona was there with his .exile government wait-
big for a beachhead were proven false... group of workers who
massed before the United States Embassy Wednesday were prac-
tising marching for May Ist not demonstrating... Mrs Gerard
Ettinne flew to Leopoldville (Congo) to join her teacher husband
along with her children Danielle, Albert and Bernardette... Law-
yrfi Georges Rigaud and Legros-4eturned to college Rue du Centre
this week... Edouard Baker (Sugar planter) wlio has grown only
gray hairs during past six months has graduated from the Rue
du Centre... The Page-setter asks to be excused for placing a cut
ol the beautiful germah visitor in place of the' lovely Tobago
(Robinson Crusoe beach in the Travel section last week:.. Candi;
date'Dato Dauniec waded into candidate Constant over Radio Car-
ibe criticising his manner of campaigning etc just like old
times... -Man identified as Tichoutle was discovered in the -middle
of the main thoroughfare of Bel Air Thursday. morning tied up
like a parcel of' old shoes his crime... wont leave other peoples
women alone... Sales of radios climbed expectedly this past week
with all Castro conscious Haitians living with an ear in the radio...
Lt. Jim Bonthron and wife Marljke will go. to live in Montreal
when his tour of Duty with the Marines ends. He holds dual citiz-
enship (U.S. and Canada). His father down with the rest of the
family for the wedding is the famous Olympic runner of the 30ees...
One Wounded here in the Cuban invasion was a griot fiend who
was stubbed at Gtons restaurant on Delmas road by a fork weild-
ing companion planning a pincer.movement among a table full
of the excellent -thirty cent (U.S.) Griot and tassot... The Freres
Road disappeared with the rain Thursday night...

The beautifWl 1960 Lincoln sedan belonging to Ex-Senator Ulricl
St-Louis was the first casualty of the campaign for primary elect-
ion' April. 12. At Coupe pintade- between Ennery and Gonaives the
he !y luxury auto took a swan dive and ended like a bagged duck.
'MrSt Louis was visiting his hometown of Plalsance where he is
s 1i-dng for the Legislative Chamber... A Chef de Section (Rural
Po leman) from the South Coast was jailed this week when he
tr. to flatten his Parish Priest. Reason he went for the Priest -
s6ione had prevented his marrying a giri in the Capital because
bhiiad a place and three children bad: ho'.ie and he suspected
hPriest... Dick Korner General Motors Field Sales man in the
ewas over for a visit from his. Sa:t Juan base this week..
?'ilue Fils-Aime and Jean E. Villard are fi:ace. Another son
oJD.and Mrs Elle Vilard Max, is engaged to Mile Stecher...

.Wand Mrs Emeric Percy left Saturday for Switzerland, t anco
SMorocoo. Ex-President Elie Lescot was at the airport to spe
l ughter Elaine depart. The Percys are on an extended tour
a... Marvin D. Anderson of Saint Paul. Minnesota here to
ly with Ti Ge Chancy over the sales of Thermo-Fax Off-
opy.ing Machines (no office should be without one according
to Ge) dined at Sans Soucl Friday night.. Toto Bissainthe's ren
S`'of Frenc.i and Martiniquian songs were the mbstest and
n cited Tohi as better than anything he had seen m Paril
"It Paul for that matter... Mrs Al Nonstas returned from
l ast week wit~ daughter Gloria and two grandchildren Eli-
tthree months and Tonio 1 yr... Jacko Sassine returned
tourist bureau in Miami yesterday... Songs being made pop-
T re. y Toto Bissainthe Bada are "Tr me fails turner la
IT "Mon Honrmme", "Tu te laisses caller "Doudou pas pleu
r pad "Ne gain mlauvais nianles"... La (.omtesse Rt aDel
a'de Capri, an artist of international statue is sejourning
Lele... Mr and Mrs Robert Galliard are home from a tour
SElza.Salgado flew to Miami yesterday...


