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Haiti sun

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date:
Christmas Issue 1951
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00066

Full Text








CHRISTMAS 1951


Chrismas Customs
(Continued irom Page I)


e large seaport and indus-
trial city in the Atlantic
oast State of Maryland,
l put lighted- candles in
e windows of their homes
welcome any wayfarer
ho might see them for,
Sis said, that on this night
he Christ Child wanders as
Stranger.
A. While that really is the
beginning of Christmas,4 in
e Polish neighborhoods
te youngsters big enough to
dle are already three
ks into their celebration
use to them Christmas
been -practically there.
e Saint Barbara's Day,:
ember 4. Saint Barbara's
y, to them, is one of the
ortant days of the year
use legend forecasts a
liar, cold, and icy Christ-
ins Day if it rains on Saint
Barbara's Day. If ice is seen
That day, legend says that
hen it will rain on Christ-
I- Another important pre-
hristmas day is St. Nicho-
as' on December 6. That is
he day, the youngsters say,
hen this saint, accopm-
ied by an angel and a
il, makes the rounds to
erve the conduct of all
dren anit to plan their
istmas gifts accordingly.
t:The Polish grandparents
o remember Christmases
g past in their native Po-
dhabei. had fascinating
es to'repeat. One of these
srthe story about' the water
the wells turning into
ne for a, few brief mo-
ments od Christmas Eve. An-
Other tale, one often recount-
e in whispers, is thelegend -n
'that on Christmas Eve the c
little talk ambng themselves
i1i the stables, and that any
fHortal who hears them will
die, before the night is gone.
*-.-And so begins the most
sentimental religious observ-
ance of all Polish people. It
15 an observance of mingled
solemnity and gaiety around
ihich all household activity
will revolve through Janu-
ry 6, the Day of the Three 1
K ID no. I


On Christmas Eve there is
uWilian, the vigil supper. .Merrie Ole
The family is seated, with sMerre lde Enlandi '
the father at one end of the seems to be the traditional
the father at one end of the,
table, and an empty chair setting for Christmas stories
table, and an empty chair ... .. .. 6
and place setting for the and illustration. Greeting
Stranger at the other. An cards stillfavor the eery
ped g t on s scenes of stage coaches laden
unexpected est on this with holiday travellers roll-
night is considered the bestwth t
of luck, a belief which stems ng over a snowbound land-
from the Polish adage scape, or of mediaeval carol-
Guest in the hoe is God ers standing outside a can-
in the home.is die lit window, theirr noses
int, red but their hearts gay.
.


Straw is spread beneath
the tablecloth, and all'un-
married young men and la-
dies present will tell their
fortunes by pulling out piee
ces of it. A single stem in-
dicates a life of bachelor-
hood or ,spinsterhood. A
forked straw means .marri-
riage, artee one more year of
single life for each prong of
the straw.
If the family adhers com-
pletely to old Polish Christ-
mas customs, 13 traditional
dishes are provided for the
vigil supper, and everybody
present eats ,ome of each.
The main dish usually is
pike in aspic. The old -folks
say there are bones in the
bead of the pake which re-
semble the cross, the ham-
mer, and the spikes used in
the Crucifixion of Christ.
Until midnight the family
may go out for an hour or
so to sing carols at the win-
dows of neighbors, stepping
inside briefly at each house.
There are small presents or
capdy for the children at,
these stops, and cups of cheer
for the adults. At mid-
night thd family goes to-
church to attend Shepherds'
Mass. Before the service
there .is an inspiring ritual
ir which the priests in for-i
mal procession take an image
of the Christ Child from the
altar to a miniature Nativity
setting and deposit it in the
manger there. After Shep-
herds' Mass, the children go
to bed and their parents
either go our caroling or en-
tertain carolers in their
homes


Sr
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WALTEP BRAUN distributor


S To millions of Americans,
SChristmas wouldn't be Christ
mas without the voice of
Lionel Barrymore growling
out his annual rendition of
SDickens' ,Christmas Carol.
And -here in the tropics, chil-
'dren gaze wistfully at the
Dickens illustrations and
wonder once more what it
would feel like to be trans-
ported to that magic'world
of snow.

Modern England makes
the most of its rgle as trans-
lator of the holidqy4.pirit.

SJust before Christmas the
London County Council pla-
ces tall fir trees in 'public
parks. The trees,are decor-
ated, by members of the
Women's Voluntary Servi-
ces, with. illuminations and
small bells. Children gaze
at these symbols of goodwill
and, led by the Mayor of the
district, sing carols around
'the trees.

This is one of the numer-
ous ways in.which Britain's
local authorities, assisted by
voluntary 6rganisations, en-
sure that all children can
participate in Christmas fes-
tivities. There are.. many
treats in addition to school
parties and visits to circuses
and pantomimes, for the sea-
son" is the occasion of much
civic planning. Entertain-
ments are provided for old
age pensioners and Old Peo-
ple's Committees ensure that
no lonely old person is over-
looked.


Carol Services In
City Squares


The City of Manchester
inl'England's industrial north
celebrates Christmas in hear-
ty Lancashire fashion. In-
dustrialists finance parties
which are organised by com-
munity associations and one
great gathering is arranged
by the Cripples' Help So-
ciety, while handicapped
children,, unable to attend
are taken presents. Another
is called the -Vesta Tilley,
party (Vesta Tilley was a
popular music-hall star). A
public carol service held


aHAITI SUNNY


Even the two ral
III +" Icesses took leading rolejsin
this traditional form of holi.
day entertainment.


near a decorated tree.in Al-
bert Square is another thrill
for the youngsters. But per-
haps the greatest excitement
of the younger generation
comes in the presentation of
the Christmas Pantomimes.


Pantomime ,is the most
purely British of all the
forms of Dramatic Art. Is'
flourishes nowhere outside
the Commonwealth. Its ori-
Continued on Page 22)


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Tradition in Merrie Olde Engla


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.HAITI STUN


*CHRISThMAS 1951 .


,DAR READERS...

In all messages of good cheer this Christ.
mac, as last Christmas, there is qu aware-
ness of the things which will make Christ-
mas less pleasant for some than we would
like.


Yet, despite the conditions vhich sur-
round us and cause us to pray that 1952
Swill be a better year; we wonder if even
in this apology we are not losing sight of
the real meaning of the day-Christmas.

There are certain things about Christmas
that economic conditions will not alter-
First, Christmas in its very origin leaves
room for the humble things, and the poor
men and women of the earth to come in.
Remember the manger the stable -
where a Child poor in worldly goods lay
in the humblest of cradle ?

Remember the humility of the Great
Occasion from which Christmas came ?
How then, can we apologise for our own
poverty and humility when that is the very
spirit of thristmas.

Of .course things have changed. The
Christian principles and aims of Christmas
have been pushed out of the wny to make
space for gaudy and affluent displays. We
no longer think of Christmas as the anni-
versary of Christ's birth, but merely as an
excuse to indulge ourselves more than cus-
Stomary.

If we fil to enjoy our festive holidays
it is not because we haven't got enough,
but because we haven't done enough.
"Christmas is the time when men come
down from their high perches and shake a
friendly hand with their brothers lower
down.

SIt is the time when people exchange
goodwill and glory in te. exchange of
SfaI i, .. It is the time when even in eor
pr 4'itten society giving becomes as is-
porkipFt"as receiving.


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.SA" Al the buying and selling in the shops
A::s to that end. When the season is over
S''the new dresses and the new hats take their
i places', fog the ahas beens-m It is only
the thkigs hba) we did to those around us
S"that hdrve any real lasting meaning.

J' t "I isqtuly the spirit of the season that
.goeP.' from year to year without getting
"tale-ED;FTOR. .
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1. ," .HN AMERIICAN
PASTRY

Ucious home-made Mme


Jear


Graduat
S... a es


S'. on Comer o
FCaonr
f FernandR

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The Christmas Tree.
(Continued from Page I)

Legends concerning how
the evergreen tree came to
be associated with peace are
many. One story is that the
fir tree"was designated as a
holy tree by St. Boniface, an
English missionary to Ger-
many in the eighth century.
He said the tree had the
wood of peace. Another le-
gend is that in the ninth cen-
tury God sent three messen-
gers to earth. They were
Faith, Hope and Charity.
Their mission was to select
a tree to be used in lobserv-
ance of Christmas, the birth-
day anniversary of Jesus
Christ, the Son of God. They
chose the balsam fir because,
they said, it was high as
hope and wide as love.n
In French and German
tore a man named Bonche-
valier first, associated an
evergreen with Christmas.
Walking through a fores;on
Christmas Eve, so' the story
goes, che beheld a tall ever-
green, brilliantly a g 1 o
with glimmeringcandlelight
and crowned with an irides-
cent halo. His mother later
interpreted this phenome-
non by stating that Bonche-
valier has seen the uTree of
Humanity, and rhal the can-
* dies represented the people
all over the world, while the
halo at the tiee's crest was
the Christ Child watching
over all."
i


In the Scandinavian coun-
tries the association of the
tree with Christmas may
have arisen from the prac.
tice of supporting sheaves of
grain on poles; .the grain
Being offered the birds as a
Stolen of the Christmas sea-
son.


The gaily decorated Christ
mas tree that brings joy and
cheer into the home each
Yuletide once was forbidden
in the White House, in
Washington, D.C., the home
of the President of the Uni-
ted States. President Theo-
dore Roosevelt (1901-1909),
who was a great lover of'
wildlife, forbade the use of
the trees because he thought
the practice of cutting yourig
evergreens w as wasteful.
Howeve', that order was
short-lived. One Christmas,
two of Roosevelt's sons were
caught trying to smuggle a
tree into the White House.
When their father became
furious at the attempt, the
sons appealed to Gifford
Pihchot, one of Roosevelt's
closest friends and Ameri-
ca's first professional forest-
er. Pinchor immediately
talked't6'the Piresident an
explained thie value of cut-
ting small evergreen trees in


the fact that when trees
were properly cut, the pro-
cedure actually helped the
forest. The President listen-
ed intently to Pinchot's story
.:a. -


realized there was a great
deal of truth in it,' and
abolished his former theory
on the subject of evergreens-

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... from home to home goes the richness of this Gayest
of Seasons and with it goes also; our wish for a merrier
day for all.





OEFRICHEZ VOS TERRES
il.

gflfk g I& LHL


..pour en augmenter la production igricole

...pour en retire de plus gros profits!

Voici le bon moment pour bultiver vos
terrains inexploites. Le monde est affam6 de toute'la
nourriture qu'ils pourront produire!


I Pour mettre en valeur les terres ind6frich6es ot
I. envahiespar les herbes et les broussailles, rien ni'6gale
S la vitesse, la vigu6ur, la resistance et l'efficacit d'un
STracteur. Diesal "'Caterpillar" 6quip6 d'un Bulldozer
I "Caterpillar".
Venez nous fair visit et u os consulter sur la
manimre de retire de votre optillage "Caterpillar"
actuel le maximum de rendemeit. S'il a besoin de
reparations, nos m6caniciens sont experts dans la
matibre. Et n'oubliez pas que nous avons toujours en
S megasin un stock important de pieces de rechange
pour votre materiel "Caterpillar".

Votre Distributeur "Caterpillar"


IHATTIA TrACTOR and EQUIPMENT COT., S.

Srt-ap-Plice, Haiti


L.


