Arco Iris: Rainbow City High School Yearbook

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Material Information

Title:
Arco Iris: Rainbow City High School Yearbook
Uniform Title:
Arco Iris
Alternate Title:
Rainbow City High School Yearbook
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
Spanish
English
Creator:
Rainbow City High School
Publisher:
Rainbow City High School
Place of Publication:
Rainbow City, Panama Canal Zone
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Schools -- Panama -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Yearbook
Apex group
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Privately Held
Rights Management:
Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
System ID:
AA00015016:00008


This item has the following downloads:


Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Dedication
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Administration
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Faculty
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Organizations and clubs
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Graduates, 1949-1962
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
    Back Matter
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    Acknowledgement
        Page 117
    Back Cover
        Page 118
Full Text

"7Tis4te to oat
Edacatot" jI
i Siactf"


eS ,w 25, 2 06
R, of.6 Panama


77- .
" r .' ,








R4 Sgecial 74ad yuac

.. ... -- -- -- -.- -.-.






3 n honor, celebration, recognition anb memory
of the former ebucators
of *ilber City anb Rainboto Citp itg tb hools

2c, tle ttlbbcnt of tlt former irlier City aiib 3ainibow City 1)igl)
i'c !ool, take great picasure in bcbicating tlis; journal to Ullfreb fsborine
alb all tle former abuininitrators allb teatcerrs of saib institution luIjo teure
u;lttersftll in iniipleIrentihlg all effctibe rbticational program Oti our ibeIalf.
Qlle nccb to Ijonor our IjiFtorp is a focal anb bital tlicuil in tl)c preparation
of tlis jourital. Itt's a crdbration of tl)e rsurgenlre that tool root inl
iE t Oe l intullity bring tfl) 19405. it'5 the recognition of tle IjcroiSinl
inlgerent in the struggles aunb cdjalleingc by theses bolb klabcrs, to
Spearlcaib a billon to beterlin control of our oIllnIunll itp's blilnllbing
hIiglhr cbiurtional incbsg aib cxpcrtations;. lir jourtial is a 14-pear
pictorial, etlrilorp-lailn bisplap of tile lasting allb I)appp years of our
srlool life at tlj 6iltbcr Citp/1ainibou Citpy 0iglj. Tllc 14-pear periob
begins Wuitl tlhe first grabitatinlg Class of 1049 up to hie ClIs of ~ 1962.

We ar Trr tlI'1 a'ippOtitil'ir of our Cbllraors' wluloe -irairirb brar 1liion
iinb interest. ii liitIIIlitIlp bisplalrb oln 0111 brlilf iuthoiiu hoiilr
our forniitiD r Ir" ring vrairs. 'Rli tclrre Li no bou t. tiit ti r W ull i
altuiarps Iiiiriiib r our l 1ini1 lai trr i n 1b tir c rbilllin it p louibrb
witll apprfcltion, 'T at pribr. siltier grani' ibr mb li m li'ol l ,o :
--- 'iBNr
















As you know, ever since our forefathers came to Panama, in masses, to build
the Panama Canal in 1905, canal administration neglected the education of
black children born and raised on the Canal Zone. Curriculum for the CZ
Blacks had originally been the three Rs acquired through rote memory, a
course dictated to large classes. In the early 1930s they allowed West Indian
teachers in the all-black segregated schools to create a philosophy and curri-
culum tailored to the black community's needs. As such, schools became
beacons that guided the Canal Zone's West Indians throughout the stormy
1930s and 1940s. Alfred Osborne stood out as the leader in the so-called
colored schools. The son of a Canal Zone Principal, Osborne attended the
inferior school system, but completed high school in Chicago and be-
came a naturalized citizen. Upon his return to the CZ in the early 1930s,
he supervised normal schools where he developed a curriculum guide
and trained thirty-seven of the brightest first-generation black Panamanians
to be teachers. Alfred Osborne led what amounted to a philosophical reform
of the colored schools, and while his actual accomplishments remained
small, his efforts galvanized community leaders who were able to turn back
the tide of chauvinism and forged what became a politico-diplomatic alliance
that would prove powerful in the years following WWII.

The tenets of West Indian integrationism included: (1) incorporating the
best of British, American and Panamanian cultures into their own; (2) loyalty
to Panama as citizens; (3) using opportunities for individual and group
advancement in the Unites States; and (4) nonviolent and nonradical means
of promoting the interest of the community. This philosophy guided the
first-generation blacks in the Canal Zone and tended to undermine the
West Indian British culture brought from the Islands. This subculture was
considered necessary and, above all, a response to Panamanian chauvinism,
particularly after the 1941 Constitution and to American mistreatment.

The new teachers, along with other community leaders, embraced the integrationist
philosophy and disseminated it throughout the community.


fWeaw"c4 4 Sfd~ &WtR'e444 &4 l'ei Sedmts













In July 1942, Alfred Osborne, George esterman and Sydney Young of the Pa-
nama Tribune, and several others sponsored the Isthmian Negro Youth
Congress (INYC) as a Canal Zone Youth Club, specifically targeting unemployed
teenagers in the community. Their slogan "Progress Through Education,"
revealed that cultural and literary activities would dominate their agendas.
They hoped to create a healthy outlet for the energies of bright young
people and a spirit of pride in Negro history and in their own community.

Secretly, they hoped to obtain U.S. citizenship for those born on the Zone.
From 1942 to 1946 the INYC published a quarterly Bulletin whereby mem-
bers contributed articles, essays, poetry, and information of public interest.
Canal authorities approved of the INYC and provided some facilities in
the silver workers' clubhouse. The INYC helped pave the way for the first-
generation of West Indian descent to assume leadership of the community
after the war, and also convinced the authorities that the young people
could be committed and serious and warranted better educational facilities.

Leonora Jump and George Westerman collected funds to buy 1,000 books
emphasizing black studies and got the Canal authorities to open a public li-
brary in La Boca for colored students. Westerman also obtained autographed
photos of fifty prominent Black Americans, which he personally hung on the
walls of the library.

The graduates of the La Boca Normal School formed the Association of Co-
lored Teachers and submitted a long petition calling for both academic
and vocational secondary education. Simultaneously, they sponsored a
series of lectures and held meetings in the silver town site to build support
for high schools. They had suffered from poor schooling as children yet
had enjoyed the intellectual stimulation of La Boca Normal School. Their ideal
came from U.S. textbooks. No one told them that the books left out many
aspects of American life. They grew up with segregation and demeaning
treatment by whites. The British colonial tradition, while in many ways
as racist as the American, nonetheless, did not prepare the WIs and their
children for the personal humiliations of CZ life. Also, time and again pro-
mised improvements did not materialize, as one governor after another
broke the pledges of his predecessor. Behind each governor they could
see the mocking smiles of Metal Trade Councils (White union) leaders
who controlled day-to-day personnel policy. And the injustice continued!
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The schools themselves evolved in the late 1940s as the post war baby boom hit the schools
driving up enrollments in both the white and colored systems. The division between college-
bound white children and trade-oriented blacks persisted, but Johnson had higher skills in
mind for the latter. He raised the level of skills taught in high school and upgraded acade-
mic disciplines as well He set up a summer recreation program for colored children The Ju-
nior College curriculum consisted of wood and metal fabrication, motor maintenance service,
printing, book binding, sewing and needlecraft, business and office procedures, and home-
making skills and home economics where some of the teachers participated as well

Johnson hoped that his graduates would move up into middle-level jobs with the Canal
Johnson's promise of U.S. rate appointments for qualified persons spurred many to pursue
higher studies. Guillermina Jump, Aubrey Stewart and Emily Butcher obtained master's degree
at Columbia University. Others were assiduously at work on degrees throughout the U.S. Once
they qualified, however, most chose not to work in the segregated environment that prevailed on
the CZ. Of the group that trained in the early 1950s, only eight (0. Shirley, S. Springer, MvL Mulcare,
H. Parker, C, Whatley, R Beecher, E. Butcher) went back to the CZ schools, while others like
E. Gooden, Stewart and Ana Bennett got jobs in private schools in Panama, where their credentials,
experience and English skills were highly prized. Bennett recieved her degree from the Panama
University only to find that the Zone Administrators would not recognize her studies in Panama.
In the long run, the largest number simply stayed in the U.S. Indeed, the 1950s saw the beginning
of a brain drain from the Panamanian-West Indian (the "Criollos") community. Ana Bennett would
later return to the CZ colored school system.

Ironically, Supreme Court Justice William A. Douglas visited Panama at the invitation of the
State Department and President Rem6n. He later stated that the U.S. had an opportunity to
create an American showcase in the Canal Zone, but instead displayed discrimination "of the
worst sort." Sooner or later, NAACP lawyers, who had spearheaded the legal movement against
segregation, would find a case that could force the issue across the nation. Thurgood Marshall,
head of the NAACP Legal Defense, proved he had it in Brown v. Board of Education.





This history-making case resulted in the 1954 conversion of the colored schools to Spanish instruc-
tion by the governor at the urging of the white bigots in the racist Metal Trade Council Union.
It was a deliberate act to subvert the U.S. Supreme Court's "Brown v. Board of Education" ruling
that set aside the "separate-but-equal" doctrine and paved the way for full integration in the U.S.


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Red"storag -q t"-dde ist


Teachers were the ultimate keys to improving colored schools, and they struggled
to better themselves. These teachers began to pursue higher studies in La Boca
Normal School and the U.S. From 1943 on, La Boca offered in-service training that
raised most to high school equivalency level. They had a friend in Superinten-
dent Johnson, who gave the teachers backing and support. Although he did not
contemplate integrated schools, he clearly committed himself to equal ones.

This group of emerging leaders began to demand decent secondary
training for its children. Because of their efforts, the educational Mecca
for our generation was built in the heart of the tranquil town of Silver City.



i











Dr. Lawrence Johnson was responsible for designing, creating and esta-
blishing the high schools in La Boca and Silver City townships. He wrote
his dissertation for his Doctoral Degree on this magnificent accomplishment.