"HAITI SUN "


Old Candidates Get...
(Continued from page 1)
the forthcoming election was
announced. Their aim is report-
ed as good.
Their bone of contention ap-
pears to be that the onl9 time
they see their representative
they see the representative
they sent to Port au Prince is
election. The long interval be-
tween elections has given many
a constituent an unwanted feel-
ing that eventually manifest it-


FETED HERE Baguidv Returns
From Africa
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth
of England was toasted here on Foreign Minister Joseph Ba-
the occasion of her birthday guidy returned from a tour of
Friday. the new African Republics of'
Senegal. Dahomey and the Re-
British Ambassador and Mrs, public of Liberia this week.
J. G. Corle, Smith gave a Minister Baguidy was accom-
splendid noon reception at their panied on his tour by Michel
residence in Debussy attended Aubourg, Chief of Service of the
by Secretary General of the Fo- Department of Interior


PAUE i1.


self in the urge to lob a rock eign Office Dr Adrien Raymond.
onto tQe old candidates noggin. Army Chief of Staff General and
This of course in not a gen- Mrs. Pierre Merceron, high gov- essmdn
eral occurrence there are ex- eminent officials, the Diploma- tish C
ceptions to the rule. tic and Consular Corps, Busin- wives..


and members of the Bri-
ommonwaalth and their


(au




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Foreign Minister


QUEEN ELIZABETH






SUNDAY APRIL 23, 19i


I'AILh 16


Traffic Advisor


(Continued from page 5) Goes To Cambodia
island already so tortured is going to know the shock of a terrible (Continued from page 12)
comotibon. Brothers are going to kill brothers. rian crossing were received last
The event is of an exceptional gravity. The consequence can year.
be terrible for our Americaand for humanity. It will not be long Several of the Traffic Depart.
Sent's officers have been sent
before we feel then in Latin America where it is needless to to the United States to study
I hide it, the fundamentals of the Cuban revolution and the ideas traffic conditions and have re-
it pursue find the most sympathetic echo. Is the Cuban conflict turned with a fund of new ideas.
Whichh' in its first declaration of the morning, the American Gov- Among them are Capt. Christian
ernement wants to size down to the dimension of an internal Theodore, in charge of Traffic,
who underwent a six month
struggle, of a civil War, going to enlarge to the dimension of course in the U.S. at the North
a struggle between the world Powers between the URSS and the Western University and visited
USA? traffic departments in the Mid-
It is going to provoke tremors and distress in certain countries West and East Coast, Lt. Arcel
'in our America passionately divided on the Castro revolution. Toussaint, in charge of Accident
Investigation did a three month
,.If in. Latin America we sympathize with the superior ideas of that U.S. course. Two further mem-
5. revolution, many think that Castro deviated from the line he bers to gain outside experience
I.ld ad set in the Sierra Maestra and that he is engaged in a danger- were Lt. Plummer, in charge of
us. direction especially for the security of the hemisphere. the drivers License and License
The gap will widen. Yesterday Brazil through the ipice of Plate Division, and Lt. Fritz
q Paret, in charge otor Cycle Pa-
IQuadros 'was saying positively that it' would not tolerate any trl, who did a 3-month course
tervention in Cuba be it continental or extra-continental. The in Panama.
e iezuelan Senate adopted last week a resolution in the same
e. Velasco Ibarra President of Ecuador had also opinionated DU BARRY EXPERT
Sthe Cuban peoples auto-determination. SCORES HERE
Hilda Martinez. beauty (oun-
cellor for Du Barry Products
The Quito conference, where the Cuban question was going to er r Du Bay uc
made news in feminine circles
4e .the center of debates threatens to become more than explosive of the Capital this past week.
iid.to provoke a dangerous crisis for theinteramerican collective The prim expert is reported
system. It is very probable fiow that the Quito conference will to have imparted to girls and
i;:lot be held. ladies here her new techniques
in make-up, beauty care and
On the morrow of April 14 which was another anniversary of in make-up, beaut care and
II",'. skin analysis with success.
h iat nter-state organization which stresses to the highest-decree Scores of women consulted
Ie principal of non-intervention, .ore .may wonder about the new. Mrs Martinez at Claude Mar-
ziban tragedy if the OAS charter, the judicial system so labor- tn's Store and the El Rancho
Ius put together by numerous inter-American: conferences will Beauty salon. Unfortunately, Du
o-0ot be shattered. Barry representative's Claude &
t Helen Martin and Jean Theard
explain d, the Beauty Ex-
.. One can argue about the responsibility of the' one and! thi? pert had to leave, Monday to
oPther. But lhe 'brutal fact is there. Blood is flowing,in -Cuba and, fulfill other engagements but
S..plenty more of it will fldw. The deadly ferocious struggle.goes on, will return here next June.
1 During her visit, Du Barry pro-
Is the American community that one would like to call the. Durin her visit Du Barry pro
ducts, were sold out and special
American family going to tolerate that in our already tdrturea consignments of cosmetics ad
of cosmetics had
.i"hemisphere which goes through- the horrors, of misery ap" under. to be airlifted to Port. Victor
l dev,6opment that this bloody drama ta'ks place? Is.t "going:.to St Louis of the Claude "Martin
i.'emain indifferent to this fratrctidlal .iwad.. Office is to leave today for San
More than ever the USA the.OAS the peoples of s heisphe Jua where he will undergo spe
e at the crr cialized training with Du Barry
S products.
a t cs pdc