FW'h all the money in the world, Christ-
-sas tbould still not be happy if wd fail to
captst ,t.he meaning of it all. It cannot
be. MbiighI'D and it cannot be sold: it is some
shin freely .givin and gladly received.
1 1


me Bauduy
e of Iridor
New York.

loot fr house
f Raes 7 ana


.y No. 112
gam)


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.... ..1 i H AlT! SU "


Australia Officially
Denies Santa Claus


... the most useful

GIFTS and SOUVENIRS

Located: Opposite the
National Baic
57 Rue des Miracles



FOR RENT
Furnishec or unfurnished:
Rooms or apartments with
private bathrooms -- hot
and old water spacious
law n- beautiful site --
delicious meals reason-
able prices -AddrescRuelle
SRoy No. 35. Call Mrs. Viller
*franche No. 3955.. *


Children In Tdars; Parents
Angry At Broadcast


Melbourne, Dec. 18. -
Children throughout Austra-
lia heard today on an offi-
cial radio broadcast that
there is no Santa Claus, and"
sore believed it.

A teacher said she prepar-
ed the script to clear the
minds of fiw-year-olds puz-
zled by the appearance of so
many department store San-
tas" and it was aired on a
twenty five minute 'kin-.
dergarten show by the Fed-
eral Australian Broadcast
Commission. ;She added it
is merely what is taught in-
all Australian lindergar-
tens.

Many parents said their
children started crying when
they were told that the pre-
sents they' receive at Christ-
mas do not come frbm Santa.
The broadcast commission
received numerous angry
telephone calls from parents.


aNew York Herald Tri-


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IS THERE A SANTA CLAUS?,-A Famous Editorial


In September, 1897, a lit-
tie New York girl named
Virgin O'Hanloi wrote a
-letter to the editor of the
Newp'York Sun, asking Is'
there a Santa Claus? In te-
ply Francis P. Church wrote
an editorial article that
pleased so many readers that
The Sun was, :Prompted to
print it every year at Christ-
mas from 1897 to 1949.in-
clusive. The editorial, en-
titled "Is There a Santa
Claus?, follows.
We take pleasure in ans-
wering at once and thus pro-
minently the communication
below, .expressing at the
same time our.great gratifi-
cation that its, faithful au-
thor.is numbered among the
friends of The Sun.
Dear Editor-r-am 8 years
old.
Some of my little friends
say there is no Santa Claus.
Papa says aIf you see it in
The Sun it's so."'
Please tell me the truth,
is there a Santa Claus?
Virginia O'Hanlon.
115 West Ninety-fifth street.
Virginia, your little girl
friends are wrong. They
have been effected by the
skepticism of a skeptical
age. They do not believe,
except they see. They think


that nothing can be which is
not comprehensible by their
littleminds. All minds, Vir-
ginia, whether they 'be
men's or children's, ,re lit-
tle. In this great universe
of ours man is a mere insect,
an ant, in his intellect, as
compared with the bound-
less world about him, as
measured by the intelligence
capable of grasping, the
whole of truth and knowl-
edge.

IYes, Virginia, there is '.
Santa Claus. He exists as
certainly as love rand gener-
osity and devotion exist, and
you know that they abound
and give to your life its high
est beauty and joy. Alas!
how dreary would be the
world if there were no Santa
Claus! It would be as dreary
as if there were no Vr-
ginias. There would be no
childlike faith then, no poe-
try, no romance to make
tolerable this existence. We
should have no enjoyment,
except in sense and sight.
The eternal light with whic6
childhood fills the world
would be extinguished.
Not believe in Santa
Claus! You might as well
not believe in fairies! You
might get your papa to hire
men to #atch in all the


chimneys o i
to carth SAnta JS.:
even if they' dia
Santa Claus coi I
what wquld that.
body sees, Sunt 9
that is ao. sigia.
no Sant.ClausA .
real thigsings .in thg.r
those dtat neitzhL
nor nme'fcan see&er."
ever see, fairivSr,-
-the lawn? 0.
that's no PIr
are not there'.
conceive or
wonders therieO i
and unseeabiiI
You tear-.a.a
rattle and sei ',
,the noise inside
veil covyeorg
world wt@iki i
est man, a
strength citA
men that
tear apart."
poetry, lov.4e
tpush aside ti i
view and 'tv
nal besutVIaa 9s
Ts it all reaJI?;|.
;n all this
thMi edhelka1

No Santa,:C !
God! he lives a^
forever. A
from now,
ten times t t~4h
from now,-l h
to make gladl'
childhood.


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THE MANAGEMENT and STAFF OF I



MAISON ORIENTAL


SDADLANI'S LIMITED S.A.


Extend their sincere thanks to their many FRIENDS, CUSTOMERS and WELL .
WISHERS, for their wholehearted and generous support given throughout.
1951. I


With deep affection, our best wishes to everyone for a HAPPY XMAS, a
brighter and more prosperous NEW YEAR. MAY PEACE and greater under-
standing develop amongst our people for a BETTER HAITI.
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CHRIS TMAS 1951


c HAITI SUN


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CHRISTMAS 1951


'r. .


JOURNEY OF THE MAGI


T. S. Eliot


cold coming we had of it,.
t the worst time of the year
aa jumney, and such a long journey:
wdys deep and the weather shatp,
very dead of winters
j the camels galled, sore-footed, refractory,
big d9wn in the melting snow.
were times we regretted
saipmer palaces on slopes, the terraces,


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silken girls bringing sherbert.
*.camel, men cursing and grumbling
'fway, and wanting their liquor and women,
i ht.fires going out, and the lack of shelters,
Ir ciqs hos$le and the towns unfriendly
Wliagps dirty and charging high prices:
hadof it.'
i e pa(erred to travel all night,
~iWstces,
-q singing in our ears, saying
I fqly.


SILENT NIGHT
Then at dawn we came down to a temperate valley,
Wet, below the snow line, smelling of vegetation; For one hundred
With a running stream and a water-mill beating the thirty-two years the w
darkness, Christian voices have
And three trees on the lowsky, singing this most belov
And an old white horse galloped away in the meadow. all Christmas Carols,
Then we came to a tavern with vine-leaves over the strikes as close to the a
lintel, of divine inspiration ir
Six hands at an open dooricing for pieces of silver, kind as any music can
And feet kicking the empty wine-skins. Like much that is I
S. But there was no information, and so we continued it has a humble, a
And arrived at evening, not a moment too soon ignominious, beginning
Finding the place, it was (you may say) satisfactory. was created, in a final
All this was a long time ago, I remember, operate effort to meet a
And I would dp it again, but set down ceremonial emergency
This set down the combines effort!
This: were we led all that way for Frank Gruber, school
Birth or Death? There was a Birth, certainly, and Father Josef Moh
We had evidence and no doubt. I had seen birth and sistaet priest of the
death, rian village of Obernd<
But has thought they were different, this Birth was First sung on Chri
Hard and bitter agony for us, like Death, our death. morning of the year
r We returned to our places, these Kiiigdoms, the wonderous words
But no longer at ease here, in the old dispensation, music of ,Stille Nacht
With an alien people clutching their gods. 'revered today by the -
S I should 6be glad of another death. civilized world.


A wide election of Toys for the Xmas Gift Hunter


and
world's
been
ed of
which
source
man-

great,
Most
ig It
,des-
local
, by
s of
master
r, as-
Bava'-
of.
stmas
1818,
Sand
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whole


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Boulangerie. St. Marc


GRAND RUE across the Street, one block South from the Fire Station
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Here's a wish for a smile of Happiness on every

face, Goodwill in every heart and A IERRY


CHRISTMAS for all!


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... The Store lhat will solve year Shopping
'Problems not only during the holilayseason but
also Ihroughout the entire year !.


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- HAITI SUN ,


Capital Welcomes President

'From Triumphant Southern Tour


When President Paul Ma-
gloire drove through the
gates of the Palace yester-
day, .he passed under an
Arch of Triumphe which
could well. stand as -the sym-
bol of his two-week south-
ern tour.
SThe Palace Arch was ,the
-final link of a chain of such
tokens of devotion stretched
along the. route of the Pre-
sidential entourage. It was
Sa chain stronger than it look
ed ... because in the unity
i t expressed lay the strength
and hopes of our small Re-
1-public.
The Presidential tour gave
the people of the Southern
"Provinces an opportunity to
tell the Chief of State they
are solidly behind him in
Shis 'far-reaching orogramme
to make Haiti a land of pro-
g res-. And the tonr g/,e
-the President the chance to
tell the neoole directly iust
-"whbt he has in mind for
thp;r welfare.
T.st Sunday at Caves he
made one -F his most im-
-prtantl addresses. Ho re-
-viewed the p comnllishments
of hW; adminictr"nr' n and a-
"a;n h rnno-lht forth the maior
rvtc. f :V ff r-;ver. nm-


Singing Ambassadors Off.

Goodwill ambassadors are
S playing a greater and great-
e r role in forging the links
of friendship between the
S -two neighboring countries.
S And who could fulfill this
S role better than the Michel
DBejean Chorus which so
Sably draws on the richness
of Haitian Music and Folk-
lore.
This week, the talented
group of singers made a
; trip to the Dominican Re-
public to give rqdio listen-
ers in our neighboring Re-
S-public --a chance to hear
tilViu aIiU SIO T_ lAtzl'i


aiLng aitan airs. ILn a[ UUI-
-tion the Chorus is offering a'
proeramme of classic com-
odsitions and another of re-
ligious music.

The young and promising
director, Michel Montrosier
D6jean, is already well-
known for. his ability not
Only as a performer but also
as a composer. In the ranks
of the chorus will be such
outstanding young singers
as Pierre and G&rard Dus-
seck, Georges Desmangles,
and Jean-Marie Durand.

After their return from
,Ciudad Trujillo, they will


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gramme. cIt is an evolu-
tion=, the President went on
to say, wan evolution which
is backed by the forceful and
irresistable desires of a peo-
ple who are putting their
cards on the table. It is up
to us all to see that this
march of progress is qcce-
(Continued on Page 8)


To Cuidad Trujillo

repeat their performance for
the Haitian. radio audience.
Our best wishes to these am-
bassadors of the Haitian Mu-
sical Art.


Ponce de Leon
Missed Kenscoff

Centuries back, a deter-
mined and wistful fellow by
the name of Ponce de Leon
plodded through the Carib-
bean searching for the Foun
tain of Youth. Our histori-
cal research editor main-
tains that the Old Boy would
have found what he was
looking for if he had only
struck back in to the moun-
tains just 15 miles. South-
East of Port-au-Prince.
If the age of the year-
round inhabitants is any in-
dication, the true Fountains
of Youth are the Kenscoff
springs. Many a centenarian
is doing his own farm work
in those cool mountain hills
... in fact the peasants are
so used to knowing someone
who has sailed past his 100th
birthday that they don't even
bother to make a fuss over
(Continued on Page 8)


The earnest little peasant
.sitting outside his two-room
caille watching the setting
sun outline Mt. La Selle in
a rosy glow.was one of the
first to"feel the change in
the Valley of Marbial. It
was not a tremendous change
like all the poor suddenly
becoming rich and all the


The Acute News
Shortage

The American
says it will continue
most to support
Publishers in their
for relief from th
newsprint shortage.
embassy also points
the shortage is wo
in scope and is hitti
ted States newspaj
hard that next year t
have to cut down th
Ambassador Trav
nealed to the Americ
Department several
aeo for some aid in
ins the situation h
(Continued on Pa

Haiti Versus Jamai
In Kingston Xmas
When the PAA
takes off for King
day most of the seats
occupied by 17 you
in dark blue sports
sporting the emblem
Haitian Football Fe
on their breast pocket
have been picked f
cream of Haiti's pl
compete in three b
ball matches. against
traditional rival, Jar
(Continued on Pa


eroded mountain lands sud-
denly becoming lush and
green once more. The little
peasant in his earth-bound
wisdom was thankful for
small benefits and did not
wait- for miracles. If one
happened to occur, fine. But
meanwhile he was living by
the adage, -God helps those
'who help theinselvesn ...
and an excellent. motto it
was turning out to be too.