From 1948 on, the University of Nebraska conducted an interim program
which, when combined with summer studies in the U.S., led to a Bachelor's
Degree. In 1950 Superintendent Johnson converted the Normal School
to La Boca Junior College. Finally, a number of teachers, on their own,
enrolled in the University of Panama or other colleges. These initiatives
did much to improve the long-neglected colored schools.

NMeuun 1 S5att t Ww &t/ &4 2i Sed'4













The advent of Silver City High represented the new subculture that
began blending elements of West Indian, American and Panamanian
traditions into a diverse, very rich and enviable culture of their own.
















This pictorial journal is also a documented attempt at educating the younger gene-
ration, especially, and adults as well about the importance of this building as the
"cornerstone" of our history. It reveals how our West Indian ancestors defined and
passed on their legacy to us, the next generation, our own identity; which they
hoped we, their descendants, would carry on. Education was of prime value in the
community because it allowed us to break the chains of ignorance and tear down the
barriers that separated us from progress. At times, fortunaltey, it was the only part of
our lives we controlled that reaped immeasurable benefits.

The Silver City High School was completed in 1949 just in time for its first gra-
duating class, was renamed Rainbow City along with the community's name
change in 1954. Once a vibrant center of educational life for Panamanians of
West Indian origin, this educational Mecca is regarded as a living symbol of
our history and validates us as a people. We have been a vibrant and active
people invisibly woven into the tapestry of Panamanian life and history.

As it stands today, we dare say the building is deteriorated and in dire
need of restoration but, nonetheless, deserves landmark status.

tewsosee o Setfe 't4y/Itesm cfl WV't ScSMds










Ruromew" Z .ap -B #a F: -













j'I








Linda Browl v. Bd of Ed 1954

The teachers gave their best at performing such a difficult and unfamiliar task. Despite
impressive efforts, most teachers were not conversant nor fluent in Spanish. Therefore, it
was a struggle as teachers taught incorrectly and with much difficulty. They also lacked
text books, instructional material and teaching aid in Spanish. Officials then hapha-
zardly searched the files for correspondence requesting more Spanish and Panama-
history in the curriculum. Some of the teachers managed to teach in Spanish, but a few
(particularly the old-timers like Allan Forte and Harold Josephs) continued instructing
classes in English. Reportedly, Harold Josephs may have lost his teaching position be-
cause of his defiance in this regard. For the most part, the teachers created bilingual and
bicultural schools in defiance of Zone policy then.

One Principal would later explain, "In effect the program of instruction
which has evolved is made up of elements from U.S. programs of instruction and from
that of the Republic of Panama, with a strong North American flavor." If the governor
could subvert presidential orders, they could do the same with the governor's.

WewtU" 4 Siro" &/^Wf ^ &# Vq# Se"

































The following depicts the school administration staff since the Silver City High School was completed in 1949.
Dr. Lawrence Johnson was the Superintendent of CZ Schools in 1949. Upon his death in 1954, Sigurd Esser
replaced him until 1961 when officials decided to separate the two schools (US. & Latin American). A single
superintendent oversaw the work of two assistant superintendents. Alfred Osborne became the Assistant
Superintendent for the colored schools. Upon his retirement in 1969, he was succeeded by Ellis Fawcett,
who served for a few years and was replaced by Audley Webster. Eventually, with the closing out of the
Latin American schools, under the Department of Defense, Dr. Ruth Russell was promoted to be the
Superintendent of the Canal Zone School system, the first Black to be appointed to that position. There
were a few more Superintendents between the appointments of S. Esser and Dr. Russell we did not list

The first Principal of the Silver City High School was Charles Dubbs, followed by Charles Olson for a brief
period of time. Roscoe Haining replaced him in 1952 through 1956 when Owen B. Shirley became Principal
Upon Mr. Shirley's demise in 1958 Alfredo Cragwell was appointed, and when he took sabbatical leave
to get his Master's Degree, Carlos Vas filled his position briefly. Eventually, in the final days of RCHS,
Cragwell retired and Joselyn Barrowes became principal of both the elementary and the high school.

The first School Clerks of the Silver City High School were Maria Archer and Rodmel Pamther, replaced by
Dorothy Peat later Emilio Dixon and June Greaves.
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TiiH 1


Lrnrence Jolnson


Sigiir Esser


Ruth Russell


Ellis Fawcett


A-dhly IVebster
.Lr lsr


Sc44aa d~et


I Butcher


Aimla Be


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Page 2


Alf o ra ell
* Alfredo Crngwell


Carlos Vaz


Dorothy Pent


Emilio Dixon


Mari Archler


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Joselyn Barrowes


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We realize that this distinguished list of our teachers on the following
pages may not be all-inclusive. We apologize to anyone who may
have had a brief/short-lived teaching experience at the Educational
Meccas, especially at the Elementary and Junior High levels, but did not
have their photos taken for the yearbooks we used in preparing this
project. It's important to note also, that many of these teachers were
multi-faceted and taught more than one subject during their tenure
at the Silver/Rainbow City High Schools. We, however, listed them in
the Department where we most remember them for their contribution
and impact on our educational lives.

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S9ta SPfie4 Vep'ttmaes

--------AlsoO- -


Jiisto Arroyo
Spanish-Civics


Aim Benmett
English


Audley Webster
Spanish


Lucille Williams
English/Spanish


rin Hormeciea
Spanish


wCeiwesa of Stte &/IRaew &#e S'eP Sdeed


Svanisl


Enrique Quintero
Spanish








due.-ce Vq~efwea 1


Spencer Joseph
am I


Edward Dawkins


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nu-mrEF;'


Violet Chilcott


Holden Cockburn


L evteit'lllii tums


nttanl rorte


Wilnwoth Morrison


Aljonso Greaves


Sylvia Stoute


beryl Wtlluams


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Pastor Sanchez Sylvia McDonald Daniel Miranda



Edwardo Douge Beril Jordan

(SB


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Scial Stcadee


Hylton


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- ----- -------








ecatinwUca '94 Sef


Lyle Brown
Tailoring





Liai1 ouglas
Af Woodshop


Hugh Jones
Printing


O v


Ift i, Russell
i Woodslhop



Lorenzo TIWite
Bookbinding


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SI omeoo Miller
/ T \boodsholp


FredcriAn
R'odshcu


George Saudifob
Altoslho ,


Arcelio HfrM
Printing


MAlirice McLean
AutoShop


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!Wme Ecoowc4 VDepretment


This Monteza


Olive Hearns I


IElsinora Lynch.


Fladell Joseph


MAildred Bolt


S Gladys Sy
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4 s d, ~~I ,,d s


Diana Faria


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p~ ~eat~a_ ~cl~l~c


Clinton Parris


Ahston Looney


Harold Scott


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Estlher Stnart Rosalee Lowe


Lorna Willianms


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Alan Forte, Jr.










SwmCMai Poot StaW


Oscar Morrell

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Alma McPherson

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Harold Brown


Mr. Hultciiilntoin
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Ajandro "Pto" N llI
Alejan dlr "Palo" NcI 'beih/


Roberto Gill





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James Lynch


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George McFarlane Reno Patrick I


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Leafi DeSol
Svanish


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SL 'itsh
Spanish


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N. Frederick
Soc. Studies


NlT A vilai
Substitute


c ixon
Science


Ar-Pilosoenry
Art-Philosophy


Ernest7miee
Spanish


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Fiarl Dick
Spanish


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Art


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?/tadiC V~c~aQEteaCt


Emily Butcler
Alt sic Supervisor


Reginald T. Prescott


Kenneth Griffith


Viola Duncan


Edwiin Cobliam


The Music Department of the Silver City High was originally composed
of the School Band under the direction of Mr. Reginald T. Prescott, and
the Glee Club under the direction of Mr. Kenneth V. Griffith, with Mrs.
Viola Duncan, pianist. Besides participating in various school programs,
this department provided special entertainment during the Christmas
season and Music Week. These programs became increasingly popular and
the community looked forward to these musical presentations, especially
the Christmas pageants and the "caroling" from door-to-door at Christmas
time, with great interest and enthusiasm. The Glee Club originated in
1949 and the band in 1952; they both played a major role in the cultural
life of our school and community. In 1955, Mr. Prescott became the
Director of both departments and worked tirelessly to have each parti-
cipating student showcase their best musical talents and abilities.


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Sedool atd


1960


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Cheerleaders i' Wg


1955


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I 1955


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1953


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Reginald T. Prescott


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que nos


y la luz de tu faro,


iro, nos guiara.


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1958 Class Offcers
195& Class Officers


When Alfred Osbone brought the New School Educational Philosophy
to Panama, he knew that avocation shaped personality as much as
vocations and that it played a positive role in learning. These and
other elements of the "New School" movement opened Osborne's eyes
to the inadequacies of his generation's training in the Canal Zone.
Thus, he included Fraternity Clubs into the Zone schools' curriculum
to ensure that the students' personalities, skills and ambitions would
all interact with the environment to guide them into adulthood.
The following pages speak for themselves.

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The Student Association of the Rainbow City High School was or-
ganized in August 1949. The association was governed by a Board
of Directors composed of representatives who were elected from
each classroom. The association was the nucleus of all extra-curricular
activities of the students since it began to function. It benefitted
its members by partially financing the many activities in wluch
they engaged. It also sponsored several cultural and recreational
activities. "Amateur Nights" was one of the favorite activities of
the students, which were sponsored by this association. The
accomplishments of the association were largely attributed to
the indefatigable sponsor, Mrs. Lucille Williams, who guided the
group since its inception through 1954 After Mrs.Williams left
for the USA, Mr. Terry Butler assumed the responsibility of
continuing the guidance of the organization. In 1955, the students
of the junior High School were admitted as members of the
organization, with DuBois Andrews as co-sponsor.


DuBois Andrews


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Student Bo4 ls4eicatla


'~- ~-------- 95~


1956 La Directiva de la Sociedad
de Estuidiantes
The graduating Class of 1956 (left) was the
first graduating class under the newly
converted Latin American School System
The conversion changed names and pro-
cedures without altering segregation by race.