7 77



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--'


SUNDAY APRIL 23, 1961



Kennedy
.,,' 1


(Continued from page 4)
SECONDLY, it is clear that
this nation, in concert with all
the free nations of this hemi-
sphere, must take an even closer
and more realistic look at the
menace of external Commun-
ist .intervention and domination
in Cuba. \

rThe American people are not
coihplacent about Iron Curtain
tas-and planes less than 90
int.ifrom our shores. But a
nin Cuba's size'.is' less a
to our- survival than it is
Sfor subverting the sur-
viaof other free nations
out the Americas. It is
noti primarily our interest or
our security but theirs which is
now in ever greater peril. It is
Zor ,their sake that we must
show our will.

The evidence is clear and the
hour is late. We and our .Latin
frends will have to face the fact
that,.we cannot postpone any
tlnger the real issue of survival
):. freedom in this hemisphere
.tsdf. On that issue, unlike per-
ij.some others, there can be
y-$ ddle ground. Together we
nuit build a hemisphere where.
iredom can flourish; and
here any free nation under
side attack can be assured
'at all'our resources stand rea-
iy to respond to a request for
Sssiatance.
THIRD, and finally, it is clear-
*!'than ever,that we face a re-
ess struggle in every corner
globe that goes far be-
i' he clash of armies or even
armaments. The armies
there and in large numbers.
In clear armaments are
SBut they serve primarily
e shield behind which sub-
iA, infiltration and a host
l r tactics can steadily ad-
picking off vulnerable
1


areas one' by one in situations
which do not permit our own
armed intervention.

Revolution's Aims
Betrayed in Cuba

POWER is the hallmark of
this offensive -power and dis-
cipline and deceit. The legitim-
bte discontent of yearning peop,
le is exploited. The legitimate
trappings of self-determination
are employed. But once in pow-
er, all talk of discontent is re-
pressed all self-determination
disappears- and the promise
of a revolution of hope is bet-
rayed, as in Cuba, into a reign
of terror.

Those who staged 'automatic
"riots" in the streets of free na-
tdons over the effort of Cubans
to regain their freedom should
recall the long roll call of re-
fugees Who cannot now go back
to Hungary, or to North Ko-
rea, or to North Viet Nam, or
to East Germany, or to Poland,
or to any of the other lands from
which a steady stream of ref-
ugees pours forth, in eloquent
testimony to the cruel oppres-
sion now holding sway In their
homelands.
We dare not fail to see the in-
sidious nature of this new and
deeper struggle. We dare not
fail to grasp the new concepts,
the new tools, the new sense of
urgency we will need to combat
it, whether in Cuba or South
Viet Nam. And we dare not fail
to realize that it is this struggle
which is taking place every day,
without arms or fanfare, in
thousands of villages and mark-
ets and classrooms all over the
globe.
.The,message of Cuba, of Laos,
of the rising din of Communist
voices in Asia and Latin Ame-
rica -these messages are all


"HAITI SUN"


the same. The complacent, the
self-indulgent, the soft societies
are to be swept away with the
debris of history. Only the
strong, only the industrious, only
the determined, only the cour-
ageous, "only the visionary who
determine the real nature of
our struggle, can possible sur-
vive.

