<%BANNER%>
DLOC DUKELIB
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015023/00001
 Material Information
Title: Haiti sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince, Haiti
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti -- Port-au-Prince
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Sept. 1950.
General Note: "The Haitian English language newspaper."
 Record Information
Source Institution: Duke University Libraries
Holding Location: Duke University Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification: lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID: AA00015023:00080

Full Text

Hail! ( &t


-. - -


PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI Avenue Marie-Jeanne ('CI

|' WINNER OF "THIS RECORD IS YOURS"

. RECEIVES NADAL BRAND GOODS


...! ..- L'JA

ffiuer ot th monthly Nadal prize of twenty dollars worth of
merchandise, Franck Watler collecting canned Delmonte, Tide,
Quaker and Armour, products at AU LINCOLN grocery store.
The e..time weekly Radio Haiti "THIS RECORD IS Y OURS"
program isnowo popular with radio listeners who send in listing
of recordings they hear and like along with a DELMONTE label.
I-:i their fisting favorite music heard on the program, matches the

(Continued on page 15)


Commercants Give
Opinion On
Duvalier Ville
I Financidg


-*. Tl.iray marked an AImport
ant date in the proceedings of
the "Mouvement de Ucnovatio.
Nationale et d Com ie- Exea.ti.
.Dualierville." For the f tr.i
'-ie, the committee was gett
bg a tonek wth the vita'
'strengif of .the country: the'
coimmerelal and tedustsla cirm
'le who is -destined to play a
part in the process of rehabilit-
[:loiin of the 'arriere-pays."

The coordinator, Mr Luckner
Cambronne. who began the dia-
logue by a brilliant improvisa-
tion, gave highlights to this
Meeting of energies and wills,
when with an optimist and con-
vincing accent, he declared: The
sh of the President of the 'Re-

(Continued on page-5)
..-
'; ...


G






.\
b:
w[


TE DUMARSAIS ESTIME Phone 2061 Vol XX Sunday October 15th, 1 .961 J....'..


Haitian Deportati n7t


From Bahamas Isla


Haiti May Reaches Peall
Haiti May '

Wr Nassau, Bahamas, October 7.-Almost as many .a
D raw lians were deported from the Bahamas in the' fra
three-quarters of 1961 as in the two full' years 1
$60Million and 1960,.Immigration Department statistics reveal.ii'

Frm Internatinal In the nine months ending Sep- Last year,- 113,500-0-6 steruiug'
member 30, a total of .1,186 Haiti- (CORRECT) was spent by'' thVl
Monetary Fund as who illegally .entered this Government for .passage hozi4,
Colony -all but some 50 of them for somewhat under 600 illeg
During Next since January were shipped entrants, nearly all at a flat rat,1
12 Moniths back to Haiti at Bahamas Gov- of TI6 sterling per head. If-the
2 ernment expense. present deportation rate. conti-
The International Monetary f G a hua ues, the ye deportee ta
Fund has entered into a stand-by 23 Graduatei wi scrape 1,96, wsi a cost
A ,ceeding Ib9,500 sterling -
rrangement under which the A National- from maintenance and
Government of Haiti may draw costs while they are
the equivalent of $6 million S I W o rkers -' averageof. at lea
rom the Fund during the next .3
othu next month while waiting passage. ':
welve months.
he moths. After twvo years of academic .
The Haitian Government did studies and practical work twen- As October began, 45 Haitian z,
ot draw upon its previous stand- ty-three Haitian national Social were under six-month sentences
by arWangement with the Fund; Workers (Assistants Sociaux), with earlier deportation recomi
which expired on September 30, h a.fied, t eneL
f 4 rairf Soc rk.-Prepara- (Continued have u edon pgp t:o4
ex Acit..ord Prepara- (Continued on pigek 6y.


tye's amountedCIUJLU toL ,u$5.4 million,I
of which $2.6 million has been
repaid. There was some impro-
vement in Haitian finances dur-
ing 1960-1961, but an arrange-
ment with the Fund is still re-
garded as a useful supplement
to the country's reserves; assist-
ing the Government.in,maintain-
ing thle convertibility 'of its cur-
reucy.


HAITI-- PANAMA FETE
- . .


Ambassador Rouzier surrounded by fellow diplomats accredited
to Panama apd American Army Zone Commanders. From Left to
Right: Spanish Ambassador Ricardo Muniz, French Ambassador
Lionel Vasse, Generals O'Conner and Stranathan, Commander of
American troops in the Canal Zone General Theodore Bogart, Am-
bassador Rouzier, General 0 Meany, British Ambassador Vaughan
and American Ambassador Joseph S. Farland.


tory works are' on the 'way to
celebrate the first Graduation
Ceremony of the Haitian Social
Workers,
The National School of Social
Work sponsored by the Haitian
Institute of Social Welfare of
The Department of Labor and
Social Welfare has been exist-
ing since 1959 under the name
of "Social Studies Center" till
April 1961. After the arrival in

(Continued on page 3)


Bahamas Seek Farm
Labor Here '
Nassau, Bahamas, October 9.&.
Mr Arthur Smith, Nassau repre- '
sentative dof four large-scale agri-"
cultural projects in the Baha-?';
mian Out Islands, flew today tot
Port an Prince, Haiti, to invest-
igate the possibility of importing.
labour from Haiti to meet. a' J
larm labour shortage.
(Continued on page 15)
.------ U

_ ___ it


Hlaiti's Envoy to Panama; Ambassador Raoul Roazier recelting ,.^
Major General William A. Carter Governor of the Panama C'Wamput
bnd Mrs Garter during a reception he offered to strengthen Pana.. .
ma-Haiti relations earlier this month. ...-
I .'-
; -* .'* .. .. .* t*'.-' ,- "' .fi; .- :-. -." : ....^ *' ,


Weekly
Every
Sunday


ml-W


. '. ..-.'

;-C.





Z* -:...
.,, .. -."-a







;PAGE 2 "H HAITI SU N" Sunday OCTOBER 15, 19


ST h is W "Admiral (retired) Wilke Hill
;.fl ti vv W eeic Bereton and distinguished wife
Haiti 1 i Wk Agnes are back again. The Bre-
B- By AUBEIN "UOLIEUR retons who are from Easton,
*Miss Judith Leslie Gumpert, an Executive Connecticut came here every
Secretary for the architectural firm "John Ab- for their vacations since about
ten years. They are guests of
bate" of New York arrived here early this Mr and Mrs Everett Shrewsbury
week on a three week visit. The youthful visit- for a week. They will come back
or whose hobby is travelling Made many trips again in March to occupy the
to Europe and Central America, sbhe is fluent Kingsland house in Gros-Mornme
in many languages. She has her words to say which they recently purchased.'
in French, Spanish, even Greek. She is guest "Industriais t Abraham Albura
Bzurau, Executive of the Bzura
at the Gingerbread Palace.... Chemical Co of New York and
.'*,'Dr Axel Laurent-Christensen, a Danish Physician at Victor New Jersey and of the Haitian
e State Hospital in Cullen, Maryland is back this week. loaded Agricultural and Chemical So-
l sgift for his many Haitian friends, the poor he became friends ciety brought.here this week Dr
last year, on this first visit. He paid more than sixty dollars ElmerL Petersen, Director oflidated
,th ls "., Research of the Consolidated
overweight. "What I brought for my friends is worth it," he Tobacco Co in New York to as-
Csld without any regret. sist the Haitians in the -culture
Di Christensen has always a story to tell and you are bound of the Tobacco...
jtlister to him. lie is 66 years old, he spent 28 years as a physic- *Attractive, beautiful, Alber-
lan with the Danish Government in the Eskimo Country, Greenland tina Bijl, a water ski champ and
zid got back there for another five years with the Canadian Gov- visiting here this week- in com-
pernment. He was with our fellowman Dr Louis (Routo) Roy in pany with her parents, Dr Oil-
:ome where they studied tuberculosis in 1938-39 in the same Uni- vier A. Bijl, Head of Public
;'rsity. He admired, he said, the wonderful works accomplished Health in-Aruba, Dutch Islands
5i Dr Roy i nthe tuberculosis field in visiting the Haitian Sanato- and wife Jacoba. -- -
The Bijls are on a seven
m. t. ,neh' m month trip in the Caribbean area
1I learriedto know and love the negroes" he said -during my -United States and Europe.
ree ears working as a specialist in tuberculosis in an American They were met at the airport
$egro hospital. I'realized how wrong are those who do not even by Mr Heyn Van Der Linden,
t to know them." Now he has been working at Victor Cullen Hos- Agent of the Dutch Line and
rital for-a. year. Dr. Axel Laurent-Christensen is 'sharing his lodg- Tma celebrated her twentieth
|ngs between thie Oloffson and the Park... anniversary on October 9th and
S*What made Dessalines, the Founder of the Haitian Independ- arrived here the next day.
bnce, decree the Polish a Haitian Citizen? That is what Miss Olga She 'won the water ski champ-
os is trying to fathom, on her, .two-week visit here. As she ionship of the Dutch Islands
"oil- "this year. An artist, she appear-
ascomidng here mn vacation she wag asked to write an article the Star dancer and singer
r T hAmerican World. Workng an Exeutv Seet at The Aruba Caribbean Hotel
Ir fi'"verett ..McKinney Inc." a Radio- TV Representative' in. & Casino, she is the Star in a
YNew York Olga is also an artist and a journalist. She belongs tb film made for the tourist promo-
iaftdance group called The KUJAWY Dancers which puts on show tion in Aruba that is shown thru
WI;'TV in Holland. A "ravissant"
many places in the U.S. on TV and stages. The-Kujawy dancers model, she appeared av PAG-n
gia' semi-professional group which performs Polish Charactei EANT Magazine in New York
-dances. as the leading model of the

,.Ajournalist she covers many subjects for the Polish American -
,4wid, a:. weekly published in New,. York. She,has a beautiful sub-
edt to'!.over here for this. Polish American Newspaper since the A
e ,i*s.,bee made a Haitian Citizen by Dessalines at the same oHu n e
it' .As the native -because of the attitude of the Polish forces
'b.,ch. arrived- here in 1802 with the French 'Expeditionary Army -
0"fight Toussaint Louverture. It is said that the Poles made C
,.,!cause commune" with the 'Negroes because they were angry with
poleon who refused to give independence to Poland. 4
ss -lga Sorokowsky a charming blonde is staying at the *
Rpoost'br artists" the Oloffson...
'*Are curently honeymooning in Haiti: Mr Harold Stein, an
iiountaint from New York and wife Myrna, a teacher; Mr James .
rIa r, merchant from Columbus, Ohio and wife Jan, a teacher;
rHeiry Kramer; Jr. an Engineer from New York and wiMt Bar-
.'jThey got married on October 7. They are guests -at the El
ncho,- Also are honeymooning here Mr Oliver Shaevitz, a law-
ctbr 7Mon.da
et, fr6m New York "and wife .Ina, nurse, .married on October 7.
ia' knows: in New York some Haitiants of whigh Dr Harold Najac;
: Herbert Levitt, a salesman from New York and wife Marcia,
4. hair dresser, married on Sunday October 8... Mr Murray Scheflin, 4
..Fur business in-New York and wife Helen are also visiting here.
h week' So are Misses Marian Devlin, a bookkeeper, Lorraine PRICES UNBE
s, ..a bank .teller and Gloria McDonald, a clerk from New
.1.rk nd. *Patricia Mulligan and Florence Barlow... "Fraulei'" 4 FOR LA
arg, t Abrahann, a young German "Cordon Bleu" from Miami
stopped hire for a short visit... Miss Virginia Bittikofer, in research SAVE... GET M
tAew York arrived here this week for a 10 day vsit. She is guest
t the Oloffson... Maryann Stewart, in Fashion publicity for a WHILE
ttern company, in New York is guest at the Ibo-Lele... Misses
i1areen McCarthy, a restaurant Manager and Kathleen McCarthy FO
-al.travel. Agent from Chicago are visiting also...


Dutch Islands. And she is a
"Poster girl" for KLM.
Tina who is bejng tutored
here by "sympathique" Ernest
Martijn held audiences in rapt-
ures at the Bacoulou Night Club,
Wednesday night. Her dancing
recalls Terpsichore, the Greek
Muse of Dance and Song...
Mrs Agnes Rizzo was given a.
very moving send off at thie air-


port Sunday after by a group .bf'
nearly a hundred girls; of the,
Orphanage of the SalesiaA Silt-''
ers.
Mrs Rizzo made 1ie0 second
visit here last weekend with her
lovely daughter Janet, a 22-year-
old Secretary for the Advertid-
ing Departmnent. of I lidajr Ma-V'
gazine, and spent two days at
the El Ranchq. Agnes anid Janet-
:


ing The Great Event'

)f The Year

At



N ORIENTALE



I Sale StartsH


y Oct.16, 1961
AFTER 5 YEARS

LIEVABLY SLASHED ON ITEMS

DIES, MEN, GIFTS (ETC.)