In the past year he was
able to buy one and a half
carreaus of land to add to
the fields that he tills to feed
his wife and 10 children.
Before he had to hire much
Sof the land ... and much of
the crop was earmarked for
the pockets of the landlord.
But the little peasant learn-
ed there was a way to get
off the treadmill of hopeless
poverty. There was a way
to bring strength back. into
the worn-out earth. One
day he trudged down the
rugged path leading from
his mountain home, forded
the Gosseline River and
walked up the pathway to
.the new UNESCO project.
He didn't now what UNES
s CO meant or who provided
it with funds to spread the
Slight of knowledge in the
arid valley. All he knew
print was that big men from the
outside world had come ta
provide him with some im-
Embassy nortant learning ... and the
e its ut- little peasant has a sound
Haitian respect for knowledge and
appear schooling. Hat in hand, be
ie acute shyly asked Monsieur the
But the Director if he could come to
out that the adult classes and was
)rldwide told he was welcome.
ng Uni- Those classes were a re-
pers so velation to the little peasant
hey will whose learning had been
ieir size. confined to a few futile
rers ap- frustrating struggles with
an State French textbooks and the
weeks peasant lore passed down
i reliev- through generations.
Lere but
ge 8) He found out that the
precious top soil of his few
carreaus of land need not be
ica swept down the mountain
Week during the rainy season be-
Clipper cause he had the power to
ston to- stop it. With extreme sol-
Swill be emnity the little, peasant di-
ng men gested this vital piece of in-
jackets formation. He HIMSELF
i of the had the. power. It was a
deration strange and wonderful feel-
et. They ing. He listened with wrapt
rom the attention while the instruc-
ayers to tor told how to terrace the
uig foot- lance. How to alternate
t Haiti's rows of food-bearing plants
maica. with rows of grass and Sisal
Sge 8) (Continued on Page 9)


The Change In The

Valley Of Marbial


I I 1 _i_~


His Excellency President Magloire returns
from Southern trip.


;I


)J4.!


PERSONAITYr
OF THE WIE .

On the ancient stone
of Jacmel this week ht
were two inscriptions wS
ten in enthusiastic scrg
The first reads: aVivei^ .
gloires and the s i~&
"aVive Senator Baptiste.3 ..j

The Jacmelians have.a.,
genuipn pride and fondness':
for their representativesilh
the top house of the Hailian,-
Legislature. They point onut:i
his store as one of the town's;
landmarks'of distinction:. a:il
in nearby Marbial V
the Baptiste coffee
with its ingenious hydrgltW (
System and its.shiny tow'i
coffee bins is looked upon as
concrete evidence of their '
Haitian March of Progress. -
The fact that the Senator
is a aself-mades man wht? j
was handed nothing on a sl .
ver platter only increases his k!
popularity. Like people any-
where, the Jacmelians shoqwI:
respect for achievementtha
comes from hard work and'
persistence. Leon Baptiste
had talent for both.

He was born January 13,
1904, in Jacmel, where his
father was a public surveyor
and his mother a merchintr'.'
He recalls that as'a child.he b
had one ambition ... to Iket
out of politics and not to oc-
cuoy himself exclusively .to
a business career.
When young Leon recetv-- :
ed his diploma (6tudes second
daires ler degre) he went on -.
to study law. But.he didn't!:-.i
lose sight of his ambition 'to
become a good businessman. .
Senator Baptists .recalls. i
tl started modestly deter- :
mined to set up a working :i
orogramme and stick to it.
For my capital investment I
had sincerity, honesty, intel- '.:
ligence and discipline.,
The investment seemed to
work out well. Right now
he is one of the leading im-
norters and exporters of:.:
Haiti. His firm, established..
in 1930. sends-Haitian pro--
ducts all over the world and 'n
brines all sorts of merchan-
(Continued on Page 12)

Something New hn
Local literature

Next 'Sunday, DegmPb*r
30th, at the' Beaux Amts Pa-
vilion of the Exposidtiki
there will be a rendezvous'
of Port-au-Prince book lov-
ers ... all anxious to get their
first peek at the latest' po-
duct of Haitian Literature,
a novel Terre D'ctaante-
mentsr written by 3 ndamne
Lagazy (Malval). 'A
(Continued on Pdge 12)


I







Fag p HIISN CRSMS15


CAPtAL WELCOMES PRESIDENT
FROM TRIUMPHANT SOUTHERN TOUR
r (Continued from Page 7)


Ponce de Leon
Missed Kenscoff
(Continued "from Page 7)


berated. We will soon come
t the time when it will no
longer be a question of re-
conciling Haitians divided
by special interests and pre-
judices; when it will no long
er be a question of discus-
sing a dollar of taxjn order
that there will be less mis.
ery, shame and ignorance
around us. The moment
will come ... and we will
see.it together ... when the
pry'iples of justice, and bro-
tqrhood will be closely in-
tgrated in the Haitian way
of life ... when all the eter-
nal motives and pretetts
leading to turmoil will be
eliminated. This will be the
result of our efforts, our
sacrifices and our self-de-


Haiti Versus
In Kingston


(Continued from Page 7)

The matches will be play-
ed in 'ingston's Sabina Park
Sat 3.30 p-m. Wednesday,
: Thursdayy and Saturday of
S,': s week. All games will
be', broadcast. over Radio
a ca ... wave length 5
kflpcycles.
t "he history of the Jamai-
can Haitian Football Cham
pionships is a long one ...
'going back to January 1927.
And it's also known for its
spirit of true sportsman-
S. ship. In december 1949 Hai-
fi beat Jamaica 2 to nothing
*at' Port-au-Prince. The fol-
i lowing October the Jamai-
ans took their revenge on
Some grounds, defeating
Haiti two to one. Only one
game was played on account
o--f bad weather conditions.
The players selected to
i garner another Haitian vic.
Story.rwere picked from a
group of 25 who have been
practicing twice a week in
.readiness for the big battle.
.',11l, men chosen were given
:: thorough physical check-
up, ad only those in top
..j.itlon were passed.
SiJt nbers of the Haitian
te4aa include:.
S Gal'-keepers: Roland La-
cossade, Henri Joseph..
Backs: Roland Thybulle,
S-ndreI Dieudonne. Guy Ha-
-:: '1e'.: G6rard' Kerbv.
:'ailvPs: Pierre Th6venin,
".i h fo'rcans, Andr6 Bal
S&taille. Emmanuel Desince.
. %..." *,


nials of today done in a spi- the fact.
ric'of love for the country However the report that
which has been betrayed too one of the hardy Kenscoff
long by its own sons." residents was nearing the
The majority of Haitians venerable age of 150 sent
are back of the President in visiting medical men scurry-
his attempt to put his ideals ing up the mountain road
into practice. It was plain to view the phenomena.
to be seen in. the size and They agreed that the briglt-
the enthusiasm of the crowds eyed alert old chap was
that came to see him during mighty old indeed. And
the many functions in his checking historians second-
honour. Cries of RViv.e Ma- ed the verdict.
gloire" rang through the Birth records were a rar-
Sourth from Cayes to Jac- ity in the Haitian hills but
mel, to Leogane. And in there is one way to learn the
them was a ring not only of approximate age of a resi-
hope concerning good things dent. He always pegs the
to come but also of knowl- important things in his life
edoe that each mhan has an on one historical factor ...
inrd;v; idu duty toward hisswho was president at the
Republic. time.
The Kenscoff Methuselah
-- ---'--' questioned by doctors spoke
Jamaica of the time he .was a bare-
mas W k foot bov thrilled to watch
as Weethe soldiers under Dessaline
Forwards: Andr6 Vieux, struggle along Fort Jacques
Paul Desrosiers, Justin Faus- Ridge. He also tells of being
tin, Andr6 Augustin, Elder in the police under Presi-
Beaubrun, Antoine Marc dent Hyppolite, which adds
Elie, Jacques Louis. further weight to his story.
The three officials accom- If true. he may be iust about
nanvin the team are: Mr. the oldest man on earth.


William Macintosh, secre-
tary of the Federation; An-
,Tionie Champagne, manager
of the team and Antoine
Coicou.

The Acute Newsprint
Shortage
(Continued from Page 7)
he has not yet received an
answer from Washington.
The Embassy warns that it
is rather pessimistic that
such aid can be given. How-
ever, it stresses its firm be-
lief that newspapers are a
vital cog in the wheels of
democracy and that every ef-
fort should be made to see
that they continue their
function of informing the
public of events both here
and abroad.


BROOKLAX

- a small piece of delicious
Chocolate laxative brings
relief overnight. Pleasant,
effective ... that's


BROOKLAX

A smile with every dose.


aAUX BELLES CHOSESn

... is the talk of the town ...
It's a chic little shop stocked
with interesting items ...
especially for the Xmas gift
hunter. All first quality
"Name" merchandise from'
the States.
Cocktail and evening bags
evening sotles, lovely scar-
ves, jeivelry, charming gifts
- shower curtains, garment
bags, ((Hot dishes', for baby
and many useful items for
the home. All reasonably
pr.ced.

,AUX BELLES CHOSESn

Rue Pavee (next to Kneer's
Garage)
Hours 9 1 p.m. 3 6.30
p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. to 6.30 p.m.


A photo of the newly renovated St Michel
Hospital in Jacmel


..daWU Tys


NAITIA P




.Ne r f DOQ 7R 0 PAiP,


0tm 9ew.A00
op,
SHprIT/pn
9s noDiRfERap/Cf
Y fRS lonsn IRFl
Ai nchisseie mm
, ACA05os STRer. ,T


Quick and Easy to Brush On

Painting is a lot easier when you have smooth-flowing
- Central paints to brush on. Their fine oils give them great
covering ability, and highagradepigments assure fresh,
clear color even'under severe weather and service con-
ditions. Formulas are the product of latest scientifla
research..


.1' "..LESS WOK ...
fl3 wINCO" PER ACRE.
t stWdors: *HArIT" MOTOR -. Grand Rue


sAVE -g MU
P; s.A.~b -xQg rS


r I


CHRISTMAS 1951


1PageS


*HAITI SUN,,


.










=- C". cBp q I' THE drink
TALLETOF MAB1. AL poorly
(Cestis frv4 al e J) ln th
I* -. -" :,. l"yb



-, ... -..
-to hold the er s
S-build compost *i o or
-pleish the death the wor h
-vital minerals talen out of other
,: it by generations of tilling, mns
He was giren. diedMhgas, ,
S-and told how to begin the aer t
:' -much-needed task of refores- could
:r action. The little peasant
A "ad been vaguely aware that
-when the mountains' f Mar-
Sial lost their treestley lost
in much valuable :earth there-
after. But he didn't know
What he ... a little man wi
hardly enough tiine to pro-
vide food for his family ...
-' could do about'it? He alone'
Scouldn'"t work miracles.- But
: "UNESCO. oihted out, he
V, nqedn't be alone.' All over
Sthe Valley his neighbours-
and friends had the, same
S toblem. And all over the
Valley little nurseries of seej
lings are being tenderly car-
Sed for until the infant trees
Scan be placed: Oh the denu-
ded hill sides.

