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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00102


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Full Text
Y A,


Weekly
Every
Sunday


\


POR;AURINCE, AITI Avenue Marie-Jeanne CITE DUMARSAIS EiSTIME Phone '2061 Vol XX Sunday MARCH 25th, 1962 Nb. 26 i -


V,.OA, DE OH
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f|t yif'I"La -T m ^ ^'^ wLlf ^ _


W 0r __^ *l "^^^^-^y*^^^^frfl^^ .* ^id^f


Colonel. iohard .Curtis, Chief .United States Air Force to Haiti,
accompanied by Lt. Clonee, Cr.iig, Inspector General, Headquart-
tis Carlbbesy.4 qopimapdvievwlug tables and chinaware donated
Is a ..p prqjept, .h, "Bouacee de Pain" in Petionville.



SPoP -- ifice Rotary/

To -B Me Charter
TO ^'i'. i' i .- -


The newly ia e 4 lacy
,Club of Podrt Affl hold
Its, charter 9f3.:ypn:
ing, March tgpe CsWtel-
ualti Hotel.. -me
p.rhidp In eptet ppal
world-wide ,ga '
on February ,Jie loe-
al Rotary Club di-tos.JRs a.-
mission with. i e
Hlon ceremoulesj, B DJ.
Arnold Straqs.. otL Rytary.Jub,
of Virginia, d legatloap, o-f
Rolarians fri WI. B.,ptary Cl0bp1


of Norfold.and Richmond, Va.
. -Mr. -Joseph A, Abey, President
'of Rotary Internatioral, will pre-
sent the charter to Dr. Harold
Wood, President of the local Ro-
tary 'Club, and welcome Port au
Prince Rotarians into Rotary's
.global fellowship of more than
500,000 business and professional
,men who belong to 11,000 Rotary
clubs in 127 countries.
,. Joseph A. Abey has been Pre-
rident and publisher of 6 news-
papers in Tennesseee, Virginia
and W. Virginia, and is now cir-
(Continued on page 13)


V~j re, Rotary


To. a new organization of business and professional
men of this conimunity, we extend a hearty welcome.
It is the Rotary Club of Port au Prince, and its memb-
ers are businessmen who have accepted a concept of
thoughtfulness .of, and helpfulness to, others that is
known in Rotary as the "ideal of service." This ideal
is held by more than a half million Rotarians in 11,600
cities and towns in 127 countries of the world.
The world-wide program of Rotary is fourfold: it,
seeks to develop acquaintance; it fosters high ethical
standards in business and professions and the recogn-
ition of the worthiness of all useful occupations; it en-
courages every Rotarian to apply the ideal of service in
",his own personal, business, and community life; and it
furthers the advancement of international understand-
ing and. good will through its world fellow l
(Coot lS on page 15)


New Tax


Harmful To


Investment?,
Businessmen, Haitian and for-
eign, are concerned with the re-
*eept Governmental decree taxing
sports entering under "fran
'chise donaniere" (Customs-free
entry) granted by previous leg-
idation. The tax on imports is
20 percent of the normal taX and
on, exports is 10 percent of sutl'
r,-)rmal tax.
lT he actual dollar value of
1i h taxes probably will not be
g.-at at least at the present r.te
o, incorporation, but' business-
n-on fear that slice complete tax
e empflon had been granted by
p envious laws, and comparative-
ly recently, it will have an un
fa orable psychological effort on
(Continued on page 1

Thurston- Sees
Watershed Progress
UNITED. STATES Amb'ssad-
or Raymond L. Thurston con-
tinued his review of American
aid projects Tuesday as he vi-
sited one of Haiti's largest de-
velopment areas, the Artibonite
WATERSHED.
There in the Central Plateau
above the Peligre Dam, joint
Htitian-American efforts are 'ie-
ing made to control erosion of
the Watershed's one million
acres and improve the living
standards of its 400,000 inhabit-
ants.
Travelling by boat, jeep, heli-
copter, horseback and frequently
on foot, Ambassador Thurston in-
spected many representative pro-:
jects, including several dempon-
stration farms, a community
school, five individual co-op.rat-
ing Haitian farms, "self-bolp"
road construction and the U; S.
financed $25 million Pelipre
Dam.
(Continued on page 11;

Haiti To Shoot
At Panama
Haiti's highly regarded rifle
feam departed March 22, bv U.
S. military aircraft for the Pann-
nma Canal Zone and the annual
Pan-American rifle matches be-
ing held there March 23-31.
The eight-man Haitian teini
enters the Pan-American compel.
tition with an enviable record in
the 1960 and 61 matches. In 1960
Haiti defeated all her Latin
American competitors losing on-
ly to the USARCARIB team. N
number of this year's team.
-(Continued on page 15)


D Cruisiz.,
Dr. Manfred Graf Von Linde sailed away from Haiti
before dawn Saturday morning after' being detained'
for five days by Haitian Police in the honeymoon tri
death of his wealth j socially' prominent New York
bride. His sudden unpublicized departure marked the'':
eend to a bizarre incident with macabre overtones that
not only intrigue Haitian but also American and was
a !headline winner, especially in New. York's tabloids.
"L'Affaire Von Linde" Included Mrs Von Linde died March ;4
sudden death, two burials, tiwo in Cap Haitien's Hostellerie du
autopsies and a surprise ending. Roi Christophe.. An autopsy con-
The thirty-eight-year-old plast- ducted at the scene certified the
ic surgeon was aboard the Home cause of death as i -e:t* aitack.
Liner Homeric when she sailed She was buried in the ground at'
for Nassau the last Port' of call 'Cap Haitien on March 15'.' There.'..'
on a Caribbean cruise shortly was no funeral service and Cur-
after midnight Saturday. tis Hough officer. manager of
Changed Name Plantation Dauphin who iS in
Von Linde, born Robert Emory charge of American Consular a-
Dent of Be r r i n g h a m, Ala- fairs in the Northern town ahrriv-
bama boarded the ship in the ed in Au Cap to' find the burial
harbor within hours of his sud- had already taken place in ad-
rin r e l e a s e from officer's (Continued on page 16)


quarters in the Port au Prince
Police Headquarters.
Left "Tonton"
The husky blonde teutonic
looking Von Linde took time to
shave off an accumulation 'if
whiskers at the US Embassy
iuf Tlffb ltid"' is 'ITugian-'I-"d
onton" the white Fr~ nch
poodle which he and his 5?year-
old wife brought to Haiti follow-
ing their March 1st wedding at
Wilton, Connecticut.
Charles Emmet, Jr., one of
Von Linde's two lawyers has re-
mained in Haiti to collect the
luggage. Tonton and her mink
coats.

New York Lawyers
Attorney Gerald Barandos of
"Barandes Barandes and Moss'
Manhattan Law firm represent-
ing Von Linde who flew here
Saturday morning left with his
client aboard the Cruise-Ship.
Charles Emmett Jr. told news-
man that their client had been
completely cleared in the Haitian
investigation into the death of
his wife at Cap Haitien.


.r. 1 7 t i g
1.`3


Dr. R. NAKOMO DUCHEIN,
Author of: The Pan-African Ma-
nifesto and of: Pan-Africanism,
the only Way To Survival.
(See Story on page 8)


Lawyer
"Liquidated

.. police Discrlse. .

On Saturday March 17th, about
7:30. p.m., the Police of Petion-
ville and Port au Prince were
advised o fthe assassination on
the road of Petionville of Mr E.
mile Noel, lawyer of the Port
au Prince Bar, who was return-
ing from a cockfight opposite
the cemetery of Petionville to
his home in Port au Prince.
Investigation permitted Police
to establish that the crime was
committed by LUC NAPOLEON.
(Continued on page 15)


GIANT EGG
MYSTERY IN CAP
HAITIEN


Two Monstruosities
Of Nature Uncovered
In its last edition, the Cap'
Haitian weekly "Le Nounean
Monde" revealed a curious in-
stance of Ihe overgrowth of the
terminal flower of a banana Iree.
The normal event wasn diines-.
ed at flaut-dnCap, in the vicinity
of Le Cap. A little farther a ire-
nendously big egg was also
found. No bird living in Haiti
is supposed to have laid thii fx-
travagant and hard-shelled egg.
Engineer Paul Bastien. a Ra-
diesthesist of Cap Haitien, de
'tected the two phenomenons and
alerted the agronomists and the
newsmen. The abnormal items
were photographed and mef;enl
ous further investigations will be
pade by the specialists.


lOC








''HAITI SUN''


Sunday MARCH 25th, 1962


In Haiti This
By AUBELIN JOLICOEU


W eek Misses Enora RowenaSimp-
son 18 and Ora :ugenia C'.,per
17 of the Buxton School of Wil-
R liamstown, Mass are currently


"*A twenty-two member Commission of Miex-
ican Jurists conducted by former President of
Mexico. Mr Emilio Purtes Gil, current Presid-
ent oi the National Commission of Insurance
of Mexico arrived Thursday morning to be
warmly greeted by a Welcome Committee in-
cluding the Secretary of State of Foreign Af-
fairs. the Secretary of State of Justice, the Sc-
cretary of State of Interior and National De-
fense, the President of the High Court of Justice. the Secretary
.general of the Foreign Affairs, the Chief of the Protocole, some
.. officers of the Presidential Guard. and many other Haitian officials.
: A batallion of the Casernes Dessalines formed a guard of honor.
Friday the delegation in an impressive ceremony 'at the Palac2
decorated President Dr Francois Duvalier with the insignas of the
order "De La Culture Mexicaine" the rank of Grand Croix. A ric.i
r program has been arranged for the distinguished visitors and an
account of their visit will appear in our next edition.
***The Seven Member Metropolitan Trade Mission of Toky'i pre-
sided over by Mr Hideichi Sasoki, President of the Association for
Foreign Trade of Tokyo arrived Monday and were joined here
Vu,'Wednesday by the Eight member Economic Mission of Japan in
I;. Latin America presided by Mr Ichiro Terao. Special Assistant 'o
...the 1Minister of Foreign Affairs and Manager of the "Mitsubishi
Shoji K.K."
SThe Economic Mission which arrived in company with Mr Sh -
geru Obayashi, Secretary of the Japanese Legation here was met
at the airport by the Consul of Japan in Port au Prince, Engineer
: Daniel Brun, the President or the Chamber of Commerce, Mr Louis
;, Decatrel and Mr Julien Lauture, General Secretary ,of the Chamber
' of Commerce and Mr William Theard on behalf of the Shell.
The Metropolitan Tradpg.Mission is on a ten day visit and the
:-.-Ecdonomic Mission stayed only three days here.
.'.***Lovely Josiane Vital, daughter of Promirnent Businessmian
|C.Gerard ,'Vital, Manager of., the Compagnie Generale Transailanti-
-'que and wife flew to Miami last Sunday in company with her
mother and her aunt, Mrs Lucierine Schmidt. Josiane, a Cler!.:
1 at the U.S. Embassy went to buy her wardrobe in view of her
Marriage with youthful businessman Ronald Madsen. The wedding
;.Will take place on April 28.
l**Three charming couples arrived here Monday for a three day

visit and checked in at the Ibo Lele. Irving Kastil, a furrier frc m
ji Wilmette, llinois and wife Doris; Mr Leonard Borris, a Realtor
: from Glencoe, Illinois and wife Helen; and Mr Norman Tucker,
a wholesale Jeweler from Glencoe and wife Deborah. They weIrt
taken around town and,;country by Marc Princy. They' made plan
for a return trip next, .ar. Doris is a fabulous Twister.
*I: Mr. William Julian Strauss and wife Beatrice from New Zork
I,;were met at the airport. Sunday by son Dr Strauss and his wife
of the Schweitzer Hospital in Deschapelles... Miss Beatrice Mazu-
ka,. a. medical technician fr6m New York arrived here last Suinday
Id was met at the airport by Mr Johnni Maglio, Haitian Vice-
Consul In New York and his brother Joseph. Miss Mazuka *was
delighted with a trip'to Jacmel.


visiting their relatives at the
Liberian Embassy.

*"Anybody has a request, ask-
ed Ray Garrison (a Marine of
the U.S. Embassy) as he was
about to put coins in the Jew-
box at the Rendez-Vous. Mon-
day night. I have one, prompted
Dan Allen, the piacide Bar Own-
er, Go home. It was 1:45 a.m.
and the boys got involved in a1
long discussion and did give any
hint that they would be leaving
soon.

***Mr Joseph Capobianco, an
electronic Engineer from Lagn-
na Beach, California and his
"ravissante femme" Audrey. ia
Stewardess for Pan Am stopped
here early this week for
a short visit. Joe and Audrey
were'Jsland hopping in the Car-
ibbean. They made a trip around
'the world last year and were
completing the tour before Au-
drey quit Pan Am. They were


' *Mr Stephen B. Kay., iI ,I1oc
business in Boston and wife J;.ne
a reporter stopped here thin!
week... Mr H. Edgar Simmonis
an Optometrist from Bronkl:ne
Mass. and wife Marion aroe cur
rent guests here... Hrs Eimyr;
Simmons Breene, a H. M. For
eign Service Officer arriveri
Tuesday'.
***Mr Arnold K. Davis, in In-
surance in New York City i
back again. He is introdit:ii;
his wife Betty and sons Rober.
14 and John 10 to the charm.
of Haiti.
"'Colonel Herbert Paul '.\int
erhagen. Army Attache of i!io
German Embassy in Washing
ton and wife Ursula stopped!
here this week.. Dr Edwin Hen
ry Schmidt from St. Louis, Me
and wife Elizabeth are current
guests here.
**'Dr Stanley Dwight Quanbeck.
newly graduated from the Uni
versity of Chicago arrived here
Wednesday to get familiarized


guests at the Grand Hotel 9Iof-.
son. Audrey is a marvelous dan-
cer.

***Mr Clive Morris, a company
Director from London and his BAR GEISHA &
French wife Susan., a Lawyer OPEN EVERY
flew down here this week and CUISINE, OF
were met at airport by Dr Jac I H t
ques Coicou. Mr Morris who is Your charming Hostess
a big art collector came here PRE
with the prompt purpose to get G ran d
some Haiban paintings. G a

Real Estate Agencv
LOISEAU & Co. I
15 Bourdon
Phone 2620
Cable Address: AILOICO


Renting of Houses, Apart-
ments, Bungalows, Camping
Houses for short or long
period.