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H aMS&


" Bomberos"


Enjoying Carnival!
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dmarcm t iZet


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" Vilma Elliott


I Teen Trio


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The Club Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, was one of the most active
clubs of the Rainbow City High School. It made exclusive use of the
Spanish language during all its activities. Founded October 22, 1948,
the club was named in honor of Cervantes, the famous Spanish writer.
As its primary objective, the club encouraged speaking freely in Spanish
and as a result of the assiduous efforts of Mrs. Lucille Williams, the
sponsor, many students acquired greater facility in conversational
Spanish. By regular presentation of colorful programs, students derived
cultural and educational benefits regarding Panama. It concentrated on
"On the spot" studies of Panamanian geography, culture, and customs;
which were made possible through many field trips to the interior of Panama.


1953 Cervantes Club Student Body


4AVw d Se&.4 eeeIaW.tM4 5'4 SCdet4 \










eew~stes lued Stadet ~Arce


1955 Cenranles Club


-.


1956 Cervantes Chlu


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nal useu
Nlation~hn


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r(Jillilnr LIIf


San Lorenzo


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Tobacco plant


I














The Rainbow City High Biology Club
was organized August 1950, and be-
came affiliated with the Science Club
of America. The purpose of the club
was to foster a deeper appreciation of
the sciences and to give each member an
opportunity to exercise his/her skills and
abilities in resolving scientific problems.
The sponsor was Mr. Alfonso Greaves,
instructor of biology.











Biology Club outing- 1954

----------------o~=sSi(^a& --------------

74e Pawot

The Parrot came into existence in 1949
and was the voice of Rainbow City High.
It provided extensive news coverage of
school activities while improving the
students' composition skills. The Parrot
staff consisted of students from grades 9
through 12. The sponsor was Miss
Sylvia McDonald.


eWedm s ~. S4it4 d / IRaeSd & qel Sc6de


~__I~_ __












The Drama Club originated in September 1952 when a group of
eleventh grade students approached Mr. Horace Parker and requested
that he sponsor a school club which they hoped would promote
programs to develop proficiency in public speaking, a mastery of
the language, debating skills, poise and appreciation of modem and
classical literature. The club also presented humorous short plays
as well as writing and essay contests.
_" i PflIW


-ff Minniers of Lssay and Locithon Coltest 1952
2--- a^---- ---------

2cM~U e gtft .j


The Rainbow City "Square Steppers" was organized in 1952 by Mrs. Violet
Chilcott. The aim of the club was to provide wholesome recreation and
cultural awareness for its members.


%fote4 ow Sita &?iIeaw &aVO qi StuwU









S'Da"a et1cade'rea


Henry Morgan


Quadrille


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Bnlboa


Under the Palm Tree


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1953 Photo Club


of the club each year was to supply
Pictures for the school yearbook.


1960 Photo Club


Cleveland Ennis


rr ~nTlljf'll3ljf i


One of the oldest student organizations
was the Photo Club which came into being
in 1946 under the sponsorship of Mr.
Haining and the guidance of Mr. Cleveland
Ennis. The club provided the students with
the opportunity to learn more about
photography and to improve the quality of
their photographic work. One of the projects


1957 Photo Club


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Joselyn Barro


Elementr School Ilcons

URVi








,,s Dubois A
Mr. I Vilkie


Mr. Willie was the Principal of the SilverCity/Rainbow City Elementary Scools ever
since anyone can remember until 1963 when he was replaced by Joselyn Barrowes.
Dubois Andrews replaced Mr.Barrowes as Principal in 1967. Mr. Andrews also served
as the Principal of Santa Cruz Elementary School as well as at the Paraiso High School.

In the early days prior to Mr. Wilkie, other Principals of the Elementary School included
T.S. Johnson and James C. Webster (Audley Webster's father).






L oroth ennett Eva Tait


Dennis Josiah JolmT Evans


4wc SdU" /4IR^aN etA4 EcwfVif SeC"


U


nidrews


Randolph Brown






Oda Sd.ol 9rea*ds

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i '
i I -Iusc~~~


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aduates 1949 1962

.......__ -. -, J l


This section represents the graduating classes and their various school activities from the first
graduating Class of the Silver City High School to the graduating Class of 1962 of the Rainbow
City High School Of note, the Silver City High School was completed in 1949, just in time for its
first graduating class, which had a membership of 77 seniors. This graduating class did not
publish a yearbook, however, we are providing information regarding their Baccalaureate
Service and First Commencement in addition to listing the names of the graduates as well as the
original faculty staff listing.

In applying Alfred Osborne's philosophy of getting to know the geography, history, social studies,
culture and language of Panama; the graduating Class of 1949 formed the Miguel Cervantes Club
in October 1948. They were more known as an adventurous group. In that year they journeyed
for a three-day stay in Penonome; traveled to Chorrera, and also camped in Veraguas for three days.

W~9&4 *w SAM e W1 W* & 0V#4 ef S"ed4










1949 f9adaes




Silver City Occupational High School

Jaccalaureate berbices


9une 5, 1949
bree-t-irty o'clock
aft3

jirst Commencement

fte 12, 1949
Wo o'clock

Class of '49

Camp Bierd Theatre
1We"t 4 SOtn x %14 S;dd








Page 2


accaralaurate terbice
1. Invocation................................................Rev. Solomon Jacobs
St. Mary's. Silver City

2. Hymn.................. "Fairest Lord Jesus" ....................German
Class of '49 and Audience

3. Introduction of Speaker............................ Chas. A. Dubbs
Principal SCOHS

4. Baccalaureate Address....................Rev. Solomon Jacobs
St. Mary's, Silver City

5. Solo............ "If With All Your Hearts"............ Mendelson
Lloyd Edwards

6. Chorus..... "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God"..... M. Luther
Class of '49

7. Hymn........"Faith of Our Fathers"......... Walton & Henry
Class of '49 and Audience

8. Benediction...........................................Rev. Solomon Jacobs
St. Mary's, Silver City
*4uWCMM 4 SiC& e&4 Vid Sefd







1949 fadrcates
Page 3


first Commencement


1. Processional March, Pomp and Chivalry...............Roberts
SCOHS

Orade o P4eeu
The Class Officers
The Graduates, in alphabetical order
Rev. Raymond Lewis, C.M.
The Speaker and Vice-Principal
The Principal and Acting Superintendent
2. Invocation....................................Rev. Raymond Lewis, C.M.

3. Salutatory.................................Conrad C. Hinds

4. Chorus.... "God of All Nature"....Arr. by W. Loomis

5. Commencement Speeches.............................................
Theme
"The Community High School...Fad or Fundamental"
A. "Educational Demands on Our Growing Adult Population"
David Williams

~feau#t 4 SC eaf q -a SaMd






1949 9fiwdaawc
Page 4


^iet bm-meMccmeat (^Hu te

B. "The Community High School and its Offerings"
Esther Stewart

6. Solo................The Last Song"..............Paul Koepke
Cida Cadet

7. Introduction of Speaker .....................Chas. A. Dubbs
Principal, SCOHS

8. Commencement Address...................Calmer A. Batalden
Director of Vocational Education

9. Presentation of Class
to Acting Superintendent of Schools.........Chas. A. Dubbs
Principal SCOHS

10. Presentation of Diplomas.......................S. E. Esser
Acting Supt. of Schools

11. Valedictory .........................................................
Arthur Adams

'Memnie 4 Sd tw .. f SeLst







1949 9Paduates
Page 5


jfirt Commencement Continueb

12. Class Song......."Hail! Silver City"........N.L. Smith
Class of '49

13. Benediction..........Rev. Raymond Lewis, C.M.

14. Recessional...... "Farewell to Alma Mater"....Prescott
SCOHS Orchestra

The audience is required to remain seated until the
class has marched out.


uwaid s4 Sa t ea qI SJd







1949 faduates
Page 6


S2iEty O Occupw c 9at Hg Schoo/


Charles A. Dubbs
Owen B. Shirley
Walter D. Goring
Lyle F. Brown
Cleveland Ennis
Terry Butler
Alfonso Greaves
Hugh M. Jones
Fladell Josephs


Holden Cockburn
Leafy DeSousa
Laurin Douglas
Viola Duncan
Allan Forte
Bernado Tomas


0#16c


Roscoe F. Haining
Levi F. Olsen
Edwin R. Dixon
Spencer S. Josephs
Elsinora Lynch
Maurice McClean
Horace Parker
Frederick Roland
Lucille Williams


Kenneth Griffith
Harold Josephs
Violet Chilcott
Sylvia McDonald
Gladys Spencer
Maria Archer

-- Ca of 149


Conrad C. Hinds........................President
Irving Parnther.........................Vice-President
Manassa Garrick..........................Secretary
Arthur Adams....................... Treasurer


2XcgMe dg Sr t .a f Se4


SiPcag~ ~CC~ ~iO~ ~i9~








194Pae 7
Paige 7


1. Adams, Arthur
2. Andrews, Douglas
3. Babb, Bernice
4. Babb, Byron
5. Babb, Marcella
6. Bartley, Thomas
7. Beecher, Josephine
8. Best, Pearl
9. Brownie, Olga
10. Barnett, Agnes
11. Cadet, Cida
12. Clarke, Ines
13. Cooper, lona
14. Cox, Rachel
15. Douglas, Clarence
16. Dutton, Cecil
17. Dutton, George
18. Earle, Cleveland
19. Edwards, Lloyd
20. Erskine, George
21. Facey, Daphne
22. Ford, Hylton
23. Forde, Mavis
24. Forte, Mary
25. Francis, Pauline
26. Francois, Pauline


el4 4 1'49

27. Garrick, Manassa
28. Gittens, Leroy
29. Graham, Junius
30. Gray, Louise
31. Grazette, Aura
32. Henry, Lynette
33. Henry, Williams
34. Higgins, Roy
35. Hinds, Conrad
36. Him, Hazel
37. Hunter, Jasper
38. Jones, Elwyn
39. Joseph, Lloyd
40. Landers, Rudolph
41. Landry, Consuelo
42. Lovell, Bernice
43. Lowe, Rosalie
44. Mootoo, Albert
45. Mootoo, Allister
46. Morris, Gloria
47. Newell, Verona
48. Parnther, Irving
49. Pascal, Edith
50. Pent, Dorothy
51. Peters, Clinton
52. Phillips, Oscar