[ORE FOR YOUR MONEY'S WORTH

THIS OFFER LASTS ONLY

R TWO WEEKS ONLY 4


11


TI- IOSEPH REPORT
(Continued from- page 15)
Society for the Rehabilitation of the Disabled is on a visit here.
She was welcomed by Presideht and members of "Comite National
de Rehabilitation des Handicapes" and Sister Joan Margaret...
Faine Sharon is named senior clerk at National Education Depart- l
ment. He replaces Mr Raymond Bastien... Engineer Eugene Li-
mousin, Assistant Director of National Eradication of Malaria
Service is back from Mexico... Tomorrow. October 17th, at 8:30
a.m. a solemn last prayer will said at Cathedral Church at occa-
sion of the 155th anniversary of Death of Jean-Jacques Dessalines...
Me Jules Blanchet First Consellor at "Cour Superieure des Comp-
tes" left Sunday to visit the German Federal Republic and Egypt.
He will return on the end of November..' By commission of 8.E'*
the President of the Republic, Dr B. Mondestin is appointed Dir-'
ector of Materno-Infantile Center... Tuesday at 2:30pm", by. PAA
431 return Major A. Kubellus, Director of Inter American Geodetic961
Survey in Haiti... On October 12th, arrived by PAA,- Mr Albert
Silver from a special mission; Dr Louis Mars ex-Ambassador of
Haiti to France; Dr Fernando L. M. lRiccardi, General Consul of
Argentina in Haiti... Mordekal Schnerson, Ambassador of Israel
in Haiti flew to Miami; William Fernandez, Ambassador of Libe-
rian Republic in Haiti left to New York... Thursday afternoon,
Members of "Secours Catholique d'Haltl" met at Archeveche under
the presidency of Mgr Claudius Angenor Regent of the Archidiocese
for the choice of a new Administration's counsel composing: Mr
Daniel Theard former Chief of Protocolb, President; Mr Mobtrosier
Dijean former Minister, General Secretary; R .P. Roger Augustin,
Assistant-Secretary; Mr Jean MaHebranche, former Consul to Pa-
ris, Treasury; Mr Duplex Pierre-Louis, Printer; Mrs Adrien Mas-.
sa, Presidente of "Bouchee de Pain", Mrs Georges Berthol, Mr
Albert Chancy, Dr Antoine Ganthier, Mr Jean Clesca, Mr Constant
Sylvain, Agronomist Lucien Cantave and Mr Antoine Bervin, Coun-
selors...







Sunday OCTOBER 15, 1961 H

HAITIAN PROGRESS IN THE FIELD
OF SOCIAL SERVICES
(Continued from page 1) needed in order to strenghten
Haiti of the United Nations So- and develop Social Services in
clal Welfare Adviser, Mr John Haiti, the sound planning of So-
I Troniak, the Haitian Government cial Services to be rendered to
' assisted by Mr Troniak, has re- the Haitian people by the profes-
Sorganized the "Social Studies sional Social Workers trained at


'Center" into "' regular. "Nation-
al School -of Social Services".
[ Mr Jbhn Troniak had been giv-
.en the authority of the Director
of the School of Social Services
in April 1961. As the -Insttitute
of Social Welfare has been giv-
ing-Social Services to the Haiti-.
people, the professional train-
ig of Haitian. Social Workers
eight be regarded as the most
important-4decision of the Haitian
Authorities. Haitian Social Work-
ers are badly needed in all the
areas of Social Development of
e country. In cooperation with
he Medical Services; National
education and Community De-
elopment, Haitian Social Work-
rs will be incorporated into the
community services on the local
[Port au Prince) and regional
evels. An appropriate national
flan of Social Services has been
workedd out by the Chief of So-
.ial E'rvices, (IBESR).. aine..
irnine. Edner Neion in cooper-
tion with Mr John- Troniak 6f
le United Nations Technical As-
istance and approved by the
government of this country.'
Although rpuch more help -is


I


su


AITI


N


USIS OPENS PRESS CENTER
IN NEW YORK


0
The United States will open
a press 'center for foreign cor-
respondents in New York City
this fall to meet a long-standing
need to assist journalists from
overseas in covering American
news.

Plans for the center have been
developed jointly by the White
House, the Department of State,
and the U.S. Information Agen-
cy. It will be staffed and operat-
ed by USIA. The center is ex-
pected to be opened in mid-Oct-
ober but the exact date will de-
rend on the availability of faci-
lities.

There are over 500 foreign cor-
respondents permanently based
in New York and their overseas
audiences total millions. They-
have long expressed a desire for
more adequate assistance in cov-
ering the American scene. The
problem is even greater for
overseas journalists who briefly
visit the U.S. and make New,
York their base of operations.
In many cases they speak little
English and have difficulties in
Ipeating sources of information.
Great emphasis will be. laid on
the personal handling of in'form-
ational problems of foreign cor-
respondents(


foreign correspondents from
corners of the world.
The center wil be located
340 East 46th Street, within
few blocks of the United Nati
It will include a library of bE
reference books and docume
an extensive collection of ne
papers and periodicals refl
ing the broad scope of Ameri
opinion, and it will be equip


"Youthful Martin Grier, a
his pretty wife Geraldine (Ge
dn Sunday 8 and are currently
happiness at the Hotel Chouco
**Mr Gerard Thomas Corle
ain in Haiti came back last
England with his distinguished
ton 18 and Ncola Vernon 16...


Ref. 73f7 < NecPlusUlt
watches 39 Jewels G
See the superb x96o
<( Selection )"-models at fc


.ON SA.

'B.ETTE
1


- -


0 HAITI

ART GALLERY
on.1u edu QuAil

lculplures by PAINTIMP*
R.T .FRAN.OIS .e..or "
'J.DUPERRIER V. en- ou
O.DUPERRIER L.Lazard
SA.DIMANCHE N.labriel
~T a r
S


FOUAD A. MOURRA
Port au Prince, Haiti


1-
i S**,*
F*: ;*
i :..


I


the Haitian School of Social Ser-
vices might be regarded as a
remarkable progress. H. E. the
Minister of Labor and Gocial
Welfare, Mr. Gasner Kersaint
and the Director General -of the
Institute of Social Welfare. Dr.
Jacques P. Fourcand should be
congratulated for their achieve-
ment.
The development of Social Ser-
vices in Haiti is one of the most
encouraging examples bf a Tech-
nical Assistance to a needy na-
tion.

The first group of graduated
Social Workers of Haiti have
created an "Association of
sociall Workers of Haiti" (Asso-
ciation Nationale des Assistants
Sociaux d'Haiti) "ANASH", on
September 25, 1961. -The first
elected President of the Asso-
ciation is Mr Jean Garnmier, who
recently has beezi appointed Re-
gilonal Supervisor of Social Ser-
vices in Jeremie. Melle Renee
Telemaque has been attached to
the Schodo of Social Services in
order to cooperate with Mr John
Troniak. ,.


OAGE .
with a special "voice" line from '\A
Washington so important press
conferences, brie fing s, and *:,
speeches can be directly piped 'P
all in to the center. AI is planned, '
for example, that the daily
at briefings of the press by Lincoln
n a White, the State Department' ..\
ons. Director of its Office of News,
asic will be piped in directly. Texts.- ,-;J
nts,. of important Government docu-
2ws- ments will be available as 'ra---
ect- pidly as possible through a Gov- .
can eminent news wire supplied by .
ped USIA.


purchasing agent from New York and ".
?rry) a 19-year-old Biller-got married
y honeymooning here. They nest their
oune...
ay Smith, Ambassador of Great Brit-'
Sunday ,from a 3-month vacAtions in -
I wife and two daughters Clare Dove-





AT DISTINCTION [ t .
EAR WITH.PRIDE



A:,














ra) o dselfwind;g
yrotrn ppweed- .
Girard-Perregan-,
oremost jewellers. '. ,
N!













LE AT THE.

R STORES




4:.
.1~


"HAITI


S-UN"


Sunday OCTOBER '15, 1961


'.- C O N F-. 'E
REGIONAL OPERATIONS CONFERENCE as coordinator of all U.S. Gov-
SSCHEDULED FOR L ATTIN ANIMERICA ernment activities in his coun-,
SCHEDULED FOR LATIN AMERICA try of assignment.
nde ,' "Our earlier conferences pro-
SUnder Secretar y ol State ed. by senior U.S, representat- ved very useful in exploring pre-
'thester Bowles will -be Chair- ives from 45 countries in Africa, wisely how this integrated ap-
t.a of two United States Reg- the Middle East, and South Asia "proach can carry forward- U.S.
..rial Operations Conferences to respectively. policy with the greatest' efficien-
i'be. held in Lima, Peru, on Octo- One of the main purposes of cy," Mr Bowles declared.
Sber 9-11, for U,S. representatives each con ference will be to
-hm all the South 'American coun-" strengthen and coordinate U. S. ''lIn addition there was a val-
itrIes, and-' in San Jose, Costa operations overseas by stressing uable exchange of views on
on.Ric, on October 16-18, for those the "Country Team" concept of worldwide and regional foreign
,t_ Caribbean areas. Ambassador will be accompani- philosophy and. objectives of the
..,.. The two conferences will draw ed by the Chiefs of the 'U.S. Jn- Kenpedy Administration in for-
U.S. Ambassadors and other top formation Service, the U.S. Ope- eign. affairs, as well as on ways
.U.S. officials for three days of rations Mission (the foreign aid of improving and tieing together
meetingss to discuss U.S. foreign mission) and the- U.S. Military our administrative operatioftns
r-lrolicy and operations in Latin Assistance Group in the country overseas. We hope to have the
t.Anerica. They will be similar to which he is accredited, same fruitful discussion at Lima
jo' the earlier conferences held Last May, President Kennedy and -San Jose,'" Mr Bowles said.
bby the Under Secretary during wrote to each Ambassador, em- Inter-American political and eco-
Lithe. summer in Lagos (Nigeria), phasizing that, in addition to his nomic problems, aMd especially
:Nicosia (Cyprus), and New Del-- traditional role as representative the new_ Alliance for Progiess,
(India), whLch were attend- of the President, he must serve will receive major attention, -he
.i. added.
EDNESDA NIGHT MEANS: Accompanying Mr flowles to
Sthe meetings will be:
Edward R. Murrow; USIA Di-
BACOULOU CABARET-THEATRE rector
S PETIONVILLE Lesseps S. Morrison, Ambass
SPETIO VILLE- ador of the United States to the
It, '' : ., Organization of American States
'. Exciting, Robert F. Woodward, Assistant
Sophisticate secretary of State for Inter-Amr-
p "...tc rican Affairs
-, TROUPE DE DANSE -. George L. P. Weaver, Assist-
B.. ACOULOU D'HAITI ant Secretary of Labor for Inter-
Y-' .in -..rep e national Affairs .
n"a -n ew. 4> George C. McGhee, Counselor,
Cooplimnentary Meringue Lesson at 9:30 p.m.t. of the Department of State and
S. Chairman of its Policy Planning
.Council ,
.t Thompson, Director e-
F p "' eral. of the Foreign Service.
YOUR HOME AWAY FROM HOME,: Department of, State
1-, .Elmer B. Staats, Deputy Dir-
ector of the Bureau of the Bud-

A1 a 'ir Richard N. .Goodwin, Assistant
SSpecial Counsel to the President
B 1L N G A L 0 W S James Symington, Deputy Dir-
D. R ector of the Food- for Peace Pro-
.A :FRANCK ED.'-'ROY, Manager- gram
i, In the delightful "SOUS-BOIS" of Bizoton John W. Johnston, Jr., Acting
I The. effort and privacy of your .own cottage Regiona Director for Latin
if America of the International Co-
S' with the .best typg of Hotel 'service. operation Admnistration
BAR, RESTAURANT, SWMMhING POOLS, Max Isenbergh, Deputy Assist-
COLORFUL GARDENS ant Secretary of State for Edu-
ATTRACTIVE RATES national and Cultural Affairs
"Herman Pollack, Deputy Ass-

I .. .


: FISHER R'S

S HATES LARGEST FREE PORT PRICE SHOPS
1) TmI. CORNER SHOP RUE BONNE FOL .
S) ART & CUROm sHOP FISHERS ACROSS FROM JU O
STOM& '

AN-D BUY HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS
S STRAIGHT FROM THE FACTORY

"' ON T 'E BRU DIU QUAAl
S' (Al EXPB. AND DNERS CLUB ACCPTKED)


SA-VE UP TO 60 Per Cent ON IMPORTS
SHOPS AND MAHOGANY FACTORY


instant Secretary of State for Per- party, will leave Washington o;rn
,sonnel Saturday, October 7. BetweenI
Carl Rowan, Deputy Assistant the two conferences. Mr Bowles
Secretary of State for Public will visit the Puno area of South-
Affairs eastern Peru where he will offi-:
Haydn Williams, Deputy Ass- cially open a school lunch pro-
istant Secretary. of Defense for gram supported by the U.S.:
International Security Affairs Food for Peace Program. After
Jay. P. Cerf. Deputy Assistant the San Jose Meeting, he is-ex-
Secretary of Commerce for In- pected to spend two days in
ternational Affairs Mexico for informal conversa-
and other senior U.S. Govern- tions with the Mexican Govern-
ment officials. ment, returning to. Washington
The Under Secretary and his on October 21.