Buying and selling of com-
mercial businesses such as:

Bars, Restaurants, Hotels etc.
Reservations at Hotels and
Guest-Houses
Joseph LOISEAU
Manager


with thhe tropical diseases ;to
is staying two months here in
view of preparing his specializ-
ation in tropical pathology. He
was met at the airport by Dr
Harold Wood, Head of the Health
Division for USAID and Dr Vic-
tor Laroche, professor of Tro-
pical Pathology at the Universi-
ty of Haiti.
***Mr James J. Feit, a Finance
Executive from Livingston, Nuw
Jersey and his beautiful wife
Anita were 'very impressed by
the char n s of the Mag'ic
Island. This charming couple
spent four days in Haiti.

*"Senator Manuel Moreno San-
chez, Majority Leader of the
Mexican Senate and his wife
Senora Carmen -T. de Moreno
Sanchez stopped -here yesterday
en route to Bolivia. Senator Mo-
reno is accompanied by his Ad-
judant, Major Nicolas Otamen-
di C. They are guests at the
Hotel Choucoune.


DUNHAMff
)UNCES
SALON GUINEE
EVENING FOR
THE FAR EAST
KATHERINE DUNHAM
3ENTS

Spectacle.

,:, } I


FOCUSING, COMPOSING AND
EXPOSURE SETTING IN ONE
COMMON VIEWER-

REFLEX CAMERA WrTD
NIKKOR 50mm F:2.5 LENS.
umm SINGLE -LENS--



Nikkorex


Nikon
QUALITY
OFFERED
IN
MEDIUM PRICE
CAMERA !


TUESDAY FRIDAY
At the Peristyle DANSE VAUDUN
In The SALON GUINEE
SPECTACLE' INTERNATIONAL
TRUE VAUDUN CEREMONY
AT THE OPEN AIR PERISTYLE "
SATURDAY .
Special Haitian Menu
Dancing To MOZART DUROSEAU'S Orchestra
FOR YOUR PLEASURE IN THE
COLONIAL SELLING OF ,t
HABITATION LECLERC
FAg .ITE PLEASURE PARK OF
PALI)INE BONAPARTE
5 MINUTES FROM PORT AU PRINCE ON.
l, THE' ROUTE MARTTSSANT

f J. L


PAGE 3


New At: ITTLE EUROPE

THE HOME OF. EXQUISITE GIFTS


[,',...................,. ....
I .. .. *": .. '- *
. .. h ..'* r~ ,.:!.':, .^ 'i .'.. '.l.',. '**"is-,, .:l .5"' '",ifl. i& ,

























"I"
'~'4


countryy "and the scenes of our
i'daily life. *


So' it happened 'that Mrs Jac-
queline Elie Joseph Nesti gave
a shot in hempown country For
Ie b.dfi, r. i d"i a* doze.n-
of her paintings are hanging
atengM- th,- entrihce .-balk-0of "E.
"Racho" 'hotel, 'axid the"d'exhibi-
tion previously planned for only
three days, is now,at.ah.,end of
its first .weMi':-uces. by our-o
sity -1 ot t-D.' :It ig ,rather' a
genuine interest in a- well-done
Stak.~-for the sincereness and the
S pdv.rful,. expression'.of an artis-





'F;"^- o 'fMFJac"i'e-
h -'Neat4fall to
elroduffion
flowers, still-


men are often painted in the at-
titude we are used to seeing
them: chin .supported by the
palm, bent shoulders, dull eyes.
They are squatting close together
and just at their feet our. tropic-
al fruits' which are- b listing with
the beauty of nature- shbwing in
through, their sparkling, rediart
colors. The contrast is alway-,
remarkable between those peop-
le, stricken by poverty, seeming-
ly abandoned to their fate, anid
the .multicolored fruit baske.:
extolling the prodigality of. the
nature.

-,This -eeling of extreme dejec-
tion is not the only impression
picked from the conscience of
.the people. The artist discloses
.also the. courage and the forti-
tde of our country people fac-
ing. misfortune, especially the
endurance of our countrywomen
skilfully walking to the market
with their vegetable produce on
the head.


Basket of flowers by Jacqucline (Made in Italy)


, Nevertheless, we regret that the,
artist chose the primitive style,
somehow revealing ugliness. to
define the noble faces of our
country people. Certainly an ugly
theme may give birth to a very
artistic.'work. But we' are ques-
tioning why some themes, un-
doubtedly beautiful by themselv-
"es, might be expressed in condi-
tions of ugliness? Sometimes art
gets out of shape, but the de-
formation is then necessary to
express much better the reality
(I am thinking of certain paint-
ings of Cedor, for example) and
never to betray it. In that res-
pect. we turn "our eyes away
from the scenes of peasant life
and look at the flowers of Mrs
Jacqueline Elie Joseph Nesti,
the flowers of our own country.

Bunches and Bouqiets

There are as many pictures of
flowers as of rural paintings.
Nine.
First there are bunches of
flowers of varied radiant hoes,
pleasant to see, looking like liv-
ing color. Then some flowers
painted around one color: blue,
and different shades of blue and
greenish-blue. Although t ho s e
paintings are less sparkling than
the others, they reveal a deli-
cate, almost chaste, touch. And
the..,touch of the brush is made
nearly impalpable. Finally, there
are some paintings in which the
flowers of some varieties are
presented in group: a bunch of
"cattails" (langue de chat) with
their pendant red vines and the
poinsettias (red-colored for six
months of the year, -' and green
the other months), so natural in
their impressive red shadings!
It even seems the eye can pen-
ceive the soft, velvet-like 'feeling
of the leaves.
Even people who don't appre-
ciate this style because it is con-
sidered an artificial one, will en-
joy seeing those paintings paint-
ed with deap fondness.
Items Of Every Day Use
The last five paintings are cer-
tainly the most beautiful and the
most impressive. They ire in
still-life style. This style has been
very often misjudged. Why is it
necessary to picture a lifeless
object instead of a human face?
And why the tendency to put to-


A Haitian Woman by Jacqueline (Painted in Italy)


The



Chc


Secluded :



zteau


Caprice

RESTAURANT EXTRAORblNAIRli
7.' ,


YOUR HOST RON DEAN
OVERLOOK PORT AU PRINCE
AND THE OCEAN
JUST OFF THE PETIONVILLE ROAD
IN MUSSEAU
"But Never On A Tuesday...
For That's Our Day Of Rest"


.Sunday MARCH 25tli, 1962 H A ITI SU N /


PLEASANT TO SEE ...


fRediscoeing The Country Through Mrs. JacquelmeNest aini

For the first time Mrs Jacqueline Nesti opened tin According to our opinion, Mrs. -gether utensils not having the leads& us in' the di.
art exhibition in Haiti. However, her paintings were Jacqueline Elie Joseph Nesti ex- same use in our daily ..Way of their, potential b ari
exhibited in other- countries, especially in Stockhohn; cels in- expressing the astdnish- life? The people, therefore,_ who merely by,.the-conventib
where she found a gaery by an ncence of good luk. ing attitude and the wonderful blame the still-ilfe style :,would of turning them outef th
where she found gallery by an incidence of good luk psychology I our people ,who be inspired to see the still-life rpn purpose. .
Regularly her artistic works are on show thdre aLnd accept. poverty, but at thh same
besides het very real .talent, the charm of her Haitian time are determined to go ahead
topics, without doubt, helped to increase her reputati.r anyway, because we must 'live
among p visitors and .purchasers in this cruel ,world without de-
r .;r' :Jacqueline. Elie Jo:.eph habitantss", it. seeml that, ofr eiful hopes and illusions This
Nesti, of course. lives abroad being a longtime away fiin attitude always surprises foreign
most of the time. When she caine home, she has been affected bi visitors.
back to Haiti for a few days their stoically endured poverty.
vacation with her relatives, she This poverty is not expressed in We admire the true character
was irresistibly -recaptured by a realistic manner (filthy ,envir- of our people seen through those
the fascination of the country, onment, emaciated bodies, d4- countrywomen. painted by Mrs
by the whole familiar scencry of cayed huts); this poverty is.only Nesti 'as they go to market in
her childhood, and, extended her mirrored in the Haitian fees groups. They seem, and they
stay in order to put on cloth or selected by the painter for her are, laborious, stoical .and won-
the paper the images of her home artitic nurnnpose The countr'Two- derfu. l








' H.A TI


SUN''


Sunday MAMCH 25th, 1962


Healing Angel To Haiti


By Edward 8. KITCH

CHICAGO (AP)-Can an Ame-
rican woman find joy in serving
others when she must deny her-
self the comforts of modern liv-
ing-electricity, bathroom fa(ili-
Sties and cosmetics?
Dr. Evelyn. McDonald says yes,
emphatically.
SHer m o n t h-long experience
F among needy in Haiti has
'.."brought that all-Negro republic
closer to her heart.
A psychiatrist, Dr. McDofiald
',:is an instructor at the Neuro-
Spsychiatric Irnstitute of the Uni-
'versity of Illinois Medical Cent-
Ser.
She recently joined her hus-
band, Dr. James E. McDonald,
R -an ophtalmojogist, on his pri-
vately sponsored medical mis-
sion to treat the eye ills of Hal-
Itlans.
The couple was the first vol-
unteer team scheduled to pro-
.JiVde care free of charge. The
': idea was conceived during a va-
i[ cation trip to Haiti last year.
,]Mrs. McDonald is .40, br'wn-
,.eyed, ash-blonde and 140 pounds

Mother of Three

i. Her motherly concern for 'th-
ers comes quite naturally because
.aPie is the mother of three daugh-
ters. They are Mary Jo,-14 Vir-
fEiPa, '8, and Michele,7. The fa-
"i ily lives in' River Forest, Ill.
She received, her psychiatrist's
degree two years ago to launch
liler second career after first
,rearing childreih and sending
them to school. '
hejhas been-a general practi-
ioner for seven years. She now
PIs a' consultant, at Hines General
hospital of the Veteran's Admi-
.lsation; Hines, Ill., in psych-
|itry.
I 1HoW- does a wife and doctor
manage so much activity?
I ,"t takes planning," she says.
iAnYit takes a very understand.
-. M nayNg


ding and cooperative husband, as
well as a good supply of love and
tolerance by everybody concern-
ed."
Her husband is assistant pro-
fessor of ophtalmology it the
University of Illinois.
He and his wife often are able
to enjoy coffee-breaks together
at the University. Their children
are cared for by a housekeeper.
Have Government. Agreement.
He organized Focus, Inc., a
charitable-group of eight Crica-
go eye doctors dedicated to sur-
rendering their vacations for
good works. They are supported
by a dozen pharmaceutical and
medical supply firms.

The agreement with the j.ov-
eminment of Haiti through th4e
cooperation of the Haitian Min-
istry of Health, provides the doc-
tors with room and board.
It also provides .that the doc-
tors, who give up their vacations
to the cause, 'receive no salary
and that the eye care is fre? to
everyone.
The American ophtalmologists
of all religions following the Mc-
Donalds in rotation will care for
1300,000 inhabitants who have ne-
ver had eye treatment.

Her Philosophy of Life

Mrs. McDonald's decision to
accompany her husband was
easy to make.
"I have a philosophy nbout
life," she says. "Whither thou
goest, I go."
So the McDonalds took their
vacation leave from the univer
sity and their patients, arid en-
planed for Port au Prince, ITait.
They lived at the Hotel Le-
Belle Coquette in Port de Paix,
250 miles north of Port au Prin-
ce, an eight-hour jeep ride.
"I found the visit very inter-
esting and really not as tough Las
I thought it was going to be."
she says. "I heard it was a wil-


|: Monday Nig


Hotel Ibo

SHANGO NIGHT


Rht


Lele


CLUB


H'-ERBIE WIDMAIER & HIS GROUP

:. <^4 6\ft..A't. 6&ft~ ^>~ ^ 3Lj* .j- -A^ ^&j


: I


to 12 p.m., some three nights a She Does Twist
week.
"I found out it was wonderful At the farewell fete attended
to get along without makeup and by 400 Haitians, Mrs McDonald
saved a lot of time," she -;ayss did the Twist with the mayor of
"Another thing was getting the city.
along with people you could t "He had been in New York,
converse with. and the first thing he asked was:
"The Haitians. speak Cr.o'o.. 'Do you know how to do the
We used charades and were able Twist'?" she says.
to make ourselves understood
with f a c ial I expressions and "That brought down the hou-
hands." se," says her husband.



Chatelet des Fleurs

GARDEN PRODUCTS

Are Available Exclusively At
AU LINCOLN GROCERIES
and RIGAUD GROCERIES
High Class Iceburg-Lettuce
Strawberries, Broccoli, Water-Cress
With 'Unsurpassed Standards of Food-Purity


derness and the food would be so
different.
"But where can you get bowls
of avocados to serve for lunch
except in a place like Haiti'"

She Finds 2-Year-Old
Mosquitoes were ignored by
Mrs McDonald, but she could not
dismiss the children she saw suf-
fering from malnutrition.
"I felt emotionally touched as
I thought about our life in Ime-
rica and the need here."
MJ:s. McDonald once saw a 2-
year-old girl sitting with her
small brother in the corner of a
marketplace. Mrs McDonald was
able to find quarters for the
children. They are now with Bap-
tist missionaries, and their tooth-
pick legs are growing stronger
and their bloated stomachs are
regaining their normal shape.
Mrs McDonald is contributing
to their support and hears regu-
larly about them by letter Lfom
the missionaries.

There's Plenty of Work
"I believe the Peace Corps is
the most wonderful thing that
has happened," she says. "You
can talk about politics and giv-
ing money to' underdeveloped
countries, but when natives ac-
tually see Americans working
among them, they realize 5ou
are there to help them., It is a
rewarding experience for the
American."
Dr. McDonald exam ned some
-100 Haitians. He performed 18
cataract operations and several
eye removals; treated cases of
trachoma, an eye disease, and
fitted glasses.
"There 'is enough work in the
area to keep a doctor busy for
a 100 years," Dr McDonald says.
Mrs McDonald worked as her
husband's assistant at the clin-
ic, managing the establishment
and organizing some system of
keeping records.
Except for a two-hour siesta
each afternoon, the McDonalds'
day was from 8 a.m. to 6 p m.,
five days a week.1
Weekends required visits to
patients, in the Hospital Tmma-
culee Conception where the t'ov-
ernment furnished eight beds for
McDonald's patients.
Being a medical diplomat in
strange surroundings was a very
responsible role.
"I felt I was representing Ame-
rican women because these peo
Pel haven't seh+.