53. Quinlan, John
54. Rawlins, Henrick
55. Robinson, Edwardo
56. Robinson, Mazel
57. Robinson, Ruby
58. Russell, Carl
59. Russel, Frank
60. Savory, Edna
61. Scott, Beryl
62. Scott, James
63. Sjogren, Firpo
64. Skeete, Clarence
65. Small, Mercedes
66. Smikle, Mavis
67. Smith, Milicent A.
68. Smith, Milicent I.
69. Smith, Victor
70. Stewart, Esther
71. Thomas, Alsace
72. Thorne, Marion
73. Thorpe, Benjamin
74. Wallace, Oscar
75. Williams, David
76. Williams, Lillian
77. Worrell, Violet


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i


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Hal 1 l-ma ml-i-er to rour col-ors +k;+ AVd b. lue.-Witk


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-your

+orch a He |lith Vi\'l l-lu-rt;n tht niht for we iI, w ,*
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savot a#SA^tu


twtsrd u 4 a5 1&m, S& 4 %9'_sed


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W49 F--am

Page 8



__ -, ----- --
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1950 9~aa"uatc
Page 1


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Mlfjtb A~r~EJums







1950 adPaCtes
Page 2


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M EaIwAr*WAiOrn EjAH4WjlcH protdWijAm


Junie Jennings (Hector Lopez) went on to play baseball in
the Major Leagues with the Kansas City Athletics in 1955.
He was purchased by the New York Yankees in 1959 and
played in New York until 1966. Ted Williams named him
manager of the Washington Senators' Buffalo farm cub
in the International League in 1967.
Edward Griffith went on to become a teacher in the Latin
American School system. He taught Jr. High but left for the
U.S. in 1955 where he successfully made the transition from
education to politics and became an Assemblyman repre-
senting East New York-Brownsville area in the NYS Assembly.
He served for more than ten years in that office.


Valedictorian


Edgar Hawkins


. e.s.i o S .l e(4 .it i Sded.


*r
Amdw Smina










Page 3


The graduating Class of 1950 also did their share of traveling to the
Interior and other parts of Panama. The members of this class were
instrumental in the formation of the Silver City Student Association
Club, which was formed on August 25, 1949. They started Negro
History Week in February 1950 and sponsored a community program
called "Story of Negro" on the school grounds that was complimented
by spiritual songs by the Glee Club. They were also the first to conduct
"Amateur Contest" on school grounds. They incorporated the best of
British, American and Panamanian cultures into their own unique style.
Eia pl'es of Il \'st Iidial.-British, AIterica'I ,inld Painuaiaiian cultures:





(1) (2)













(1) In March 1950, Erna lamieson, winner of a popularity contest of the Silver
City I-gh, was crowned ERNA 1. Clad in a beautiful white gown, along with
her cape of royal red, and flanked on either side by her maidens and
their courts in by-gone days. (2) Couple seen dancing the "Tamborto" in the
Studv Hall. The female is dressed in her "Pollera," a lavish flounced
dress of appliqued or embroidered linen. The male's complimenting
costume is a long, fringed embroidered shirt called a "Montuno," with a
"Mochila," and a straw hat. (3) Girls seen practicing ballet.

jMMdU q Sdt. &4 2c Sedd









Page 2







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MAle*nA AHeftw oimph Hice HwturtAfIo he kWnmcr uRcn IHU AMfw Ionr Hab Laflwke

wKeww."a 4 Sdat  We# Sed.







1951 taduatges
Page 2
*S--c-----C
ft .^ ^ ^


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kchynPet lhynmiMytic RupacenNctcnn Leoomtor H 0ofPimie tnqt uinD HruIntrcce



S>tnkCtcc Ceor5eqB tuethylloch 1ascqu halr1tSamunck Dt Smith VivianSmfit
_~ _t ~Cr~ ~l aL1


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itt t
kncl Whitaker Nim Witans Nrma Williamv Elric Yask


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1951 5aIUaI te
Page3

onwor StwclfU




gilbert Brown Sten Bryan Clarles Myers Roderick -
3.9464 3.8983 3.7674 3.94<
Since the scores of each of these seniors had been outstanding, it was
not possible (before going to print with the 1951 yearbook) who would
be valedictorian or salutatorian. The most important thing was that they
all deserved credit and the respect of their classmates. The grade
averages indicated above for these individuals are based on a possible
straight "A" average of 4.000 honor points earned during the three
high school years.

Some members of the Class of 1951 (below) on the celebration of their
25th Reunion Anniversary in June 1976



1?AIf
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91








1951 Student d4aetftme


Tailoring
l&L


r.. fdd1q~.
.-~ &


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IF


Home Economics


Homle Econromrrics


A


Shop


WeMaies 4 e Raeaw &4 4 Se#d


;s~
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ja LP


~oll


~181


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i


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1951 "Saf* & ea4"


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.... .


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1952 paduatecs
Page 1
PSa 2 s



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bweUwiE *4 C Setum. e4 Ot se 5Cd






1952 fiadiates
Page 2



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VercMictAcicrkin chven Phillips Robert Portcrr Alvin Prsco Luis dllo Iris Qinlan Willian Rci






w _


1952 4saduae


Page 3


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EwCtee nmpso NWorni Timm Okstr Tnrotan Al'crt Tunr FrAMnkV wn El5rtVcera


Rucen Webstr "Adtur W kter vista WhlI e PMWdIilwv Enirnt W>l


(tb Womd) Hoice Womfl (scyh Yewoo


Ernest Jamieson (1) and Celia Forte (r) went on to
become teachers at the Rainbow City High School.
Jamieson was Salutatorian of the Class of 1952.


term*i 4 SaDu ta& ;;4 Se.t


C6ytP Watrmn








1952 .cIaduates
Page 4


Notables (onSt'd) Senior lass Odfiees
President William Reid, Vice-President Lloyd McClean,
Secretary Ernest Jamieson, Asst. Secretary Junie Scott
and Treasurer Silvia Carter.
Valedictorian


Hi rolF Brow, went on to
become a Physical Educa-
tion Instructor at tihe RCHS.


Edgar Daiuk'ins


Some members of the Class of 1952 (below? celebra
25th Reunion Anniversary in Jlue 1977.


mc~rssic~ ~ SiCrcz Oir~ ~v~e SL~baC







195f Sced dcCwce vSU


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1953 wraduPate
Page 1


~


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Altajl








1953 fadaa4te
Page 2


Seyw' e1444 Oj(4eel


Vicior STiitiPri f, A F'-'esident,
Judith Aiedee Secretary-Treasurer and Lloyd Smith
Business Manager.


Many of the members of the Class of 1953 (as well as the following
Class of 1954) were volunteers
in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict


reimaes oj Sdcot e&# ?iQt Sepdt





* -~ -. 'I


1953 '" s 7o"
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1954 f udat

Page 1


Keith Ctrke




Eis forks


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CflCover EMArChAbers Victor Clark


AlHreD Dutt %A




Eutocc HA
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1954 9paduates
Page 2


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WCrbcvrni CAiulCI^n Ccci


:. *.-" ', ',K.


' q l


Wilfred McLeod, President Edna Stephens,
Secretary; George Small, Treasurer.


W.WMUi 4 4arm ^y a c Sedot









1954 Student dctawtes





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1955 dPagte 1
Page 1


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1955 padEate s
Page 2


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Student Speaker


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1956 9radaates

VediEcati


In August 1954 the evildoers began their devious conversion plan for the Rainbow
City High School when they converted grades K through six to Spanish instruction
In July 1955, they converted grades seven to eleven to Spanish instruction. Thus,
the graduating class of 1956 (February) was the first to publish their yearbook in Spanish.
The following represents their Dedication page of the yearbook:

VDedeaou

El empehoso esfuerzo desplegado por nuestros profesores en la conversion de
nuestros cursos de la lengua inglesa a la lengua espafiola, que ahora es la
official del plantel, ha sido un acontecimiento spectacular, digno de admi-
raci6n y alabanza.
Si no fuera por la uni6n y cooperaci6n de nuestro director, nuestros profe-
sores, y nuestros compaiieros, no hubiera sido possible el triunfo obtenido
durante el afio pasado, lo cual sera un hecho inolvidable en la historic de
nuestra escuela. Pues s61o una labor con resultados concretos puede ayudar
a alcanzar la meta softada-Una Nueva Sociedad.
Por lo tanto, nosotros, los Graduandos del '56, dedicamos este.anuario con
hondo agradecimiento a los que supieron hacer frente a un desafio y triunfar
para mantener en su alto pedestal la educaci6n de la juventud.

VDedewawt

The steadfastness of purpose displayed and the unswerving efforts made by our teachers du-
ring the past year in meeting the challenge of converting our curricula from the English
language to Spanish are worthy of high commendation.
Because the success of this conversion could be realized only through the wholehearted
cooperation of our principal, teachers, and students, we, the members of the graduating
class, dedicate with great pride our 1956 Apex to both the faculty and student body for a
job well done.








56 44adat44

Page 1


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1956 padEuat e
Page 2


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G" CCtak Ci oft D
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f Irr Ir 7 ii


AiLCetta iLJosclr i
Va11edictoritnm


Sali 'tatorianii
Salutatorian


kjeorge tirl'rson
Student Speaker


ESt eld E Ste as& o4 '56


Standing left to right: Euclid C. Tordan, Irwin A, Nhgnott, William G. Frederick Jr.,
Alexander Heron, and Basil A. Thomas (insert). Kneeling: Patrick A. Quinlan.
Insert upper left: Eddie Cover. Not pictured: Eddie Clark and Cristopher Robinson.

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Page 2





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Mcrtly Scott 1tolph Simom Haiob Smith C6te Stutt tyc Thomras CAbs Thor Crimstina Vasqze




WORM $Hc00WeWcum u iceWIihArn
Notables
June King went on to become a
School Clerk and Ruth Blackmani
became a Librarian of the RCHS.