One of them is t6cated by
thi'eath leading to the lit- t
.dte asat's mountain home. Neow
iWhen he returned to his his
-caife and began .putting his squee
S-anew learning into practice, duck
i it didn't tale long for his
I nighbours to begin asking heavy
: .esions. Now every Sun- cups
dpAy afternoon 25 "men ga- cs
other in his home for an gri
agricultural meeting., And is mu
the little peasant passes result
along'the information he re- fever
ceives at UNESCO. The devel
tneighbours work together in CO c
caring for the precious seed- ing
lings, to reforest their hold- a do
ings and now they have ask- cert
ed. the little peasant to n
-teach them more than farm dence
methods. Thev want him to
start adult "classes in his h
home tA teach theth to read
.. wife
and write in Creole. wit
with
lOch
In the Cteole textbooks lath
-now being distributed, the ha
people of Marbial get their how
literary lessons well impreg- pet
nated with sound advice on that
hygiene and health. that
SFrom UNESCO the little part
peasant learned that his erty.
children not only could baby
-.drink goat's milk but should give


* a


.*A .
HAIT SUN______


it. For generations the
ly nourished youngsters
e poverty stricken val-
ad -jpssed up ths vital
e of food' value because
ne knew thint it was fit
human consumption. An.
major source of vita-
... grapefruits and "ha-
....wee left to rot un-
be-' trees when they
not be sold at the mar-


t Opd "to
by iti I resianqp to disease.
Ahnearnd to ward off n-
laria by putting a osiuito
net over the sLeeg~ng infant.
Its older bro&ers and sis-
ters. sleep on cots or on mats
in the lIft of the Caille ra-
ther than on mats spread on
the humid ground.
They have little home-
made toothbrushes that they


A new -home of the Marbial Valley


qr making conserves, uIe, ever yday. They, have
the little peasant feeds in, ke4'. 4.spo sly
children the fruit or clean 'qd a growgig prid@
es' the juice of cha- in themselves aid .their
or papaya into their household. Four of the c ii-
o augment their starch dren go down the mountain
diet. 'They get extra every day toa.fen.d the UN
of juice whenever they EJg O. gpiqp ta Schqol.
threatened with the Tbpg~2-S"a-pd.gJ l,
e or a cold. And there mariqg, alone i tf cres
.ch less sickness. as a s4teiale, e segcls ...
. When a toothache, a,.dre@ thgt, turnei. ot ,to
or other disturbance he the, a hio t of, the diy
ops, there is the .NES at a neigi ps wding.
clinic within easy walk-VThe 15-year-Qpd boy has is
distance. Even though mind on carpentry ... he's
ctor is only available already made a number of
n days, of the week ... household furnishings and
rse is in constant resi- now he's busy putting the
e. finishing touches on a bright
red wooden jeep to surprise
ie clinic provided the his younger brother on
of the\ little peasant Christmas.
pre-natal care for her For the first .time in their
baby ... a service she lives, many a Marbial child
never dreamed of for will know the joy ,of an
other nine- She learned honest to goodness toy. For
to bathe her petite weeks the carpentry shop
e to ward off the germs has been filled with,the hum
thrive in the grey dust of buzz saws cutting wood-
seems to be so much a en figures of ducks or pran-
of the misery of pov- cing horses. Bright hued
She learned to cook sail boats are lined up for a
food from corn and holiday launching, and a
the chubby youngster (Continued on Page 16)


':-* -.'v-'-h P' .. .
-, .*, r .-
TIhR. SQPER liioera Iir
bAothefm Servant Fir 0Y e


<'
-.Sllr
.$
", --


Westinghouse
See il at BOUCARD & CO., Rue di Forl Per i


Tcwel Birect to fliqni by SoilinGS Ver.y O ees


'L UIO0 DOil"lO


For Intormatlio w Aqeni iRBIl'Ett. Aif. Exposition Stand No. 7 PB. O B, n 228. Tel. 2167


L


-a vi


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p~aLla ~acl ~-~


r
'ri
1-3


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'







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- -




; :' ::~,~ -I.


ti Joseph report


The Most Thrilling
Picture Of The Year

cD. O. A.* (Dead On Ar-
xival), the Harry M. Popkin
Presentation which has pro-
bably aroused more curios-
ity and 'lierest" than any
film of recent months be-
cause of its provocative title,
will be released at the Cine-
ma Theatre de Verdure on
Sunday, December 23, at
6.15. The story has a strong
element of novelty and sur-
prise,. Taken a4l together, it
is gripping entertainment,
with the strangest murder
ever filmed providing the
motivating theme.
The story concerns Frank
Bigelow, played by Edmund
O'Brien, a tax expert who
has been working too hard.
He goes to San Francisco
from his home in Los An-
,geles, for a rest and gets in-
;volved with a gay drinking
crowd at the same hotel on
a convention. The next
: morning he wakes up. ill .and
i learns from two doctors that
he is infected with a strange
S drug which will kill hini be-
S fore too long. Shaken and
mystified, he retraces his
life for the past few days
I4 and then suddenly hits upon
c a lue. This clus eventual-
ly leads him through a veri-
table labyrinth of adventu-
res which lead up to the
bold horrible fact that he
& has been deliberately mur-
i ered, and that it is only

f~eifVP DESIRE EMPLbY-
AMff ~D URIN TNE
0WMMER MONT"s AS SALES
GARLS 1N OUR JUNIOR HOFR..
-s' AR! Tjru PaornMs
TT CALL FO.












"1"0 PROV OUR-
PWER0NALEITIe













-I i
S...HOW y .USEE,WE
ABILI
S DONT ACTUALLY
WE JUST WANTED
>. T -r1 PRovE 10 OUIE-
=ET WORr

IV. '
r,,
'.!.
".:


a question of time before he
shall die.
It would not be fair for
us to divulge the exciting
denouement of aD. O. A.,
It can be said however, that
the audience should be all
set for a swift-paced and
hair raising story that will
?tingle the spine and cause
those well-known goose pim
ples to crop fast.

Do not miss this master,
piece, a picture as excitingly
different as its title, -D.O.Aw
at the Theatre de Verdure
Sunday, December 23 at
6.15 p.m.
-:0:-
The shy good nature pro-
prietor of the Up town
"Black Cat -boutique, Ti
Coq.... it has been disclosed,
has stowed away the years
profits and IQY in the gar-
den and will dig them up
for Noel .tq treat his regular
and distinguished clients ...
everything will" be aon the
house, at the Black Cat next
week.
-:0:--
Our Correspondent from
the North and Mr. Kay Hen-
ning dropped into Port
Thursday'bn a Xmas shop-
ping spree... tapped the nite
life in the Capital ... and re-
turned to DNrac the follow-
ing day. They never com-
plain abodt their northern
outport ... 'tis always inter-
esting ... day by day stumb-

BUT UM-HM... VERY
DEFINiELY! WELL, REPORT FOR
&WoRK ON JUNE II
AT NINE O'CLOCK,
AND DPREI 5,
CONSERVATIVIELY!
II.1- LIST YOUR
NAMESP- WITH OUR
SBOOIKEEPING
DEPAXRTMENT...
0, 7TWAr WOT^
BE NECESSARY!


ling over Indian relics ...
left overs from the buccaneer
days and then the late colo-
nial era and its souvenirs ...
and of course the possibili-
ties of turning over a trea-
sure are great.
-:0:-
Well, "Manze Rosa has
a successor. Carl Siegel looks
to be the owner of a rattle
trap Ford of 1920 vintage...
the horn is not quite as dis-
tinctive as Manze Rosa's.
-:0:-
The cocktail party at the
Purdy's home last Saturday
evening was well attended.
Ambassador and Mrs. Tra-
vers were among those at-
tending.
-:0:-
Among the countless are-
veillon" to take place this
Christmas eve ... is one at
the Maurice Fabius home in
Pacot ... they' are preparing
away'ahead of time.
-:0:-
In place of the old KAgri-
culture Pavilions on the Ex-
position, the Bayards will
this week-end inaugurate
what looks to be a high class
aNite club-restaurant, ap-
propriately named aPigallen.
It will offer, from all reports
an excellent French and Hai-
tien ctiisine by a French chef
... quiet lighting, new dance
floor, good local orchestra...
and they promise the service
to be good.

-0:-
The Walter Brauns are
patiently awaiting the fourth
member of the family ...
daughter Ingrid has it all fi-
gured out ... her new bro-
ther will arrive on the 25th
along with Santa.
-:0:-
Relaxing completely this
week-end are the Avocats of
tomorrow ... Law school
exams finished Thursday.
-:0:-
Daniel Heurtelou cele-
brated his birthday with the
family circle at his new home
in Petionville Wednesday
evening.
-:0:-
Marlene Wankun arrived
from the States Sunday to
spend Christmas with Papa
Lou up on the Dauphin Plan
station.


THE WEN MODERN






LIDO PALACE"



Overlooking the Petienville'Square


DANCING:


'December 24, 29, 31st


January 1st

Evenings at 9 P.H.


UN BAL DENFAITS: 25 December at 5 PJL.


IS YOUR PROTECTION

Obtainable from all chemists
O.PVlz7
Manufactured by Imperial Chemical (Pharmacputicals) Led
Distributors in 14aiti-TRANS-WORLD iRADING CO., S.A


NOTE:--

Mnly at the largest factory in town,

S" DORISMOND and MEINBERG"


Pantal Bldg., Grand'Rue. Phone 2684 ..'.

You will find the exquisite designs and superb quality in MAHOGANY ware ... as,
well as the famous Rush and Sisal Rugs. These same goods are exported to the:
most edclusre stores throughout the U. S. '' I I
(No commission paid to taxi drivers) '

1


CHRISTMAS 1951


..1J


Ar rr


.HAITI SUN*


S





- ---A --195 HAI TI S


SOdP S
The shops in this section
bave been checked by this
newspaper, and to the-
best of our knowledge
their merchandise is of
good quality and good
vaklu. .. A~


Lovely


Gifts


for CHRISTMAS

EXQUISITE VARIETY
Fashionable Ornaments
Beautiful Silver Gifts
Antinony ware
Brass ware
Figurines
Hovelties
and many others .
So come early!
YOUR FAVORITE STORE


YOUR 'DOLLAR GOES FARTHER
ai'




FRENCH PERFUMES -


FRENCH PERFUMES '


FISHER
Art and Curig Shop
Rue du Quai -" el: 3145
HAITIAN HANDCARVED MAHOGANY


6ur new department which has just opened on the
first floor, has a wide variety of gifts come in and
See dor your self-

GUY BARREYRE
114 Rue Dantes pestouches
Phone 3394


- paAf


NOl
'lull


G


11LY
W?.


Haiti's
Finest
MAHOGANY
WARE
is to be found .


.EORGCESq
IM70 AX8 M?


ULDDLAIDuW

FACTORY .
Rue du Peuple
S Tel. 2242
(Save Time and Expensm
Buy Direct from Factoryl)..
---


CAR


HIRE
HAYTIAN TRAVEL
SISERVICE


U~~~ ______________________


We sincerely believe that, we can offer the best insurance facilities
all brancfts such as Fire, Life, Automobile, Marine, Householder's
sive, Cash in Transii, Accident, etc., with the following Companies :
New Hampshire Fire Insurance Company
of Manchester, U.S.A.
'Union Assurance Society Limited
I *a
of London, England
United States Life Insurance Company
of New York, U.S.A.

Woods and Maslen,
Brokers at Lloyd's, Englanid

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CHRISTMAS 1951-


W-HAITI SUND


PY&I


llleoA4








rage 12 ('HAITI SUNS CHRISTMAS 195!