No greater task faces this na-
tion or this administration. No
other challenge is more deserv-
ing of our every effort and en-
ergy. Too long we have fixed
our eyes on traditional military
needs, on armies prepared to
cross borders, or missiles pois-
ed for flight
Nowl it should be clear that
this is no longer enough that
our security may be lost piece
by piece, country by country,
without the firing of a single
missile or the crossing of a
single border.
We intend to profit from this
lesson. We intend to reexamine
and reorient our forces of all
kinds, our tactics and our ins-
titutions here in this commun-
ity.
We intend to intensify our
efforts for a struggle in many
ways more difficult than war,
for disappointments will often
accompany us.
For I am convinced that we
possess all the necessary res-
ources, and all the skill, ard all
the added strength that comes
from belief in the freedom of
man. And I am equally convin-
ced that history will record the
fact that this bitter struggle
reached its climax in the late
1950s and early 1960s.
Let me then make -clear, as
the President of the United
States, that I am determined
upon our system's survival and
success, regardless of the cost
and regardless of the peril.


VAGE i1


ONIONS

FROM


OD


V


A


Onions of first quality are available at the

sales counter of ODVA at the corner of Rue

des Cesare and Rue du Centre, at the following

prices:


11Olbs.-Bags

50lbs.-Bags


15 Gourdes

15 Gourdes


Wholesale orders will be filled on the basis

of Gourdes: 2.75 per 10lbs. bags (Minimum


10 bags) and Gourdes:
um 10 bags.)


14 per 50lbs. (Minim-


''I


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AND BUY HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS

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ON THE RUE DU QUAl
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" HAit 1 1


SUN "