KATHERINE DUNHAM
ANNOUNCES

BAR Geisha.& SALON Guinee

OPEN EVERY EVENING FOR


CUISINE OF


THE FAR EAST


..
-'
,: : *- *', '


Your charming Hostess KATHERINE DUNHAM


PRESENTS

Grand Spectale

Tuesday .


At the Peristyle


friday,


DANSE VAUDL


In The SALON GUINEE
SPECTACLE INTERNATIONAL

Wednesday

TRUE VAL4DUN CEREMONY
AT THE OPEN AIR PERISTYLE

FOR YOUR PLEASURE IN THE
COLONIAL SELLING OF

HABITATION LECLERC 4

FAVORITE PLEASURE PARK OF
PAULINE' BONAPARTE
5 MILNUJTELS FROM PORT AU PRINCE ON
THE ROUTE MARTISSA!NT

Dancing Special Summer Cover Charge- $1.50 .


I '


JN




4


Sunday OCTOBER 15, 1961


r I -I-


SUN"


HAITL SUN
THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPEB
.Community Weekly Published Sunday oralu .
Edtor-Publiher BERNARD DIEDEBICiH
Gerant-Besponsable MAUOLAIR Lr.AiAgnUIE
MEMBER OF THE INTER-AMERICAN PRESS ASSN.
ESAURLISHE I IN I


CAN VALLEY ONIONS COMPETE?

The question has arisen "Can podinds CIF. Is Artibonite rice
Artibonite onions be exported at competitive in such world mark
competitive prices?" The cons- 'ets at about $5.00 FOB Port au
umer appeal of the Artibonite Prince?
onions is high-class. However,
Michigan onions in the Miami 'Expert observers note that ma-
wholesale market are quoted at chines on flat land are cheaper
$2.00 per 50-pound bag (or 4 than the cheapest human labor.
cents a pound). There is a machine used in New
The same applies to Artibon- York State, which costs about
ite grown rice. Dominican rice $4,000 and is operated by one
of "Carolina quality" is selling man, that picks 100 tons of corn
in world trade for $6.50 per 300 per 8-hour day.


FROM LE MARTIN

MALARIA OUR NUMBER ONE ENEMY
MUST DISAPPEAR

The National Service for -the Then the. booklet inform'; us
Eradication oL Malaria sent us about 'the organization of the
yesterday a large documentation campaign and the'duties of the
about the campaign agdirist Ma- responsible parties as well as
laria, signed by.Dr Marcel Tay- about the different zones.
lor, chief' of the propaganda and At the end of August 1961, the
publicity section of' SNEM. statistics reported: 200,985 pers-
"On October 1st, he writes, ons had been seen .(by the M.D.)
all over the territory of the re- 16,509 slides made, 439 of-these
public, begins a series of mani- slides were found positive and
'festations in order to devote the 44,242 aralen tablets were distri-
kmonth of October as "Month of but d. 480,130 houses were visit-
' Malaria", according to 'the' wi ed' and numbered. This work is
"of .Dr Francois Duvalier in his going on without rest and will
presidential decree of Septemb- be completed at the end of the
er 8, 1958." month of October.
Taylor thinks that malaria, ac-
cording to official -statistics, is And Dr Taylor concluded with
the No. -1 enemy of the country the words: "Our message on
because of the numerous deaths this day of the month of Maia-
due to it every' year and of the ria is that paludism can be and
.functional physical incapacity must be definitely eliminated
which it produces in the indivi- from 'the country, if the. popula-
.dual who suffers from it. In- tions of.'the malaria area think
quests have revealed that the of offering their collaboration
territory of Malaria in Haiti cov- for 'the happiness of the Haitian
ers 80 per cent of the Country, people."'
that is 25,250 square ,kilometers We present our felicitations
out of the 24,250 square kilomet- and our wishes of fruitful-work
ers. More than 3 Million Haitians to the team of pioneers of which
carry the parasite in their blood, the most eminent is still Doctor
that is -75 per cent of the popula- Francois Duvailer, specialist of
tion. An edifying figure which the malaria, and yaw problems
by if elf justifies this campaign. ip Haiti.



WOULD YOU LIKE TO GROW ORCHIDS
IN YOUR HOME?

There is no trick to it. Thousands of flower lovers
are doing so all over the world. Here in Haiti it's easier
than anywhere else. WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW
HOW?
About two years ago the Orchid Society of Haiti
was established as an affiliate of the great -American
Orchid Society which- has over fifteen thousand memb-
ers all over the world. Once- each month it meets at
the home of one of its members where every phase of
orchid culture and orchid lore are discussed and ex-
ert advice is available, If you are, interested in this
inating hobby and would like to investigate further,
,'rop a line to our president Horace Ashton, Box 133,
Port au Prince, or run up to "Villi Rosa" (Canape
Vert).


-I


Businessmen Give
Opinion On Financing
Duvalierville
(Continued from page 1)
public is that Duvalierville must
be .realized and, believe, me, it
should not be realized nor would
we want to realize it without
you, businessmen and industrial-
ists.

The Explanations of the
Coordinator
After thanking these friends
for coming to hear the commu-
nication of the committee, he
announced that Monday morn-
ing the work at Duvalierville
had been officially opened. When
he asked them, in the- name of
the country, to get together for
a common effort, oriented to-
wards regenerating of the pro-
vincial towns, one had the feel-
ing, because of the tokens of
adhesion provoked by his expose,
that the financing problem is on
the way to total success.
Cambronne who was surround-
ed by the Vice President of the
Committee,- Deputy Jean Julme,
delegate Jules Taylor, treasur-
er of the Chamber of Commerce,
Mr Gerard Theard and Mr Lu-
cien Thebaud, businessmen and
industrialists, talked for a long
time about the policy of amelior-
ation of the fate of the peasant
and urban populations which
was undertaken with faith, pat-
riotism and love by the Chief
of State.
"Without this policy of vision,
he said, our country would not
be what it actually is. And
would not have been respecting
the wishes of Emperor Dessali-
nes, who gave to this ,country
dignity and Independence, wean-
ed from degrading conditions."

Grands et Petits
Mr Cambronne then open the
floor for questions from the lar
ge public present. He answered
Mr Saleh who observed that
small .businessmen are willing
to contribute to' the work but
were surprised to see themselves
catalogued in the same series
with the big businessmen and
for the same contribution. The
coordinator cleared up things
saying that the committee had
been alerted and that the ques-
tion was being studied for a
readjustment of the contribu-
tions according to the size of
the business and industry..
Not only some...

Then, Mr Dominique emphasiz-
ed 'a point of view which has
all its importance and which
met with everybody's agree-
ment. "We are willing, -he said,
to collaborate and help the gov-
ernment at Duvalierville,.but the
effort must be general, which
means that it must be asked to
all: lawyers, engineers, medical
doctors, financiers, to subscribe.
Jean Julme welcomed the sug-
gestion with these words: "This
is extremely important. And I'll
say better: that all those who
breathe and live on this land
of Haiti, in Peace, liberty aund
security must contribute to the
realization of Duvalierville."
The Gifts
The meeting was ending. It


Phone: 3955. P. O.


BO..'.284


The More You Know About Scotch

The More You Like Cutty Sark




/-














NSOTCHIiESKY'













BLENDED
Si N WHISIdf-





.I



















Exclusive Distributor:
DR. GERARD KENOL
151 Rue du Centre


ON SALE AT
THE BETTER STORES


.T,:j


I ---- --


I -


1 . -" ,


'I
I'A~kb


ended with the best omen since tee to promise the adjustments".
MM. Pierre Gabriel, Lucien The- signaled by the businessmen' and'
baud, and. Mevs of "Gift Fair industrialists, and to appreciate,
Shop" gave substantial monthly the depth, and extent of this na-.,
contributions ranging from $50 tional movement as well as thei
to $100. confidence that business and in-::,
The Profit duqtry have put in those called.'
This conference was, according upon to administer the common':
to us, necessary and indispens- funds.
able, for it allowed the commit. (Reprinted from LE MATIN) .,


Caribbean Construction Co. S-A.

Builders Of The Military City

Gen. Manager: Gerard THEARD








AGE 6



f t Telediol
',: ,.' -,. '


S' an
.-'-The little Flamboyant trees planted along the Boulevard .are Du
r vieally making progress. Hope they manage to .keep. the cattle addec
I.'tfrom eating them beore they gain their'full height. -Roger, Saieh In
may. be seen these days working on the Exposition Grounds. H-te's held
,making the mountings for two large folklore scenes painted by c, apt
-atist-Wash. Iho nmountings dre .cement but carved" to look esse
lilike -oambo around the border,' and-like straw matting above. .com
E'Roger is. the man who designed the very modern esinent benches of la
Viih tiled tops which are scattered around the new park. -jf '.ou ly on
(want Id elijoy the sunset from a real vantage point, that: new park caug
.1 I nght
'between the AiU.entine Embassy and the Chamber of Commercre ahd
:- the place to do it. When it is completed it will be' a lovely esca\
s'ot 'with the pools and..jountains and the lamppost lights decorated time,
l't. I 's'tcbes- and( personalities. -'-The Fombrun family is An
building a laige granite-block mausoleum in the Cemeter whici I a t
Sgrant
dye~s idWs Averything around it. -Addition to the camionette th
.pa.am'e list: Entant de la Veuve. I can understand them havii: ng
fatbhe,"ilike Mr Ford and General Motors, but I didn't know ca- rese'
iees had mamas too. -Public plea to: HASCO: When you and
rClear. t"e -tracks of mud along the Martissani. Road, please dion'l' over
-- ers I
i...move td from one side of the road and dump it on the' other. ing
b'e.e's a.huge pile'of chocolate pudding in front of the Aqtrarium
4 rd. ty ngte next dopr. What's' the sqnse of having the car:'Wa.ushed
S,hav tl. plow thoughh th t? -John Quinn is having-a""secor.d
cation at home'while the little' lady is in the States. --Diz-y
dictionary defties 'Eveniij'"Gown: A dress that's tnore gone ihan
-Little Cyrthia Ayot had her first birthday last Su'nlay and
fietfher the "Matain6 not the Parin" was on deck.... ofe had the
tate mixed tip and the ..the; was sick in bed. But "Cynt'l has
-a weet dia5 position Aand is sure to'forgive us. -There's a'.map nf
niti on f "wall 'in front o my -desk knd -the-'place nalies are
eguilinhn I'd like to know" 'w somb' of them originated, such as
te du fit Paradis, Pte. db la Plateforme'alhd Me. Citne. -Ole
p'ofpn washed a party' on the, Choucodne 'porch one night last
;4eek iand turned in a rendition of St Louis Blues that rocked hie
lace. He's good, but e4eryone'.is'still trying to 'figure out what
't. waa doing with a bottle of 'tetltp 'in his' pants pocket. -Riddle
this What .has a.'face bu' tho head;. hands' but no feet; and is
usually seen' running? --A numfiber of easily 'birds took out their
.licenses in Petion'vil( bdefre- the new $1.50 fee was add2d.
ted. earlier in the city. --.Luc" Edouard, 3rd Section Chief in
Artibonlte, grows 'he best.'barltaloupe in Haiti in his backyard &
den. Sweet, sjvdt; '--Aaron Maer, President of Bellas-Hess,
.W in tpwn on a 'r6itine visil last week. As always, he staked
p at Rendez-Vous. -Elaine Barrymore' returned to town too, and
Was Rendez-Vousing 'with her Ma. *In -fact, last week was',"ateak
eek" at Dan's. There'mpst be a little money around, town. Those
teaks don't sell for 'peanuts..:' but they're worth what you' spend.
-The-airport word is that'grofnd is about to be broken. Is it too
sbon to yell "Hurray!"? Qiuen sabe? "

...'-- ...
5 -







OP EN NIGH-TL Y
.GAM B'L I N G
I DANCING TO .