Beautful Pee L e L L.nae wmn f emonves embarrassing rnuo eaves nair soft
perq)ns, except missionaries." dandruff from both hair manageable-shining with
Sshesays. and scalp! olorfut natural highlishtst
for any and a"f who wish to partake of the beautiful had misgiving about the
foranyandallwhowishtopa eofthebeauiful need for this project until the Yes, "soaping" your hair w ith
goodness of a peaceful vacation amidst the sur- people came from all directions even finest liquid or oily cream
roundings of nature's own greenery. as soon as they learned of the statchp leavea dulling, ah '" -
S 38 Miles From' Port au Prince project. We have since learned wit-h anewingredient, contains
HUNTING FISHING C from the doctor who followed Ps no soap, no sticky oils. s ihPg.,
S SWHUNTING ... ...... R R ATFISHING there that patients are coming Thus Halo glorifies your hair .
SSWIMMING ..RECREATION from as far as Port au Prince. the very first time you use it.
BUNGALOW ....-.. RESTAURANT I "Tt's an amazing thing! fou Ask for Halo-.4merica's I
SWATER SKI ...... .... .... RELAXE tell these people they need sur- favorite shampoo-today. America
gery and they accept It in 'zreat
SFer your reservation, call up In ODVA Radlof-tation at g f and t s pt in yt s
faith and trust in you," she nays.
POWR AU PR.NCE Throws Out Makeup
1 _, Corner Rue du Centre and des Cesars 6. Mrs McDonald learned to live Halo reveals the hidden beauty: of the hair
..,.... with rationed electricity from' 6 .- .


i'AGE 4


q


I I


'Soaping" dulls hair..

Halo glorifies it!







Sunday MARCH 25th, 1962


' HAITI. S UN ''


HAITI SUN

THE HAITIAN ENGPLIH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
ommunlty Weelp. Pubilahed Sunday Morning
Editor-Publlber BERNARD DIEDEBICH
Grant Besponeable MAUCLAIB LABISSIEBRE
ESTABLISHED IN IM0

SERVICE HYDRAULIQUE DOES NOT
HELP SITUATION

The newspapers and private conversations in recent
h months have evidenced water shortages throughout the
'Port au Prince metropolitan area. There are days when
households have been without water for the most es-
sential domestic uses. Tourists sometimes find hotels
and public places without water.
Yet one need: enter almost any public or private edi-
fice and find wastage of water. Faucets often are never
closed, flush-toilets leaking for weeks without repair.
We also have observed in recent years, that although
the Government4 eeds, every cent available to it, the
Service' Hydraulique will 'let' quarterly bordereaux be
left unissued for 12 months or more at a time. We vent.-
ure to say that efficient administration of the Service
SHydraulique would yield a hif-million gourdes or more
of- revenue in the next quinziine.
".'We'4yield to no-one in ouj respect for some of the
competent energetic consoientious men. But hope tor
aid is considerably iultified by such absence of self-
discipline in an administration so much before the pu-
blic.

EVENTS PUSH HAITIAN ECONOMY FORWARD

If one- reads the Miami-ani New York newspapers it
will ~ ftlited 'that the fine Winter climate as an
inc#tive for increased landjvalues has been augment-
ed by' the sace-exploration kativities at Cape Canave-
, pal. The latter have not onl3 created demand for lands
f"-.fr 'living facilities but also for industrial operations
'r-el.ted to space-exploration and research.
'.The'reSut is that lands t iat were formerly devoted
ti Avocado groves and Winter vegetable crops, are
& now too valuable for-such purposes. We saw one result
of this -in the fine market Which Haiti had for its Cu-
cumbers last Winter. Lands in Haiti for agricultural
purp os. and 'later for industrial purposes will there-
fore coincidently increase 1il value, with those in Flor-
ida, although a lesser degree. Moreover, crowded re-
sidential areas in South Floride will impell Winter res-
idents to seek new locales. new diversions. All these
factors will aid in greater or lesser degree in lessening
our terrible unemployment feature. Unwittingly then
we in Haiti, will also profit for the space-exploration
activities.
If we could make conditions somewhat more attrac-
ive for tourists we could also share in the prosperity
that is now enjoyed not only in Puerto Rico and Flor-
ida, where tourist accommodations have been 100 per-
cent occupied, but also in other Caribbean Isainds.

FAMINE IN THE NORTH WEST?

According to some persistent rumors, a drought in
the Northwest once again paints an unhappy picture
of want. The population of some rural communities~ is
having a particularly hard time as food becomes more
scarce.
It seems the authorities were alerted to the plight
of the Northwest by Deputy Candelon Lucas who was
seen this week in Port.

OBLIGING GRACE LINE'
Joseph Nadal and Company issued notices to the ef-
fect that the Grace Line ships could take on no cargo


Entequera, (Spain),
February, 4, 1962.
Mr Bernard Deidrichi.
Editor, ,
Port au Prince.,
Distinguished Mr Deidr'cait:
Respectfully I write to you re-


very difficult, to find them here
in Spain, and this is the reason
because I call on you, Mr Dei-
dricht, with the hope that you
will be gobd enough as to order
them from any bookeller of
New York.
It would be so asy thing for
you, Mr. Deidrlcht,!
And by 'other hand GL:D will
bless you for such wonderful ex-
ample of generosity and filan-
tropy.
Dear Mr Deidricht:
. ?h hfnlroks Whinh T .Irerestf to.


questing the following favor: your generosity are the follow-
I am a Spanish proineJA.r of iug:
the SAN PEDRO COLLEuE,
here at ANTEQUERA, (Spain). Principles of CoUge Physlio,i by
This College is formed for : Shortley, (Prentlde-Hall,
more of 150 students, the most Around the World in '000 pictu-
of them of a very extremely, res; edited by Runyon and.Ber,
poor families of this town, and gane,
therefore we are in want of all Introduction to Modern Physics,
kind of teaching materials., and by Blanchard, (Preuticl'Hall),
especially we Want a little group The Physical Sciences, by Cable,
or books published in the USA. (Prentlce-Hall),
But sincerely I will tell you Matter, 'Earth and Sky, by Ga
that these foreign books Erc 'mow, (Prentice-Hall),


1-


from Port au Prince on the regular scheduled ships
for March 25th and April 1st, leaving shippers aghast
at 20 days without opportunity to ship cargo bound
for' Haiti's biggest market, New-York. With only men-
tion of the situation, it is pleasing to state that Grace
I.ine immediately staggered its non-shipping dates.
The schedule now permits loading April 1st' and 8th
Sand a non-loading dates of March 25th and April '15th,
Shippers are appreciative but hope for schedules when
there need be no postponement of loadings whatsoever.


OFFSET PAA STRIKE'


The New York Times reported that the Flight Eng-
ineer's Union had declared a strike on Pan American
Airlines effective on March 23rd. Company' officials.
however stated that there would be no stoppage of'
flights, and that engineers berths would be filled by
supervisory personnel of the company.


MALANGA EXPORT INCREASED


More than a thousand fifty plmnd bags of Malangas
were shipped to U.S. markets itst week by Grace Liner.
Three different U.S. importers are interested in receiv-
ing this Haitian product.
On the same steamer, many bags of Mazoumbel
(Yams), Pumpkin, sweetyuecas were shipped as free
samples. Very soon, a sample -shipment of ginger roots
and breadfruit will reach* the New York port, at the
request of an important U.S. 'businessman.
OFF THE CUFF


A textbook on Zoology, 1by is
'kher and 'Iswol, (The;
tillan Company),
College Physics, by Be y
(Prentice-Hall),
The EvolUtion o Sclen't1fi|I
fteught, by Abro, (Dover Pa
Sblicateon), ;J
Modem Physics, by Van Nam
(Prentice-Hall),
Explaining the Atom, by .Iede
(Viking).. .
Those are, "Mr Deldricht~.,.
ten books which I request to yo
they are availphbl at eny bpg"iI
seller of New York, and -I "hX
that 'you will 'he able to ot
them. .
It will be very easy for .yoUi
anid GOD will reward you for jl,
you can do in assistarc'e-ofl thil
poor 'SAN PEDRO'; COLLEiX ~
Hoping such good action frmz
ydu, remain
Sincerely Yours,
Francisco TELLEZ.
Address: '
Francisco TeUlez, ",
professor,
Pio Xi, No. is.
Antequera, (Spain).


3M -a
I. F. .oo.i,

LONGLIFE
FAN BELT$ .


fADJATOR HOSE
-- ^t-^. ^ -4


MATERIAL

4 Aeile~i? hesserAlq,


SEE YOUR DISTRIBUTOR:.
Commercial
WILLIAM NARR, S. A."
JUST RECEIVED
BF GOODRICH:
Tires and Tube-Batteries ,
Port an Prince
Pierre SANSARICQ Jeremle
Gerald DELAQUIS Jeremle '.
Nablh S. HAGE Salnt-Mari .
BOUCARD & Co. Jacmel


fRB AND FAMOUS
| j, AMt(ew.00oiise ao &L Sisal.
2E _fl., Moat cL ittbormssiu."S. PHONE:a684*


* ,A E








''IAITI SUN''


TELE-HAITI WEEKLY SCHEDULE
MARCH 26 TO APRIL IST., 1962
MONDAY MARCH 26, 196-1
5:30pm-Musical Program (Mire Tele-Haiti)
5:55pm-Evening General Program Schedule & Weather Report
6:00pm-Let's Learning English
'6:40pm-Cartoons
7:00pm-The Whistler
7: 30pm-Children's program: second edition
7:45pm-Telenews (1st edition) Review of the day's events
8:00pm-The Ford Show, new series: FUREE
8:30pm-The friend of your home: Dr. Emerson Douyon
9:00pm-Telenews (2nd edition) Summary of the late news, pre-
sented by the Esso Reporter
9:05pm--Powell Industrial Works' weekly program: "I Love Lucy"
9:35pm-Air France presents: EVASIONS
10:00pm-Close of program National Anthem
TUESDAY MARCH 27, 1962
S5:30pm-Musical Program (Mire Tele-Haiti)
5:55pm-Evening General Program Schedule
f 6:00pm-Let's Learning English
6:35pm-Weather report
6:40pm-Children's program
T/' 7:00pm-NOBBE & BONDEL presents: "My Three Sons"
.7:30pm--Children's program (2nd part)
..7:45pm-Telenews (1st edition) Review of the day's events
.2 8:00pm-Dramatic Art Courses, with Lucien Lemoine
i7-8:30pm-Teieclnema C(st part)
|.9:00pm-Telenews (2nd edition) Summary of the late news, pro-
sented by the Esso Reporter
LN O9:05pm--Telecinema (Cont'd)
tO;00pm--Close of program National Anthem
::WEDNESDAY MARCH 28, 1962
5; 5:30pm-Musical Program (Mire Tele-Haiti)
.' 5:55pm-Evening General Pr6gram Schedule
6:6:00pm-Let's Learning English
6iF S35pm-Weather report
e6(40pm-Children's program: Cartoons
f': ,pm-Dragnet, with Jack Webb
i :30pm-Children's program: Cartoons
iT:45pm-Telenews (1st edition) Review of the day's evnts
S8:00pm-Alfred Hitchcock presents


Sw

BESSA


'CAMERAS AT






',RUE BO

|l S., :.. BHN .


5/cod


WITH A


S^B~^


S :3pm-Boulangerie La Poste presents a new chapter of "Le
Comte de Monie Christo"
9:00pm-Telenews (2nd edition) Summary of the late news, pre-
sented- by the Esso Reporter
9:05pm-"Club 5" in its weekly program, our guests: Guy Scott,
Robert Durand and Fritz Benjahtin
9:35pm-German Paces Documentary
10:00pm-Close of program National Anthem
THURSDAY MARCH 29, 1962
5:30pm-Musical Program (Mire Tele-Haiti)
5-55pm-Evening General Program Schedule
6:00pm-Let's Learning English
6:35pm-Weather report
6:40pm-Children's program
7:00pm-ICI INTERPOL (last week episode)
7:00pm-Children's program (2nd part)
7:45pm-Telenews (1st edition) Review of the day's events
8:00pm-Western Theater with Bat Masterson, presented by M
& S Construction Co.
8: 30pm-Telecinema
9:00pm-Telenews (2nd edition) Summary of the late news, pre-
sented by the Esso Reporter
9:05pm-Telecincma (Cont'd)
10:00pm-Close of program National Anthem
FRIDAY MARCH 30, 1962
5:30pm-Musical Program (Mire Tele-Haitil
5:55pm-Evening General Program Schedule
6:00pm-Let's Learning English
6:35pm-Weather report
6:40pm-Children's program
7:00pm-Our Miss Brooks
7:30pm-Pour vous Mesdames, cooking show presented by Miche-
line
7:45prd-Telenews (1st edition) Review of the day's events
8:00pm-Sea Hunt
8:30pm-Melle de Paris
9:OOpm-Telenews (2nd edition) Summary of the late news, pre-
sented by the Esa0 Reporter
9:05--Wagon Train
10:00pm-Close of program National Anthem
SATURDAY MARH 31, 1962
5:30pm-Musical Program (Mire Tele-Haiti)
6:00pm-Evening General Prograin Schedule
6:05pm-Let's Learn English
7:05pm--Weather Report
7:10pm--Children's program Wells Fargo Tales & Cartoons
7:45pm-Telenews (1st edition) Review of the day's events
8:00pm-Banque Commerciale d'Haiti program with Languichatte
8:30pm-Pan American World Airways: ICI INTERPOL
9:00pm-Telenews (2nd edition) Summary of the late news, pre-
sented by the Esso Reporter
9:05pm-German Actualities with Gerard Jolibdis
9:20pm-Tele-Sport.
10:00pm-Close of .program National Anthem
SUNDAY APRIL 1ST., 1962
12:30pm-Musical program Mire Tele-Haiti
L 0Opm-Program Schedule : '
1:05pm-Widen your knowledge
1:30pm-Children's program
2: 00pm-Tele-Journal
3:00pm-USANA Program: DESTINATION DANGER
3:30pm-Inteerscholar Trophy by Ovaltine
4:OOpm-Guy Lombardo Show
4:30pm-Telecinema
6:00prm-End of program National Anthem.


Creamery Coop Faces
Financial Difficulties
The "Courrier du Sud" the
News journal of Cayes, reports
financial difficulties of the coop-
erative creamery of the region,
"La Beurrerie Cooperation du
Sud." and that the direction of
the enterprise has been tranter-
red to the Institut de Credit pour
le Developpement Agricole et In-
dustriel. This latter, ICDA, is the
joint development bank of the
In t e r American Development
Bank and the Haitian Govern-
ment.