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ITTeL a T L


Correspondent)
Dr Patricia C. HerLert, [rom
EducYtion Division of Pote Cole.
will leave thid country in a fei S ch
days. For mon than site
months, sher wolkned with the o-.
Sficials .of the Education Depart- RITUAL DANC
: ment and teachers of the North RIAND MOD'1.
in p an ning improvement of
schools and helping people de.-
shote d themselvep to phe le de. r. PATRICIA HERTERT at a falrewell party given at Milot
^voted themselves to .the struggle Dr RICIA Hert
S:`againdt illiteracy. in her nonr, receives a bouquet 'ot fldwers from a young Haitian
admirer.
; Dr Hertert became very po- nice buffet was offered and. the.
-pular among peasants living in attendants enjoyed drinks, sand- biasi textile exec., returned to
rural areas, joking with them, wiches, cakes etc. Late in the Chdticoune last Monday.
omet es in creole, explaining night, they danced and early i,'
to thA with a great patience the morning, people left the re. x x
I~wy tife must send their child- ception-room converted into a RObert 0. McDaniel, Kingston,
tdilchool and to learn them- ball-room. Jamaica bank manager, is vaca-
ele how to read and write. tiontrng at Hotel Choucoune.
dr dldiily contacts with Haitian When Dr Patricia Hertert
eifhes encouraged them in reached the micro' to thank all x xx
r Work to reduce quickly the people who were so kind to her, ElifTy MacNeal Tnpp is going
i tlliteracy in this country. in many eyes tears cold be to ,irake grandparents of Bar-
doth' tired, Dr Hertert who seen. Peasants of the North, baitn and Mac this coming July.
akf French and gets along Education Division personnel of Hdrley Smith and Dick llen~
'Creble did 'a 'fint' job dating 'Pdte Cole and Educatiofr-Departo- (D 's son) were nearly tossed
si-emonth stay with Pote ment, yourg boys and girls of out'llof a Washington Hotel for
oie. Teachers whb had the op- Cap Haitien and other northern plamng the "Bongo" drums.
iprturllty to cooperate with her, rural zones will miss Dr Her- Didl is coming down on vaca-
trganied on March 25th last a tert, for, she is recognized by E11 May. 20th. *. -
tsjlendid farewell party. The re- everybody as one ot'thei most x x x
tceptorl took place in one of the conscientious technician ever as- ~B ard de Verteuil Cocoa ex- The Katherine "D.
nice bUlngs- raised at Miot- sigaeldt to Haiti by ICA. pton loan,to Point Four, left' follows the same pt
S'bi-:otie Cgle. Many. orators de- for -good on Friday to return the same. diplomN
livered speeches, to magnify the home to Trinidad. Banque, Agri-the
gram realized by-this- very TRA cole came through with his re-
f techno ician o .U ori- Te return ticket at' the last minute. DUNHAM SCHOC
neer e~rard'Jospitre, Coordn- THIS WEEK xxx
r of the Organization,. Direc- Whitey Whitehrirst 'is bacl ... nrl now
tor Antoine Diis, head of the Mary L. Gordon and Gladys from Miami and still has his
tEducation Divisien and many Taylor, both of Beacon, N. Y, a stk t hr wih r
instructors of Edireati6n and R- who were aboard the Ciistobra bands.
ral 'Development Division told on its last call last week; lunch- xx
the guests about Patricia Her- ed at Le Perchoir. On the table Sammy Ferber is going to the' NI ROND PO~ N -
tert and what kind of job she was a Nescafe jar with.a -small Bahamas on lobster business,
1.did at Pote Cole. live snake in ih the ladies had for which the world is hungry. Daily from 10:00am t
collected somewhere., '
I:Loely girls apd ladies work-
iok, with the project presented x x x
flowers andi souvenir-gifts td Charlie Shayne left Friday 4
AMiss Hertert who thanked with for six weeks in the StAtes, fol-
; appropriate words She Was tiu- lowing a bout with the dentist.
Vly much affected by so sincere ,
.',nd deep feelings demonstrated x x x E A
:. by her former collaborators. A Lionel Delorme, French-Colom- .W


S. j1 ,,.
ii ii I. Ii ...


CONSULT ',

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S architect U. of M.

for FO

decoration BETTER CAKES WIT

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BETTER TASTE.
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AM of Port '.al lPrin:
euramme and delivers.
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ML OF NEW YORK

Sfor classes.
RESTAURANT 'OF

- (Gite de I'Exposition).

o noon -- 4pm to 6pm.





MAZINWi





TAL

,p 1


rH


Dr Patricia Hertert
Leavwy Hait
(by Our Cap Haitien


SUNDAY APRIL 23, 1961
-'


Sunnam

o01


4flooooe

7 C *~' i
'l 7f


`7,75,7


__~~ __~_______ _~L____~_ ~__~__I~__C




:I~ ~ ~~f '* 'd ''


' APRIL 23, "1961


' hA i iUN


$12,000
12


ra -.1


iad helped launch
',nt Center opened
Ji..' 1Qg~o


CANCER


the Treat-
in Novemb-


*. iT,. ,/.

,The "CLinique des Tumeurs"
as the Cancer clinic built by the
league on the grounds of Hosp-
ice Saint' Francois de Sales is
calledis opened daily from 9 am
to Noon for the general public
'and is accessible from the Rue


;Lareron.


FUND


In 195Q-60 $8,000 were raised
and last year $9,607.78. $1,200 of
the proceeds from. a special be-.
nefit ball held at 'the Sans Souci
'in December it this years initial
donation to the fight against
Cancer, one of .the most prevel-
ant killers in this country.

Gina Celestin and Mrs Rob-
ert Heini are leading a group
of civic-minded ladies in collect-
ing funds throughout the Capi-
tal this week.