Ilrtn'il' teUwa
VIIldedictorian


Stl tntorin
Salutatorian


Class Speaker


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Ivan oe E. Frederick ,liceiif.urelieii Jonn iwai e
Valedictorian Class Speaker Salltatorian
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Page 2 I


4 44-
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Violet Mxwell



Yvonme Sisnett


SI
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frAwcis jolliffc Caen McCourtN Ewin Jocs Pe, Focph


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Page 3
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Va Youi Ricakr Tlentson LioIndTho GkniUll Walk FrankWam~r


Kenncth Watso


Alet Wclkh L1to Wiso


Lionetl ergtus
Valedictorian


Lionel King
Satltatorian


Roger Pesson
Class Speaker


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Page 1


apoleon Ashby Diana Bptite


Annette Cordova


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1960 q4aduates

Page 2


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Litwl> Sitkc ArkccSiwn


Abina Smith ArnSwmith MAiSActiSmHih DavM*Srti


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1960 raduates
Page 3


DirsI1 Su~vc


IoAn WArri EAdr WAtrAn CAtol Whit Ce ill White WiliAm Woob

?one Stadentsu


Arlelne Sinimons
Salutatorian


Valedictorian


Student Speaker


mftrrs" ib R4aidw &Cf ..t See9


___l_VI__











1960 Student 4cldtecs


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Full Text

PAGE 1

.. ..

PAGE 2

]n onor crlehratlon reco nltlon anb memor.v of t r formrr of QCtt J anb RainboW QCitp ? i :-oo[g illr, tlJr of tiJC fortncr QI:1tp anb 31\ainuow Qfitp till\c great pleasure in bcbiciltinu tfJi5 journal to Urcb shornc nnb all tiJC fortncr llnb tcnr(Jcrs of saib institution w[Jo wcrr successful in i1nplctncnting rtn tffcrtiuc cburational pro{tt'
PAGE 3

r----------------------------------------------------------------------------------' . : . . . . . . . . . . . . . : . . . . . . . . . . . . t . . . . . As you know, ever since our forefathers came to Panama, in masses, to build the. Panama Canal in 1905, canal administration neglected the educationof black cluldren born ru1d raised on the Canal Zone. Curriculum for the CZ Blacks had originally been the three Rs acquired through rote memory, a course dictated to large classes. In the early 1930s the)' allowed \'Vest Indian teacl1ers inthe all-black segregated schools to create a philosophy and curriculum tailored to the black conm1.unity's needs. As such, schools became beaC011S tl'lat guided. the Canal vVest It"ldians throughout the stormy 1930s at'ld 1940s. Alfred Osborne stood out as the leader in the so-called colored schools. Tl1e son of a canal Zone Pri11cipal, Osborne attended .the inferior school S)rstem but completed high school in Cl1icago and be. came a naturalized citizen Upon his return to the CZ in the early 1930s, he supervised normal schools where he developed a curriculum guide and trained thirty-seven.of the'brightest first-generation black Pan ians to be teachers. Alfred Osborne led "\vhat amoUnted to a philosophical reform of the colored schools, and while .lus actual accomplishments remained small, his efforts galvanized community leaders who were able to turn back the tide of chauvinism and forged what became a politico-diplomatic alliance that would prove powerful in the years following vvWII The tenets of vVest Indian integratiorrism included: (1) incorporati11.g the best of British, An1.erican ru1d Panamania11 cultures into their own; (2) loyalty to Panama as citizens; (3) using opportunities for individual and group advancement in the Unites States; and (4) nonviolent and nonradical means of promoting the interest of the community. This philosophy guided the blacks in the Canal Zone and tended to undermine the vVest Indian B ritish culture brought from the Islands. This subculture was considered necessary and, above all, a response to Panamruuat1 chauvinism, particularly after the 1941 Constitution and to American mistreatment The new teachers, along with other community leaders, embraced the integrationist philosophy and disseminated it throughout the community

PAGE 4

In July 1942, Alfred Osborrte, George esterman and Sydne)r Young of the Pa nama Tribune, and several others sponsored the Istlunian Negro Youth. Congress (INYC) as a Canal Zone Youth Club, specifically targeting unemployed teenagers i11. the conununity. Tl1.eir slogan "Progress Through Educatio11.," revealed that cultural and literary activities wot.tl.d dominate their agendas. They hoped to create a healthy outlet for the energies of bright young people a11.d a spirit of r'ride in Negro history and in their own comn1.unity. Secretly, they hoped to obtain tJ.S. citizenship for those bor11 on tl1.e Zone. From 1942 to 1946 tl1.e INYC publisl1.ed a quarterly Bulletin whereby members contributed articles, essays, poetry, and information of public i11terest. Cartal authorities approved of tl1.e INYC and provided some facilities0i11 the silver workers' clubl1.ouse. The INYC l1elped pave the way for the firstgeneration of West In(..iiru1 descent to assume leadership of the corrunt.mity after the war, and also convi11.ced tl1.e autl1.orities that th e }Tou11.g could be corrunitted at1(..i serious and warranted better educational facilities Leottora Ju1np ru'ld George Westerma11. collected func:ls to buy 1,000 books emphasizing black and got the Ca11.al authorities to open a 1-,..,ublic library in La Boca for colored students. Westerman also obtained autograpl1ed photos of fift) r promi11.e1'lt Black Americans, vvhich he perso11.ally l1.ung on the walls of the librarv. ,./ The graduates of the La Boca Nornw.l School formed tl1e Associatio11. of Colored Teachers artd submitted a lo11.g petition calling for both academic and vocational secondary education. Simultaneously, tl1.ey spo11.sored a series of lectt.rres and l1eld meetings i11. the silver to, ,vn site to buil(..i st.tPI'ort for high schools. They had suffereti fron1 poor schooling as children yet l1.ad e11jo;reti tl1.e i11.tellectual stin1.ulation of La Boca Norn1al School. Their ideal came from U.S. textbooks. No one told them that the books left out man)' aspects of An1.ericru1life. Tl1.ey grew up witl1. segregatiort ru1.d demearung treatment by whites. The Britisl1. colonial tradition, "'rhile in ma11y ways as racist as tl1e American, I"l011.etheless, did not prepare tl1e V\'ls and their cluldre11 for tl1.e personall1.umiliatio11.s of CZ life. Also, time and again pron1ised itnprovements did 11.ot materialize, as 011.e. governor after another broke the pledges of his predecessor. Behinli each governor they could see the n1ocking smiles of Metal Trade Councils (\-Vhite wuon) leaders who controlled day-to-qay personnel policy. And the injustice continued! f l : % t t : I :. t } l : i f 1 i ? t f ( l I t l f l l l } : I } i : t I l } f f f t

PAGE 5

The schools themselves evolved in tl1e late 1940s as the post ""7ar baby boom lut the schools driving up enrollments in botl1 the white and colored systems. The d.ivisio11 betwee11 collegebound white and trade-oriented blacks persisted, but Johnson had higher skills ill mind latter. He raised the level of skills thaught in high scl1ool anti upgraded academic disciplines as welL He set tlp a sununer recreation progrrun for colored children T.l1e Junior College curicultnn co11Sisted of WOOll and n1etal fabrication, motor 1naintenru1ce service, pril1ting, book bindi.n& seV\:ring and needlecraft, business atld office proceliures, ru1d l1on1e making skills and home economics vvhere sotne of the teachers 11articipated as well. Johnson hoped his .graduates would move up into tniddle-level jobs \o\rith the Canal Jolmson's promise of U.S. rate appointments for qualified persons spurred man}r to pursue higher studies. GuilletnlinaJump., i\ubrey Stewart and Ernily Butcher obtained n1aster's tiegree at Colum.bia Others. were assiduously r at V\rork on degrees tl-rrougl1out the U.S. Once they qualified, however, most chose not to work in the segregated environment that prevailed on the cz ... Of the group that trained in the early 1950s, only eight (0. Shirley, S. Springer, !vi. ivlulcare, H. Parker, C. vVhatley, R Beecher, E. went back to the CZ schools, \vhile others like E. Goodertf SteV\rart and Bennett got. jobs in private schools in P at1an1a, wl1ere their creder\tials, experience and English skills were prized. Be1mett recie ved her degree from the Panama University ortly to find that the Zone Administrators would not recognize her studies in Panama I11 the long ru.n, the largest 11urnber simply stayed in the U.S. I11deed, tl1e 1950s saV\7 the beginnitlg of a brain drain fron1 the P \Vest Indian (the "Criollos") commurrity. i\na Beru1ett would later return to the CZ colored school system. Irani<; ally, Supreme Court .Justice vVilliam A. Douglas visited Panama at the invitation of tl1e State Department and President Remon He later stated that the U.S. hati ru1 opportunity to cre ate an.lt\merican showcase in the Canal Zone, but instead displayed discrimination ''of the vvorst sort." or later, lawyers, who had s1'earheaded the legal movement against segregation, -would find a case that could force the issue across tl1e natiort. Thurgood Mru"shall, head of the N i\ACP Legal Defet1Se, proved he l1ad it in Brovv11 v. Board of Education I l I I I ..... -.. = .....;..,. ..... .... c ,.. . . . . . This history-m case resulted in the 1954 conversion of the coloreli schools to Spanish instruction by the governor at the urging of the white bigots in the racist Metal Trade Council Union It was a deliberate act to-subvert the U.S. Supreme Court's "Brovvn v. Board of Education" ruling that set aside the "separate-but-equal" doctrine and paved the way for full integration in the U.S.