JOE TROUILLOT'S
ORCHESTRA

MIDNIGHT SHOW W

Entrance Charge $1.00 *
On SATURDAY, SUNDAY AND HOLIDAYS


*~4rC44oeoo*4


"HAITI SUN"


laitian Deportation
from Bahamas
Continued from page 1),
procedure followed in Baha-
Magistrate's Courts.
ring this week 11 more were
d.'.
addition to those ndw being
for deportation, the owner,
ain and 13 crew members
he Haitian sloop Marie-The-
are in -custod. pending
)letion of trial on charges
nding 70 passengers illegal-
i September 12. The 70 were
ht very shortly after a midL
landing, but Immigration,
police say that 30 to 40 more
ped apprehension at that

unstated number, of hes
t er have reportedly, bbee
ted temporary permits whili
Bahamas C.I.D. is investigat-
allegations that Mlarie-Thei
s captain, Neocles Lubin,
others deliberately threx
board two. Haitian passefig
some hours before the Idnd'
occurred.
.


!-


Sunday OCTOBER 15, 1
-


* A. nit.ential itniq:' '-s ti'ss o sources stale a h:at tne 'qjesti
e.sX-passeL]ngrs .are being. perni L- of Jurisiliction is oms as a pI
ted to remain -temporarily, it is sibly insurmountable sturhblr
untderso'd6'. ', block to grmal charges.
Unofficially, however, police I ,


POE


.TS' CORNER .

-T- ERN WIND

.; Western. WiFrd,.k-h.en 'ilt ;thou hlow?
The small rain down can rain.
Christ, if -.m love were in my arms,'
And I in rnmy bed again!
Anon. 16th Century

PARTING.
-Mly life closed twice before its close;
It yet remains to see
If Immortality unveil, '.
A' third event to me

So huge,. so hopeless to conceive'
As these that twice befell.
Parting is. all we.. know, of heaven
And all we need of hell.


-I.

-'I


r:' Ir : .fl mily'DIEfS.RSON


[heel-Type lrnoxcuvators



'09 K I


.. O.


,t',)-j ,i^' Caterpillar kheel-type Traicavators can'
,) dig- and load a ducketfull' of gravel in less
than half a minute, under typical conditions.'
These loaders have power shift transmissions and automatic bucket posi-
tioners to speed up operations.. Their sturdy construction saves trouble on the"
tough jobs.
Caterpillar builds three sizes: the 966A 2-1 ou. yd.; the 944A 2 cu. yd,';'
and the 922A 114 cu. yd. Many options and attachments are available, includ-
ing cabs, quarry buckets, side dump buckets and lumber forks. _
We can match the loader to your' exact needs. Our after-sales service wi'
help keep it operating at high efficiency.


Caterpillar, Cal and Trateavator are Regiatered Trademrkar of Caterpillar Tractor Co.
HAYTIAN TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT Co. ,S. A.
Maurice Bonnefil, Manager Chancerelles


j







14
;

^
^


Sunday OCTOBER 15, 1961 HA TI S U N U AGE ,



12th ANNIVERSARY


FREE PORT SHOPPING CENTER
P. 0. Box 676, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI..




4 AROUND THE WORLD IMPORTS -
MINTON, WEDGWOOD. flUNEGA,' rATEKT IrrL GUUMEALIi, VINVn-s
ROYAL CROWN DARBY, JUVENIA TISSOT, BOREL, CARON, CANELM
-e1 ROYAL COPENHAGEN, = (=AUDEMAR PIGUET, RAPHAEL. PATOU,
ROYAL WORCESTER, BALMAIN, WORTH,
S ROYAL DOULTON, ULYSE NARDIN, RIVO, REVILLON, VIGNT,
ROSENTHALE, SPODE, ATLANTA, STUDIO, CARVEN, LE GALLON,
AYNSLEE, COALPORT, VULCAIN. FABERGE OF PABIS,
GUSTAUBEBG. JEAN D'ALBERT,
4 FATH, .PIGUET.
-KISLAV, CORDAY,
4 GEORGE JENSEN. ENGLISH DOESKIN,
HANS HANSEN, GEBO, ITALIAN* ANTELOPE. MINOX,.CANNON
DRAGSTE,, GENSE. r

SS PRINGLE, BALLANTYNE, ROYAL COPENBAGEZ
The Finest of FRANCE. BERN HARD ALTMAN, ROYAL DOULTON, .
--ITALY, AUSTRIA, LUISA SPAGNOLI. HUMMEL.

.LAMQUE, BAcCARBAT," *
ORREFORS, HARVESTS BRISTOL .
WEBB & CORBETT, DANISH SILVER, CEAM, All FRENCg.
VAL SOLAMBERT, GOLD & SILVER JE WELRY DANISH ana
| STUART. LEERMAN. and BRAZILAN GEMS. SPANISH LIQUIEUS.
S. HAITIAN HANDICRAFTS

SVooDoo Ipspired SCULPTURES RAFFIA BAGS
JEWELRY & SHOES



SNiv-,r -Factory ouUeti0 HATAN mUSIC
SPORT SHIRTS MAHOGANY Collector's Itens
T- Best-


'Typical Costume-Dressed DOLLS
^ C ^ World Famous RUGS & DRAPE4Y 4
S Haitian RUM BARBANCOURT
4; !. Hai3 -s send gifts to your friends in the U. S. A.
4 without affecting your quota.- See us for more information.


^^^^^^~ ~ ~~A' AL^^^^ 4&^^^^^^^^'^ ^ /^^^




.' .'. -.- ..... .-.-


PAGE 8


INTERVIEW IN THE AMERICAS


Lincoln Gordon C


Planning And Goi
U.S. Attitude Towards Economy of Latin America


idncoln Gordqu, a U.S. econ-
i4tt served as a consultant
t- U .S. President [tennedy's
SAtin American Task Force"
n.Iting -the first months of the
ine* administration, and accom-
paidied', U.S. Ambassador' to the
ii. iAdli .'i. Stevenson .on. his
t ir of South America. He is
'U oing private research in
BraAi2. under a Ford "Foundation

" : ," '
r.D: Gordon has .been William
degler-*'Professor oqf Interhation-
t don6mic Relations at the
pn ivard "Graduate School of
Bu"ines Administration since
-1955.f-ias experience in econom-
;: planning dates ftom service
With the ,W.r. reductionn .Board
during. World .yar, h' and pre-
% wr.dUty with the National Res-


sources Planning Board. In En-,
gland, he. was U.S. Minister for
'Economic Affairs and Director
of the U.S. Operations Mission
from 1952 to 1955.

AMERICAS takes pleasure in
presenting tils interview, with
Dr Gordon, conducted at his
Harvard office prior to his de--
parture for. Brazil in July. This
is the first in a new series of
interviews that, will bring read-
ers the ideas of leading person-
alities on subjects of Hemisph-
ere-wOide, interest; it has been
transcribed from a recording of
"the live conversation.

AMERICAS Re p o r t e r: The
United States' attitude toward
the ecofiody of Latin America
seems to be changing. For in-
stance, the United States has ac-
cepted the new common markets
and the idea of-the Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank: and .it
has accepted the kind of con-
trol of 'capitalism that has been
developing in Latin America late-
ly, -the Export-Import Bank
makes loans for. oil to state-own-
ed companies-iand that is a big
change In outlook. I would like-
yery much to have you tell us
the reasons'.for this- not. just
the accidental political reason,


69., RUE.DI

WHAT TO Bk


S. ISAL BAGS and BELT

FRENCH PLRFUMLS

.WOOD CARVINGS


TORTOISEE

.STRAW G


but the deep rei
change.
Dr. Gordon: I
some extent, the
the result of a mo
tinuous process o
North American I
the economic probe
America. The cha
You have identifier
more significant on
taken place grad
period of time,, no
the change of pol
ration in this cou
them began sever

It is certainly
a period of time
States took an exc
ow view of probl
American e c o n o
ment. Latin Ameri


Sunday OCTOBER 15, 1961 "'HAITI

could be achieved and if there Milton Eisenhower, who kn.vows
were a receptive climate for Latin America very well, and-
private investment. There was some views expressed rathfre-
a tendency to underestimate the strongly by Nelson Rockefeller,'
importance of public investment. who also knows Latin- America '"
More seriously, there was a ten- very well," tended to change theA
l Olency to disregard the very ser- policy of the last administration, r
ious social and political imbal- but.only slowly. -i
ances in the Latin American pq- There were, however, two imr-
litical and economic structure. portant developments as a res- -
asons for this There 'was -also a tendency to ult of- this gradual recognition--.
underestimate the importance of that Latin American economic -,
certain particular Latin Americ- development was proceeding too 4
think that, to an economic problems, especial slowly and political relationships '"
changes are ly those that come from concen- in the Hemisphere 'ere becom- '
re or less con- traction of exports on a small ing. less and less satisfactory.. a
f evolution of 'number of primary commodit- They were first, a more sym-"-'
thinking about les-such items as coffee, copp- pathetic attitude by the* govern- '-
ilems of Latin er in the case of Chile,-lead 'ind ment in Washington toward some
nges are reaL zinc in the cases of Peru and efforts to improve the markets
d many of the Mexico- and a failure to recog- for Latin American pronary:'
ies. They have nize that the markets for these commodities through internation- '.
ually over a 'products were growing only very al agreements. The sympathetic .
it simply with -slowly, and'that Latin American attitude toward the coffee agree- '"
itical adminis- e c o n o m i c development was ment was the. most important ^
rntry. Some of therefore hampered by serious symbol of that. "
al years ago. shortages of foreign exchange.
Seqondly, there hJad been" for
true that for many -decades -as I think you
e the United Then here was a brief period, mentioned- a, strong desire in .
cessively narr- just after the second World War, Latin America ,for some fonm ..
eims of Latin in which Latin America had no of regional development institu- ...:
m ic develop- foreign exchange shortage. Many tion; this has now become the .
ca was known people in this country failed to Inter-A m e r i c a n Development


to be- an area with extensive
natural resources, and with pro-
rfiiefIn standards.- d in manv of.


realize that this was dnly a
transitory situation.. During the
591 0's there gradually came t.>


Bank. This idea had. been re-.
sisted for a long time in Wash- ,y
ington, -on the theory that the .


LLUt Lo1r uus i U V U 5tI oitaF t ,ta, . . . .b -.- - -I*-.-I -' ,- n
the countries, of an intermediate be increasing appre'clation of World Bank on the one hand, _
level' -that is, above thbse of these difficulties, and there took and the Export-Import. Bank on.
the poorest I countries of Asia place a gradual evolution of po- the other, could really take care .;I
and Africa, but far below those licy as a result. Certain events, of. all the needs, and that the
of either Europe ,or North Ame- for example the difficulties of real shortage was' not one of
rica. Many people in the United Vice President Nixon at the time institutions to finance Latin
States believed, therefore, that of his visit to Latin America in American- heeds..
it ought to be possible for dev- 1958, were rather a shock to Reporter: It was one of mo-=g
elopment to take place more or North American 'opinion. The ney '. .. -.- ,'; ;
less spontaneously, if sound-do- sticess of the subsequent visit of .
me s t i c monetary conditions President Eisenhower's brother, THE REAJl SHORTAGE

_ Dr Gordon: -Not even one of-
1 money. It was .the shortage o
-. 'good"'projects. It was felt that'"
if good projects could be found
he existing institutions' could
take care of' the situation. This-
\ ,' Tt attitude failed to recognize that
an Inter-American instit u t i.o n
. would give Latin American gov- -'
Sernmehts-and people a sense of.
So n. active participation, through an
S* institution that was. particularly
S. understanding of Latin American
conditions, and would be 'respon-
S- / sive to those special needs. The'-
C, --"-' Inter-American Bank -w h i ch
* has only been' in operation for
S(- a few months- ,is already de-.
monstrating very clearly that it..
r* was an excellent idea, and the
misfortune is that it wasn't adop-'.
I UA| 'Q ted a long time ago.
U- Q I"- Now, coming to the present.
administration -the Kennedy ad-t.
UY: ministration- there is a further-
very marked move along the-
Ssame line. It goes so much-.
further that the difference of de- "
d LIQUOR d gree has practically become a'"
and LIQWUORS 'difference of kind. This is espe-.
cially true with respect to -the'
S MAMOGANY notion of.long-term development:
planning and a concerted effort,
HELL to deal with social as well as
economic development.

005 PAINTING6 The idea of singling out some&
of these social imbalances forj
special attention was the ceo
tral theme of the Bogota Confe',
_ierre & ri\' vCe ence of last September. I don't
s "' know the precise history of the'
thinking that was later reflect-
Sed at Bogota. I understand that-


c




U U e~ ~ --


U N"


!many of the ideas came from
President Lleras Camargo of Co-
lombia, and Prime Minister Bel-
tran of Peru. They were rein-
forced by the visit of Senator
Wayne Morse, and his report,
by a series of reports made to
the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, and by some cong-
ressional visits as well. Every-
one who looked at the situation
came out with a similar diag-
nosis. They said, in effect, that
while, in much of Latin America
there had been a great deal of
economic progress in the period
msince- the war, the "benefits of
.this progress ware not ver',
widely distributed. The agricul-
tural- parts of the economies
.were lagging very badly--obvi-
ously-.a serious problem, since
most of .the people live in the
countryside. In the very rapidly
growing cities there were also
grave .problems of miserable
.housing conditions, and frequent-
ly mass unemployment. Some-
*hoW' or other, it was clear, the
simple formula' of monetary sta-
bility and a receptive attitude
toward private investment was


about Latin America. There is
also a wholly new emphasis on
systematic long-t e r m develop-
ment programming or planning
which is to be the keynote of
the conference which will" take
place in Montevideo. This repre-
sents a real change of attitude
and change of direction.