Rediscovering The
Country Through...
(Continued from page 3)
However, her work is not uni-
formly successful. In that case.
the stumbling-block is the lack
of perspicacity and harmony in
the composition. Even if the mo-
dels are exactly reproduced in
such a way that the shape is
sketched out at the most accur-
ate angles, it is important that
the lines are not superimposed
and that several interesting det-
ul's do not call for a contradic-
tory look.
In this respect, the best ex-
imgle is the painting in which
i stove symetrically framed by
wo charcoal flat-irons, is pictur-
'd. The tips of these two irons
ire superimposed to the stove
n such a way that the three
teams look' like a one single
')lock, And it is be noted that
dl .the three are :6f the same
,hade, so the eye must disso-
'iate itself what should have
'een separated in the picture.
This malconstruction does not
exist in the other pictures. The
still-life group is a success. The
composition offers real uniform-,.
ity: a cast-iron pan for roasting
coffee-seeds, a wooden spoon of
the color of the smoke, a white
enamel coffee-pot, a coffee grin-
der. Each item is styled with
the idea of expressing its plast-
ic quality and there are no inter-
ferences in their respective lin-
es. On the right hand, the .
straight angles of the coffee-
grinder;in- the middle, the half
sphere, of .the. cast-iton 'pan, on
the left side, the round-shaped
coffee-pot. On the whole, three
objects of different size. but they
are harmoniously put together.
This stil-ilfe painting is indeed
stirringly alinedd.
The exhibit is still opened. The
artist should seen to enioy a
true personal touch. Amateurs
should also take the opportunity
to look on, to give opinions and
to enjoy the thrill of an artist at
work.


-iUtLAtU ILE MONOCLE.
MATIC __________I
n. &CACTOUE ISLAN
--,6u "IBO BEACH"
ONLY 30 1UNUTES
FRII: HRTm1 PfIMS I FROM PORT-AU-PRINCL
..kENTRY INCLUDINGG
IS .... ROUND-VRIP
BOAT
ENTIRE CR eRSON TRAVEL TRANSPORTATION)
r i/s &ONLYa1.oo00
LOMldren -- D sentg
NNE POI 2arivate Dromaing Reomm
Phone 230 White Sand Beaeh
AIRTC6NDITIONEC -a'. 1 ai F InBe -tan iit- and Snack nor
S. -. WATER SKIING
::- "" -.... -.. SKIN-DIVING .


PAGE 6


Sunday MARCH 25th, 1962






Sunday MARCH 25th, 1962 HAIT SUN PAE




13th ANNIVERSARY







FREE'PORT SHOPPING -CENTER
P. 0. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI




AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS
]KINTON, WEDGWOOD. U==EDAZ a nUEB.IaiW, VXawnVET r
ROYAL CHOWN DARBY, JUVENIA TISSOT. BOBEM6, | CARON, CHANCE 4
ROYAL COPENHAGEN, AUDEMAR PAGUET, RAPHAEL, PATOU,
ROYAL WORCESTER, JAEGER LE COTLTRE, BALMAIN, WORTH,
^ 110^tOYAL DOULTON, ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO. REVILLON, VIGNY,.
ROSENTHALE, SPODE, ATLANTA, STUDIO, CARVEN. LE GALLON,
AYNSLEE, COALPORT, VULCAIN. FABERGE OF PARI.
GUSTAUBERG. JEAN D'ALBERT,
FATH, .PIGUET,
KISLAV, .CORDA ,
GEORGE JENSEN, ENGLISH DOESKIN,
SHANS ]ANSEN, GERO, ITALIA. ANTELOPE. MINOX, CANNON
DRAGSTEi, 6ENSE.

SPRINGLE. BALLANTYNE, ROYAL COPENHAGEN,
The Finest Of FRANCE. BERN HARD ALTMAN, ROYAL DOULTON, .
SrITALY, AUSTRIA, LUISA SPAGNOLI. HUMME.

,rLALIQUE, BACCARRAT; 1
.' ORREFORS, HARVEYS BRISTOL
SWEBB & CORBETT, DANISH SILVER; CREAM. All FBENCW
VAL SOLAMBENT; GOLD & S MLVER JEWELRY DANISH and
SSTUART. LEERMANG and RRAZ-AN GEMS. SPANISH .QUIEUR.

HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS'

VooDoo Inspired S'CULP TUES RAFEIA BAGS




Native-lsulh O FactorL outlet HAIAN USI
SSPORT SHIRTS MAHOGANY Collector' Items
'The BesL


B 'Typvical Costume-Dressed DOLLS
SWorld Famous RUGS & DRAPi k
Haitian RUM BABBANCOURT
HaNv us send gifts to your friends in the U. S. A.
S\without affecting your quota.- See us for more information.
N DE&GSTEP, ENSE'. "^ '
















4D




rrr~. ~ru~~mr.irrY.,nw.wr ~'r. -: ''. ~ ~ r A .'*.~.


PAGE 8



-- PAN-AFR


Sby Dr. ,R. NAWfOlrO DUOCHEIN.
Monrovia, Liberia.


BLACK AND WHITE OF THIE FLAG PROPOSED BY
Dr. DUCHEIN FOR THE FUrLrE UNION
OF AFRICAN STATES


Real Colors: Rt-d Background... Onlliine- of the Map of Alrita
South ot the Sahara and Boundariesp of the StaLt' in Black...
A Golden Sun...


Re are publishing beloN the preface of Dr. Duthem's [.bk.
PAN.AFRICANI-''M: THE ONLV W3A fU SURl'It IL. iPAN.A LRI
CANIShME, LA EL.LE IOE E VERS LI C.G.ANDELUR POUR L'A
FultluL.
This ti.olk non under print awas. ritiin ll de, elop lie idea., pill
forth b. the author in THE PAN U LIIC. MANIESTlO publish
ed in LIse id 1 f1i lifi hr. Iia.cne.n i1. Haiitm born. lie I'.-.il 1.1
African some ulleen .rfas ag. and bercad -a ntdltrajied Lil'ei.an.

This chapter of nmy book or anu other one published
in newspapers and magazines can he quoted or reprint-
ed freely, provided that no alterations or changes are
made, that my authorship is acknowledged and that i:
is for tite good of the African people. To reprint the
whole book, a permission must be obtained.
Dr. R. N. Ducheiu

Caribbean Construction Co. S A.

Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD

Phone: 3955. P. 0. BO 284



AoA


CASINO


G GAMBLING G

DANCING TO


Casino's

i,
MIDNIGHT SHOW
'! MIDNIGHT SHOW

.... .^^i: .....^^^^


Sunday MAoC ,25th, 1002


''HAITI SUN''


ICAIISM: The Only Way To


,elves No one exarpl the Africans hase interest in African unsi ,,
and nobody is going to encourage, and Contribute to, tLe coming
of another meat power in toe world.
Of course, independence Icr the Afriean territories, each one
to remain as a small unit unicapable c. building up ecoinomn? and
mLllar, strength. is a differ:ntL mailer Ttuis se ter me 0., the
majority, of nations It i'dl secure nct market (our tir non r aioiii.
lal pouweri and rlew sate.uiiS loI nati ..ns ',.ncl hi'.e theri, hi..,n
kept away fr,:.m ,Af-a IT iS NOT Ql.rESTION OF HELPING
,ARICANS TO CORiPETE Vai ItORLD PiiEEP.S BLir OF THE_


Marcr tll, 1961
PREFACE
Now more than eeer before IhLre is a need for discussing I-AN.
AFRICANISM It is true that the moaemenr has gone a long way
From the mere idea of gathering the peoples of African race then
inder the heels of colonial powers to discuss their problems and
air their grievances, idea put forth the first time bt the Haitian
Beruto S'.Itsin in 1900 according to some historians iBennto Syi-
vain, man of letters, writer, gr-duate ot SAINT.CYR the Frenc
mnuitary academy counterpart of British SANDHURST. of the Un'
ted States of America's WESTPOINTi or by the British Wes
Indian Dr S.!'.ester Wilianms in 100 according to George Pad-
more; from the flambohint csmpa;gr, initiated and led by 'h.-
grcal MARCUS GARVEY for the creation oi an African republic
coverinn the whole continent oi which he was acclaimed the prn.-
visional Pres.dcnt, to the ALL AFRICAN PEOPLES COgNflI.
FNCE of 191A at Accra, PAN-AF'RICANISM has, e..'.lsd hi.:.m ir
inlrlle.tuari t. Its political stage Now. in spOte of thre difference-
in cion.-cplir.ri a Ularce majonri .if the- Afrncan inlelligentsa ha-
r"aii-sii that some kind of unity is indispensable for the harrr.c,
ni.-.iis ide..:lopr'menrit Arinca No one can sa.y loday w icn concept,
lion ,[l pr. iil Fi ri no orne leader tias up to now pre-enited to.
.r :isttin a deildd proeramme for Ithe iniicatirn orf Africa airli
it ;. b.ecausr cOf tris ab-ence col a lear concrpt.oan that there ers.i
;., man'. differences and so much suspicion amriong the African
Ietaers
Neierthile-., no one leader mill saa that the t.?rniories In Afr-
ca rmust remain isolated from -one another All proclaim that
.Jo. i r e- mus. c.st among the Africn terr-tories Tne word'
COMMUNITY, FEDERATION. IrN`ITED STATES OF AFRICA
COiNFEDERATION ASSOCIATED STATES OF AFRICA, etc are
ofrered as solutions, anrd all the-e witness that Afrians are coan
r.nred thLat thC.. ;n not walk s"one. The leaders io the French
ip-?jking r-rn-rtonr aire malong m ireneous effir ti buld a UNION
'rP FRENCH SPEAKING AFRICANS. and sromn of them beihese
tnat there: must be some ties bet .een them and th- English speak.
inc Anicans.
Thus tie idea is in march and it is to be hoped tnat gradually
t will matcnalize inio somclthing substantial.
But. are v.e going to be given the rim- to i at for a long pro-
ces andd world it not be more practical to reach iAthout any
further delay to some kind of understanding, some lnd of loose
union, s o ior.e that nobody ill feel much its weight? Wh. such
a .aite some w-ill sa%" Why not go slowly We say. it must not
b.: too si.:.. because time is pressing.
The bitlie : on. and forces against PAN.AFRICANISIM are
taking pc-ition, though subtl.%.
Le-ading thie 'hC:.,se interests are against .Afrcan unity coime
the great powers Such statement will seem strange to some Afn.
cans who remember tne messages of encouragement,. the radio-
grams of congratularion sent by western and eastern leaders when-
tver Afrincan leaders are meeting to discuss this all sital-question
It i- a reproche made by many observers itat Arincans are
easily deluded by the white man. But time has changed. arid I
am convinced that the large number of our people will not be
caught in the fallacies of disguised imperalis' diplomacy. How
:cier, orram ill ber.e that western and eastern leaders are sin
cere -.ihen the3 radio io African leaders that the, welcome the
idea of a united and stin.; Africa Such a confidence is dangerous
Marine that the world .s ri a\ di -ded into tao camps hostile
and Liter to each other. Each onn dreams of the elimination of
lihe ,:-L'ier s as to be sure to dominate the world Now here is
3 race of men hitherto colonial peopris, despised, considered by
all as hers of wood and drawers ol water. which all of a sudden
starts on a great struggle for its liberation. startles the world
by showing outstanding qualities in carry-in' the battle, and de-
clares to the other races that it wants to build a nation with the
magnitude of the U S.A and the USSR but ninth still more
resources' and when members of the blocks competing for the
leaderlup of the world rendei lip services to the cause o u[tie


emergmng race, this one w-ll believe that her plan to build a great
nation is welcome
When Afrcans are going to slop living in illusion? When are
we going to reahze that our salvation will come only from our-

; --,'?l :. ,... ... :'.z .:-!.i '. .-.. : -. "-


'0 THE ST RE NG TH (OF ONE

the Ali: an liberation stru gle that
" for Uns Afrcan race as a iOle
emnpliasis i-n irJpn.i:nr Vo!.:r.
"hole it tesr IA rinca dorn i.,. tlii
* the principle rf nd'pendenr, c.- i
anda. Ken.,_ T-anganr.'ka Crntril
I th. brrrn.r-t i.. iredom ni 1 ;c.i s..n
Stal,.d in in. P rtu u..es: co-i,.. r: -
\.iil notr i--i-.si lon. iii:c t. Ant.--
in it M c- rni 'ial heIlp triV i i II,
)ly leatril..ry ubere the hittlh- for
aouth Africa There will be the last
Supremaity where the &hble- maslets
ie iall. Tre people oi S.:uth Aitr,?-,
:an have Eicti.'e aszi[.iance tromn
ng lerri.orie There i.iI be fought
eiforr th- ,hole race ai. tre-. But
caii people ..
be arduous, long, fraught tiith set-
laity, lor the economic and spiriial
so in that sitrgglt Ihat the Africans
ipablhnes as men.
a' to mobtliLe uit si Jiering masses


I'AGE !