SomethiNg New I
Local Literaftre
(Continued from Page 7)
Beginning at 10 in the
morning the petite Paris-
ienne-born authoress will be
on hand to autograph copies
of her new book which is
dedicated to President Paul
Magloire. Fittingly, the no.
vel's publication date was
December 6th and His Ex-
cellency received a specially
bound deluxe edition on the
first anniversary, of his in-
auguration.
One of Haiti's greatest
literary figures, Dantes Bel-
legarde, has written the pie-
face to'the novel which deals
sympathetically and poetic-
ally with the marriage of a
French girl to a member of
the Haitian elite.
Mr. Bellegarde writes that
the heroine and narrator of
a Terre D'Enchantemens n


I7~I


JOYEUX NW.-

HEUREUSE ANNEE


dise from foreign lands to
its Jacmel customers.
To have a better proces-
sing of the all-precious cof-
fee bean, the Senator recent-
ly completed his big coffee
mill in the Marbial Valley.
The Baptiste political ca-
reer dates back from 1946-
And he emphasizes that he
is still without personal am-
biton in that field. He adds
however that ccIn all coun-
---- ----
has been able to reach the
hidden depths of the Haitian
spirit and become so identi-
f.ed to our life that she can
no longer find the cord that
joins her heart to ours."
A more detailed review
of the book will be made in
a 'later issue.


tries there arrives a time
when men who have lived
outside of politics an4 who
can continue t9 do so must
make the sacrifice of accept-
ing the job of serving their
region or their country in
order to avert the worst.,
His dreams of the future
deal more with the progress
of his country than himself.
He is looking forward to the
day when the Haitian people
will have another standard
of living more in rapport
with the norms of civiliza-
tion ... when Haiti becomes
the scene of an all-out battle
against ignorance, misery
and the ills that these two
elements engender. We have
a feeling that the Senator's
dreams mav be realized in
the foreseeable future.
The Senator is married to
a slim quiet-spoken woman
whose maiden name was
Suzanne Leroy. Their 16-
year union is blessed with
five children. Besides en-
joying a happy family life,
the Jacmel law-maker has
two other favorite past-.
times, books and sports. In
the old days he was an avid
football and tennTs player,
but now he confines his ex-
ercise to long hikes and
swims at the Jacmel beach.

A stranger meeting the
Senator for the first rime is
impressed by his. air of rug-.
ged health. His direct force-t
ful personality holds one's
attention. And his courtesy
is as natural and unassumed
as -his breathing. He is a
busy man and an extremely
interesting one.


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Page 12


I- ,,_


I---------~-


CHRISIMAS 1951


aHAITI SUN",


L^1







aHAITI SUNs


WISE AND OTHERWISE,
By T. J. Grant


Here is my contribution
it'o your Christmas. The
o spelling is very good, I think
I and I h~pe that some of you
Swill enjoy it.

4 '* The Gifts They Gave
To Jesus.

T. J. Grant-
The magi brought to Jesus,
So is the story told,
SFrankincense arid silver,
myrrh and cloth of gold.

SThey gave these gifts to
S Jesus,
SAs he lay in his manger bed,
In the little town of Bethie-
N hem,
SWhile his star blazed over-
head.

SBut 'when be walked in the
S garden,
And his star shone pale and
dim
SThroughout that night in
Tw Gethsemane,,
: Two gifts were brought to
him.

SThe first gift came from
Judas;
SBetrayal by a kiss.
Full thirty bits of silver
e'High Priest paid for this

i Then Peter's gift to Jesus,
SIn his lonely hour of trial,.
Was Peter's sin and Peter's
shame;
A stern and sore denial.

SAnd Jesus' gift from Pilate,
SWhose memq,ty no man
grieves,
Was death that day ort Cal-
vary,
On a cross between two
thieves.

K But while he hung there
dying,
SAnd his star had-ceased to
S shine,
The only gift they gave him
S then
Was a drink of bitter wine.

.The .,Maei brought gifts to
Tesis.
SSo ;s the c-orv told,
And on their knees they
worshipped him,
Those Three Wise Men of
old.

a ,Go thou and do likewise.,,
Luke X 37.




Time '

SThe Lading Amei


ANOTHER LETTER TO T. J. GRANT


Dear Sir: In my 'most dignified and best
language, I most vociferously protst'
your appalling
and& galling,
perfectly reprehensible
and insensible
Persecution of Marcel Gentil

Is there-any conceivable reason
why, in and dut of journalistic season,
a man of your undisputed,
although polluted
gifts, should systematically attack
and shellack
and black-
en the name of a charming
and disarming
member of high societal ?
'. 1 "- .- -- .
It is essential that you cease this slander
which so horribly arouses my dander,
and cut out your compulsive
and revulsive,
got to mention upsettingly loose,
abuse,
of mon amil!

(Entre nous,
it is incontrovertibly true
that his tendency to pun
can stun
even a rhinoceros into a state of coma.
The aroma
of a pipe will evoke,
In Marcel, with the sight of smoke,
the ghastly comment : -"La pipirite !N
And hor'can one hope to* beat -
his deplorable,
and far from adorable,
trick of referring to women' calves
for he does nothing by halves -
*as ,(jeux de mo-llets,,,
and in this way
torturing
and aborturing
la langue franchise
and creating a profound and sinister malaise
in people like you & mil?)


Neverthelest,
I must request
that you suspend your badinage,
and that your insidious sabotage
be concluded,
my deluded
Mr. Grant;
for instead of making him inhibit
this dreadful vice, it rather causes
it even more.-
which ;- a fearful bore-
so proud is hil
a of your publicitil.


hirp to' ex
F' r


Honina you agril,
"-EV'ith Efron.


& "Life"


riran


MAGAZINES


PRESENT

Haiti and its people, its
problems, and its arts are
presented in a series of es-
S says and selections 'rom
Haiti's outstanding writers
in the volume. An introduc-
tion to Haiti, published by
the Pan American Union's
Department of Cultural Af-
fairs. Mercer Cook, Professor
of Romance Languages at
S Howard University, made
the selections and commen-
taries. Such authors as Dr.
Jean Price-Mars, Dantfs Bel
legarde, Pierre Sylvain, and
Jacques Roumain are quot-
ed on the history of the land
origins of the population,
the wars for independence
problems of rural isola-
tion and soil erosion. Cathol-
icism and Vodun in the Hai-
tian's religious life, folklore
and folk songs. A report by
Maurice Dartioue, on the
country's educational needs
;s summarized. Philione Tho
bv-Mqrcelin tells of the tre-
mendous revival of art ac-
tivir;eq in Hait; in the article
oriinallv published n Ame-


RHOMBOID
by T. J. Grant
A few days ago I aer that.
lovely young girl, Marcel's
niece from Paris, coming out
of the Caravelle with a copy
of Haiti Sun under her arm.
"How did you like it, this
week?" I asked, glancing at
the paper.
Haven't read it yet", she
replied. ,"When it came
Sunday, Marcel got it first,
started to read it and sud-
denly shouted, "The man is
an idiot.,, .Then he tore it
into little pieces. As you see,
Sibt I just bought another copy."
l, -. I smiled. "Do you think
-.- he was talking about me?",
She smiled. "Don't be
conceited. Mr. Grant, you
are not the only idiot in
SPort-au-Prince.,,
I don't ovire get that one.
Did she mean that Marcel
was referring to the Editor?


CHRISTMAS 1951


BOOK STORES!


-Are Now On Sale at AD


Page '
.4










ING HAITI "

ricas for December 1949.
Jacques C. Antoine discusses.
,. ,
Haiti's poets and novelists,.,

lume concluded with studies
of four great Haitians :
Toussaint Louverture (the
article by former Ambassa-
dor to the United States J o-
sepi D. Charles, (rom Ame-
ricas, April 1949), Jean-
Jacques Dessalines, Henri
Christophe, and Alexandra...
P6tion. The paper-bound
book is illustrated 'with
many photographs.

An Introduction to Haiti, :
selections and commentaries
by Mercer Cook. Pan Ame- .
rican Union. Department of
Cultural Affairs, 1951. 150p.
Illus. 1 dollar.
On sale at the "Haiti Suns'
office in the Exposition, La
'Belle Creole apd La Cara '
-- -- -- ---- .i

WARFARIN


Warfarin. is the most
useful racticide yet dis-
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use.


Why harbour rats and
mice? Buy foday a pack.
age of Warfarin FI N-AT
at HAITI SEED STORE in
the Phramacie Telema-
que Bldg. on Grand'Rue.


FIN-RAT is now for '
sale in many stores
throughout Haiti.

Don't let waste matter .;4
affect your health. You cad
be pleasantly and easily .
relieved with

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the world-famous
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On Friday and Saturday next
SRUMEURS.
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THEIATE DE VERDURE

Sunday 23rd at. 6.15 p.m.
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DEAD ON ARRIVAL)
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For critic see Ti Joseph
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Monday at 6.15 and 8.30
p.m.
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CHIST'AS 1951
CHRISTMAS 1951


uHAITI SUN '


I HOTEL IBO LELE


CHRISTMAS EVE and NEW -YEAR'S EVE DINNER DANCES.


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Phone: 7886


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Tel : 7175.


Caslera's Maternity
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---


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DRUMMING
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every morning by
The aLittle Old Souvenir
Shop, of Port- au Prince Haii's No. 1 Drummer,
... doesn't look too inviting
... but it has a stock of first TI RORO
quality merchandise at rea-
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We suggest that you make your reservations immediately as only those having
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CHRISTMAS 1951 aHAITI SUN, Page 15
-W I I ag


Haiti is a land so full oj
both history and romance
that it is no wdhder it has
drawn the interest of a beau
tiful young woman wh(
combined the two above
elements to write one of the
best selling books of mod
ern time.
Miss Kathleen Windsor is
no stranger to a great share
of the Haitian reading pub
lic who devoured the French
translation of her famous
tomea ,Forever Amber.w We
might add that Miss Wind
sor, in the flesh, is just as
lovely as the pictures'on the
cover of her best seller
We'll also add that she came
to Haiti with her husband.
Mr. Arnold Krakauer.

The couple, who arrived
the 21st of December, are
spending their Christmas va.
cation at El Rancho. But
they're not spending all
their time "dunkihg in the
pool ... they want to make
a thorough tour of Haiti.
Does Miss Windsor have in
mind another book ?

-*-:0:- *
Ambassador Joseph L. De
jean, permanent Haitian de.
legate to the O.A.S. returned
Tuesday from Washington
accompanied by his wife.
-:0:-
The social event of the
week in the (Cap, was the
christening of little Miss
Alice Laroche, daughter o
Mr. and Mrs. John Laroche
Alice's godparents are hel
grandpa Mr. Raymond La
roche. and her grandmother
Mrs. Ciancialli.
-:0:-_ .
Mr. and Mrs. John Mc
Queen are leaving today ti
spend Christmas in the
States.
-:0:- -M