Reporter: There has been also
a big change of attitude with
respect to planning. Can you tell
us what in your thinking is the
exact meaning of development.
Planning? Does it mean planning
in each country, or.does it mean
also Continent-wide planning-a
Latin America planning for not
producing refrigerators in both
Montevideo and Buenos Aires,
for instance, which is an absol-
ute waste? Or is It also a joint
North American and Latin Ame-
rican planning for investments'
and for some kind of regulation,
or compensation, or something
to be done about the prices of
basic commodities, or what?

'Dr Gordon: This is a uery
large group of questions. Let's


not enough. take' first the question of what
is meant by development plan-
Hence the Bogota Conference ning. My view is that the- cen-
Here again I stress that this at- tral effort in development plan-
titude began to be' formed be- ning should be national planning
fobre (he change of administra- in each Latin American coun-
tioji of this cobintry, but this tine try. Planning doesn't mean that
of thought is now coming to everything, that is planned has
.play a much more central' part to be-done by the state. There
,in the policy of our Government should not be a confusion bet-





IN PETIONVILLE IT'S



MOTAItA


A(-' Il.100eeE altitude .yel only minutes
from the heart" o PORT-AU-PRINdE

SThe most exquisite OievOs,overlooking the dity
I the boy, 'i plains, the mountain.

l, Dieiious donhinenlol-duisine and superb
SerVide .

Personalized allenhtion to eOery guest.

voi-min P.o ol& oih l Lundbeon Lounge
and Bar Panorama Terrode
Air-donditoned de-luxe rooms



SVEEKLY. ENTERTAINMENT PROCIRAM

TUESDAu :Ino-irmalrol e |f. t1,'ncing rom
S7 : P to madniqg
1 1 1 JVierinfue in'mTruchon arl g dntest
aM 9:3o .dosua dfes.o odniion{ee
vEODNEs)AL.: omplimentarg get-logebterPundiblow
Party rom 7P m to 8pm.
FRI Ay : alacDinner-Dande from 7:3o Pm to
-- 1:3o a.m. 6uperb Sov at 1o : l o 0 c
NJo admision tee -.
A LL OTHER Jh4lTb: Cocktoil bour from 7 to 9 wVi h
)- notice dipmo


ween planning
complete social

THE ME.
SOME C
Reporter: Wh'
ge in the Unite
mean?
Dr Gordon: Y
change of attit
cial credits her
equipment for
ed oil monopo
change which is
chance, although
ant as is somi
The new policy,
it, is to provide
financing of ex
export guarantee
types of oil mach
ment required
monopolies. The
ies, which refi
such credits, di
appreciable effeu
ment inonopolhe


It's no set
coffee ext
beans go-i
Nescaf6.
it's made
complete
the accen


PAQ "


on the one haid change presumably should make nomy that a country would like-J;
sm on the ctier. some of their operations a little to see five or ten years hence.
bit easier. But what I think this This picture becomes a basis,
ANING OF reflects is a-recognition that the then, for the systematic deve-
CHANGES question of whether a country lopment of programs for the pu-
at does the chan- wants to run its oil industry blic investment sectors. There..
ed States attitude through a state monopoly, or are some sectors that are bound
through concessions or leases or to be putllicly directed. In the
ou mentioned the licenses or other arrangements cases of transportation, .conimu-
ude toward offi- with private concerns, is essen. nications, and electric -power,
re for supplying tally a matter for each govern- even if they are operated by
government-own- ment to decide on its own. And private companies, they must be, ,
lies. That is a that whatever the decision is, as planned p by the government.'
s of some signifi- long as the county operates the because in all cases they are sub- t'.
not as import- industry reasonably efficiently, jecr to governmental regulation ."
times supposed. we shouldn't refuse to cooperate and in most cases thq financing .'
as I understand because of a doctrinaire view. as of expansion, is largely in gov-'.-'
de governmental to how it should be organized. ernment hands. There are also
,port credits, or harbors, water supplies, and ir-
ees, for various AIMS OF DEVELOPMENT rigation works, all in the area
hinrery and equip- PLANNING of so-called economic infrastrtc-.,
by government Repoi-ter: In your view, what ture. '
e previous pulic- is the principal aim of planning The public social sectors are'...,:,
used to provide for development? equally important and often have '`-4
d not have any Dr Gordon: The minimum is been disregarded. Take educa::. :.
ct on the govern- that some broad picture is de- tion, for example, the moderniz-
es anyway. This eloped of the shape of the eco- (Continued on page 10).





- :' ,



1























beans in every.y cup of1












No othercoffee...no matter how 20
... tastes so fresh, so friendly, so
y satisfying. In today's Nescaf,
t is on coffee! ll


Get NESCAFE today!


-. ..-~,.




-S. ~ -~


.PAGE 10


SUN "


Sunday OCTOBER 15, 19,61


Lina

(Continued from page 9)
action of which is enormously
S,-important. It is a curious anom-
l.aly that the systems of national
.'accounting regard educational
expenditures as consumption. In
i tact, this is a form of human in-
" vestment, and often the most re-
l"warding possible type of invest-
m inent that a country can under-
take. Other important social
fiflelds include public health, hou-
,-sing, technical assistance to agri-
IP'culture, development of adequ-
21.ate credit arrangements, parti-
cularly for small farmers.
-
Things of. this kind ought to
be reviewed on a systematic bas-
is' and should be laid out for
.-some years ahead. They apight
4to .be consistent with one en-
ther. Moreover, and most im-
portant, they should be consist-
ent. with the resources available,
~.whether those resources are do-
mestic or come. from the out-
jide.
S'With respect to the industrial
.sector, which in most of Latin
'America. is mainly in private
hands -although the situafin is
mzxed- there again I think it
Very use ful that there
be bro ad- development
,aigets for certain of
te key industries. These are the
'industries which pro vide the
"iiost important generating im-
ulmses to economic development.
I They too should be consistent
w`*.th the broad pattern ,of. econ-


oln Gor,

omic development that is fore-
seen. They may then become
subject to some special incent-
ives, either through tariffs or
through governmental financing
of some kind; or they may not,
depending on the broad -policies
of the governments; but at least
there should be some picture of
how these will fit in. There
should also be a systematic re-
view of the balance between tot-
al investment expected and the
mobilization of savings, again
whether domestic or foreign, in-
cluding private. investment, for-
eign public investment in tihe
form of loans or in some cases
grants, or loans on easy terms.
Unless that is done, the-whole
program is likely to be under-
mined by inflationary pressure.
Finally, there ought to be some


sort of foreign exchange budget-
ing that takes into account the
prospective earnings of foreign
exchange and the needs.
. This does not imply planning
in the sense that certain indust-
ries are selected for each coun-
try and that all other countries
refuse to engage in those indus;
tries. That -ldnd- of planning haL'
been suggested for the Central
American common market giou-
ping.

Reporter: A kind of division of
labor.
Dr Gordon: That's right. I
wouldn't object' to some of this,
it depends on what people want


don...


to do. On the whole, however,
while it is useful for national
plans to be developed for cert-
ain key industries, with a view
to what is economical and sens-
ible for the country concerned,
taking also into account its rela-
tions with other countries-it is
generally not a good idea to
have governmental direction of
the location and size of each
private factory.

For one thing, life is not as
predictable as that. One must,
of course, plan for the basic in-
frastructure sectors. It is useful
to plan for certain key industries
as well, like steel, and perhaps
cement, and obviously the lead-
ing agricultural commodi tie s.
Beyond that, it seems to me
desirable to have an environ-
ment in which there is room
for competition, which is a con-
siderable spur to efficiency, and
in which there is an opportunity
for private entrepreneurs -I am
thinking now not so much of for-
eigners as of Latin Americans
themselves- to experiment and
to have the right to fail. One
of the most constructive things
about private enterprise is the
right to fail. People try things.


tegration of the Hemisphere, how
can the national plans of each
country be related to one an-
other?
Dr Gordon: Here, we must ob-
viously recognize the fact that
most Latin American markets
aie too small to afford highly
diversified modern industries, if
the markets' of those industries
are going to be confined to sing-
le nations. This is not necessar-
ily true of Brazil, or Mexico, or
Argentina, which are all very
large countries -geographically


STEPHEN BROS

M.V. HAITI TRADER

M. V. HAITI MERCHANT

PERSONALLY SUPERVISED

LOADING AND UNLOADING

SERVE HAITI AND FLORIDA
forthrightly sailings of the
Miami-Port au Prince-Miami

MIAMI ADDRESS:
Telephone: Highland 517C7
Franklin 9-7228


.








JOSEPH NADAL a Co.
Agents.


GRACE LINE


l i ~~iARE FOR HAITI
One Class 4

NEW YORK PORT-AU-PRINCE (DEPARTURE 4
EVERY FRIDAY):

&CARGO SHIPS (12 PASSENGERS) $135 ALL YEAR


[AD COMBO-SHIPS (52 PASSENGERS) FROM-$155

n PORT AU PRINCE NEW YORK (DEPART EVERY SUNDAY)

LUXURY SHIPS: SANTA ROSA SANTA PAULA
300 PASSENGERS FARE FROM $195.00

FOR INFORMATION



"I Joseph Nadal & CoX
S., _OR YOUR TRAVEL AGENT


"HAITI


spemer.

CAP-HATIEN AND THE CITAQEL.
ONE WAY SY PLANE ,ONE WAY BY LIMOUSINE

O. O- I oe 7ALL
$4 .-INCLUDED
OPERATED BY dIIRjST6PIETbURp5
AVENUE PAN AMERICAIN'E
/ PETION-VILLLE -HAITI
P.O.BOX 312 .Phone: 77.61 RA


If one jist assumes tha-t a cm .:nd fairly large in size of popu-
ent plant in a given place wil, lation and market. Except for."
be efficient because that seems these three, and possibly Colom-
to the planners to .be a logical bia, most Latin American coun-
place to have a cement industry, tries are very small in popula-
this' disregards the differences tion, the average income is low,
in managerial efficiency and en- and therefore the total size of
gineering plans, or possible new the national market is very
techniques. The only way to find small. This is obviously true in
out about many of these thiings the Central American countries.
is for someone to try. If several Any effort made there for diver-
people try, some will be success- sified industrialization in each
ful and some will not be success- country must be uneconomical
ful, and the successful ones. will and inefficient in the nature of
survive. This is a useful way of things. The idea of trying to
employing the incentive struct- group countries together in reg-
ure of private enterprise, but ional markets, one or several,
within a broad framework of seems to me most desirable.
national plans. The United States has been sym-
pathetic toward the efforts of the
ECONOMIC INTEGRATION Central American groups since
EFFORTS they began, and toward the wid-
Reporter: If we think bout er efforts reflected in the Treaty
the problem of the economic in- (Continued on page 11)


I







S9tunday OACTOBE2 15, 1S-1


"HAITI SUN"


1 4AG2.lp


(Continued from page 10) '
of Montevideo, which set up the
Latin American Free Trade Ass-
ociation, as long as these plans
are really meaningful.
There has been some fear that
"the, free trade area would not
really provide for industrial free
trade among its members, but
would simply lead to very high
and discriminatory tariff obst-
acles against the outside world.
In other words, 'there would be
'the disadvantages of -high pro-
teqtion without the advantages
of a genuine regional market.
Most thoughtful North Ameican
who look at this problem recog-
nize the validity of the so-called
infant industry argument for
protection. 'We '-had it.-in this
country in the late nineteenth
Sand early twentieth centuries. ,.1
*believe that our own industrial,
ization was-,advanced greatly'4in.
time over what otherwise mlrht
have occurred because-,we- had
tariff protection against compe-
ition' from Europe, which .at
that time .was' technically in ad--
vance of,.our own country.