PAGE 6

Teachers were the u ltitnate keys to improving colored sc h ools, and t he)r struggled to better tl1emselves. These teachers began to pursue l1igl'ler studies in La Boca Normal School at'ld tl'le U.S. From 1943 Ol'l, La Boca offered i11-service training that raise<..i most to lugl1 scl1ool eqt.tivalency level They had a friend in Superintendent Jolmson, who gave tl1.e teachers backi1 1 g and st.tpport. Altl1ougl1. he did i1ot contemplate integratet.i scl1.ools, l1e clearly con-unitted lumself to equal o n es Tl1is group of emerging leaders began to den1a11.d decent secotldar)' 0 trai11ing for its children. Because of their efforts, the educational Mecca for our get1eratio11 vvas l'1uil t in the l1eart of tl1e tranquil town of Silver OCi ty. -.... re -.. .,..-.... ....... ---1 0 ... I I I 0 : .. \ 0 j } \ 0 0 Dr. Lawrence Jol111.son was respo11sible for designing, creating a11 d establishing the l'ligh schools in La Boca atld Silver City townships. He wrote lus t:lissertatiot'l for lus Doctoral Degree Ol'l this magnificent accomplishtnent. Fron'l1948 011, the U11iversity of Nebraska conducted an it'lterim program which, w l'len con1bined with summer studies in tl'le U.S led to a Bachelor's Degree. I11 1950 Superit'ltendent .T olmsot'l co11verted the Normal School to La Boca J urtior College. Fit1ally, a nun'lber of teacl1ers, Ol'l their own, enrolled it'l tl1.e Utuversit)r of Patlat'l"la or otl1er colleges Tl1ese i11.itiatives di(.i mucl1 to improve tl 1 e lot1g-t1eglected colored schools. r i f t t 1 i t i f 1 t t J 1 t i f f I : 1 i i ( t : i

PAGE 8

' l ) \ ( 1 l t I \ I ) ) Liltdn Bronru. v. Bd of Ed-1954 The teachers gave their best at perfor111ing such a difficult and urtfanuliar task. Despite impressive efforts, 111ost teachers were n()t cot1versant 11or fluent in Spruusl1. Tl'lerefore, it was a struggle as teachers taugl1t incorrectly and with n'lucl'l difficulty. Tl'ley also lacked text l'1ooks, i11structional nLaterial and teachit'lg aid i11 8}-"'lanish. Officials tl'let1 hapha zardl}r searched the files for correspondence requesti11g more Spatusl1 and Panamahis tor) in tl1e curriculun1.. Some of the teachers managed to teach in Spru.1isl1, but a fe-vv (particttlarl;r the old-ti111ers like Allart Forte ru1d Harold Josephs) conti11ued i11structing classes i11 E11glish. Rer>ortedl)r, Harol<..i. Josephs 111a)7 l1ave lost his teaclu11g position be-cause of l1is defiru1ce in tl1is regard. For tl1e n1ost part, tl1e teacl1ers created bili11gual artd bicultm1al scl1ools i11 <..i.efiartce of Zone policy then. 011e Principal would later explain, "In effect tl'le program of instruction '"'lucl1 has evolved is n1ade up of elen'lents from U.S. programs of iilstruction and from tl1at of tl1e Repul"'lic of Panama, with a strong North American flavor." If the gover11or could sul.,vert presidet1tial orders, they could do tl1e same with the gover11or's

PAGE 9

The following depicts the school adlninistration staff since the Silver City High School was conlpleted in 1949. Dr. Lawrence Johnson was the Superintendent of CZ Schools in 1949. Upon his death in 1954, Si Esser replaced hin1 Wltill%1 when officials decided to separate the two schools (U.S. & Latin American). A single superintetldent oversaw the work of two assistattt superilttendents. AHred Osborne became the Assistailt Superintendent for the colored scltools. Upon his retirement in 1%9; he was succeeded by Ellis Fawcett, who served for a few years and was replaced by Audley Webster. Eventually, with the closiltg out of the Latin An1erican schools, under the Department of Defense, Dr. Ruth Russell was pron1oted to be the Superintendent of the Canal Zone School system, the first Black to be appointed to that position. There were a few more Su tendents between the appointn1ents of S. Esser and Dr. Russell we did not list. The first Principal of the Silver City High School was Charles Dubbs, followed by Charles Olson for a brief period of time. Roscoe H8ining replaced him in 1952 through 1956 when Owen B. Shirley became Principal Upon Mr. Sllirley's demise in 1958 Alfredo Cragwell was appointed, and when he took sabbatical leave to get his Master's Vas filled his position briefly. Eventually, in the final days of RCHS, Cragwell retired and Joselyn Barrowes became principal of both the elementary and the high scl\ool The first School Oerks of the Silver City High SChool were Archer and Rodntel Pamther, replaced by IIIII Ill I II 1111 111111111 Ill Peat, later Dixon II IIIP"'I Ill lUI

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I

PAGE 12

Page2 I ........,.. t...,.. ----., .,.. 1 .. I I l \ l I J i I I I < \ J \ I 1 I J I 1 I ( { I I I 1 } r \ J I .l 1 I J \ c f j 1 t c --, -----Orve11 Sltirley AI:fredo Cragcuell I ..., __ ., ,..., ......... "'" \ t I I \ I I t { I I i ) ( I I I I I \ I I { I t r ( i I I I \ ( I I I \ I I J l l } ( { I I \ I ( l ) I ( { I I } Carlos Vnz Josel}fll \ } I ( I ( Dorotl!y P e at En1 ilio Di:xo1t ... -._._. ... _......._ _,..,.._ .. ... _., Mnrin Arclte r

PAGE 13

: . . : . I : i < We realize that tllis distiJ.1guished list of our teadters on tl1e followiltg pages n1ay llOt be all-inclusive. We apologize to atlyone wl10 ntay have had a brief/ short-lived teaching experietlCe at the Educatio11al especially at tile Elementary a11d Junior High levels, but did 110t have tll.eir photos take11 for the yearbooks we used in preparing this project. It's intportant to note also, that many of these teachers were n1ulti-faceted rutd taught n1ore tl1a11 011e subject during tl1eir te11ure at the Silver/Raiilbow City High We, l1owever, listeti the111 ilt the Departttte11t wl1ere we n1ost remen1ber them for tl1eir contribution and inl.pact on our educational lives. 1 I

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PAGE 15

l t "' 1 ) : ,. .. l tis l 1 E1triq1te Q ui1tftfro Sptrrtisl't trrnt1t ttge ..... .... tish A udley v\kbster Sprutislt fl111S t-lvint l 1 or nee En. Lucille Tr'Vtllin 11ts E 1 tglish/Sprutis1L ]11sto Arroyo Spf11Li s/1-C iv i c s ...... ... A1u1 Beunett E1tglisl1 Froilnrt Spmtis1L

PAGE 16

S pe-11 cer Jose p 11 Dorotltt Pi Tern B'lttle r Art 1 til r l\t111'11 ge Ed1oarti Dnloki1LS

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I 1 1 1 r .I l ( j i "' 1 >' ( h .. ..... 1" ?" I Violet Clt. ilcott Cecilio T!Villiatns AllaJl Forte I 1 "'J..I .f I Wilrnoth Morriso J L Alfonso Greaves Sylvia Sto'IJ.te Beryl Williauts

PAGE 18

..... .. ... ;.;, -.,. .. ----.......... ._ J .._ __ ".-"" .......... .... .... 4 "' ) : { i \ J J .. I J ., \ { l \ : < < ;r- I ....Ill ... _....... ... .-. ... 1Wf"" ,,..__ --- ,..,..........a Pastor Sn1'1 cllez l\1cDoruzld Da1Liel Miratldn .. Ettruardo Doztge Beril ]ordrzJL

PAGE 19

Bertluz Hylton osep L

PAGE 20

Lyle Bro'lOJl Tniloriug I I I .___,OJtglns vVoodsliOJ1 H1tglL ]o11es Printittg Arce lio SOIL Prill tiug lvLn1. ric e lvicLen 1 I A utoSllop Leslie Tl1o11ln INootlsliOf1 I I A Miller ... yVoodslwp t vVoodsJ.-.J George A ltloslJo{' :P .... R1-tssell LoreJLzo JJ\Taite Bookbitzdi1zg

PAGE 21

Olive .Heaf:JLS Diana Farin .. : t .. .. .L ._ Fladell ]o'sep/1 ,r :lvfiltired Bolt -' -'"' .. t T.Jmis lvfoJLteza Elsi11.ora. LytJclJ --------. Gladys Spettcer I I I l i I I I i l I I I I I I l I I

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Cli1ttort Pa rris AltstoJL Loo11ey Oscar Morrell HnrolrJ Scott Harold B ro'l01l Lor11n l:Villin1us AlnJI Forte, Jr. I Estl1er Shtart Rosnlee Lozve

PAGE 23

Oscar-lviorrell .. George .lvlcFarlarze J y .; ) '"r Alu1. n l\1cP l1erso n Harold B rorvr1 I . . I : I I I i i i f i I --......... ,.u ..... ..... ................. .................. '' ......................... 0 0 AlejaJtdro "Pnto-" Ne. ivball ,. ... All ----._. ....... --....7 <.1 { ( Reru) Pa{rick:

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f Srznn1e ete SJ)(1Jiisll Leaf.t DeSo1tsa pa1tis/L R u by 1 s Art N. Fre e rick Soc. St-udies L 'lllS Jllitll Spa1tislz 1 1n .t4.vila Sttbstitlt te E11l iX01'l Scietlce Pllilli p eJtry ArtPlt Ertte st 11111ie so1t SJJn1t islt C ecz ants ea r Dick S]?tzJtislL Spattisll 1

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1960 Clleerlentters 1955 1962 I I I I I t I

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1953 1955 1962

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... La esperanza y Ia con y Ia luz de -tu farO, (CORO) Regi11ald T. Prescott 1 i as lea -tad. l nro, nos gu1ara.

PAGE 29

' ; i . ': When Alfred Osbo1ne brought the New School Educational Philosophy to Panama, he knew that avocation shaped personality as n1uch as vocatiotlS and that it played a positive role in leatning. These and other elements of the "New School" movement opened Osborne's eyes to the inadequacies of his generationts training in the Canal Zone. Thus, he included Fraternity Clubs into the Zone schools' curricult1n1 to ensure that the students' personalities, skills and anbitions would all interact with tl1e environn1ent to guide them into adulthood. The following pages speak for themselves I I I

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PAGE 31

]he. Studetlt of the RaiJ.lhoV\r City HighScl1ool was or ganized inAugust -1949. The association was govemelt by a Board of Directors composed of representatives '\-vho V\' ere elected from each classroom. Tl1e association vvas the nucleus of all. extra-curricular activities of tl1e stude11ts since it began to function It l1enefitted its n1embers by partiall} r fancing the n1any activities in wluch they engaged. It also sponsored several cultural and recreational activities Nights" was one of the favotite activities of the studet1ts, which were.spot1SOred by this .associatio11. The accon1.plishments of tl1e association '.vere largely attributed to tl1e indefatjgable Mrs. Lucille William.s( who gtti.ded the group since its inception tltrough 1954. After Mrs. \VillianlS left for the U$A, Terry Butler assumed the responsibility of continuing the gttid ance oft he organization In 1955, the students of tl1.e Junior High School were adnlitted as members of the Andre"vs as co-sponsor. .. .. T ernJ t.l tler .. ,;.> ., L1tcib""' vvi lin111. s Dt-tBois Arttt're'lvs

PAGE 32

,.. ) 1956 Ln. Di'rectiva de Ia Sociednd de Estlld :iarJtes Tl1e graduating Class of 1956 (left) was the first graduating class under the newly converted Lati11 American School System The conversion changed 11ames and pro cedures witl1out altering segregation by race.