Survival --

behind the idea of Lheir liberation from the shackles of colonial
dorrunation and the leaders who .h-ve led their people to treedom
deserve the granttude of trus and the future generations Howeser,
lme battle ahead is greater. It is tr.- battle for unritj' and toc build-
ing of a powerful African nation
It is ioday fur colonialsnm as it has eain for ala.ery. \ ben tne
Airicans in the island oi Hiit.i i America broke the chnins o
sla'.er., on the heads oi their ns iers and snihatterd Napolin'ilw
at.ialiions, the sl.e rioltrine nariliun realied that it .as belsEr
to compromise and, resorted t:to rai'ore inteltgent tactic. ab-lh_~i
iliser.s arqi the sia.e itadoe conri]-ir the coiritr' of the Alric.ns
r.,1 .rail tC t., force and make 'h. -nm ,ork as the ilis wi- erc d,.ng
but i-:.- stila't on .age- amTiountinr. to moa. be Jess tian anC'- itr
masters us-v1 to sprind to \uy their ilase, and to fe-d them
So i today for colonialism. Ii, days are numbered; and the
rulonialists Iknow it. Leaving Africa as masters, the3 are conting
hack u nh a different tactic to hatie the same result, perhaps bet
ler, and for that, the are going to use all the resources of thelr
htent) century old brains.
E.er., me-ir,. [he mra.; c-ounnn i s ILl iii- Rr i R.p toe Aifr: i;
d, ,led Trhe e\.:l:.;n ialsit. atli ue'I- relirioni, On.Ad Ll mis-lnn
twin iiliu.:: isht France calls ; ILLES JTirlILLEES n'. mirai rr
irmamri-ni Ba.ai. .JrCntn 'lWitne-.: and tLn re.rt i:4 it
hi thal struggle. women will plans an important part: and in
Iheir desperale battle for surnal., trh ,\ etiolnuahsts .I11 unlri-alh
their most powerful balalhona. ihiu utomen, nith a definite pino.-
granmme ot putting the African gaiut back to slep in the arm.
of Delilas and demorahlize Arican society. For they hate Iong
realized that fondness lor European nnomen is une of the maior
treah pomlu i o nany of our peoplc.. 7 conquer weak olelI., tontei
are a powerful weapon in the hand of niaictuatelian politicians.
E-er> man in Arica of some ,, '-rn n:oi has raised hrjn-aelf
AbhoYe the- man in ihe street ,- norii.d 0b. trE,: p...erin and cark-fuil,
watched. especially' i he ha- ma-.I S.ime urnti-nces .sh...in, t[:'
he is an African nationalist or tL at ne sympatrrise- with in,- Air,


w -- w


'r.-n rr l.tL.:naJP l Is Th., i IIs' i a- Ia i,.:d I1.-, .. [ij.;rJ i].:l piup a-
ganda or to be pcrt.m died o1 thinJnai.:-r depnrdlrg on inm.: interests
i=f the puter concerned Th.ey hna. in their te-'i 'lie nvilt dcrs-ulec
reports on the connections. the ac'iAitir: ofL that mii But CePly|
one understand that all irus lionri- to secure ute s~luable prey
that AfMric constaruties ith all ri:i healthh
Th,. is the [ime for thi Atfr.tan- to ;13ho' it the.. aren Juong
Ai a a3.sk race Ift te can a mil all the trais -l For ua lby Ithe
foes of etelerdai but them nends ., iodas.. Ih: n %c titll aconiplish
the great eork If our redemption. Ii te lll to d.r so, we are doom
ed For e er.
One great dange-,r icr Ar.La i a ..nme l.adcr' are ad.:,ca5ing
(Continued trom page 10)









S l -


on the label

(^a.


."x ,


Served at ,Haitis LeA 'rg
SJiThLS & RESTAURANTS & BY CONNOISSEU IS
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD '


A -;' oj HAITI

ART GALLERy
onA?ue du QuAi

SSculptures by ,PAINTIWqs@b
R.TFRANCOIS edr
J.DUPERRIER, .e Gorgue

--,O.DUPERRIER L .Lazard
S A.DIMANCHE J. Gabriel
iA N. JAean.


AFRICANS CONTRIEI_ TING
GREAT POWER OR .ViOTH]I
We can sEa\ at this stage o
for thote aim is a cr-iEt ftitu
in is rot necct-ar.y to plt mut
Saljmost .or, ract,...l.,, ith
Congo-Anol.a tLoundar ius [En
acepted loii Ea tUric: I.
Airica is sieaduil mrrclping a
ci'nmbl trt- rc:luii.ou has
end the colonial rec -Ie tberE
lansa and toe i.lm.qtau5,
neaghbt.iounno I.intir.ris. The
independence wall he long is
and strodigeet baanon ol while
Will fight ttith their back to
will he c- i. i,3it unril they)'
their brethren i Ln te sarraoni
the last and bloodi-est battle
freed-,nm is ceriain for the A
The hbatle whIch is going t
backs and reMer-t- is that L[n
liberation of Afrita and it is I
axe going to show their real
It peat Ici h.ae n-een r lf




- w w w -^


' HAITI SUN''


Sunday MARCH 25tb, 1962


PAN-AFRICANISM: THE ONLY WAY African union for fear th
TO SURVIVAL As an example of the
(C'onlinued from page 9) in the knocking of Africai
'its division into zones based on European cultural affinities: Ali-. Federation and the Fret
cans of French culture, African of British culture, as if sixty France realized that thes
T.years of French or British culture, just, a thin coat, could change blocks to come as units
the nature of our race when three hundred years of British cul- created the "LOI CADR
ture have not changed the people of India into Britishmen. Such DRE" machiavelian inst
is the kind of partial unity which is being preached in some sec- in French West Africa a
tions. Africa and made them
And colonial powers have a large part of responsibility in this. from the federal govern
While African leaders are endeavouring to build an African com-
.one tied with France tha
'munity, European leaders are straining to put afoot their Franco- LA COMUNAUTE" "S
African community. their Anglo-African community. tCommon-
Swealth) as for Portugal, she wants- to make the Africans Portu-
guese citizens. This aroused thiu ambit
When Africans talk of uniting Frenchmen smile: "IMPOSSIBLE, '101 CADRE an oppori
:...SO MANY DIFFERENT CULTURES..." But, at the time when ministers, and later pre
A national spirit developed
"*France was using the information gathered by her 'expert anthro- na
at one another, boundary
pologists and sociologists on the differences between tribal culture at one another, bnda
ideas of some leaders w
:to prove to a Senegalese that he could not unite with a Nigerian, to go back to
asked to go back to th
:.she was busy endeavouring to build a Franco-African union in
mnan could move and si
v*which Frenchmen and Africans would live as citizens of one country.
I breath ,of the three milli
An Imposing ceremony took place. some time In the nineteen
,, whole affair culminated
Sforties in Paris when soils from each territory in the French
of Dahomeans and Togol
African colonies were brought to France and mixed with French
! soil to impress on the Africans that from then Africans and French- Some Africans understood
'men would be one people. the scattered members of
This divides the attention of the Africans, a large section of the mined and wrecked by I
!.intelligentsia in the French colonies believing that it is more prac- survive until it had to giv
tical to reject the "UTOPIAN DREAM OF A GREAT AFRICAN Such is the develish rol
'(EDERATION" in order to take from France what she promises It is for the African tl
I. to give in the form of economic assistance, loans, schools, techni- facing .him, a youngster
..cians and the rest. These, I agree, are advantages that can deter- two thousand years of ci
ti":mine men who are only concerned with the immediate develog- tricks and cunnings of
Iment of their country and are uncapable of seeing that an African, possible to reach their go
union includes them and a hundredfold more, for, neither France and exploiters of Africa.
ynor any other western power will cease their assistance to the
,"African states because they are joined into a union. On.the con- Forces are unequal, ai
'trary, they will increase their aid to suit the magnitude of the by a clear understanding
by distrust and by must
ODETTE WIENER that he will come out vi%
Presents call AN AFRICAN MORAL
$ TROUPE DE DANSE BACOULOU D'HAITI and, make of him the bu
"I Every Wednesday Night Uie German, the Japanei
belonging to a superior
Strong man and take up
world stands, holding its
(To be cont





GR





NEW I


CARGO SHIP

COMBO

PORT AU PR

LUXURY
300 PASSENGJ

FOR INFORM)

FEATURING HA&LITS MOST EXOFIING
GROUP OF ENTERTAINFJRS
BACOULOU CABARET THEATRE OSP
(Free Meringue Lessons at 9:30 p.m.)
PZTI.iVJZ EAIT
.N; r W2 5F2ANF RM


at she will ask aid to the opposite block. I


e role played by the colonialists nations
n unity, we have the French West African
ich Equatorial African Federation. When
e two groups of territories were too large
s in the Franco African community, she
E" to dismantle them. By the "LOI CA-
trument, she created eight governments
nd four governments in French Equatorial
independent from one another and also
ment at Dakar and Brazzaville, but each
rough institutions such as "CONSEIL DE
IENAT DE LA COMMUNAUTE".

ionsi of the deal leaders who saw in the
unity to become cabinet ministers, prime
sidents of independent states. Rapidly a
In each territory, leaders began to frown
es began to close, Africans opposing the
ere considered as undesirable aliens and
eir native territories while before each
settle unhindered through the length and
ion square miles of the federations. The
to the Ivory Cost massacre and exodus
ese people.
ood and made herculean efforts to gather
the federations. Each attempt was under-
France. The Mali Federation struggled to
e up not long ago.
e played by foreign powers in Africa.
he greatest challenge in his history, for,
of one generation, are men backed by
civilization, old brains seasoned in all the
diplomacy, determined to do everything
oal and maintain themselves as the rulers


nd yet the African must win. It is only
g of his position, by great concentration,
ering all his forces mental and spiritual
ctortous. For this, he needs what I would
AL REARMAMENT to build up his forces
wilder of a strong nation like the British,
se. If'he does, he will prove himself as
race. Is he going to stand firmly as a
p the challenge? This is what the wole
breath, watching.


STEPHEN BROS

M. V. HAITI MERCHANT

PERSONALLY SUPERVISED

LOADING AND UNLOADING

SERVE HAITI AND FLORIDA
forthnightly sailings of the
Miami-Port au Prince-Miami

MIAMI ADDRESS:

Franklin 9-7228

Telephone: Highland 51767

LUNCH DINE HAVE
COCKTAILS
Excellent Lobster Dishes
A SPECIALITY


By The Sea-Side
At
KYONABEACH

Have Your Party At
KYONA
Swim, Spearfish, Snorkle,
Water-Ski And Sail
In Safe Coastal Waters
From KYONA
DEEP-SEA FISHING
EXCURSIONS


JOSEPH NADAL & Go.


inued on the next Edition) Agents.





ACE LINE


: ARE FOR HAITI
One Clani

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EVERY FRIDAY):

S (12 PASSENGERS) $135 -ALL YEAR

s-SHIPS (52 PASSENGERS) FROM $155

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^^^^ ^^.^ ^


PAGE 10








Sunday MARCH 25th, 1962


' t H AITI $ UN '


If a person is an artist in one
way, his artistic instincts are
generally to be found In anything
,he does. No better example of
this is one of Haiti's better mu-
sicians, trumpet-playing Alfred
Dorlette.
Dorlette lives at the top of
Impasse Pereira. His house is
set back from the road, leaving
plenty of garden space in front.
This garden is a virtual paradise.
for man and beast. It is lush
with foliage and blooming flow-
ers, outdoor bar and dining
nook. But the most remarkable
thing about it is that it is a-
twitter with bird song and chat-
ter.
There are at least a half doz-
en bird houses scattered about,
each one a model of man's best


Troupe Languichatte
Is 20-Year-Old

The 'T r o u p e Languichatte"
will enter its 20th anniversary on
* Match 31st. at this occasion, its
foundefi-manager, the actor-com-
poser-comedian Theodore Beau-
brun organizes a special show to,-
day at 6:30 p.m. at Theatre db
Verdure: Massillon Coicou.
The troup will perform "L'As-
sassin se Denonce a Minuit W3".


To Report On GATT

1 Maitre Franz Thebaud who re-
presented Haiti at Geneva in ne-
gotiations for readjustment of
Customs tariffs at the Gatt meet-
ings is back in Port au Princ e.
His report on the various trade
concessions accorded to and by
Haiti is expected about April 5.


effort to house himself. In fact,
it looks like a carefully laid-out
housing development in any sub-
urb of any big city but the
houses are for our feathered fri-
ends.
The main birdhouse contains
between 30 and 50 warblers. of
various kinds, all living ,together
harmoniously. ,It is higher than
a man's head, spacious, and Dor-
lette, has artfully arranged large
tree branches to similate a jung-
le paradise for his birds. Wild
birdd'come to join the flock from
time to time. Once they beenme
familiar with the garden, Dor-
lette leaves a cage door open
and in they go, to lead a happily
domestic life with their :el'ows.
The wild no longer holds any
charm for them. In the other
Smaller houses there are pairs
of doves, pintard' (guinea hen),
and many other examples of
Haiti's natural habitants.

'Each house is painted white
with red and green trim; each
is tin-roofed, has a galerie and
'ouvres. They are tastefully lo-
cated about the grounds. The
garden is carefully guarded by
Iwo handsome dogs, and Dorlet-
ie's two little girls romp ir. and
3ut with their dolls.

In the dining nook there is a
tiled-top table'built around two
Iree boles, one almond, the other
cotton. The bar is lighted as are
ill the bird houses, and there
ire lights strung in the. trees.
It is too bad that the average
tourist will never see this char-
ming old-world garden-bird sanc-
tuary, nestled in the heart of the
city, sweet with bird-song and
children's laughter.


Tuesday Nights Informal Barbecue

Tuesday is barbecue night at Sans Souci. Dress iE

informal, music is provided by the Hotel's Combo and

the dinner is $2.50 per person. The hotel has a con'

venient and safe car park.






Drambuie LIQUEUR

*: INDISPENSABLE FOR

FHE ENJOYABLE PARTY

S. AND

SAGENTES FESTIVITIES 4
UNICOS
SThe only sweet LIQUEUR made in Scotland on
the basis or the finest pure old SCOTCH WHISKl.'
4 Indispensable for festivities and for every occa- 4
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EXCLUSIVE AGENTS:
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oo o e o ,,o ''


1 Thurston Sees Watershed Progress


(Continued from page 1)

During his'eight hour tour the
U.S. Ambassador talked with
Haitian and American agricui
rural officials, individual Haitian
farmers, and community leaders
r :id was served. lunch at Tho-
monde by a group of home de-
monstration girls. Accompany-
ing him on the trip were Emile
Toussaint, Chief, Watershed pro-
ject and Jay' H. Hardee and Lee
Winters, USAID advisors, -is
well as several othd e gipcials.

A major area visit ',as the
40,000 acre pilot watershed of he
Thomonde River, a tributary of
the Artibonite River. Here dur-
ing the past two years .25 pro-
fessional technicians and 110 ex-
tension agents and conservation
foremen were trained while ac-
'ually executing an integrated
watershed program. The results
of their experimentation, testing
and training will be the basis for
and expanded program throgh-li-
out the Artibonite WAtERSHEi)
this year.

The first project reviewed in
the pilot area was a -gras de
monstration farm near Maissade,
where several foreign species of


grass have been introduced. Ac-
cording to estimates the better
species should be planted on 50
percent of the WATERSHED's
one million acres during the co-
ming years. Its dual purpose wUll
be erosion control and livestock
grazing.

Demonstration farms for im-
proving livestock production and
introducing new and better aua-
lity vegetables were also visited.