If Latin America is to.,iidus-
Strialize, which lit must if it is
going to advance economically,


along with achieving higher pio-
ductivity in agriculture, thpn
there must be a reasonable
amount of' protection from com-
petition from the already highly
industrialized countries. The ul-
timate objective is to have effi-
cierit industries that can cornm-
pete anywhere in the world. It is
clearly much more possible Ao
have such truly efficient irndus-
tries on a regional basis than
on a national basis, market by
market. The Treaty of Monievi-
deo is not a bad framework, but
its effectiveness depends on how
t i e year-by-year negotiations
under it proceed. If it works in
the direction of real integration
of the kind the Europeans are
now developing in their common
market, then it is a very healthy
thipg, and the United States. will
want to support it lith' enthus-
'asm;i'M\ly "guess is ,that our in-
fluence will bb6" exerted.-,in -the
directpn, of trying: -to' m -l it
.really meaningful and not inere-
ly a .sort of pretext for protec-
tion of special vested interests,'
'THE ROLE OF THE U.S.
. Reporter: What.kiiAnd of integ-
rated planning can .there be bet-
ween' Ltin Anperica. and the
.United Stated? . *.


Li coin Gordon


Dr Gordon: I would say three
things about that. First, some
people hae. talked about the
possibility of trying to develop
a common market in the West-
ern Hemisphere as a whole, in-
cluding both Latin America and
the United States, and possibly
Canada. This does not seem to
me a sound idea. There is .a
vast difference between the de-
gree of industrialization of the
United States and that of Latiti
America'. Any effort to put these
markets together, at least in the
short run, would simply frust-
rate Latin American industrial-
ization .and this would be con-
tra producente.

Secondly, there is the quest-
ion of how the national plans --
which I spoke of before- can
be used as la guide to outside
aid. I use aid in a very, bioad
-sense. I mean Ilard loans, wnet-
'her. they' come from the World
Bank or the Inter-American
Bank or the Expoi t-I m port
Bank. "And I, mean soft loans
whether they come from the new
International Development Asso-i
ciation, as in the case of Hondu-I
ras recently, or from the Inter-I
American Bank under the Act of
B6g6ta or under its special oper-
yatihS, or from the new aid agen-
cy that is to be created in the
o n r-ro he ne id'aen


Yot know '

it's a reanlly7. S ,ne

Scotch whi it' !

JOHNNIE
WALKER




JOHNNIE WALKERIt
aSr n aso-all goiag strong,


DISTRIBUTOR PREETZMAN-AGGERHQLM -,



Drambuie LIQUEUR

-INDISPENSABLE FOR

S HE ENJOYABLE PARTY W

AND

AGENTS FESTIVITIES E
UNICOS
The only sweet 'LIQUEUR made in Scotland ona
Stie basis or the finest pure b1d SCOTCH WHISKl.,
Indispensable for festivities and for every occa-
sion.
EXCLUSIVE AGENTS:
2L. PREETZMAN-AGGERHOLM & CO.1


-' .


It's the same the whole world over...

Behind every mapof the world lies a great tradition
of exploration and.discovery. I ,.
Behind every bottle of "WH ITE LABEL" Scotch
whisky lies a great tradition of blending- thar has
made this fine old whisky famous far beyond the. -*
borders of its native Scotland. Today, "WH!TE
LABEL" is knonn and appreciated everywhere.
Wherever you are, ask for


5$
"bWhite LabelF

2t' 5? SCOTCH WHISKY
--IT-NEVER VARIES 5


Agent Distributor:
ANDRE KIIAWLY
P. 0. Box 107 Port au Prince, Haiti
48, Rue, du Magasmn de I'Elat Phone: 3721


1'








If






'7*'*.




-a
C-



-1'--
at


/




I



S -


i-I
* *' -* .. * 1 - -. Al ;.


United Stales. I also i,,Lain tei.-
Snicil jssistaniice in \arious fields,
by the United Nations, by inter-
American agencies, and by the
United States- indeed by indi-
vidual Eu.ropean countries too,
because they should also be in-
volved in aid to Latin America.
And I mean, as well, private in-
vestment, which is not normally
considered aid. but which can
reake a large contribution to the
supply of capital and technique
and therefore to- actual develop
ment. All of these outside sourc-
es o( funds and technical skills
ought, in a broad way, to be
ielatdd to the national developI
inent programs.

Finally planning machinery to
be devised at Montevideo should
see to it that the various agenc-
ies that have aid to oifer take
those plans as the guide 'lines
for their supply of aid. 'This
doesn't mean a highly forr.al- ar-
rangement. '0bvously each agen-
ty must make its own final de-
cisions on particular projects,
but in between the idea of a
completely organized club of aid-
supliets on the one hand and the
idea of each one operating on
its o\-n on the other hand, there
is a middle ground for coordi-
nation t


THE {IOLE OF TIHE OAS
Reporter: Do you think that


INSURE WITH AURE INSURANCE .
CALEDONIAN INSURANCE COMPANY
Founded In -1805 .
INCORPORATED BY SPECIAL AlT OF. "-
THE BRITISH PARLIAlENT' -
SRONY CHENET .&'-"$SONS
S. AGENTS FOR IAt.I
Ad ep s Rue dbs .Miracles Opposite National


m


the OAS through its IA-ECOSO.t
cin be, not exactly the agency
but the inspiring factor of this
coordination?

Dr Gordon: I think it can.
is the direction that the Monte
video proposals will take. At thb
staff level, arrangements haVy6
already been made for cooper"j
Lion among the OAS, ECLA, 'an&.
the inter-American Bank. Th'
%.ill provide a quite strong,. tect
nically capable staff group whei
should be of tremendous help,14
gi hig ftechnic-.l .isistance, firt,
to individual governments in. ma
king their plans, and secondly'
to the aid-supplying agencies' .
reviewing and appraising 'an8;
analyzing.the progt-ams that
developed.


COMMODITY MARKETS ,;:

Reporter:.What kind of plan.
.ning is necessary for raw nimter
lals and commodity markets?

Dr Gordon: These are, ver
serious problems. I don't th
that one can try. to have an i
international stabilization .are
ment for every primary' c'ij
modify produced in Latin A
rica. These. agreements are co8n
plicated, and hard to work. ",
is essential to ,use them ponit

(Continued from page 12)





RAGE~~~~~~N N21hdyOTBR1,16


"HAITI SUN"


Lincoln Gordon...

(Continued from page 11) ideas have been suggested for
for a selected number of corn- this. There was a discussion at
.- /modities of the greatest impor- the UN Economic and Social
tance where the ins ability Council a few weeks ago, with
threatens to be particularly pro- (Mexican) Ambassador Carrillo
nounced. We have the beginnings Flores serving as a member of
of a coffee agreement, which I the expert group.
am sure must be improved and
strengthened. I understand that- PRIORITIES
there has been some discussion Reporter: There are t h r e e
about cocoa, and the non-ferrous more questions. First,, is this
metals are obviously of special matter of priorities. Everybody
importance to a number of speaks now about priorities, in
Countries. None of these, of every meeting of sociologistsf
course, is a purely Latin Ame- economists and so on. Do you
rican problem. In each case think that it is possible to point
,;.there are also important supp- out 'some priorities? dIo you
Users in Africa or Australia or think that they are really prior-
Canada, or the United States it- Ities or just that everythlug is
self in the case of the non-ferr- interrelated? Would not some
., ous metals, and in other parts kind of revision of the land ten-
of-the world. Since these mark- are system be one of these prior-
,ets .are world markets, if any- cities?
f .thing is going to be done about -
them, it must be on a world- Dr Gordon: I think this varies
wide-basis and not merely un a from country to country. The
Western Hemisphere basis. idea of looking for priorities is
i essential1 because, whatever is
I have felt for a long t.me done in the way of expanding
j .that we should try to dp' two aid and mobilizing domestic 'res-
things. One is to identify a small sources more effectively, the tot-
H list. of particularly vital comm- at resources available for invest-
':odities, to seelWhether, case by ment and development in any
W. case,' some means can be found given period of time are limited.
of reducing market fluctuations, The idea of consciously determ-
.: of restraining overproduction inning some priorities has the ad-
.fwhich is obviously very serious vantage that it compels people
i..In coffee- and of avoiding spe- to look at the range of altern-
"dcualation in inventories, without atives. If people are- simply per-
S'at the same time making the suaded to look at the eddcarion-
Smarket structures so rigid that al problem, for example -to ask
there is no opportunity 'or ne* themselvess whether' in view of
suppliers, and no opportunity for the population growth provision
the more efficient gradually to is being made to '"teet the most
.!drive' out the less efficient. pressing needs, to consider whe-
"The second is to explore, the their 'it is more important to
possibility of reducing fluctua- provide mass education for every-
ftions in foreign exchange in- one, or technical education for
Come earnings from the remain- some, to decide which parts of
irig miscellaneous commodity higher education should be most
L exports. A number of ingenious expanded in order to take care


Nt





S* 9Rasu


to:



Pt FREEPORT SMoiFi


kN* '
.''"' .
1 ,.'4:.... ":


Le nouveau Traction Sure-Grip
de Goodyear a 6td spdcialement
congu pour vous donner une
traction maximum. II est muni.
de longues barres pour vous
procurer la force do traction
requise par les tractours
modernes. II mord en bias et
grace a son profile A
C-E-N-T.R-E O-U-V-E-R-T,
il se nettoie automatiquement.
Ainsi vous obtenez une traction
-constante. II vous cqQte
moins de temps, moins de travail
et moins de carburant.
Allez le voir encore aujourd'hui
chez votre dealer Goodyear.


SUPER-RIB
Sp6cialement conqu pour donner une conduit
aisde . pour une meilleure faculty d'adap-
tation, pour moins d'usure . allez voir le
Super-Rib de Goodyear. Et, tous les superbes
pneus tracteurs Goodyear sont construits A
, entoilage 3T "Triple Tempered", une exclu-
sivit6 de Goodyear!


GOODIE0AR

* IL Y A DES PNEUS GOODYEAR POUR CHAQUE ROUE DE LA FERME
2-59-8F


of modern needs for' develop- b!ic lands which hre not used land. The recent land-tax re-i
ment- this is useful. Similar because there are no roads. This form in the State of Sao Paulo.
principles apply in other fields., ends to be true, for example, in in Brazil works through land!
On the question of land re- some parts of Colombia, and Ve- taxation, at rates which are gra-
form, there are some Latin nezuela, Brazil, and Peru. Usu- duated with the size of the hold-
American countries where the ally this will, not be the compl- ings, to encourage either thd4
present land tenure 'arrange- ete solution. sale of excess lands by largely
ments constitute an outstanding private landowners, so that small:
obstacle, both to economic Tnere is also the question of owners can have a share in their i
growth and to a sense'of social inducing a better use of private use, or putting the land to better.
justice in the country. The solu- land, much. of. which is no used use. This is a kind of land re-
tion obviously depends on the at all or is used very poorly. form which may be very pro-
par t i c u I a r circumstances. I This can be encouraged in many ductive. Whether this has to be
don't think fWere is any uniform cases simply by an adequate accompanied 'in particular capes,-;
solution. The aim is more wide- system of taxation. There are by the more extreme measure '.
spread landownership and more many countries now in which of expropriation depends on the'i
productive use of the land. This there is virtually no land taxa- particular case. I don's think .'
may be solved in some cases tion and therefore no encourage- one can lay down a simple' rule. J
simply by opening up vacant pu- men to the productive use of (Continued on page 13)





ai










SPOINTD'ATTAGUE
".


PAGE 12


Sunday OCTOBER 15, 1961




pP~.~.i!i ::~;' r*u" r ..
U


Sunday OCTOBER 15, 1961


"H AITI SUN"


P AGE li


(Continued from page 12)
Many people think of land- re-
form in the traditional Russian
sense of breaking up the large
estates and distributing the land
to the serfs. This is a grossly
over-simplified view of the pro-
blem and in most Latin Ameri-
can countries it would not be a
correct viqw.. But something. has
to be done in many countries
about the present land tenure ar-
rangements-I am convinced of
this,

LOANS FOR LAND
REFORM
'
Reporter: From he point of
view of loans, of economic aid,
do you think that land reform or
better utilization of land must
also have priority in some coun-
tries? Up. to now the loans have
been for very concrete tangible
things. Do you-believe that for
this kind of reform, which has
a very large economic impact,
there should also be loans, when
necessary?

Dr Gordon: Well, the Bogota
program mnakpE some provision
for this. although.. not for.'the-
actual acquisition of land. The
Trust. Agreement between, the
United States and the Inter-
American Bank, which governs
the use of the Bogota program
funds, provides as an important
category improved land use and
ihrural living conditions. It speaks
of access roads, agricultural cre-
dits and' agricultural extension
services, improved. marketing
and storage and various things
of this Tind, but specifically ex-
cludes the use of those funds
foir the purchase of land. This
is not because the purchase of
land is not an essential part of
a land reform system. It' was
felt, however, hat the problem.
of the valuation of land is so
.difficult, both technically and
politically, that this part of the
job should be the responsibility
of the national governments con-
cerned rather than an outside
agency. The Idea is to encour-
age this sort of land reform
by providing financial, help for
all the things that have to go
with the actual purchase of land.
A typical land reform project .in-
volves settling a number of
small holders on unused public
land, or unused or poorly used
private land. There are many
Things, that have to be done.
There is not only the acquisition
and transfer of ownership of the
land; there is the building of
communities, of houses, water
supplies, and schools, and there
is need for agricultural credit
so the small farmers can have
the necessary tools or livestock
oir prOduction credits to get
through the growing season.
There is' also a need for tech-
nical assistance in what to -grow
and how to grow it.