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"Bo111beros '' Guardia Nacional. Enjoyi11g Ca rnival! __ ........... __ -t ea, s

PAGE 35

S/ 17Vert0h ,Jes. Teert Trio 3 !;I Vil111n Elliott

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The Club Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, was one of tl'le most active clubs of tl1e Rainbow City Higl1. School. It made exclusive use of the Spanisl'll a ngt.tage t.iuring all its activities. Founded October 22, 1948, the club was named in honor of Cervantes, the famous Spanish writer. As its primary objective, tl1.e club encouraged speaking freely in Spanish and as a r esult of the assiduous efforts of Mrs. Lucille \Villiams, the spot'lSor, mru1.y stude11ts acquired greater facility in conversational Spanish. By regular presentatio11. of colorful programs, students derived cultural and educational benefits regarding Panama. It co11centrated on "On tl1e spot" stu<..-lies ofPanamat1ia11 geography, culture, and customs; whic h were ntade possible through mart} fiel<..i trips to tl1e interior of Panama 1953 Cervnntes Cl1tb Shut e Jit Body f I l } i l l I J I I J

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1955 OulJ 1956 CenJn'Jttes Cl1tb ar1a11ta-VieJo a'tl

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Free Zone Cervecerin NacioJlnl Gailla r Snu Lor e uzo ------------.iiiiiiiiiiiiii----------Tobacco plrntt t i I f J 1 I I I I j i ) l l I j f t i i J i I i I I

PAGE 39

The Rainbow City Higl1 Biology Club was organized August 1950, ru1d became affiliated vvith the Science Club of America. Theptlrpose of the club was to foster a deeper a1-1preciation of the sciences and to give each n1.ember an opportunity to exercise his/ her skills and al?ilitie s in resolving scie11.tific prol,len1S The spo11$.or-was l\!Ir. Alfonso Greaves, : ir\structor of biology. .)1' Biolog);Cl-ub 01ltin, g -1954 Tl1e Parrot crune into existe11.ce in 1949 and was the voice of Rainbow City Higl1.. It provided extensive nevvs coverage of school activities while improving the stu<..ients' composition skills. The Parrot staff consisted of stude11ts from grades 9 tltrough 12. Tl1.e sponsor was Miss Sy I via McDonald.

PAGE 40

The Drama Club originated in eptember 1952 when a group of e leve nth grade students approached Mr. Horace Parker and requested that he sponsor a school club which they hoped '-vould promote pro grams to develop proficiency in pul1lic speaking, a mastery of the language, d.ebating skills, poise and appreciation of modern and c lassical literature. The club also presented htnnorous short plays as well as writing and essay c ontests. Wiuners nud Elocution Contest -1952 Th e R a inbow Cit y "Square Steppers" was organized in 1952 by Mrs. Violet C hilcott. Th e ain1 of the club was to l"'rovide wholesome recreation and cultural awareness for its metnbers.

PAGE 41

Qt. tadrille He11ry MorgaJL Balboa Under the. Palnz Tree

PAGE 42

1953 Photo Cl1tb 1960 Pl1oto CZ.ub 011e of tl1e oiLiest student orgarrizatio11s "''as the Pl"loto Club wllicl1 can1e i11to bei11g in 1946 Uitder tl1e sponsorship of Iv1r. Haini11g and the guidance of1v1r. Cleveland Eru1is. Tl1e club provided tl1e students witl1 the opportunity to learn more about photograph)' ru1d to improve the quality of tl"leir photograpllic '"'ork. One of tl1e projects of the club each year was to supply pictures for the school yearbook .. ClelJe la11. d E 1 nris 1955 Plzoto Clttb 195 7 Photo Clllb

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PAGE 45

'. II\ '!'his section graduati.I1g classes and their various school activities from the first graduatiltg Class of tl1e Silver Oty Higl1 School to the graduati11g Oass of 1962 of the Rainbow City High Scltool Of note, the Silver City High Scl1ool was contpleted in 1949, just in tinte for its first graduati.I1g class, whicltltad a n1entbersllip of 77 se1liors. Tilis graduati.J.1g class did 11ot publish a Jrearbook, however, we are providing information regarding tl1eir Baccalaureate Service a11d First Conmlencen1e11.t i11 additio11 to listittg tl1e 11ames of tl1e graduates as well as the original faculty staff listing. Ii1 applying Alfred Osborne's plillosopl1y of gettit1g to kt1ow tl1e geograplty, ltistory, social studies, culture and lmtguage of Panama; tl1e graduating Class of 1949 formed tl1e Miguel Cervcmtes Club n1 October 1948. They were n1ore kt10WI1 as an adventurous group. h1 that year tl1ey joun1eyed for a tluee-day stay in Pe11onome; traveled to Chorrera, rutd also cantped in Veraguas for tluee days. I

PAGE 46

I

PAGE 47

o'clock o'clock

PAGE 48

Ptzge 2 f I 1. Invocation ................... ............................. Rev. Solomon a cobs. St. Mary's. Silver Ci 2. Hymn .................... "Fairest Lord esus" .................... German Class of '49 and Audience Principal SCOHS 4. Baccalaureate Address ..................... Rev. Solomon acol1s St. Mary's, Silver Ci 5. Solo ............ "If ith All Your Hearts" ............ Mendelson Lloyd Edwards 6. Chorus ..... "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God" ..... M. Luther Class of '49 7. Hymn ........ "Faith of Our Fathers" ........ Class of '49 and Audience 8. Benediction ........................................ Rev. Solomon a cobs St. Mar 's Silver Ci

PAGE 49

Ptzge 3 1. Processional March, Pomp and Chivalry ............... Roberts SCOHS. () The Class : Offi .cers e Graduates, in alphabetical order I e Speaker and Principal The Principal and Acting-Superintendent 2. Invocation ..... ...................... ... .... Rev. Raymond Lewis, C.M. 3. Salutatory ............................... ...... Conrad C. Hinds 4. Chorus .... "God of All Nature" .... Arr. by Loomis 5. Commencement Speeches .............................................. erne e Commun.i High School. .. Fad or Fundamental11 A. 11Educational Demands on Our Growing Adult Population11 D avid illiams

PAGE 50

1 I J 1 I B. "The Communi Esther Stewart Cida Cadet Principal, SCOHS 8. Commencement Address ................... Calmer A. Batalden Director of Vocational Education 9. Presentation of Class to Acting Superintendent of Schools ......... Chas. A. Dubbs Principal SCOHS 10. Presentation of Diplomas ................... ... S. E. ESser Acting Supt. of Schools 11. Vale die tory............................................................ Arthur Adams

PAGE 51

Page S 12. Class Song ....... "Hail! Silver Ci ........ N .. L .. Smi .Class of 4 9 13. Benediction .... .... Rev. Raymond Lewis, C. 14. Recessional ... ." .. "Farewell tO A lma Ma-ter'' ..... SCOF.lS Orchestra _,_ ,e audience is required to remain seate d until the class has mar.che. d out. II

PAGE 52

b I Charles A. Dubbs Owen B. Sllirley Walter D. Goring L yle F. Brown Cleveland En11is Terrv Butler .,/ Alfonso Greaves Hugl1 M. Jones Fladell J osepl1s Holde11 Cockburn Leaf) DeSousa Laurin Douglas Viola Dunca11 Allan Forte Ben1ado Ton1as Page 6 --Roscoe F. Raining Levi F. Olsei1 Edvvin R. on SpencerS. Josephs Elsinora L 3 rnch Maurice Mc. Cleari Horace Parker Frederick Roland Lucille Williarrts Kenneth Griffith Harold Josephs Violet Chilcott s,rlvia McDonald .,/ Gladys Spencer Maria Archer Conrad C. Hinds ........................ President lr\ring Parnther ........................... Vice-President Manassa Garrick .......................... Secretarv J Arthur Adan1s ............................. Treasurer

PAGE 53

1. Adruns, Arthur 2. Andre-ws, Douglas 3. Babb, Benli.ce 4. Babb, Byro11 5. Babb, Marc.ella 6. Bartley, Thon1as 7. Beecher, I Le 8. Best, Pearl 9. Bro\Vnie, Olga 10. Ag11.es '11. Cadet, Cida 12. Clarke, h1es 13. Cooper, lona '14. Cox, Rachel 15. Douglas, Clare11Ce 16. Dutto11, Cecil. 17. DUtton, George 18. Earle, Cleveland 19. Ed"Wards, lloyd 20. Ers e, George 21. Facey, Dapln1e 22. Ford, Hylton 23. Forde, Mavis 24. Forte, Mary 25. Francis, Pauline 26. Francois, Pauline Ptzge 7 27. Garrick, Mru1assa 28. GittetlS, Leroy 29. Grahatn, Junius 30. Gray, Louise 31. Grazette, Aura 32. Hetuy, Lynette 33. Henry, Williruns 34. Higgins, Roy 35. Binds, Conrad 36. Hitn, Hazel 37. Hunter, Jasper 38. Jones, Elw-)rn 39. J osepl1, lloyd 40. Landers, Rudolph 41. Landry, Consuela 42. Lovell, Bernice 43. Lowe, Rosalie 44. Mootoo, Albert 45. Mootoo, Allister 46. Morris, Gloria 47. Ne-well, Verona 48. Parnther, Irving 49. Pascal, Edith 50. Pent, Dorothy 51. Peters, Clinton 52. ips, Oscar 53. Quillian, John 54. Ra-wlins, Henrick 55. Robinson, Edwardo 56. RobiilSOll, Mazel 57. Robinson, Rub'r J 58. Russell, Carl 59. Russel, Frru.lk 60. Savory, Edna 61. Scott, Ber)7l 62. Scott, J runes 63. Sjogren, Firpo 64. Skeete, Clarence 65.Snrrall,Mercedes 66. Sn e, Mavis 67. Sntith, Milicent A. 68. Sntith, Milicent I. 69. Sntitl1, Victor 70. Ste\Vart, Esther 71. 1l1onrras,Alsace 72. Thorne, Marion 73. Thorpe, Be11j 74. Wallace, Oscar 75. WilliaDlS, David 76. Williams, Lillian 77. Worrell, Violet