A tour was made of the 500
acre site at Colora near Las Ca-
hobas where more than a quart-
er of a million 12-24 inch seed-
lings were. planted in 1961. In
addition several small woodlot
areas were planted on indi.'idvid
farms in the Thomonde area.
These also., serve a dual purp-
ose erosion control and provi-
ding Haitian farmers with wood
for charcoal, lumber and other
purposes. The seedlings ere
among one million produced du-
ring the past year by the joint
Haitian-American tree nursery at
Damien.

An impressive aspect of the
WATERSHED program to date
has been its work with 35 indi-
vidual Haitian farmers owning


Le Grand Hotel 0

THE FABULOUS GINGERBREAD
Presents its famous Winter Sh(

BAMBOCHE CREOLE

FEATURING THE BEST TALENTS of


Dorlette's Bird Sanctuary


The show is presented by Lavinia Williams Ya rborough outstanding Interpretor of classic and
folk dances and founder of the Haitian Institute of folk and classic dances with a cast Including
such talents as Glamourous songstress Yaiick Coupet, wvell-known Andre, Germain In a daring
and dangerous fire dance and the unimitable Troubadour li-Paris and his Trio and numerous
chebi % ell-unown dancers.

The Ashnw is presented every Monday night at 10:30 If is a very spectacular variety program
whIcl ennmprises the best dances and song of the Magic Islnnd.