German Minister
Returns Today
German Minister Kurt Lue'd-
de-Neurath returns today from
three months home leave.
Minister Luedde-Neurath and
his family spent most of their
vacation in the Black Forest re-
gion of Germany.
Dr. Faustino Perez
New Dominican
Consul General
Dr Faustino Alfonso Perez
has taken up his duties here as
Consul General of the Domini-
can ,.Republic in Haiti according
to a report published by Le Jour
Friday.


Dr. GHISLAIN
! i .


GOUJRAIGE ,TO;.. SPEAK
.. ,. ,


The Institute "National de will speak on the occasion. His'
Formation Artistique La Compa- talk is entitled "La Litterature.
gnie Gerard Resil" observes its Haitienne Contemporaine," une
first anniversary April 27 at the literature nee de 1'Angoisse et
French Institute, de l'Inquietude./
Author Dr Ghislain Gouraige which
,,


Building Up Of Breadbasket

Continued by ODVA
': y. g '''


:' PREVENTING THE CLOGGING of irrigation canals in the Artibonite Valley, workers retained
';by ODVA strip weeds from the' Canal bed and b anks. All the canals on the left bank of the river
'*are presently being spruced up as illustrated above.


OSSE NABOTH, once the bed of the Artibonite River is now a mosquito ridden Depression with
rme 100 land-locked lagoons over 300 hectares of messy land where some tive thousand people
niggle desease and floods.
-' a $90.000, special US 1961.Fiscal Year gran t approved recently by the Joint Council for Eco-
Mic and Technical Aid to Haiti, 50 hectares of the depression will be g ade habitable and 250
Ctares of irrigable land will be drained. The drainage system will be so constructed as to per-
I control of fresh water flow through several of the existing lagoons and set up as fish pro-
!tion pools,


Ref. 7517 <(NecPlus Ultra),ofselfwinding
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*k ,


PAGE 19


C( continued frism )


;





'Rightt
:mr .,







V yeai's exports -in some cases
S'fifteen cents per bag- forms a
F' fund for promotional activities.
i The World Coffee, Promotion
SCommittee that was set up to
administer this fund of more
'than eight -million dollars a
Year is composed of one repre-
.sentative each from Brazil, Co-
!fomnbia,- the, French Community,
L.and 'Portugal, while Mexico and
S'El .Salvador represent the other
SLatin American producers. Pro-
rl.iotion' campaigns are under
f~Vwy. in six countries of Western
Europe .

,'ibi',. Agement,' through the
pE io.n' ffun, supports the
iPi ert4dtc :Coffee Bureau,
'wl pmotdM.. cttee rinking in,-the
State'iand Canada, and
inducted caffee research. The
au, -an' instrumentality *,of
governments of thirteen La-
SAmerican c countries and
rto Ricoa was formerly sup-
,ted by dire!' assessrhents. of
'e .nts per bag exported by
Members to the U. S.

SToday the average U. S.
uisevife gets sixty-three cups
i. coffee per pound; ten years
go. she got forty-six and the
coffee was .better.. "Coffee with
is' coffee in it" has :b& tebe-
mag -more .and more preial-
., The Pan-American Coffee
i aU'.s Coffee Brewing instil-
|ite in New York, partially "sp-
S ted by the trade in the United
a.SiPatdippromotes the,best brew-
p.ng techniques. Its golden cup
. award goes to establishments
i'.whose samples meet its rigid
t' 'standards.
>" a t


"HAITI SUN"


Amount...


As surpluses continue to pile
up, the countries suffering the
*most from the coffee problem
are working hard to come up
with new uses for the coffee
-bean. Excess stocks are already
providing coffee oil, caffeine
extract, and fertilizer, an. .
paste fodder for cattle is beiL.-
developed. Coffee-flavored lips-
ticks are now on the market in
Brazil.

But stabilizing the market on
a more permanent basis is still
the main concern, and a long-
term answer to' the problem is
urgently being sought. br" 'thc
Coffee Study Group, currently
under the chairmanship of (.S.
Assistant secretaryy of State for
Inter-American Affairs Thomas
C. Mann. A detailed study en-
titled The World Coffee Prob-
lem; Present status' of the In-
dnsf y and Futui06 Prdspeqts is
beliig prepared for-the group ,
leading research organizations
and, international institutions and
will be ready by April. .