*:.' 1/












REG.TRADE MARK
fL


Lt. Victor Blanchet will
divide his Christmas week
in Jamaica ... watching Ha;-
ti versus Jamaica in King-
ston and watching the sights
of Montego Bay.
-:0:-
a Miss Maud Peloux spent
SO~~s the latter part of the week
Visiting her fiancee's family
2:in the (Cap.,
i Mrs. Marion Saul is back :0:7-
e to spend another winter here Next Thursday Mr. Ul-
s in Haiti. Mrs. Saul who has rick Duvivier is leaving tc
- done a great deal of travel- take up his post iti Mexicc
0 ling in her day arrived here City as Haitian delegate tc
e recently with her household the permanent Cultural Conm
e ... a black cat ... two birds mittee of the Organization
. on a string ... some plants of American States.
... rare furniture and a Mer- -:0:-_
s cury station wagon. Don Lungwitz returned
e Monday from a business trip
--:0:-- to the U.S. and Canada.-
Dutch Consul, KIM man- -- .O:--
ager Tony Burgers returned There was a '-gala pre.
Ls-a
This week from a swift busi- Christmas party at the Eric
Sess trip to Nova Scotia. Tippenhauer's residence in
-:0: town last night"... offered
Director .of the Haitian and attended by the ymngei
American Institute and Mrs. generation who chipped in
James Cassedy are setting off to defy expenses ,
this week-end for ten days -:0:-
Sof the Christmas holidays in of the PAA trik
San Juan, Puero Rico. Mrs. and missinR Xmas with the
SCassedy's brother is stationed family in Texas, Bill Tala-
there in the.Air Corps. mas flew off Tuesday. Wife
:0:_ Julia artd the children Diana
SArthur Bechtel, director and Billie Joe have been vt-
Sof the experimental Rubbcr cationing these part month
station at Marfranc in the with relations in the U. S.
South returned last week
from an inspection tour of -:0:
the Rubber Plantations in Home for the holidays
Central and South America. from the Polytechnical In-
S.:0:- stitute in Troy, New York
The girls with the fire is Jacky Auguste. Jacky flew
engine red convertible Ford' in to town Friday morning.
Offered a gay cocktail party .0:
n at their residence in Boudon Mr. and Mrs. Arh
Monday evening report Vincent are looking for.
by a -tripotte." ward to the brief visit Feb.
.0 ruary the 19th of Mr. and
e Mrs. Frank Vilson and ,Mrs. John Payne of Louis.
s daughter Carol left for ton, Maine. Mrs. Payne,
daughter ......tsister of Arthur Vincent, a-
SChristmas in Kingston yes- steer of Arthur ncen, a
Yesterday. Papa will join them long with her husband will
r .have 12 hours .to talk over
Son the 25th in time for Tur- t
- keydinier and pl i.pud- old times before continuing
- key dinner -and plum pu- -
i, n. %their Caribbean cruise a
board the Dutch tourigs
:0:-' ship 'Veedam."
- After four years of Den- -:0:-
o tal Science in the States ... Miarie Jbse Jeanty, and
e Pierre Frederic is home for Carol'Madsen are home frorn
Christmas. school in the U.S. for Christ
S--:0:-. mas.
STi Mamam and the chil- -0:--
dren are back again from The Union school Christ
Mexico City. mas Play Friday was report
-:0:- ed a grand success.
Businessman Milo Hakime -:0:-
I is spending Christmas in Radio man and Foreign
Venezuela. news catcher Michelet Jn
-:0:- Baptiste is to be wed ... De-







T mo0,m s since t862
-_______*.*"


cember 29th. The popular
man about town wouldn't
disclose the name of the
lucky girl. It's said that he
may leave for Parips next
month to study television.
-:0:-
Ginette Sendral, daughter,
of Emile Sendral of Haiti
Motors flew home from
school in Cuidad Trujillo
Saturday to spend the holi-
days with her family and
Friends.
..' -:0:- --
SChemical Engineer Louis.
SAuguste, son of Rene Max
, Auguste of the Librairie Nou
1' velle, came all the way home
from Venezuela to spend
Xmas with the folks.
I*. -:0:-'
Tuesday Marie Jose Roy
observed her birthday anni-
versary ... the following day
accompanied by sister De-
: nise and friends, she flew to
i Jacmel to attend the Presi-
l,dential celebrations.
-:0:-.
i Married Wednesday. al
the Sacre Coeur at six in the
evening were Henry Man-
Sgones of AllU America
i Cables- and Gisele Massac.
--:0:-
Sunday the 'Bishops of
SSHADA offered a delightful
buffet supper at their resi-
dence .. for all those who
assisted in makingthe Union
School Bazaar the great suc-
cess that it was-

Kenscoff got its first
*gasoline pumps, this week.
* The, Esso Company with an
* eye on public relations, not
sale ... installed one of their
Latest models Wednesday ...
Sits simple geography that
Syou can coast down from the
heights ... but it's nor every-
I one who has that much
Sbrake lining. Don't worry
Esso you'll have sales as long
as I have my faithless Jeep.

i



An 8 pound bundle of
Sjoy entered the 'Bob Duvi-
vier household last Friday.
3 Mrs. Duvivier, the former
- Monique Hilaire, and her
new son Reginald are both
in the best of health.
-:0:
S A boy was born last week
to Mr. and Mrs. Gerard
Kenol. Mrs. Kenot is the
former Mireille Victor.
-:0:-
Mr. and Mrs. Rene Am-
broise were blessed with a
S-baby girl last week.

The household of the Ge-
rard Bonard family was
brightened this week with
the birth of a baby girl. Mrs.
Bonard is the former Mirelle


Menos.
Doctor Taicher of shoe
making fame flew to Miami
for the Xmas holidays this
week-end.

-:0:-
To ensure that our side
gets plenty of encourage-
ment during the three bigt
matches against Jamaica in
Kingston this week ... a
large group of football fans
sacrificed their Christmas at
home and flew over there
this week-end. Among those
football fans are : Gerard
Philippeaux, Denise Rou-
zier, Gerard Rouzier, Marcel
Douge, Dr. Henry Mevs,
Eugene Baillergeau, Roger
Gaston, Sourit Bonnard, Pe-
rides Laventure, Yvan Mar-
tin, Monioue Blanchard, Mi-
cheline Denis, and Fritz
Blanchard.

-:0:-
In town on an official mis-
sion this week was Martin
Francis,' Secretary to the Bri-
tish Ambassador in Cuba.
-:0:-
Dr. E. M. Loughlin tropi-
cal disease specialist attach-
ed to SCISP was decorated
with the National Order of
(Honneur et Meriten Wed-
nesday.

The Ambassador of .Vene-
zuela and Madame Falcon
Briceno offered a dinner las!
Saturday evening for mera-
hers of the Diplomatic Cir.
cle.

-:0:-
Monday Miss Helen Geed
of the American Embassy
and her mother returned to
Pacot after a brief visit td
the U. S.

Last week Mr. Samuel
Cisneros Pineda of Ecuador,
arrived here on an Unesco
scholarship to study Haitiea
sociology and history.

-:0:-
At the St. Francis Hotel
last evening Mr. O. J. Brandt
President of S. A. Usine a
Monteque de P-au-P, Fila.
ture Tissage and Confection
d'Haiti, S. A., and Trans.
World Trading Co. S. A., of-
fered his employees a pre-
Christmas party. No details
are available as the Beach.
comber goes to Press.
-:0:-
This week's theme song at
the new cTambourn plant
was ... carry me back to
old Virginnyn. and not be.
cause the source of the tabao
is Virginia genuine bil
because the tabac expert
Messrr,. Guv Brown and Ju i
lien Thompson were pro
"*';" for Christmas,-li :
;n Richmond. Va. Tre b4e
leave this week-end. -"''


. 0


- -





CHRISTMAS 1951


*I


rhc 'u


CER FAMA S Tl ic
TVAUW K ADABlA in
(Continued from Page 9)

caravan of jeeps are ready needed items can be bought
t/ fq, distribu.ionw The youth- at a modest price with the
Ail finXes making the toys m.ers still getting a modest az
U.e gui4ed by the patient pro(t. The shop also makes ec
skill of Mr. Fausten, a Hai- coffins to keep in stock. This u
rian teacher on the UNESCO aay sound a bit gruesome th
stagf, and an adult instruc- but i is a sound piece of cc
tor. Nearby in the weaving foresight. Many a family has b
apd handcraft shop another been forced to pay a -pre- sc
instructor is busy teaclijig miumn price for a coffin hur tl
the youngsters how to. turn riedly constructed in the fe
out the highly marketable
rugs made up. of squares of
sisal sewn together to make
the attractive and fashiop-
qble floor coveting now so
much in demand. Other
yguPgsters are busily filing
copbs. out of cow's hprns.
S Both themselves and their
parents have a drastic neec
for a 'skill to enable them
:,o produce sellable articles
to provide money to tide
( n lies over the lean peri-
ods when their fields offer
liW6tl or no. harvest. And
SUNESCO is doing what it
S can to buld u1 a series of .. -.
*small industries in Mar- .. an Adult T

.ldults and children alike
are diligent in learning new c4y and carried to their h
S kills. But i. is not enough iountai household. Now bI
to rn oqt a .prodpct. for they can seltt one from the T
tket ....i- w usto bY made cooperative at a cost of seven ti
oertpe y d enqogh. to be able to eight doRlars. ti
to com-and, a goi ptrie, The peasants of Marbial a
specially in., the toui5 's ... who have had little op- ti
S hops. UNESCO is trying, o portunit to learn the bene- n
S overcome one major short- fits of communal activities i
coming by teaching the pea- outside the conibite ...now ir
sa s to cure leather proper- are getting other- valuable ti
i spt that te belts and san- lessons 'in cooperation. f
,4s j. qi e fro it won't b
,- end potential customs' A trip to a UNESCO adult d
noses in the'air. training center shows how p
But the "skills acquired 'assets can be shared to pro-
Saren -being used to make vide the greatest help to all. v
ds for sale outside the In the poultry yards are
valley. .'. for generations the imported' chickens available er
fpeas.nts-have been handicap for cross breeding with the
ped by theq. inability to native birds to improve both s
share their skills cdoperative their eatability and their t
ly to provide for their own egg-laying capacity. -In a er
de nimbli needs. nearby pig sty lies a huge
Tender UNESCO guidance, male Duroc Jersey ... his
: credit, coperatie has been function, to provide more.
;. tablished with over 100 marketable acochons in the'
Siembets, each purchasing a valley area. Well caed for
irem i1 the undertaking nurseries give the peasants
;. ,10 gourd.s. Some 300 hardier breeds of 'vegetables
:' ._ars. is noW* in the till ant plants ... as wel as
Sdca be borrowed by seedlingsfor their reores-
S: P s f or; emergency traction projects. Early next
i ieeds The m9ney can also. year. a fish pond will be
S be used for m investment, such built and stocked to pride /
I:t, kbjuying. a pig, fattening it another source of food and
L, &~ope or two months, then revenue., In the center of
O: iie it "for a gain. It this agricultural station is a
S aches the peasants how to rough open tunnel, with
,ye money and use it wise- seats and blackboard.
buqt sqst important -of all There are 19 such adult.
S to cooperate to aid 'chnol in the valley -
A:'i r 0Q in time of need. --'h 700 nupil learning the
,'The members have set ut) lementarv things to give
arpe~ trty- shop to make them a chance to lift them-
s n -iarc When someone :lvee out of ihe ahvss of
..P, s married and wants to mi M, -'Iup housekeeping, the, UNESCOhas already train
*a''


I 35 4dult instructors air
t January it is opening its
teachers' Training School
: LaFotd.

When finished, it will be
n establisbhefi to be pint.
d to with pride, The first
nit, a large stone house for
he director, is now nearing
completion. Classes will pro-
ably be held in it until the
hool and dormitories for
he 35 resident pupils are
erected. There will also be


UNESCO to set up one of
its pilot experiments in bi-
sic education on Haitian soil,
nether party foresaw all the
difficulties that lay ahead. A
team of visiting experts who
made a tbhorugh st sy
thb Matbial Valley iti 19,7


and fervently agreed tha
its people were in need of
help ... but there was a
question of whether UNES
CO could hope to make a
dent in the misery of 30,000
illiterate and diseases pea-
(Continued on Page 17)


: It rprq tegnly o -



..nipg ." ox t.sa t M. 'r. .,
.g te- .r even the. g is in Y- -'-
pines.for the everen t in is incr nvpiy
ars. of t teaching sjAaff.- t, it W.ti 4.g. M .
his trajqini school twill a t t e e t ."'.
urn out teachers worthy of
he name. ... teachers who ofl wer ni'tans all hie pa d th., E T
re equipped with the prac- 'Wt tobo. *e Cak Cocp lp- Icing; S. '
cal' knopwg ge necssryto
of op.ly lift the cur.ta, of A .. -
literacy but cut into the Agents Froni S.A..
in4ad. ma by, superi- P ne 289.4
ion, disease and backward. .
arming methods. They will
e carefully, chosen. candi-
ctes for. a tremendously .im 'The delicious Chocolate
ortant job. Laxative Ii -


Because the eye#. of the
entire world are on Marbial
While the eyes of most
>phisticated Haitiaps tun
e other way. Nhen the.gov
hn;ent 9f Haiti asked


--- -'" \
-ro a x


I
^'


pObKLAX
brings relief overnight. So
Stake
.BBOOiLAX
'to-night and, to-morrow
-you'll.be all right.