GENERAL ADMISSION: $2
DTNN2ER AND 4HOW: $5 PER PERSON
DINNER TIME 7:30-9:30

~~~~~......./.^f .^:.r .:..*. ...... -*"


rom 5 to 150 acres of-land. Am-:'1.
bassador Thurston and his part. .'r
inspected five such co-operating. '"
(arms. For each farm compre-.:'
'>ensive plans have been design-.i"
ed by WATERSHED sonserva.. i'.
tionists to encourage them to-'9
adopt erosion control practices
as well as improved farming
techniques. Most have already:'.- '
received woodlot plantings nnd : .-
improved animal stock as they
kave demonstrated willingnes_6i
and effort to cooperate in 'tie,
long-term soil conservation p'vw'-i
gram."

An. additional key to the uiuq.; "
cess of the WATERSHED pror-i
ject is the willingness of the lo-
cal communities to engage- in"
organized "self-help" work pir-
grams. Two such achievenme
were seen Tuesday the !re-, J
cently completed 4 room school
at Colora and construction, on.
the Las ,Cagnite road. During'i
1961, a total of 40 kilometer's of '
secondary and access roads were"W.
built or re-habilitated through ES
community labor directed by.ex-
tension workers. .I

Since the beginning of -the cur-
rent program in 1960 the U.S.
Government has contributed ap- .
proximately $600,000 towards the.
success of the Artibquite WAT- ':
ERSHED project. Four Amnri- "i
can advisors are assigned to the
project.




loffson

) PALACE
)W ..:4'
ow




the ISLAND,






? -4












v .;- I -


. U E ;.....
*--:,:,r


o







PAGE 1:'


'HA 1T SUN''


Sunday MARCH 25th, 1962


"The Voice Of Prophecy Receives


Off The Cuff
Mr Wendell Turner advertising executive, of Flint Michigan arr-
ived here last week for a return visit to Haiti, with Mrs Georgie
.Baker and -son Glenn who spent several weeks here last fall.
Wendell left to return to the nine to five routine bue Georgie
stayed on, she said she couldn't fight the masses in the cold cold
i' ground. Wendell- who incidentally patronized the Bacoulou every
4: Wednesday night he was here, said he enjoyed the waltz more
than 'the marangire, what is everyone getting old. I think this
I:;reporter will stay a perennial teen ager.
*"' Bill McDonald son of the McDonald ranch in Australia spent a
few days in Haiti last- week. said lie modestly, it's just a small
S'spread in southern Australia... I understand however it is southern
SAustralia.
"Bill is on his second round the world jont.
i He missed Haiti last time around but said he wont make that
.mistake next time. Swing ing Georgie Baker may have had seinme-
ig to do with that.
.a Nirt (king castor bean) Abramovitz is back in town after meet-
ings' in New York and Washington. Rumour has it that, something
r0inew'is in the wind now that all those nice little castor beans are
t :behaving so well... it just goes to 'show, you cant keep a ,ood
,man down.
Slife an begin at 35 and even beydhd. What is the story on that
'.nontetous pair of bloomers with the hearts all over theni: Bill
..Imoknw who) oh! oh!
T'.Lynn Hunting .professional artist from the U.S. has drfcidctd to
r.ipake-Haiti- her home for the next few months and maybe linger.
4Rumour hai. it she may start painting portraits again. I saw ( re...
.very nice indeed.
,Fritz... was' the -music too loud, or maybe you were too. quiet?
.qrry. kii... If looked so romantic too. Some days it just doesn't
Say .to .get out of bed huh? Next time we will signal first.
"ILeonard Sellmani noted Broadway producer is spending t- few
days at the charming -Hotel Oloffson,..: -matcherly, where else
,'would Leonard Sellman stay. -
_.An open letter of,'creditto'the PettonvtllePolice Dep. Last week
: certain American I know stopped off at one of those little ha-
:on the Petionvillet road to buy some cooking oil. It seems
the proprietress, who looked like a Charles Adams characterized
it, charge them BLANC prices. When the customer asked for ihe
bottle back, unwilling to payihigh price, .the htbarles Adamns doll
fused. The customer had to get one-of the officers from 1ie Pe-
qnville police .dept.. to,;-settle. the matter The dolls. reason for
ot. giving the. bottle back was that she didn't want to soil her
.6as, pouring the' oil back: into the original container... now isn't
t hygienic though. The officer .finally had the bottle r lured
tits owner... all that fuss over just a bottle..., not at all... it's the
Sriciple of the thing. My compliments gentleman, it's nice to
pow you are there.
pat MeNell lovely new addition to the American Embassy in
.rtau Prince spent two trying weeks looking for an apaiiinent
Without much success.' She finally throw up her hands and went
to Beach. last Sunday. Pat got her beach mat mixed un with
r te .gng from the Chateau Caprice and discovered they had one
Apartment. left. Voila... moved in by Tuesday. R
|.. ... By bn'D .AN


us
',, I'.
I.


Tou -kULM


Scotch when is
*. JOHNNMi V
WAALK

0 *ee0*eeeeeoeeeoo 0

JOHNNIE WALKER
SBn eim i -Me oi runm


in the entire world wherever
the voice of radio reaches, The
Voice of Prophecy carries a mes-
sage of courage to its listeners.
On March 26 "La Voix de 1 .ts-
perance" and the Radio B;hle
School in Haiti are anticipating
the visit of Elmer K. Walde. di-
rector of Adventist radio and te-
levision programs, and FQ,-nnn
Retzer,' director of this depart-
ment throughout the countr'cs of
Inter-America.
For eight years Mr Waldo was
the announcer for the Voice of
Prophecy, Los Angeles, Califor.
nia. Since 190 he has worked
with the ra department of the
Seventh-dai..Adventist Church,
planning f' programs and dir-
ecting their broadcasting sched-

11


FERNON RETZER
ules. Today ties program is tran-
smitted in 22 different languages
over 1,217 different stations.
It is interesting to note that
several different courses are of-
fered by the Radio Bibl'e S-hool,
and at this time ,more than 5
million students are following one
of them. There are three differ-
ent series of' lessons available in
the French language: a course


E. R. WALDE


followed these courses in Haiti.
The actual number of students
enrolled at the present time Is
1,750 who are taking these cours-
es in the French language ind
there are several who are sin-
dying the English course. (The
Voice of Prophecy P.O. Box
1325, Port au Prince, HaitiD.
A two-day convention has been
planned when these visitors will
meet with some fifty leaders of
the Adventist parishes in Haiti. .
They will study together how to
make "La Voix de I'Esperarce"
even more efficacious in pr,) id-
ing spiritual food and a mess-
age of peace and hope to all.


TROPI GAS'




TROPICAL GAS i COMPANY,. INC.

* Makes everyday a "Holilay" in your kitchen... Use
Sthe "Gold Star Awardv' winner, the TROPIGAS range.
No finer range"anywhere today.
EFFLEX TOP BURNER A, single flame with
countless accurate stages oil adjustment for every cook-c
ing need from fast boiling or frying down to gentle
I boiling.
I EQUAFLO OVEN BURNER Makes possible new
I perfection. Heat is. spread in-a feetangular pattern, the
i shape of the oven and broiler. No' hot center, no cold
Scorers.


of Bible umies. a cuuBr- c. pc-
cially prepared for youth 'entitled j PIN- POINT NPILOTS M Cool;a-'eMe a,] Pin Point
"Bright Horizons" and a course ,p.ote are- only one third the size of ordinary pilots -
of studies on family relations. flame sotiny it keepmrange cool in any weather, and
More than 12,000 persons have
'saves you money, too.
TWO NEW SCHOOL IN : HUGE OVEN with visualite window.
ARTIBONTE LIFT TOP BURNER and PULL-OUT BROILER for
.The inauguration on February easier, more thorough cleaning.
25th of two primary schools at ECONOTROL BURNER makes every ustensls au-
Denis and Drouin, near Verret.
tes in. the Artibonite Valley tomatic. ,
marks the initiation of a .rrogr- Lifetime guarantee of all burners.
am by the Haitian-Amerioan De- Too many features to list here. You must see it to
velopment Organiza'tion (HADO) appreciate it. Easy terms too.
to bring elementary education to a
3G00 pupils in the Artibonite. A TROPICAL GAS' COMPANY, INC.
good solid project. i RUE PAVEE


I F 1SHER'S .

S AITI'S LARGEST FREE PORT PRICE SHOPS
I) 'THE' CORNER SHOP RUE BONNE FOL
2) ART & CURIO SHOP FISHERS ACROSS FROM CU .
gTOMS

AND BUY HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS
STRAIGHT FROM THE FACTORY
ON WHERUEDUQUAl

(AM. EXPR. AND DINERS CLUB ACCEPTED)
SAVE UP TO 60' Per Cent ON IMPORTS
SHOPS AND MAHOGANY FACTORY

. ,- .- :- '
,. '.,-, -'.; :.,/ ,o :... ,,: ., "-.. ._: -. -:_ =. ...".'" -.,..'..'_-..,.-,- ',.YTc :-_ "


:, Exiclusive Agent: IJNJEL S. D'ADESKY


IH








Sunday MARCH- 2 th, 1962


' HA ITI SUN''


Off the Telediol

-In the next issue of Mercedes-Benz Around the World, their
own magazine, there will appear an article on Haiti illustrated
with Byron Coroneos' choice shots with a running commentary.
The pictures will be in color and the whole article will be a boost
tor Haiti's' tourism. -Ronnie Kahn lost his head last-week; pried
off a bottle-top with his pearly white teeth, and broke one off. Now%
the nerve .has to be killed, his dentist says. -bear Barbara Mac
Neal I told you a few weeks ago that the VO-5 worked miracles,
but you didn't believe me. -Word's going around that Castrb is
calling his new radio program, "I, the People". -But the Voz de
Cuba broadcasts begin and end with "Cuba, si, Russia, no!" -Traf-
fic being what it is these days, what we need around Port au
Prince is a good detour. -Jim Moran was so hot last week he
sat down in the shade of a Vingt et Un table at the Casino and
came out much cooled off. Good thing he's not in Lost Wages,
Nevada. -But then I hear came back on a borrowed double saw-
buck and got pretty close to even. Take our advice, son.- stay
that way. -There's been a rash of skin rash around town. Reminds
me of the old exterminating company ad -- Be's you got bugs?
Sure, I are. Everybody do! as asked by a little boy to a little
dog. Remember? -Bill Fraser's new strapping (adhesive tape)
has cut-outs for his guess what's. Young and pink, they are, too.
Shades of Paris.ligerie! -P an.Allen was at the piano at noon
on WMaotdiy, playing St. Patrick's Day songs. He didn't have time
'todo it on Satu.rday, the 17th, because -he spent the weekend jack-
asA.l..poi back and forth from Martissant to Rendez-Vous, while
Shannon Y.'was.'massaging his big food freezer back to life. --Saw
the cutest moo-moos yet for little girls in the new fashion room
at Carlos. They have a ruffled, bottom, are touched with embroid-
ery had come in luscious colors; at about $7. They also come in
sizes-for larger girls at around $9. -Speaking of clothes, Acra has
in a new supply of Indian Head linea-like material at 80 cents a
yard, in a lot of offbeat colors that are very interesting. -I like
that brand new, white bus called "Vierge" on ,top, and Fleche
d'Or underneath. Any significance? -You think P-au-P is bad?
New York City has asked the public to notify the Borough Presid-
ent where the worst potholes are so an emergency crew can be
rushed out to repair them. It was through the AAA's complaint
files that the campaign was started. -Those match folders, leil
over from Canape Vert days with pix of the boys, are now called
Allumette Shellbeure. Oy, 19y, loy. -Bill Steed's young son. is
sporting a real shiner, and Bill says it was a result of:a fall not
because the youngster called Papa "cochon", instead of saying
"good morning" the other day. -I'm so glad the emphasis has
been taken off "stenographer's spread"; it's been up-dated to
"TV Bottom" so it applies to the boys too. -After 20 years with


Port au Priice Rotary

To Receive Charter
(Continued from page ') -'

culation director of the Reading
(Penna.) Eagle-Times. As Pres-
ident of Rotary International for
the 1961-62 fiscal year, he is the
chief executive of the world-wide
service organization. Albright
College in' Reading and Rikkyo
University in Tokyo, Japan, have
conferred upon him the honorary
degree of doctor of humanities.-
The Rotiry Club of Port au
Prince represents a cross-section
of the business and professional
life of this community, since the
. asis of membership in a Rotd-
ry club is the selection of one
man from each recognized bus-
iness and professional activity in
the locality. This principle of
membership was begun il 1905,
when the first Rotary club was
organized in Chicago, Ill., by
Paul P. Harris, a young lawyer.
It is the core of Rotary and im-
poses upon each Rotarian the
obligation of representing his vo-
cation not only in the Rotary
club, but also In{ the community
-it large.


Upon becoming a member- of
Rotary International, the Rotary
Club of Port au Prince adopted
the same objectives of other Ro-
tary clubs around the world.
These goals relate tb the. pro-
motion of fellowship as an op-
portunity for service, the prac-
tice of high ethical standards in
business and professions, the
betterment of communities, and
the advancement of international
understanding, good will and
peace. _


New

*(Continued from pi
potential investors. Tb
that if tax-exemption,
granted and then annul
amount of 20, percent,
to prevent a subseque
tax, and subsequent
thereafter. Other count
way .intensely compete
us in seeking investms
al, have granted sim
cuatoms-entry and fre
without subsequent mi
and we can suffer ui
by comparison. '.
The dollar-value of


A program of events for the
visiting Rotarians attending the
charter ceremony of Haiti's Ro-
tary Club is planned.

The number of these visiting YANK


tavinia Williams Yarborough

PRESENTS AT
LE GRAND HOTEL OLOFFSON
EVERY MONDAY

Bamboche CreoleO :
, HAITI'S HIT SHOW OF THE SEASON!!!


$






Featuring. .
XO :OUPET i


ran nmerican, Dick AbDOtt is quitting to go into a distributorship Rotarians is fewer than origin- TI PAR
business in St. Croix. Tired of paper work, I guess. -Micheline ally anticipated due to the fact AN DRE GERMAIN-',
Succar gave birth to a 61i pound baby at Canape Vert Hospital, that the storm disaster of recent .Choreographed and staged by
which died soon after birth. -What was all the brass from Ramey days along the Eastern coast of AC regA WIaheAMd ARdROae b
Air Base doing in town last Friday? -A list of pop records of the U.S., has hit their towns and I AVINIA WILLIAMS YARBOROUGH
Air Base doing in town last Friday? -A list of pop records of Ges. l Cl general Admission: $2.00
homes. The local Club is honor- General Admission: $2.0
recent date has one called "Nut Rocker" by B. Bumble & Stingers ed that many of them have made Dinner and 'Show: $5.00 per person
-- Rendezvous No. 1666. While Dan A. disclaims any connection, the sacrifice necessary to visit Dinner Time 7:30 9:30 P.M.
he thinks the title might stem from hereabouts. -The Jap business Haiti to welcome this club into
mission is getting a snootful and is looking over yonder. -U.S. the fold. .
Marine Smith put a match to his stove when the pilot wouldn't. -
work and it blew up. He's burned over 25 percent of his body and
is on the critical list at Gitmo. -Marjorie Strauss, the pianist GOING OUT OF BU SINESSS SALE
from the U.S. who will appear here next week, is the wife of Dr.
Arnold Strauss, visiting Rotarian from Virginia, here for the in- 9 piece Dining Room SUITE -
duction of Haiti's Rotary Club into Rotary International. -Helen Modern Walnut Value, $595.00 Now $325.00 .
Martin has dropped 11 pounds with the Mayo diet now you'll 6 piece Living Room SUITE
be seeing her full wardrobe again, sans gaposis. -Which reminds 6 piece Livin With Zg Room SUITErs and Foam Rubber C
me, if I don't get to a dressmaker myself, everybody will think
I'm broke. Well? So think so. Value $550.00 Now $325.00 ,
KAY MAJOR
2 Piece Modem rn
DROUGHT ON COW ISLAND Wall Oven and 4 Burner Stove Set-Value $325.00 now $150.
DROUGHT ON COW ISLAND

-Maison D'OR
L'lle a Vache, South West of West Indies Mission, a protest-R s o
Cayes has suffered a worse than ant religious group from the Uni-I Rue 1. J. Dessalines No. 394
normal drought during the dry ted States, is sinking a 25-foot4 Port au Prince
season just finishing. To allevi- well, greatly appreciated.
ate the condition members of the V r V-, -
. ,. .. .. .. ..;.. .... .. ..'i


age J takes on previously tax-tree
bey argue. try will not to great, hardly e4
had been ough to compensate for the riso
[led to the of discouraging new capital.-
what is vestment and much-neede
ent added rolls. ,4
increasRe .
tries, in a Secretary of State Clovis D&
itive with, sinor has. pptponed appuei pei
ent e.pit- of the tax. untUl April 1th, ha
ilar free has Invited sympathetic.I
Bp export sion of the law and its .effuet
modification by interested parties- with bid
nfavorahly in his office. Logical sympathy
discussion possibly can "obal
the small nullification of the decree :








PAGE 14
", .


''HAITI SUN''


Sunday MARQH 25th, 196


St


L/


Itt-i

1"




'-/

4


I


By


'World Medical,Merger

CARE And MEDICO Seek Lower Costs,
Increased Efficiency And Better Service
'; .* 0 ,-; _-. .


HOWARD A. RUSK, M. D.j


Each day the financial p,:ges
of this newspaper and others
carry stories of corporate merg-
ers. The reasons behind such
mergers are usually the -same
--increased efficiency,. lower ad"
ministrativee costs, expanded ser-
vices and greater dividends for
stockholders-.
Last Wednesday, .two of our
largest and most respected vol-
untary agencies concerned with
international assistance, CARE
and MEDICO, announced a mer-
ger.effective netd mopth'..
The reasons for this merger
are the same -increased' effici-
ency, lower administrative Costs
and expended services. The only,
basic difference is that the great-
er dividends will be shared by
the- millions of Americans who
contribute to CARE and MT'DT-
CO ,and the millions of persons
in underdeveloped nations "who
benefit from their prograMs.
CARE *as founded in 'Nn6vm-


ber, 1945, as the Cooperative foi
American. Remittances to Epr.-
pe to meet the immediate needs
of European nations shattered by
war.
Change in Emphasis ,
The current name, Cooperative
for American Relief Everywhere,
signifies the changes in its em-
phasis over the last sixteen
years. The volume of aid it hai
given during this period has b'en
around a half-billion dollars :
As its name implies. CARE is
a cooperative of 25 member ag-
encies, including leading servi *
ees organizations.
As conditi6hons proved in Eu-
rope, CARE terminated its per-
vices in many European nations
and started programs in the de
veloping nations of Asia, th'-
Middle East, Latin Americi Enil
Africa. Services, ?re now gnirii
in thirty-two nations.
Newest members of the CAr.I.
"familyof-nations!' are Lineria,
Cyprus and Sierra Leone and ne-
gotiations 'are' being conducted


':
.:Time takes on airpsy huW ; e,
-throUghAhe eapphire ctal .
ot, youiaMoVa'do ,Flrt.matntwat. w
,, .... -. ,* .' :


*' 'The lov"do sapphire crystal 1t.,2554, .
gleas, with -arare brIIian-. Th.o, 'k
i Its hardness Is surpassed *'.. -Idi'lguredlaU,
only bythat of thediambnd. '. :
You -will cherish your
SMovado whiIch offers.you a. ;
Precision' thrice trium ihant Ref. 148,
SIi,thfe years (at'the official* mitiature move-
.,Swiss Observatory at meant. gold 18 at,
NeudhAsl). gold figure-dial

-i "





A. ONE SALE AT MAISON QRIENTALE
SAND LrrTLE EUROPE

FRIDAY NIGHT '



FAMOUS CREOLE BUFFET 8 P.M.
NATIVE FLOOW SHOW i 9 P.M.
DANCING TO THE MUSIC OF THE

CASTL COMBO. UNT. .1 PM.
.-, .. .-'-4 .... tI; Z K &.2..


on the possibilities, of estab.isi-1 ort are provided the needy tl '*id


ing CARE missions in Ni',trn..
Cameron, Tanganyika,, the Do-
nainican Republic and British
Honduras.

CARE is best known for its
program under which thou-Inds
of tons of food and other essen-
tials have been sent to rora
than fifty countries. Last year
these shipments included surplus
agricultural commodities, valued
at $33,700,000. contributed by the
United States Government.

Governments Cooperate

Such .supplies are usually used
'for school lunch and institutirn-
al feeding programs conducted
In cooperation with the host 'go-
vernment and for family-welfare
and disaster-relief feeding.
Of eqal importance, however,
Is the second aspect of the CAV'.I
program under which the touls of
education, health and self supp-


them in helipng themselves,