In one part of this report, var-
ious aspects of a long-term agr-
eefent, 'b. include both consum-
ers and producers, are examin-
ed. It would go beyond the fix-
ing of export quotas; it would
control surpluses internationally
to assure their orderly disposal,
and encourage reduced or in-
creased output as the world si-
tuation demands, through, a sys-
tem of inceritves.

Some permanent arrangement
will have to be worked out. An
effective coffee-control scheme
must not merely restrict exports
but provide for a long-run flow


S:"MIAMIAN SEARCHES FOR SURVIVORS
OF CUBAN INVASION HERE

; Al Burt, the Miami Heraldsl ti-Castro invasion and is inter-
t night= city editor is in town on ested in visiting Mole. Saint 'Ni-
;.a search of Caribbean islands colas for a feature on the near-
,;for possible survivors of the An- est foreign soil to Castro's Cuba.


W l '.'



S' IDENTITY PHOTOS
SP~ASSPORT PHOTOS
DEVELODPWG
V^ ''>aA -wEwNTs
Ri REPRODUCTIONS,
SFastest Service In Town
/ 4Ave Marie-Jeanne, No. 5
4 Cite de I'Exposition


of supplies that is not out of
line with the ability of partici-
pating countries to maintain
stocks and, more important, it
must allow for demand event
ally to absorb part of these
stocks in addition to the new


Perhaps the biggest question
is how and when the major cof-
fee-consuming countries such as
the United States will decide to
participate in a long-term agr-'
eement. Their support -would .be
practically essential They would
benefit directly from the aspur-'
,ed regularity of coffee supply
and from increased earnings of
their own export sectdts, and
indirectly -but. perhaps most
importantly- from the effect
that economic stability, would
have "on the producing nations:
It has often been stated that
consumer nations should jbin n'
a broad.agreement because' the
ideological and political security
of the Western World is directly
dependent on its collective eqo-
nomic- security.'

As the Chairman of the Cof-
fee ,Study Group said in January,I
"There--are no easy measures
for solving the'problem,. Had
there been, the' problem would
have ', been solved 'long .ago."
However, we are on the goad
toward A solution, and with con-
tinued international. cooperationn
we should reach it.
Reprinted from March-Americas


JAMAICA --- HAITI

(Continued from page 1)
The selection of the Ligue Hai-
tie.nne De Bridge composes:
Louis Auguste, Andre Theard,
Franz Gerdes. Herard C. L. Roy,
Henri Reiher and Gerard Ther-
mitus. Jean Vorbe is the teain's
non-playing Captain.
A number of bridge fan sutp
porters who are accompanying
their team from Jamaica parti-
cipated in a tourney by pairs
Friday night at last night at the
Bellevue Club.
The Haitian League invited all
bridge players to participate in
the pair contest.
Tonight at 2:30pm and 8pm
the finals will be played and the
bridge playing public is cordial-
ly invited.
TENNIS LESSONS?
TOE ETIENNE
Experienced, patient and
meticulous
capable of making a champion
player of YOU!
lInscription For Lessons at:
Carlstroem St. No. 1377
Port au Prince Haltl.


INVASION
at widely separate points but in a
the Bahia de Cochinos the point f
indicated as (1) on the map. a
Czech Gun Hailed t
By Castro's Army, t
OFFICERS SAT FOUR- '
BARRELED WEAPON v
I HAIEDR EBE"tS e
HAVANA, April 21 (UPI) -
Premier Fidel Castro's army n
officers credited 'a multiple-
barreled Czech machine gun e
having beaten backs the invad-
ers who landed in Las Villas
Province Monday.
They said militiamen using
C
the weapon -originally designed
for anti-aircraft use- held back p
the invaders until reinforce-
ments cquld be. rushed from
HaVana to' me@t 'he-'attalk. ,The t
gun, known as fie Quatro Boda, a
(four barrqled-),. also shot- down
the invades'"'dircrdft. -
It was a bloody, battle for the
beachhead .en.'Ja3h[a de dochinos
and.'loss s' wW' Hiey *n" .a both e
sides, .jany N litia'mdn drown-
ed .i the ". s-wben

.. in th, ..*- .