C'est pourquoi diS 1 101 Olltrl, t

Sde plus fors tonnages sont transpoirl s
sur p os pies pi 0 lords Goodyear que Sur

pheus de. toIte autie marque


Lee entrepreneurs de camionnage et de services
dXautobas savernt quie lea pneus poids lords
S yGoodyea foptp preuye d'un maximum de
longivit6 et d'un maximum de rendement


kilometrique tout en aeshrant le meilepr
service qu'on puise attes.-e de pneus pIa s
lords. Pour un maximum d'avantageea-
achetea des pneus poids lords Goodyear!


PD0,f 16


!


clurrlT SEJNI






CHRISTMAS 1951


aHAITI SUN,


(Continued from Page 16)

sant eking a living from the
eroded and worn-out soil.

S The UNESCO conference
S voted to take a chance. It
would assume one-third of
the first year's estimated
Cost of 66,000 dollars, the
SHaitian government another
third, and it was hoped, other
in t e r e s ted organizations
would be prevailed upon to
contribute the remainder.
SMuch of this money was
spent in surveys and the
blueprinting of a working
plan. Since then the pro-
ject has skated along on slim
mer and slimmer funds. But
there is no doubt that the
UNESCO center has made
the best possible use of its
allotment. The five neat
buildings are' attractive,
functional but not elaborate.
There is the .sch6ol. a ton-
nele sort of open-air work
shot. twin stone buildings
which honp the clinic and
Sthe handrraft department.
small nuP,-**** for rhP direc-
tor anrl e -if n- cuest room
.a.1 thb mnp hall.

After a disastrous feud
which almost put a period
to the project, there. was a
majqr change in the admin-
istration. And the choice of
the present director, Emma-
nuel Gabriel Jean-Francois,
was an excellent one. This
noted Haitian educator has
won the international ac-
claim for his long and steady
battle against illiteracy. He
has represented Haiti on the
staff of the UNESCO secre-
tariat sice its infant days,
Haiti with a basic education
and is dedicated to the task
of providing the people of
that will not only teach them
to read and write in a lan-
guage they understand (Cre-
ole) but also give them
sound training on how to
better their living standards.
Mr. Gabriel points out that
once a peasant boy or .girl
becomes able to read creole.
;t oaves thp way to learning
French if he nr she has the
means to continue in A;ighcr'
education..
He has an able staff at

, ----- "


Marbial .... men and women
wh6 have their heart as well
as their soul'in their work.
Mr. Martino, director, of
adult education, isa good-
natured enthusiastic Haitian
who is able to win the con-
fidence and respect of the
instructors and the peasants
who attend their classes. Mr.
Disencles, the assistant di-


rector of the project, works
ardently and steadily, find-
ing himself lucky to see his
family 'in Port-au-Prince
once a month- The two
teachers in the experimental
school, Mr. and Madamp
Faustin, seem to have a per-
sonal interest in the progress
of each of the 115 students
now attending classes, An
energetic housekeeper, Ma-
dame Domond oversees the
management of the kitchen,
mess hall and living quart-
ers. All togethif- it is a
smoothly run, happy 'and
busy establishment.

But like all planners, Mr.
Gabriel keeps in mind thed
future and the goal which
has been, since the begin-
ning, an effort tp help the
people help themselves. If
IUNESCO work is ever cut
short in the Valley he, wants
outstanding people of the
area to carry on the fiaht.
THe had this in mind when
TTNFSCO hegan setting up
Regional Committees of pea
sant leaders who look after


.
THE CHANGE IN THE VALLEY OF MARBIAL
-


poured into its cultivation
the investment could not be
made to pay. No the Mar-
bial is a valley with too
many natural handicaps for
any 'such aget rich quick,,
schemes. But UNESCO' is
joining with the Haitian
Government in offering the
people the knowledge that
they can reclaim their worn
out land ... that they can do
something to break the grim'
circle of poverty, hunger and
despair.
If you ask one of the sop-
histicates of Port-au-Prince
about Marbial he would
shrug his shoulders and say,
(,That project isn't getting
anywhere. It's pretty much
of a failure.
But ask the little peasant
on the Marbial mountain
roo. Watch him proudly
aaze over his new one and
one-half carreaus of land ...
at his far chickens, at his
cross bred pies. Ask him
whether thp UNESCO pro-
iect is a failure. He'll tell
v'QU. The answer is a re-
soundinge No.,,


the welfare of the people in
their area and at present are
using lotteries and fairs to
raise funds for aiding the
needy.

Yes, there is a change in
Marbial Valley. A change
being wrought slowly but
unmistakably. There was no
way to miraculously turn
*the Valley into a land of
milk and honey. It is, not,
and never could be, the fer-
tile Artibonite. Everi if mil-
lions of foreign dollars were

*


WALTE I BRA3UN distributor


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-I-.
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AND AMONG THEIR RANGE OF WATCHES THE
FAMOUS SWISS, SILENT, SELF-WINDING

,,ROLEXI Wrist Watch '


Your Xmas Shopping at


RUSSO FRERES


Phone 3294
Rue Roux, opposite La Caravelle _


Great-riding, COMPLETE
MOTORBIKE amazing low cost!
Want the best for the Least? Then here's your answer--
B.S.A. Bantam a British built complete motorcycle, with
features galore and riding qualities which make it a ret&
stand out. It's sturdy dependable handsome.
ARRANGE TO BUY ONE TODAY .,i
Contact 1 .1 .
VALLES and BAJEUX
Grand Rue opposite Haiti Motors


*


C~FW.


7?&'~dae


PHILIPS


Ask for free demonstration
in the Showroom of Curacao
Trading Co. S.A.


A Xmas Gift that will bte6
fit the whole family.
i


S 1*


Li


.I~J


Pai ie ...


The farmers study a Creole text-book ...


-. .i

.r)
:


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L.


.r
I
4


I






-


-


rr


,,_r
CarriBB^^ tl


1
c


= 4


" .Z
V.

i


---n- ,=-I- --lr~b~Z~-~-=~L~,r;z~-~D=~i~:~


a





,. Pagec18 HAII SUN" CIHRISiMS 1991


Jirforce Representatives Of Latin America
Attend Graduation Ceremonies in Panama


Recently these Airforce Of
fliers of various Latin Ameri
can countries were photogra-
phed on parade during their
visit to the General .Head-
quarters of the U.S. Carib-


Front line from left to
right: General Leonidas Pi-
Sneda, Minister of War, Ma-
r'ine and Aviation of Hon-
d* uras Admiral Albert M.
Blodsoe, U. S. Navy Ma-
jor General Lester Whit-
lock, C6nmander-in-Chief,
U. S. Army, Caribbean -
Brigadier Emil C. Kiel, Corn
miander-in-chief, Caribbean
Air Command.
Second line: Lidutenant
General Aurelio Caledon
S Palma. Chief Chilean Air
Torce Brigadier General
Felix Hermida, Chief of Staff
Doniini an Air Forre Bri
Syadi"er General Fliseo Mar-
tin del Campo. Chief Assist-
s,an Mexican Air Force. Ad-
Sainistration Colonel Car-
S los Suarez Guzman, Chief of
Staff Bolivia Air Force
i.'


I
S* 1


bean Air Command, on the
occasion of the graduation
ceremonies of Latin Ameri-
can trainees at the U.S. Ai.-
force school. Present at the
ceremonies were:
U


Colonel Gabriel Pineros Sua
rez, Director General Avia-
tion, Colombia Colonel
Louis A. Giron, Chief Gua-
temala Air Fdrce.
Third line: Col. Oscar
Sanchez, Director Military
Aeronautics of Uruguay -'
Lieutenant Colonel Ernestp
Delgado M., Chief Air ForCe
of Ecuador Lieutenaiit
Colonel Luis Felipe Escofar,
Chief Air Force fo Salvador
Lieutenant Colonel Abel
Romero, representative of c
the Chief df the Venezuelan d
Air Force'- Major ,Roger
Bermudez B., Acting Chief d
Air Force, of Nicaragua -
Major Carlos A. Mungz,
Chief Assistant of Paraguay
Air Force, and Lieutenantr
Toseph Etenne, representa-"
tive of Haitian Air Force.


DINE and DANCE

in STYLE 1*
at the NEWLY OPENED



"Pigaille"

RESTAURANT NIGHT CLUD


Whre the Pavilion de rAgriculture used to be)
icellent French Chef Delightful Atmosphere -

Orchestra and new lance Floor


Dental Notice

Dr. Gerard Maglio, Chi-
rurgien-Dentiste recently re-
turned from two years with
.the Guggenheim Dental Cli-
nic in New York, and six
months at Howard Univer-
sity in Washington, D. C.,
has opened a new modern
clinic here.

Dr. Maglio's clinic is
equipped with the most up-
to-date equipment used in
Dentistry today even a
complete X-ray machine.
The clinic is located at
,No. 143 Rue Dr. Aubry.
two minutes from P.A.A. of-
fice.


HOUSE FOR RENT
A well furnished house in
Turgeau with all the desired
comforts for rent. Contact:
Mme. Andre Liautaud, Rue
4. Former home of Therase
Brandt. Tel. 5477.



FOR SALE
A beautiful mahogany
bedroom suite for sale. Con-
tact aHaiti Sun*, or see
owner No..6 Passe Lavaud.


FOR SALE OR LEASE
Well established cafe and
cocktail bar, fully equipped
deep freezer, electrical grill,
gas stoves etc. Excellent lo-
:ation and thriving business.
)wner has other interests in
Haiti and cannot devote the
necessary time to the Cafe
business. Interested parties
:all aHaiti Sun.,,


HOUSE FOR SALE
A modern home located
at Desprez with two bath-
rooms, -four bedrooms, one
:losed porch, a large gallery,
living -and dining rooms,
garage, and wine cellar, de-
tached servants' quarters, up
to date kitchen and pantry,
selling at 14,000 dollars. A
Fair price for a fine home
Ruch as it is. See aHaiti
Sun.m


FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON

=E T
S TREFINEST

SIn Men's Apparel
.i Suits


Shirts and Ties

Freeman Shoes

Adam Hats


THE SMARTEST

And Prettiest Fabrics


Lingerie
Accessories


5- -


French Perfumes
Jewelry

YOUR FAVORITE STORE


aThe Best Quality Cement at

the Lowest possible cost

ALLEN & BAUSSAN: offer their


A VENDRE
Une belle table de salle a IN BAGS OF 42 1/2 PORTLANDCEM
manger avec six chaises une STANDARD HYDRAULICIKgs NET 6 PLY
desserte- une vitrine. Tl6&'. OFFICE: MTTC BLDG. EXPOSITION
phoner 7421. Port-au-Prince Tel : 2387


FAMRSUST rins CBUT Holiday Greetings to al
Si Oour friends and pa.sos,.
SMay you be blessed with a
* THE WORLD healthy, heart y, happy
1952 .


gm 4


,= -;.' =- -L .-1 I --





J.pE


CmRISTMAS-1951


sHAITI SUN*


I..~
a -~n!-.* I


Today in Haiti with our
grave problem of soil ero-
sion and denudation, we
have to be particularly care-
ful not to cut trees down in-
d4iscminatealy ... even for
Christmas. When trees grow

British Society In Haiti


cEach year at Christmas
time it has been the prac-
tice.to give a small addition-
al sum to British West In-
dians on the Society's relief
list. There are at present 35
families on the list and we
-should like to be able to
.-give 2 dollars to each.
In view of many other
claims at this season no sub.
scription list is being circu-
lated, but any Christmas
contributions sent to the
Treasurer of the Society, c/o
British Legation. will be
sratefullv received and ac-
knowledged.u,
Signed S.' H. Anstey,
President.


thickly as in the Pine Forest,
it is often the policy to thin
them out in order to improve
"the growth and form of
those which are left. These
thininnings make good
Christmas trees. One should
however NEVER cut trees
where the growth is scanty
and inadequate to give a
good forest in the future. It
js time for all to cooperate
to save what is left ... and
help build, not destroy the
forests of- the ftu" Every
tree chopped down this
Christmas is a deep wound
that Haiti will feel for many
Christnases to come.