.- Thus, a-.-ARE package' *aa:'
be a steel pipe for d community
self-help project on pure water
in Iran or equipment for fishing
boats in a cooperative economic
project in Korea, Vietnam or
Hong Kong.
iThe range of self-help supplies ,
vary from wheelchairs to m'jbile
health units and from sewing
machines to bullocks.
MEDICO, founded in 11959 bI,
the late Dr. Tom Dooley and Dr
Peter Commanduras, was orga-
nized to establish hospitals an-1
provide American physicians air I
personnel 'to staff them in
newly developing areas. It fol-
lows the same "people to people '
concepts of CARE, except MEDI-
CO is "physicians to people."

-MEDICO is undertaking h" or-
ganizing seventeen projects in
remote villages in jungle andl
mountain areas of Laos, Kenya,


Cambodia,. Vietnaw, Malaiy a Af.
ig.f,.A' -gnd" i-'n. eth.'n
stain&, 'the-, project aSqderta-
ken at the invititiot of the host
government.

?50,000 realed

In the, last two years these
programs have treated 250,000
persons. In addition, MEDICO
has shipped abroad gifts of drugs
and other medical supplies val-
ued at more than $3,000,000.
One of MEDICO's special pro-
jects is an International Ey H
Bank. Under this program, Ame-
rican ophtalmologists travel to 1
remote places taking wilh them
a supply of preserved" human
corneas contributed by Americ-
an eye banks from surplus stnck.
The corneas are transplanted
in the eyes of ,the blind to re-
store sight. At the same time,
the techniques of the 'operation
are taught to local :ophtalniiolo-
gists. .


7 x *. 'i 1.-

,: .. /y
:7% .'"=


yes


...you get


beans i


NfESCAFE

The all coffee instant coffee with the
"Let's have another cup" taste.

It's no secret that extra coffee beans make
coffee extra good. 43 choice, deep-roasted
beans go into every flavorful cup of today's
,NeseAf6. No other coffee... no matter how
it's made... tastes so fresh, so friendly, so
completely satisfying. In today's Nescaf6,
the accent is on coffee!

GBtNESCAFE t y


20


.' ;. "- .-' -.. -.- '. .. .' : ..". ; .
V. .... "''.:, .-.. <;... .".; ." ." :'r. \ ::' "


11


I .. i w


\.








E Sunday MARCH 25th, 1962




Heifer I


Lives

Mr Thurl Metzgr, Executive
Director of Helfer Prdject, Inc.,
made an. inspection,trip to Haiti
last weel. He was accompanied
on his tour at Dainien by Dr.
John H a y w a r d. veterinarian
from USOM iho is stationed
'there.
The Heifer Project is a volnm-
tary agency which sends live-
stock and poultry to developing
aleas to assist in livestock im-
provt-ment programs such as the
4-C program in Haiti. It is one
of the livliest programs in Latin
America, which has imported
through the agency approximate-
ly 60,000 day-old chicks in two
years, prize-winning Brahmin
cattle from Caroline, rabbits,
goats, hogs. The agency has
greatly strengthened the Point
1V programs in this field .,
The idea for such a project
was conceived by ope, Dan West,
of Northern Indiana, who did re-
lief work in Spain during their
civil war. It stemmed from his
job there to help in the distri-
k6bution -of powdered milk to
I pan's hungry people. He real-
Ied that inasmutich as war des-
Ktroys a country's cattle, one of
-the first things to consider by
Iway of rehabilitation was to ini
-port herds and begin to develop
Supply of herds within the
Country.' When his service was
compltd h'1d discussed the idea


, PIANIST STRAUSS AT IU.-A.
INSTITUTE TODAY
The Haitian-American Institute-
announces tAe concert of visit-
ing American pianist Mrs Mar
!Jory Strauss, who will perform
lat the Institute's Lincoln Audito-
.Iium Sunday morning, March
25. at 10:30 a.m.
The program is as followE:
Concern Itallen (Bach)
I-Allegro
l-Andante
III-Presto
Sonate No. 32 En Do MIncur,
Op. Ill (Beethoven)
I-Maestoso-Allegro con brio
ed appasionato
II-Arletta (Adagio molto sem.
police e cantabile)
INTERCEDE
earolle (Chopin
oatlne (Ravel)
SI-Modere
II-Menuet
II-Aninme
An' accorriplished pianist Mrs.
trauss has performed -many
rmes .. th the Feldman Chamb-
r Music Society of Norfolk. Vir-
inia, as well as giving concerts
n that,.cty, .Boston, and New
or. Sine her graduation from
smith College, where she ma-
red in music, Mrs. Strauss has
studied under New York compo-
r and pianist John La Mon-
ne, Vladimir Sokoloff of the
ts Institute In Philadelphia,
d. E. Feldman, an authority
ChamberI Music.
Mrs. Strauss arrived here Sa-
rday with her husLand, Dr.
old Strauss, a pathologist.


l2 #'('HAITI SUN''



P project, Inc.


tock In Haiti


with the American Department
of Agriculture, but before nny
action was taken World War II
had broken out. Even before a
practical way was found to ship
animal overseas, the farmers cf
Northern Ohio, Indiana, Pennsyl-
vania and Maryland began rais-
ing cattle fqr this purpose. as an
act of faith realizing how much
the war-torn world would need
them.

At the end of the second war
when UN and the Renabilitation
Administration, U N R A, were
luonded, provisions were made to
ship those cattle which had iil-
ready been raised for this pur-
pose. For the first ten years thi
program was directed mainly
toward the countries which had
Jost stock because of war and
Where resettled refugee farmers
existed. After gaining much ex-
perience the agency is now in.
terested in helping solely where
they are invited to participate
in livestock improvement prog-
rams, primarily in developing
countries w o r k i n g with such
overseas agencies as MSA, ICA
and now AID, and in sime cases
with the Ministers of Agricult-
ure and also with programs of
private agencies such as agricul-
tural missions and church
groups. During 20 years of ex-
istence, Mr Metzger explained


tl at the Hiefer Project, Inc. had
slipped livestock and poultry to
more than sixty countries. In
Haiti, he said, they have suppl-
!cd pigs and goats as well as
establishing a base herd :f 35
fine cattle at Damien and .p-
proximately the same numbers
at Pote Cole. They have been
importedd mainly from North Ca-
rolina where prize-winning bulls
at the North Carolina State Fair
are selected, as well as Holstein
cattle, as 'the start of an intenp-
ive, rapid program which will
also introduce ducks and gese.
which latter can be of other real
assistance to Haiti's food probl-
em.

In order to make this a real
participation program and not
cold charity, Heifer Project, Inc
takes a signed contract from :he
recipient of cattle or poultry
wherein he agrees to return the
off-spring for redistribution to
another worthy person, as fol-
lows: pigs for each one given,
two are returned for redislribu-
tior; cattle first female is re-
t'r--ed for redistribution, etc.
l'lr. Metzger hails from North
Manchester, Indiana, which is
headquarters for the project It
is to be noted that all stock is
donated by American farmers
and not by any governmental
agency.


...This Week


***Lovely Irene Copeland. F.dit-I
or of Beauty Ideas and Hair
Ideas of New York stopped here
last week on a cruise on board
of the SS Jerusalem. She was
thrilled with her too short visit
here. She is a very good merin-
gue dancer.
'*Mrs Donita Borden, a well
known writer from New York
is back again. She is travelling
along with her cousin Mrs Iris
Franklin whose son Peter is ihe
first young man accepted 'n .he
Manhattan area for the Peace
Corps. He is now in Tanganyika.
Donita has been here many
times in company with husband
Financier Arthur Borden on
board of their Yatch FULL
SWING II. Arthur is one of the
Promotors of the Hertz Rent a
Car. Donita and Iris were met
at the airport by Mr Jean -.llt_,
Manager of the Hertz here. They
are guests at the Oloffson.

"**Mrs Dorothy Sheldon Kirk is
visiting this week with brother
Mr John Sheldon, Manager of
the Texaco here., The visitor is
being introduced to the atmno-
sphere of joie de vivre by her
brother.
"*,Beautiful "Fraulein" Oda %on
Hagen, a photographer on board
of the SS Hanseatic got her sun


bath at the Grand Hotel Clo.f-
son Friday. The charming blon-
de visitor praised highly the
Haitian art.
S'A welcome committee of the
Rotary Club of Haiti conducted
by Dr. Harold Wood gave a
warm greeting to Dr Arnold
Strauss, a Rotarian from Nor-
folk. Va and his wife, famous
Pianist Marjory Strauss and
their lovely daughter Margaret
17 and Dr David H. Burr, a
Rotarian Clergyman from Nor-
folk and charming wife Martha.
The Strauss are staying at the
Montana and the Burrs at the
Oloffson.

They come to assist to the
inauguration of the Rotary Club
of Port au Prince by the Inter-
national President of the Potary
Mr Joe Abey, at the Hotel Castel
Haiti Monday evening. Mr Abey
will arrive Monday.
The Welcome Committee in-
cluded besides Dr and Mrs Ha-
rold Wood, Mayor Jean Deeb,
Mr Edmond Murphy, Director
of the USIS, Mr. Fortune Beogat,
Mr Georges Reinbold, Mr Elias
Noustas, Kurt Fisher, Jean
Saurel, Jacques Torchon, Andre
Khawly, Jean Claude Hollant,
Elias Cassis, Shanon Yarbor-
ough. Ricardo Widmaier. Geo
Gonzalez, Andre Sassine, etc.


PAGE i


WELCOME ROTARY
(Continued trom page 1) .
These objectives are high indeed and aW mu krincer
is certain to benefit by having among its' citizens a. *
group of men dedicated to such aims. As this philoso- 2
phy of service is translated by the club's members into '
their business and everyday lives, we can expect this
community to become better in the varied ways that
acquaintanceship and understanding among business- A
men can make it better.
So, we look for great things from our new Rotary
club. It begins its existence at a time in world affairs
when men need to be increasingly motivated by ideals
that strengthen families, communities, and nations. We -
wish for it every success.

Lawyer Liquidated Haiti to Shoot 'at...
(Continued from page 1) (Continued from page 1)
Inspector of the Prefecture of Sous-Lieutnant Guy Marcel, fin' .,
Port pu Prince, ULRICK hUCZA ished second in 1960 in the 200
and DELILE RENAUD at the yard rapid fire individual match
instigation of JULES BENJA- after losing a shoot-off for first
MIN and Notary HENRI MOISE place. Last year the Haittan 3
who promised a sum of three t:,am repeated its 1960 successes. U
thousands dollars ($3,000) to 1'- again finishing second, with Lt.
quidate Me. EMILE NOEL or Francois Benoit, also of the cur- :
forced him to an arrangement cn rent squad, winning individual
an outstanding action. honors.
The investigation follows its Besides Lts. Benoit and Mar-
normal course and soon the ac- eel, the Haitiaxn team is compos-
cused will be brought before to ed of Sergeants Lelio Pompee
justice. and Geralus Monde, Corporal Fe-
March 22nd, 1962. ral Boniface, and Privates Moise
Frederic M. ARTY Roosevelt and Joseph Barome-.
Lt-Colonel a.h. FADH tre. .
Commander of the Department. They were accompanied to thea'11'
QUARTER MASTER OF Panama Canal Znoe by U.S.' Na'
THE MILITARY val Mission advisors Captai-
DEPARTMENT OF POLICE James C. Klinedinst and Mastpr 'i
OF PORT AU PRINCE Sergeant Summer E. Nichols. .
4


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Behind every bottle of "WHITE LABEL" Scotch ,
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"White Label"|

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-IT NEVER VARIES


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Agent Distributor:

48, Rue du Madasin de I'Etat Phone: 3721
P. 0. Box 1207


77'-'VT"-







PAGE 16 HAI 'I SUN'' Sunday MARCH 25th,. 1962


SVoyages par.. S CONSVLTEZ

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VON LINDE OFF-CRUISING


(Continied frobi page 1)" to leave such visible evidence.
V(ance of the specified time. Dr. Claude Lafontant, Forensic
Mr Von Linde said he request- physician of the General Hospit-
id an autopsy and that the quick al, who carried out the second
burial as' made because he was autopsy stated at the office of
unable tob arrange quick trarispot- District Attorney Max Duplessy,
stationn ot the body and FHailan Friday afternoon, that the last
tlaw requires interment within 24 phase of the autopsy was incorn-
!hours of death. plete.
i- Von Linde returned to the El No Toxocological Checrk
..Rancho with French poodle Ton. ,The second autopsy did not
-ton in a chauffeur driver auto- establish cause of death or any
,mobile in which he and his wife immediate evidence of foul play
rhad travelled north two days be- The tbxocologi al analysis would
or~e. take from a w. ek to ten days to
Vl, r, c be completed and because the
. Relathv*t'"iAce body had been embalmed in Cap
!:'Three days after his wife's Haitien it would necessitate sen-
sburial arnd Ade of his departure ding specimens to Puerto Rico
-for New Y'ork. Von Linde ( ais .or Uhited States to expertise
detained i' Port 'au, Princ6' by for traces of poison or foreign
'.-Haitiai Authdrities' who receiv- substances.
.ed a request from the dead wo& Report Due Monddy
,nian's relativesh' 'in the United Dr 4L a f o n t a n t indicated hi:
*States 1or an' investigation. would hand in his preliminary
While' Von Linde remained autop y report to the District
without charge in Officers quar- AttorAey Monday.
W#f -the new Police Head- At an interview attended by
.ilrwJM receiiing regulate AmeArcan newsmen at his office
I f1trom El Rancho-authori- in thd Port au Prince "Parquet"
1k;umbd the elby' of the Friday afternoon district -Attor-
.a p roment' New York' Cafe ney Max Duplessy said he ex-
det& .gure from a Cap Haiti- pectirig Minday by mail an on
grave. the spot inquiries by the Cap
Autopsies Don't Jive Haitien district attorney into the
Authorities in Port au Prince death of Mrs Von Linde The
'cited the first autopsy as Cap Haitien district attorney in
g'. to meet legal, require- a telephone conversation \;th
ts. by, not having .-any civil Mr Duplessy said there wore
rities preseinf;"'ie' sond some "mysterious" circumstan-
liso-, failed 'ti' confirm ces connected with her death
s.s' of a' heart Rttack s
-e" cause of 'death, although the- Relatites Differ
id sources said; )'"contriaiCtl6t0 "['p New York Mrs Von Linde'b
Jwas only itisofat as! the 2tfd shi'- physician, Dr Robert Freymann,
failed tq .uncovf "'d4cei.ible assertedd that she did not have a
r fa or other,4'~ilt delwf ieart condition and this led to
f'aheart attack .'' a demand'-by -the dead woman',
Medical soureI'.,lso "infd '-Antle'ian relatives for flip see
Ao.tlat there are some fo'rnt f dhd 'ititoiosy.
heart attack Which mighfMl ;An aunt; Mrs Estelle' Sophian,


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i f

and a'cousin, Mrs Emily O'leary
of Kansas City, retained attor-
ney seldon J. Kravitz of New
York to request action by Haiti-
an officials.
Out With Dog
Von Linde said he found his
wife of 14 days dead in bed ;n
their I Cap Haitien HoldE room
when 'he returned from walking
their Ipoodle "Tonton". He s--uo
she had complained of stomach
pains' after they arrived in Cap
from -a long and bumpy drive-
from 'Port au Princ.
She was the widow of wealthy
Howard J. Rogers. a former 'ice
President of the Bank of Man
hattan, and had been active on
many New York charity bal,
committees. She was a family;,:'
figure at the El Morocco and
other Manhattan night clubs.


NEWSMEN COVERINCr
VON LINDE AFFAIR

Newsmen covering the "Affai
r'e Von Linde" included Watson
Sims the Associated PTvss
World Service Chief in New
York, Martin MacReynolds of
the United Press, Michael Brown
of New York Post, Joe Famm
of the Daily Mirror of New York
and 'photographer A I e x Von
Gleinchen.


Dr Von Linde in an interties
tI hours before his release told
UPI 'corespondent Martin Mc-
Reyndlds thai he was inno enut
of his wife's death.-and added
"I am somewhat bewildered that
nny adult would make sumch
fantastic accusation as murder "
Von Linde stated he- was confi-
dent current analysis of the vit
al organs of his wife's body
would exonerate him "withoul
any doubt" and added that Nc;'.
York attorney Kravitz was per-
secuting him with irresponsibler
criminal accusations."
The boyish-faced doctor -stated
during the interview in the off-
ice of district at torney Max Du-
plessy he was unaware that Ius
wife had changed her will mnak-
;ng him the beneficiary,. and said
lie understood his wife's estate
goes to her aunt Estelle F. So
phian.
"My wife was not as ,verIth:.
is people think. She told me her
estate was much less th-vi.
hundred thousand dollars," lic
dniil ,,bt nAAdd d he did nnt Ikno.


3asJ ut aunea Ie m II( IUU%
how large the estate was.
"I know of no will but m5
own. which -was carefully ,mnade
and leaves everything I -own to'
my wife," Von Linde said. Ask-
ed if his estate was large, hec
said "no."
Calling his wife "a lovely wo
man and so generous and,.Eo,6
with charities" Von Linde said
"she was the only woman I evei
asked to marry me."

Von Linde said he- iiVd; a
series of decisionsd fw&.i- n "i.
wife's death under',rrssurerori
local authorities but' received
"little suggestion or help" from
the United States Consular offi-
cial in Cap Haitien.
He said he paid eighty dollars
for dhe Cap Haitien autopsy ",nly
to find embalming performed
instead. He explained he had
never mentioned the word em-
balming and discussed only au-
topsy with a white clothed indi-
vidual at the Mnorgue of St. .Tu-
stinien Hospital of Cap Hai'ien.
He stated the unnamed man
returned and said "its all done"
but gave only vague replies when
asked for the cause of death ind


it turned out that the body had
been embalmed.
"I would not permit a.h burial
without an autopsy --it was I
who insisted on the autopsy",
Von Linde said.
He said his wife apparently
died while- he was walking .hce
dog about 8 pm before going to
bed after they had trayelled to
Cap Haitien from Port au Prin-
ce.
Von Linde said he returned wn
-he room at Hostellerie du Rol
'hristophe and found his wife
'sleeping comfortably, I
thought" before realizing she
was dead.
Asked if his. wife showed. any
strain from the six hour drive
to Cap Haitien over the, partly
mountainous, n a r r o w winding
road with bumpy cobblestone'
stretches Von Linde repliedd "no-
thing, nothing". "She loved Haiti
-we went, by, auto .to,see as
much as possible. We were going
to visit the Citadel the very next
day but never got there," he
said.
Wearing a. grey business suit,
tieless -and without boot lace.s in
Iis black shoes, Von Linde, had
neglected to shave. and white
stubble ,beard covered his boyish.
face.
District Attorney- Dqp1',sY. wio
-spoke to Von LiddLiM-J S 'h
asked whether e 'vshp&ad pddi-
as6ke ..$t
tion dottiFg Firen don t
e' eplied il %Freflb---.. don't
i oir sats going to happen to
know'a :;-. rF;,!.. I,..

us.d3I I dbn't ne, e Ire
btust '.ift, a.to befreed

of course I'want all ,y bagga-
ge.,
Asked about",the season f9r
cha going his name frP3.n brt
Dent to :Mantrfed,.Gr9P Von Lin-
de he declined, comment Otati0g
"its ;not pertinent'".
He said he ,was ,paFtW' of.
Gernian extraction but eftugqse
to give his exact age cMInU,,1t
a personal matter. .
Asked ,about,.the., 4eatth 9t, his
wifels eighty-year-o.* .ant Pau-
line ;Felix on, FbrufppyJ.~ie rT ,
plie4 "she was a swet.pli,la.dy -
-very ,nice".bhut hp- saw. nttpnq -..
nection with the Ap4a, "4 .p-..,
curred before his .rigge.


Vonrthd- La JSISiC


Enrers'4th Year,
Commercial Journal

Our Colleague "Les Informa-
tions' Techniques et Commercia-
les" entered its 4th year o ex-
istence on March (15th .1962. This
important paper; "interested in
our 'economic problems has pj
blished many articles related to
our agriculture, commerce, im-
port and export, taxes, custom
duty, etc. Its fight against mo-
nopolies has been particularly
consistent.


Catibe Has Tip Ruling

' The Department of Labor has
negotiated an agreement between
Hotel Caribe, formerly SdMPIE
HOTEL, and its employees,' con-
cernibg the distribution of gratui-
ties, 1(they mean tips);. distr.bu-
tion 'based on hotel receipts to
be made by a committee.


FOR SALE
Fiber gluss Sail Boat ,18ft. -
3 saus small motor enason-
able.'
R. L. WINTERS (iUSOM).


FOR SALE
Pontiat Catallna Coupe; -Model
1956,.lin excellent condition, with
new battery, good fires, and an
assortetient of repair parts.
For more information,1 contact
Mr. Igor B. ALLAN
Building Baboun
Rue du Peuple
or
Malson Jacques FAUBERT
Musseau.




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