Our thought has been that out-
side financial help should be
available for all of these related
i things, which are an essential
part of an effective land' reform
ti.. s: : A;,,=.-..


measure, but
arrangements
be taken care
governments.


the re-distribution
themselves should
of by the national


-. THE TAX STRUCTURE

Reporter: You were speaking
about taxation as a means to
aid in solving these problems of
land. Lately much has been said
about the need for generalrevi-
sion of taxation systems in Lat-
in America. iEverybody is con-
vinced of it, even the people who
will have to pay more taxes.
Dr Gordon: I think that in
general, although the details
vary from country to country,
all experts are in agreement
that the tax structures in Latin
America are not appropriate to
modern economic requirements.
They do not encourage the mo-
bilization of savings for ,produc-
tive investment, which is one of
the important purposes of i mo-
dern tax structure. They nortf-
ally do not provide enough re-
sources for necessary jlublic in-
vestments; hence the inflation-
ary financing of such invest-
ments. This is one of: the prin-
cipal sources of excessive infla-
ffon in much of Latin America.
And they tend to be very regres-
sive,-and therefore socially un-
just. Finally, they ,tend to fall
almost entirely on the. urban
sector and not on the rural-this
goes back to the earlier point
of not' encouraging proper use
of land.

In this connection some very
systematic studies are now be-
ing made under an interesting
joint project of the -Organiza-
tion' of American.,States, ECLA,
and. the Harvard Law School,
which has had for some years
an elaborate international tax
research program. This is going
to lead to two major confer-
ences, one concerned with prob-
lem. of tax administration, -and



"IBO BEACH"

CACIOUE ISLAND


ONLY 30 MINUTES

FROM PORT-AU-PRINCE

ENTRY (INCLUDING

SROUND-TRIP

BOAT

TRANSPORTATION)

ONLY $1.00

Children 50 Cents

Private Dressing Rooms

Wilte Sand Beach

Fine Restaurant and Snack Bar

WATER SKIING

SKIN-DIVING


Lincoln Gordon


the bther with problems of tax
structures.
I 'should add to my list of
weaknesses the fact that the tax
system is not normally enforc-
ed. All observers agreethere is
a great deal of tax evasion by
business firms and individuals,
and were is obviously a good
deal of corruption and ineffici-
ency in tax administration agen-
cies. There are often on paper
absurdly high rates that are sup-
posed to make up for the fact
that many people evade the tax-


N


In Geneva since 1755


Exclusive Agent:
FOUAD A. MOURRA
Avenue Jean-Jacques Dessalines

and LE CONTINENTAL STORE
Rue Bonne Foi


es. This is extremely unjust,
because the few people who pay
the full legal taxes due are con-
tributing much more than they
*should and the many who are
evading are paying much less
than they should. It may 'iell
be that lower rates with better
enforcement would p r o d u c e
more revenue than the present
system.
Then there are the needed
structural changes. Here again
there is no uniform pattern. One
reason for stressing the idea of


planning on a national .basis is,
that each country is. different-4 -
different Ain circumstances, and "
in the present degree of econo-
mic development. The tax struc-
ture in a country like Brazil, .
which already has a very con-
siderable amount of moderii in-
dustry, would be wholly inappro- $
private for Bolivia, which has al- -
most no modern industry what- .5
ever. Countries that have large '.
mineral exports may quite pro-

(Continued on page 14) -







.PAGE 14.


"HAITI SUN"


LincolnGordon

,' (Continued from page 13) small farmers in the North and
..perly get a good deal of their West, and there was industry,
revenuee from the mining indus- first here in New England, and
try. Venezuela has a. tax system later in the Middle Atlantic
:j.that. is largely dependent on the states, gradually moving west-
f. oil industry, which is of course ward. There were many inter-
the largest single industry in regional struggles concerning
.pthe country.- economic policy, for example the
:'. THE U. S. EXPERIENCE tariff policy struggles between
Reporter: The United States at the North and the South. There
'K.oame period, in its history had was the most bitter antagonism,
sinimlpr g oblems. There was which ended in a very severe
.'also this -same kind of exper- civil war, on the institution of
.lience, with corruption and eva- slavery itself. The ided of a fed-
;s.inon'asnd soon, at the beginning eral income tax was tried brief-
of it. development. Was it easy ly during the Civil War, and
Nvtd establish a coherent and just then again in the early twentieth
tax, systeps, or was it a long, century, but it turned out that
i.long process and a hard fight? we required a constitutional
Gordon: I think it is a amendment, And it took a num-
progressive process. It does take ber of years to get this. It, is
:a..long time,- arid I am sure that really only since the first World
li:this is a very long effort that we War that we have had a truly
are talking about in Latin Ame- modem tax structure.
trlrca.'
Reporter: In what way can One must also bear in mind
'the experience of the United one very important -point. Al-
'Sttes be applled to Latin Ame- though the state of economic
'rica,' in this particular field? development of many .Latin Ame-
.Dri Gordon: I am not sure how rican countries today is compar-
'lilectly A-pplicable it is. Each able with that of the United
country's economic history is a States a century ago, the claims
reflection of its social structure on public resources are very
t'and its resources. We had three much greater today. All coun-
fiferent types of economic struc- tries expect to have social secu-
ture in thil country in the early rity 'systems, for example. In
neteenth century. There was the United States in 1850. nobo-
r.he plantation based on slavery 4dy had ever, thought of social
in. the South; there 'were the security. Today it is- assumed
|. .- . -..

Speigre. Lake

tfok any and all who wish to partake of the beautiful
goilhess 'of a peaceful vacation amidst the sur-
; iopiding of native's own greenery.
I j 38 Nliles From Port au Prince
HUNTING ........... FISHING
SWIMMING RECREATION

-' BUNGALOW RESTAURANT
| WATER SKI ............ RELAXE

For your resErvation,- call up in ODVA Radio-Station at
I PORP AU PRINCE


that governments will provide
for modern systems of transpor-
tation, power, and communica-
tion._ In 1850, electricity hadn't
been invented, so factories were
built beside a waterfall some-
where on *a small stream, with
the company providing is own
power .supply. So the added tech-
nical and political and'social de-
mands on governments are very
much greater.
Latin America can't afford to
take a century to go through
the kind of economic evolution
that we did, say from 18.50 to
1950. And there is no reason why
it should. If we in the United
States, and the British half a
century before us, made some
very great mistakes in the
course of our industrialization,
Latin America carn learn by
these mistakes.

BENEFITS FOR THE .-
UNITED STATES
Reporter: And now the last
qeustion. With this new concept
of development planning, are
there some specific economic
benefits,- besides the obvious po-
litical benefits to the United
States as a power?
Dr Gordon: The benefits to
the United States of truly healthy
economic, social, and political
development in Latin America
are of all types including both
political and economic ones. The
kind of relationship that I would
hope to see develop is more or
less what exists today between
the United States and Western
Europe. Politically we are very

HOUSE FOR RENT
I Large Living obom with
Hercule, Petionville:
2 Bathrooms
Beautiful Furnishtd House, re-
cently repainted, in cool Morne
4 Bed-rooms
I Kitchen fully equipped
I Dining room
klass louvers & wrought iron
Water reservoir -
Electric water pump
Water heater
Garage, Hpitian kitchen, ser-
vant's quarters, nice garden.
Contact Jean BOLTE eno Auto


Corner ,Rue du Centre and des Cesars 68. SA. 360 Ave J. J. Dessalines,
STel: 3134 2772.

























.altl'. "Gingerbread Palace" and tamed hoseilery the Grand Hotel Oloffson, show place .


Gardens the Oloffson, complete wilth minlst are pool, is the haven for the uninhibited.
IIr-t:-, ,


Served excwsmwa at Hait's Leading
HOTELS & RESTAURANTS & BY CONNOISSEURS
4 THROUGHOUT THE WORLD "


friendly. We happen also to be Flook more and more to tie 3ut I
allied militarily. in thbe North At- side world, and it happens th&,t
lantic Treaty Orignization. Tis" there "are available in L4tii
alliance has not the slightest America many of the types of
trace of an imperialist or satell- materials that we will be need-
ite relationship in it. It is an ing in increasing quantities.'"
alliance among countries who There will be also an increas-,
are all -if not equal in size and ing mutual economic.-
resources- completely equal in omic interpenetration of mark7-,,
their self-confidence about being' ets of manufactured goods of'A
modem states able to make various types, and of services,
their own policies, recognizing just as there now between the
that in the modern world a giv- United States and Western Eur-
ing up of a certain amount of ope, between the Unite4 States ;
sovereignty is essential. and Canada, and between the
Reporter: Equal in condition... United States and Great Britain,
Dr Gordon: Exactly, 'equal in The evidence of all economic a
condition" is a very good way history in the last two centuries ,i
of putting it. This is the kind is. that increasingly prosperous ,,
of relationship which I confident- countries generally make the
ly belive can be created between best trading partners with one
the United States and Latin another. The old notion of...
America. We must candidly re- Reporter: "Rich and poor..."
cognize that it does not exist at Dr Gordon: Yes. "Rich and '
the present day. We 'talk in poor, raw materials as against
speeches in the OAS in these manufactured goods..." is a kind
terms. But now, as President of cultural lag, a mercantilist.
Kennedy said inraconcept of the early eighteenth
address, we,. must all .convert century, which should have died
these fair words-into fair deeds a hundred years ago and which
- to make these aspirations into still lingers on in La tin America 'h
a reality, as well as here. So it is very "
What does this mean econo- much to..-our advantage. econo-
micallyto the United States?, I micallS' as well as politically,
look forward to increasing econ- to live in a' world, and in a reg-
oniic interdeliendence between ion, in which our associates are
us and the Latin American prosperous, self-respecting, fri-
countries. There' will be the con- andly-bound together with us in
tinuing supply of raw materials all kinds of joint endeavors and
for all of us. Clearly, as the each contributing to the common
United States exhausts its own interest what its ca-picities best .,
raw material supplies, it must permit.


Sunday OCTOBER 15, 1961i







day OCTOBER 15, 1961 "- : i(.E li ;