Don't Chop Down That
STree This Christmas ,


Merry Christmas


And


A Prosperous New Year


*1952




LA PLANTATION


DAUPHIN S.


A.


.1


* ". .


%UIV


\N.


" I.


' "" i .


LA .
BANQUE RATIONALE
DE LA BEPUBLIQUE D'HAITI.
D' EPARTEMEITr
? '"
inaugur6 le 26 Novembre 1951 son nouveau service
:'3'" + '

Location De Colfres-;Iq s
"_ '... "- ^' : '-
Amdlior6, modernis6, ce service vous offre A l'intdrieur de sa vodut i
fret du dernier inodale en usage aux Etats-Unis, dans lequel voui< "-
You* Dije '
Tos Bis
Vos Papiers Personnels
Vos Tities ''

En Toute Independance
E' En Toule Securite
Avec Discretion ..i..
El Confort
Nous avons hour de solliciter vore V TE et vore
Nous avons l'honneur de solliciter votre VISITE ... et votre PATO 4G


-I
r -"I
?,_


*'





r*1


itrv
R i"rl
nA! 1P -r(


CHRSAS 195


cHAITI SUN)"


SI HNight before Christmas



S... And, though the chil-
.sen were nestled all snug in
ir bed, the grownups
..busily trimming their
i ;in silver and emerald
tIh


p


Cbhristniss, wue eex
,Ip of our 'frends '
,a sincere wish
Add jyous ioli-
,,Merry ChMrit-




.. Wi"so
1 C .,






f:etresentative of


- and COMPANY


ask Wilson)


. .


MAlSON"

Rue Bonne, Foi


,s^ : r,'^ .i i .X ;X
-* *A'U'.... .;


BASKETBALL
BECOMES A MAJOR
SPORT HERE


Basketball is enjoying a
tremendous v o g u e The
games played at Vincent
Park Tuesday and Friday
evenings draws swelling
crowds that fill this little
stadium to the bursting
point.
It means the long efforts
of the bureau of sports are
crowned with success. After
providing the stadium with
modern comforts,. the bu-
reau helped form teams and,
two years ago, organized a
basketball tournament at
Port-au-Prince. Thanks to
the, sponsor members of the
Basketball Federation, a num
ber of difficulties have been
overcome though there still
remains others to solve.
One of the noted Port-au-'
Prince citizens who came
-forward to help the sport is I
General Levelt who offered
the Championship Cup
which bears his name.
The basketball players
themselves are getting a re-
putation for the kind of
sportsmanship and fair play
which has ceased to be pre-
sent in our football. Thus
the vogue basketball now is
enjoying hardly comes as a
surprise.
The bureau of sports,
wishing to make the most of
this enthusiasm, has decided
to build up the sport in all
the schools. Soon an inter-
scholastic basketball tourna-
ment will be organized.'
As to the teams, they have
sponsors who will see to
their needs and equipment.
The Pirates are-under the
sponsorship of the Esper
Brothers, the founders. Speed
is aided by Issa el Saieh,
Aigle by Murray Knobel,
the team's honprary presi-
dent. Flech has as its spon-
sors the Sergile Brothers,
Gerdes etc.
We do not need to speak
of Aviapo, Garde-Cotes and
Casernes, since it is well
known what a major role,
basketball plays in the actual
army..
Mr. Murray K.nobel, an
avid basket ball fan since
his own.playing days, has of-
fered to help the Basketball
Federation in the construc-
tion ofra new stadium. The
spot where it is to be built
has already been chosen ...
the Ross Maning site at the
Exposition. It's' a wonder-
ful project which, if it suc.
ceeds, will contribute much
Sto the development of bas-
\ ketball in our country. We
sincerely hope that Mr. Kno-
bel and the Federation will
be able to turn their plans
into reality.
(Transitaed frost the
Nouvelliste).


'1~'


Above Mr. and Mrs. knobel, *George Talamas, and -
the well equipped (thanks to Mr. Knobel) uAIGLEB
basketball team.


. ..- -. '* ':.".W ,'. g'" .*'. "" *
.* .. -.s ** ;" ..,--.. 'tK .,:
a ..s


n-fl2~O~li~i~
e~. kss..
.:l'-"-'i I,


'S i


'yi:need,
*!, ".*... ,:


** ;




Xcuis'MS 1951


lsiVoe Of Amgrica To
;. I. tcast Christmas

a$r a iue Ti


'New York.- No less
Than 15 special English lan.-
Sga'ge Christmas and year
Send' features will be broad-
Scast over The Voice of Ame-
r ica's facilities during the
Holiday week, December 23
;' "through January 1, 1952, to
; listeners in Latin America.
SMany regularly scheduled
programs will be cancelled
to permit maximum cover-
age of this fen-day cYule-
tide Festival.,

Among th e highlights
: will be aPeace on Earth,.--
. a half-hour dramatic presen-
: -tation; cMy Favorite Christ-
mas Songs with singing stars
Bing Crosby, Dinah Shore,
Perry Como, Frank Sinatra
and Kate Smith; a special
Christmas edition of the Jo
Stafford Shown; a variety of
aYear End Reviews, and
predictions, by several of
America's well-known cbm-
mentators, on the course of
events in the year ahead.

On Sunday, December 23,
a half-hour dramatization of
the Nativity will be present-
ed under the title '* Unto
You This Day",, while on
SChristmaas Dhy, Tuesday, De
cember 25, there Will be a
choice of special programs
Among these will be the
dramatization of aThe Smill
Oneb, a Christmas story fea-
turing Bing Crosby, radio,
screen and television star,
who earlier in the day -joins
four other song artists -
Dinah Shore, Petry Como,
Frank' Sinatra and Kate
Smith in their cFavorite
Christmas Songs., Another
feature of the day will be
aPeace on Earth", a half
hbur dramatization of the
impact of the ancient mes-
sage of the Nativity upon
today's civilization.

On Wednesday, Decem-
ber 26, the celebrated ac-
tress Katharine Cornell will
read ,Alil through riThe
Night,,. a tender Christmas
story by Rachel Field, and
on December 27, -Cross-
Country,, U.S.A., will tell
of Christmas celebrations
throughout the United
States.
On Friday, December 28,
The Voice of America will
present a lively, colorful
description fo Christmas fes-
tivities on a typical -Ameri-
can farm, while another
highlight of that day will
be the f"Musical Headlines
of 1951.) This program
will offer a review of the


"_HAITI SUN,


most important musical hear how members of one of
events, produced and heard North America's great la-
in America, during the past bor unions, the Internhtional
year. Ladies'. Garment Workers
On Sunday, December 30, Union, celebrate their Christ
a aUited Natios' Reviewn mas.
featuring the most import- T 4 e Yuletide Festival
ant developments in the Will be concluded on New
United Nations during, the Year's Day, when a special
past year, will be broadcast. ,Commentators' D iges't,
The same evening, a half- with Larry Lesueur, H. V.
hour broadcast will be de- Kaltenborn and Erwin Can-
voted to a review of 'top ham will be resented, in
News Stories of 1951., On which the possible course of
Monday, December .31, lis- events during 1952 will be
teners in Latin America will discussed.


S


Editor The Herald: I de-
plore the use of the lazy
term -Xmas, for our most
wonderful holy day. X is a
symbol of the unknown
quantity. Sbrely Christ gave
us the greatest "known


quantitys ever given. .
Let's keep "Christ i
Chiistmas, and celebrate l.
birthday by remembering
Him!'
t. Rudp Eckman, r,
MAwmS Rest


o ,




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Sif} jChristmas
- ._, ;- ..', ,, ....


Felices Pascuas


ta IAI


,Boas -eslos I <


anr hihr
m u m .


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In any language these worar bring a message of hop \
and comfort to all humanity.
A


LU UU ln Inlgi



and on earth


A Fl in mn of aond will"' Pan American World Airways
flo a ti Mon f Ofiffn will.


PUll


,UU Lt. IlIUllI tgvvu VII l extend best wishes for a
Merry Chriitmas and a Happy New Year to their .'
friends 611l over the world.



IPAV W AMERICAN WORtI' A4aWrtj
_ __ __-- a n~~


4


Page


Let's Keep Christ" In Crit
ett e st ,n noltmif
Remember Him
On His Birthday


.t ,,"






*HAITI SUN,


ii
RS 11
*v 1'*
CHRISTMAS 1951


jrate __ ____________ _______________________________________________________________


Tradition in" Merrie Olde England"


(Continued from Page 3)

gin is ancient but the people
of Britain laid hold of it in
the reign of James I and in
the way typical of them,
welded it to their own idea
and made it their own. All
the same, it went through
much evolution.
It is, in effect, the mid-
winter carnival of the peo-
- pie. It occurs at Christmas
time, when nights are long
and days are short and
brightness and fun are need-
;ed. It is more likely that
this season has always had
some particular -festivity of
its own. The Greeks gave
It its name it derives from
two Greek roots, meaning I
Imitate All for panto-
mime does not need to be
speechless or mimed in-
deed, it never is.

TWoo Hundred Productions
This Year
Nowadays the subjects for
pantomime are the familiar
Fairy Stories and any de-
parture from them is dan-


gerous- aCinderellax is the
favourite, followed by such
tales as -Dick Whittingtonr,
Jack and the Beanstalks,
"Sleeping Beautyp, aMother
Goosen, B abes in the
Wood", Puss in Boots",
aRobinson C r u se and
aAladdin.n This year there
will be about two hundred
of them in Britain.

Pantomime has' to be to-
pical and comment on events
of the day which are in the
news. It also has to be lo-
cal in appeal. In the big
provincial cities of Britain
the comedians must be fami-
liar enough with local af-
fairs to .crack gags about
them. That topically is the
chief reason why the films
cannot make a job of real.
pantomime. It is also de-
sirable. to have a North
Country comedian in North
Country pantomimes and a
cockney comedian in Lon-
don. ,

All sorts of traditions are
peculiar to this form of en-


tertainment. There should
be a Fairy Queen. and a De-
mon King typifying the age-
old fight between Good and
Evil. The Fairy Queen
must only enter from the
right hand side of the stage
and never cross to the left;
the Demon must only enter
from the left hand side and
never cross to the right. That
is a link with the mediaeval
Miracle and Mystery plays,
in which the left hand side
of the stage was the side of
Evil and the right hand the


MAUD
MAUD


At the end of an old year
When I suffer most,
I felt a hope ...
That shall so brighten
the entering new one,
I feared ...
In Cod trust less I
Suffer more ...
Maud ...
That hope is you -
Happy New Yer ...
It is for us both ...

-JEHU.


territory of Good. The Fai-
ries and Demons are the
tImmortals. the rest of the
cast the uMortals' and
the uImmortalsn should al-
ways seak in rhymed cou-
plets.


Pantomime, of course, is
supposed to be a children's
entertainment, but, curious-
ly enough, it usually takes
at least four adults to accom-
pany each chid. This is an-
other tradition.


Ticklers .


. "Aw, he's eot holes in his head!"'


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