The asuales werd. especially
hikh ;6-n ehaGovernbii t's side.
No figures weer artoiiced, .but
hospitals aKid clubs, in the d.- t
by towns yere.filled with wouhd-
ed. Sixty bodies.: were' buried t
yesterday in a common grave, a
A Cuban Armyofficer said the t
Castro men were "more chris- i
tia.n then they." .."We buried
their deAd ones in wooden cof-
fins while. bur own boys were
bnried,wl4ere they-fell," he said.
Took Vdtim'sto hit t
The' offers -said the attack-
ers took their wounded and dead
back to their ships whenetr ,
possible.
They said the high number oft
casualties was explained by the t
fact that the militiamen had to
fight in the open over *roadsd
where the men could be picked
off. They said the rebels. Used
tanks and recoil-less rifles plac-:
ed in strategic places and
"wounded .and' killed *many at
one time."

Government officials 'express-
ed surprise at some -actions of
the attackers. They said the
rebels picked up 180' workers
and several volunteer teachers.
mostly teen-agers assigned to
teach ,illiterates in that zone,
treated then well and released
them later.
Several captured. girls were
reported to have been ordered
to take off most of their clothes
and then sent out of the combat
zone because "this is no place
for you."

Boy,'14, Termed Hero
The Cuban Arrhy singled out
Haroldo Massone, 14 years old,


SUNDAY APRIL 23, iBI
*BIg


I FLOP. .
is a hero. It said'he escaped .
rom *the attackers and joined
a Cuban Government patrol to:
ight alongside .ren. The boy,y
armed with a Belgian semd-au-
omatic rifle, captured a revol-.
'er and a knife from one pison-.
r, it was said:
Haroldo said he saw four..Sher-.-
ian tanks debarked by the re-
els' but that others fell in the
rater and were destroyed. He
estimated that there 'were 500
avadeys.

The Cuban officers said Dr.
Cast'o had directed the battle
ersbnally and moved forward
ith his men They said Dr Cas-
o was still in the battle zone
llking with, prisoners, including
man who' killed a miilitiaman
while trying' to" escape 'to the
Jilted States.
Militiamen asked Dr Castro if
hey should take out tje prisn-
r and shoot himrarid Dr Castiro
replied, "No, but please take
im out of my sight,' they'te--
orted: ..,. -
'^. .' 4 ,.' .' ',
;They aid: ooie o.t Dr Castro's
ides. 'aw captainn Cnrvo, ds: kil-
ed at his side during the battle.
Attaef.les Called Wealthy
tastro officers said most of
he attackers wr 'members of.
healthy 'families' whoi lost ,all
heir holdings iuider' revolution-,
ry law. One man writing dcvwn'
he names of the prisoners said
t was like reading the rmem-
bership roll of the Havana
Yacht Club.

Cuban Army officers basted'
hat their men had recovered
ifter ,their initial setback at the;
invasion site and fought like
ions. At one point, an officer'i
said, "we ordered them to re-
reat so' we .could fire ',against':
he invaders with. light and hea-
vy artillery but the leader re-
plied, "I have never retreated
and I won't do it now'."
"It was the Quadro Boca that:
did' the job," the officer said.-
"They had everything imagin-|
abl9 to'.resist -- men, weapons'
and enough ammunition to sup-
ply .two regents, but they soon
lacked air support." Reinforce4
pmeits arrived and forced the
invades back.
When the rebels tried to go
into the Escambray Mountains
to join other, rebel forces there;
they .were caught by Cuban Ar
my men from behind "and wer
between two -fires, and crushed;,'
it was said.

Governmnt -troops still- arq
trying to round up the remain
er of the Invaders believed t
be still hiding in the swamp.
area. Dr Castro. was report
twenty miles away leading
group to cut off rebels fleeing
toward the Escambrays.


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