.L. "BaiEas0 Sek Farm WINNER OF "THIS RECORD IS YOURS" "'
f (Continued from page 1) :
1h fpe F 1abor Here
tContbtIed from page 1)
II. He was, accompanied by Julio
Bordes, Haitian vice-Consul in
-Nassau.
The search for labour came as
deportation of illegally entered
SHait i a n s seeking employ ent
here reached a new peak and
cretafy of State for Public Works, Minister Louis Leveque left as several hundred Bahamian
Washington via Pan American Airways Wednesday October 11. farm workers recruited for agri- .
ally accurate source says thri the Development Loan Fund, cultural employment in the Unit-
ed States were being recruited ,
-gency of the Urited States Government, has agreed to a loan and sent northward. A hundred
e new jet airport and that Minister Leveque's visit is in that of these latter are expected to
ection... Manurger Richard Abbott left for Miami Tuesday Oct- leave by air tomorrow.
10th... Joseph 8tassi an industrialist from New York returned The main centre of labour
H Tuesday the 10th. He said he would Ib back in a week in shortage here is Andros, the
largest island in the Bahamas.
au Prince... The U.S.'Weather Bureau announced that in-ex- In Haiti Mr Smith will meet
entation to break up Hurricane Ssther, they disseminated with Haitian officials and go into
pounds of silver iodide over a segment of the disturbance on -the' cost of bringing men to An-
ber 8th, north of Puerto Rico. On or about Sunday, Hurricane dros, especially. Final decision,
r passed over the eastern part of Hispaniola.,ould the bene- however, wil rest with the Im- list made by the program master of ceremonies, Flash Publicity,
eas pmicration Committee, which will
-rains of the early part of the past week be associated. with meet Wednesday and study the they stand to win twenty dollars worth of merchandisee in the
silver iodide days after the storm had passed? One hundred farm groups' application for per- mionthl. raffle from NADAL aid Company.
'ds is a value of a lot of silver-iodide molecules floating in mission to import labour.
paper air... Chatelet des Flears m ade a trial shipment of water- When the companies began de-
during the past week. The water-cress comes from their veloping Andros and other acre- a
mountain over 6000 feet above sea-level property where there age, Mr Smith said before leav-
ing, they were assured of ample',a UUtL d u ll SS wS iii
large spring and no population in the water-shed. They do not labor ur, a
t any great dollar volume of revenue to develop, but can,. "'If bringing in Haitians will f l gI rf l S t
e a good livelihood for that coi nunity... Sunday Dr Oswaldo be too expansive," he stated,
l Pombo Ambassador of Argentina in Haiti and wife returned "the companies will be forced to
vacation... Mrs F. Barbot has been appointed departrhental close up and go elsewhere.
at "Centre de Psychiatrie"... ,Miss Marle-Therese Beaulieu, Over $200,000 (U.S.) is spent
each season on picking the cu-
uated of Psychiatric Hospital of Rookland State of New York, cumber crop at one 1600-acre
er assistant at C.P. is promoted departmental head at "Deft- agricultural develop p m e n t, he
ofspital"... By arrete of the President of the Republic, Com- said.
e, SVhbols and Public Services will be closed Otober 17th, At Mastic Point, Andros, the
am1 vibrmary 6Of- death ,o( Jean*aeiues Dessalines Fgyunder total labour force is 350 men,
SHiltlim- Independence...-" .. M ut at the peak of the 'season
Hi Independu ... Friday at 10 am Foreign rMinistei 300 additional labourers are
Chalmers received in a special -meeting Dr Salvador Rovira, needed.
ge d'Affaires of Salvador to Haiti... This week, Mr Pierre Cha
t, Introductor- of Ambassadors and Ministers, accompanied b3 In Haiti This Week
Officer of Presidential Guard were presented Haitian Govern- .
t's greetings to Charge d'Affaires of Chile Republic at the oc- visited Hpiti 1o the firWt time
on of. 50th Anniversary's Chile Republic... Dr Lucien libbert, last y,ir;,fell"fi love ith the
ernor' of the Interamerican Bank of Development arrived Sun- country andits people. In their
tours around Port au Prince.
.Thedistinguished Haitian Official will stay fei days in the they visited the Orphanage of
try... Mr Gerard Thomas Cowley-Smith, British Ambassador the Soeurs Salesiennes and de-
aiti is back from vacationing in England... The new commit- cided to p them Back to..:.
of VAC is follows: Claude Orlol, Presidbnt; Cqptaln Rene Mi- Philadelp ,gnes seit lots of
Vice-President; Yvon Cesar, SeJ tary; Joseph Beaulieu, things Ind ter gi t. to the
m orphans. HeFr l trip was- m .ade,
surer; Serge Blain, Henri Kenol, and Jean Desmornes, Con- specially'.t 5g personally .w -
ers; Mkv Edouard Petrus, President d'honneur... Dr Louis some gifts to them. On her de-
is named Extraordinary Ambassador of Haiti to the U.S. parture Sunday the girls con-
assador Ernest Bonhomme has been moved to head Haiti's ducted by the Head of the Or-,
gation at the OEA... Mme Dorothy Warms, eminent American phanage criedzzo for their gratitude to
sonalit y, Assistant General Secretary of International the in coming and out going Not a soap, not aS
(Continued on page 2) visitors... cream-Halo cannot Gives f lagrant
catching soap film! -needs no special rinse!
USING, COMPOSING AND
SUiE SETTING fl ONE
MMON VIEWER- WLfA Removes embarrassing Halo leaves hair soft,
I dandrufffrom both hair ,manageable-shining wilhs
RFLEX CAMEQUALITY and scalpl colorful natural highlights!
NIKKOR 50mm F:2.5 IjN8. OFFERED
m SINGLE -LENS Yes, "soaping" your hair with
IN even finest liquid or oily cream
MEDIUM PRIC shampoos leaves dulling The rest
I aME MEDIUM PRICE dirt-catching film. Halo, ma e g
CAMER with a new ingredient, contains selling
Orx CAMERA no soap, no sticky oils.
_Thus Halo glorifies your hair poo
the very first Lime you use it. -
Ask for Halo-America's Il
New At: LITTLE EUROPE favHriteshampoo-today. A aao

THE HOME OF EXOUISITE GIFTS Halo reveals the hidden beauty of the hair!
jP




... . ... . . "
T 7.:!?F PT .... ... .


"HAITI SUN"


Sunday OCTOI


PAGE 16


7' IMPORTANT DECREES ABOUT
RESIDENCY IN THE HOSPITALS,
THE FACULTY OF SCIENCES,
THE SCHOOL OF SURVEYING
Decree Modifying Art 1 of the Law of Sept. 24,
S1960 on Residency in the Hospitals
Considering that the compet- eral- of Public Health as Chair-
ence of the students, first rate man."
factor, must not however be the Art. 2.-The applications to-
only determining element in the wards hospital residencies will
choice of residencies; that the be made in writing, to the dif-
S' election of the residents of our ferent chief of departments, for
bospltals must be based .on the t h e i r particular departments,
general behavior of the medical between July 1st and July 15,
S student; that his financial poss- of every year.
S' ilities must be considered as T h es e applications will be
well. as his love of the vocation transmitted by the chiefs, with
.shown during his years of study; their recommendations, to the
S .Considering that it is of con- Dean of- the Medical school, in
sequence that the state, on whom order to be submitted to the
the Obligation of the gratuity of Committee of Hospital Residen-
Medical School is placed, must cies for the necessary proced-
control impartially and serious- ures.
S ly the selection of the residents Art. 3.-Arts 5 and 6 of the
in the interest of preparing the above mentioned law are and
S...-castes framework -(of the or- will be stricken out. "
gBlatfzln),; t Art. 4.-Arl" 13 of the law of
: Considering that to reach this Sept. 13, 1952 is modified as fol-
aim we. wust Wmod4y certpi .lows:
dispositions of the Laws of Au-
gust 14, 1951, September 13, 1952 "Art. 13.-Those who will not
: .. and September 24, Ii; have been chosen when the re-
Upon -report by the Secretary asdents. were being selected will
;of State of. Public Health -and hard to work- for two years at
Population; a program of rural medicine or
Anid A ftler deliberation, at the at the medical service of the
meeting of Seoretaries. of State; Armed Forces of Haiti, control-
b' E ed the administrator of the
-, .. l.-Art 1 of the. law of district.
i" .,24, 1969 is modified as fol- "Liberty Is given them, how-
l e. vero to apply again for resid-
e c y selection t h e following
.Art. 1.-he ste of real- ar."
,;- e.of iso.Jow Opw 4 establish. ..
e thee weIe -loeaitaLof
;E'S t .. a@bic A ha. Wke other
ba oet 41* e epable, us they
V 'qWq*uly bebg completely
Sequll- .
S"The t..* feijekoy is a mandatory FR
,training opeed' to the Doctors FRC
i who want to deepen their know.
r d.o..ledge of the medical sciences
A nd specialize In a definite -
branch of medicine.
"'The determination of the .
: number of Residents for each
A..'department. of the University
'.,hospital or- any other approved
b'....pitB will be made by a com- Onions of first quail
.R.I-t~" vailled "Committee of sales counter of O01VA
spital Residencies" and com-
a pp o the Dena of the Medic- des Cesare and Rue du
:-il School, ol the Administrator prices:
.o the University Hospital, and
:. of .tLoa -Doct. ehieet of the de.
apartmentss of Medicine, Surgery,
^, Obstetriea, an Pediftries.
"Tw- Co mmittee of Hospital, -
S-esitenqies will also have to 50lbs.-Bags
.. any problem which may Wholesale orders wil
'risAo, the choice of tneshe of Gourdes: 2.75 per
hospital residents, according to 10 bags) and Gourdes:.
f9h- openOaI will be made by un 10 bag.)
the CoemittQe of Hospital Res.
Sidenees with the Director Gen-



SHOES



KFOR EVERY OCCASION
i. .: .." '


fle-ree Tnoe r.atinn thi trin fCorcntii tn n~rn


Art." 1-The Polytechnic School
of Haiti has become The Facul-
ty of Sciences and is part of
the State University.
Art. 2.-The Dean of the Fa-
culty of Sciences is nominated
by Commission of the President
of the Republic.
Art; 3.-The. Faculty of Scien-
ces is divided in four depart-
ments:
1-The department of prepar-
a t o r y courses: Physics.
Chemistry, Mathema t i c s
(P.C.M.);
2-The department of civil en-
gineering;
3-The department of archi-
tecture;
4-The department of Mechan-
ics and Electricity.
Art. 4.-To register at the Fa-
culty of Sciences, the interested
-party must carry:
1-A certificate of Sbcondary
School, second part;
2-Copy of his birth certifi-
cate; .
3-A certificate of good beha-
vior delivered by the Dean
of the Civil Tribunal;
4-Authorization from his guar-
dian if he is a minor;-
5-An Identity card;
6-Any other documents re-
quired by the Faculty of
'Sciences.
Art. 5.-The studies will last
fqur years.
Art.' 6.-Each dep artment t
awards a diploma for the whole
of the subjects which are taught
. i-:-Any other documents re-


ONSi


OM


VA


ity are available at the
k at the corner of Rue
Centre, at the following


15 Gourdes
15 Gourdes
I be filled on the basis
lOlbs. bags (Minimum
14 per 50lbs. (Minim.


quired by. the Faculty o A.rt. 11.-A.,renumeratidn
within this depaiftnent,-;&1d't l i)tbe-g the dtrnees.
section of Prepacdf omis :Adric Second


(PCM) awards only a certificate.
Art. 7.-The personnel of the
Faculty of Sciences is composed


1-The Dean;
2-Haitian professors (profes-
seurs titulaires Haitiens);
3-Haitian Instructors (profes-
s e u r s non-titulaires Hai-
tiens);-
4-Foreign professors or spe-
cialists;
5-Administrative personnel.
The scale of salaries will be
the one for the different classes
of the- personnel of the State Ufni-
versity. .
Art. 8.-The program of stud-
ies, the interior disciplinary rul-
es, the type and schedule of
exams are relevant 'of the Board
of Professors of the Faculty of
Sciences and according to the
Decree. of December 16, 1960
creating the State' University.
Art. 9.-A number of mainte-
n a n c e 'scholarships ma y be
awarded every-year to-.the stud-
ents of the Faculty of Sciences.
The a w a-rd i ng. is left to the
Dean's discretion..
Art. 10.-The training of the
studAnts of 2nd and 3rd years
as well as. .the mandatory final
training will he made as much
as possible at the offices and on
the fields projects of the appro-
priate public services. The train-
ees are subject to the interior
rules of those services.
Art. 11.-The length of the fin-
al training is a year beginning
at the end of'the fourth acade-
mic year. During this period,
the trainees are in touch with
the Faculty of Sciences only as
far as their State diplomas are
concerned.
Art. 12.-A remuneration will
be given to the trainees,

Decree Integrating The
School of Surveying
Art. 1.-The School of Survey-
ing is part of the State Univer-
sity and is annexed to the Fa-
culty of Sciences.
Art. 2.-The Director of the
School of Surveying is nominat-
ed by commission of the Presi-
dent of the Republic.
Art. 3.-To register at 'the
School of Surveying, the inter,
ested party must carry:


I


School, first part:
2-His birth certificate;
3-A certificate of good b
vior delivered by the D
of the Civil Tribunal;.
4-An authorization of
guardian if he is a mi
5-His I. D. card;.
6-Any other,documents r
ed .by the School of Surn
ing.
Art-. 4.-The length of the
die is two -years.
Art. 5.-The. School of Sur'
ing delivers a diploma of
veyor-Topographer- for the w
of the subjects which are tau
there. .
Art. 6.-The personnel of
School of Surveying is com
ed of:
1-The Director;
2-Haitian Professors (prot
seurs titulaires -Haitiens)
3-Haitian Instructors (pro
s e u r s non-titulaires H
tiens); *
4-The administrative -pers
nel.
The scale of salaries will
the one for the different clans
of personnel of the State Univi


sity.
Art. 7.-The program of st4
ies, the disciplinary -rules,
type and schedule of exams 4
relevantof the Board of P
fessors of the School of Survi
ing and according to the Decr
of -December 16, 1960 createi
the State University.

* Art. 8.-A -number of main
n an c e scholarships may I
awarded every year to the st
ents of the School of Surveyirl
The awarding is left to the Di
ector's discretion. .,
Art. 9.-The training of t
first year students as well 1
the mandatory final training w
be made as much as possil
in the offices and field project
of the appropriate public set
ices. The trainees are subje
to the inside rules of the abo'
mentioned services..
Art. 10.-The length of the
al training is of six months s
ing at the end of the seco
academic year. During this B
riod the trainees are in toi
with the: School of survey
only as far'as their State diplo
as are concerned.


Monday _Night

Shango Night Club
HOTEL IBOLELE

JERBIE WIDMAIER & HIS GROUP


FAMOUS

OVER or

The, Worki


AIR FRANCE a
0 ING ET CARAVEI.J .. Ln smIUs ETS. sun I' nuS GRAND RESEAU DU ONDE
i.. i n. i .ILI. ,. *** ------------. o- *


Im,, .. ., i .AJ L .lU.k ,Lg g IC & .