PAGE 54

s 0 ............ 0 ............................ : 0 : .. 00= oo 0 oo 0 w 0 oooo ---o-o=--0 .. -0--o-0 -0 OooO 0 ..... -oo .... oo-00 ooo- .......... o tou -o -+. : +ore h a.s I; g We U & l'u-"'i"e.. '11t .llitlti'Ar we low ou ..,. _____ ,, ............. ..................... ... ................................................ -.... -....... ----..... ------

PAGE 55

Pnge 1 I I I I I 9 F I IF 9 I v h\VH hWtic U"'ld VCtt"-'" C\"" ClArke VkliA y.,tct Sit1\)r( HDiscnoH GIAb\fl Hutttr I .; IUHtt\&nt ltDltert JCAmt\\ric Jwtic .. Mil

PAGE 56

Pnge 2 1 I MAbd U toM
PAGE 57

. .. : Page3 'The Class of 1950 also did their share of traveli11.g to tl1e .and other parts of Panama. The n1embers of this class were tJ1e .fo:rmation of the Silver City Student Associatioti Club, wl1ic:h forn"led 011. August 25, 1949. They started Negro flist9ry w e .ek in feb.ruary 1950 and sponsored a COnil"liUt:rity program Negro" on the grow1ds that V\7as complitnented by_ s piritualso11.gs Glee Club. Tl1.ey "''ere also the first to conduct on grounds. They it1corporated the best of and. Pan ian cultures into their ovvrl unique style. 0 :ooo o ooooov,
PAGE 58

Page 1 fM ClArk 1-kH"f Cl\rk Hcrl1CrtCIArk '""mi\ AlphJKS4l 1)(\vif

PAGE 59

Page 2 'ft.v 0 I I 53.4!-Nh!IPt 1 1$ V .., .U. a ; az: a PIM l:J\11 r l'lii Ltwis Mc&l\\lb Mlf:rf Anwl

PAGE 60

Page3 --o-----_........_.._ ..,. ..... ,..,., ._.ooooooo-1 : I A/Ve rt Brozon 3.9464 S teiLfl Bryn n 3.8983 Cllllrles Myers 3.7674 Rode-riel\-Steve11. s 3.9491 Since the s cores of eacl1 of these seniors had been outstru1ding, it was not possible (before going to print with tl1e 1951 yearbook) who '\vould b e valedictorian or salutatoriru1. The ntost important thi11g was that they all deserved cre<..iit anLi tl"le respect of their classmates. Tl1.e grade averages indicated above for these individuals are based on a possible straight "A" average of 4.000 honor points earned during the three l"ligl"l school years. Some n1embers ojtl1.e of1951 (belo1v) on the celebraion of their 25tl1 R eunio11 in ]u1,1e 1976

PAGE 61

Biologtj ............. ...... ........ ..... .... ...... Attfo Shop ._. ..... Ho1ue E coJIOJIIics

PAGE 62



PAGE 63

Page 1 Jiiiit lluaLsdi?'f tar FIJilktttliliiiiJIuutlhusJJrr .. au 1 a satt .t .... .,.,. t s uu?'l .. ._ Carter kirb\i Clift\>H Clark Cl'rkt lt1(% Cl\rkt L\riC

PAGE 64

Page 2 I t' I ---

PAGE 65

Page3 aWPPlaWWNi'Dl: WttWi sif?SXWI '4: a :SO' W A '%J \'?tt'Ct"'Q'W WXUH 'CO'! 3 a 1t' )'331:1fat l! !"1 lif 'US< '1 'Mt 'ctJl y. Ernest Jamieson (1) and Celia Forte (r) went on to become teachers at the Rainbow City High School. Tamiesoi"l was Salutatoriatl of the Class of 1952

PAGE 66

Hnr o l r f B rozou z o e11t 011. to becon1e 11 P lly s i cnl Educati o u Instruc t o r rzt tltc R C H S 'd) Page 4 President \IV illiam Reid, VicePresident :Lloyd McClean, Se c retary Ernest Jamieson, Asst. Secretary Jurrie, Scqtt and Treasurer Silvia Carter. Vnle dictoriaJJ, Erf gar Da1oki'Jt s 0 Son1e 11/eJJJlJers of tl1e Class o_l' 1952 (belo1v) ce ebrati'ug t zeir 25 tlt R e u1rio11 li'Jl11i v ersn ry i1t fitlle 19 7 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 : i 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 : : 0 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 : 0 I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 i 0 0 I I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 i 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 0 0 I i : 0 0 0 0 0 I 0 0 0

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PAGE 68

Page 1 I ; l I t I i I I I I l l I ; I I > J t i ; i I I r : l t t j I l I }

PAGE 69

Page 2 Victor S11zit 1 Pre JLt; Albert Bror.urtie Vice-PresideJLt, fttrlitlt A1uetlee Secretary-T reas1-trer a ru,i Lloyrl Suti tlt B1tsi1zess Mrutnger ?viany of the members of the Class of 1953 (as lvell as the follo,ving Class of 1954) \vere volunteers in the U.S. Army dt.tring the Korean cortflict.

PAGE 71

1 &m\w lllliA" &bb &urtt( 8f1i"" fHzscr"b "' .,. KciJ1\\" W\\t IM" L'ftth Gc"rst Hurkrt Wiltnb Mc'sc Milkr Newrs AJ\\$t\(L\ Mul\m 1U\\ M'f(rs C\ptl Pc""A

PAGE 72

Page 2 I" \'Vilfred :t\1cLeod, Preside11t; Edna Stepl1e11S, Secretary; George Smalt Treasurer.

PAGE 73

n att 'f'? t:te 'hot w ...A .,, .. .. -WJJUU1l' tllf'fttL:'' u:tv ,.,,,.., fttn n t 'tnt tt ...

PAGE 75

Page 1 .we ... 0011 7 !F 1111111 llf'SS 0 7 1 7 1 IUWtf?l I I '17 fAll', 7111 II IJ IIJII? 1 I I I II 1 7 i ?? V itf"S!'II?Uf?' IO p II' t f c. .,_, Alk" Pltil Dcn*c Asltl1 lc""'" Ashl., N\'C1 &r*t PAwlmc ums ...

PAGE 76

Page2 AJkk\ W"lker )CAti Welch Ch"rl6!6 Wkttc Willi\f bn Wki&ktr I Her it e V nl eli i cto ri1111 R111 o p 1 1 ger Sa lt1tatoria11

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-

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II I I In A u g ust 1954 the e\r ildoers begru1 their devious conversion plan for the Rainbow City Hi g h S c hool \\7hen the y converted grades K through six to Spanish instruction I n J ul y 1955, the y converted grades seven to eleven to Spanishinstruction Thus, the grad u ati11.g c l as s of 1956 (February) was the first to publish their y earbook inSpanish The folloV\rittg represe11ts their Dedication page of the ) r earbook: El empenoso esfu erzo d esr>le g ado par 11.uestros profesores en la conversion de nuestros c ursos t i e l a lengua inglesa a la lengua espafiola, que ahora es la oficial del plantel, h a sido un acontecimiento espectatular, digno de adrrii raci6I1. y alabanza. Si 11.0 fuera por l a unio n y cooperaci6n de nuestro director, nuestros profesores, y nuestro s c on'lJ-')afieros, no ltubiera sido posible el triurtfo obtetlido durante eJ afio p a s a d o lo Ct.tal sera Ull hecl'lo it'lolvidable en Ja historia de nuestra esc uela. Pue s s 6lo una labor con resultados concretes puede ayudar a alcanzar la n'leta soii.ada--Una Nueva Sociedad. Por lo tant o, n o s otros, los Graduandos del 56, dedicamos este ru1.uario con h o ndo agradecimiento a los qt.te supieron l'lacer frente a un desafio y triunfar p a r a mante n e r e11 su alto pedestalla educaci6n de la juve11tud. Tl1e stead fastne ss of purpose tiisplayetl ru.1d the Ut1Swervi11g efforts tnade by our teachers duri n g t h e pas t year in m ee ting the c hallenge of cot1verting our curricula from the Enghsh l anguage to Spanish are "\-V orthy of high corrunendation Beca use t h e success o f this con v ersion could be realized oru y through the wholehearted coo p era tion o f our princ ipal, tea c h e rs, and students, "' re, the members of the graduating class, li e d icate vvith gre a t our 1956 A pe x to both the facult y and student bod y for a job well done.

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Page 1

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Page2 bnh:r Mattl1(ws MirA Mr)( Oh\t Ywtt( Hil\M Ivru we Fre erick Vnledictorin1z lJ'LCeJL 1trelie1t foart rn rlvnzte Clnss Speaker Salutatorian Vilu1. n B1rr e cn1iie a Librarian of tl1e RCHS

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' n.,serC\\W(s CAfl'lL\ijt'( Paul ViHC(titlt'\W Vih11c.\ Pcrkit16 Phillips Dc\Hk1

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P tzge 3 It Vt\\ W"lkc6 ftat1k W"rw.r io11e l ergus Valcd ictoria11 LioJte l Ki11g S a b 1 tat or inJt Roger Pessoa Clnss Speaker

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Page 1 I I I I II H larlenr Armando Anderson Anderson Eun1ce An WUfred Anderson .. lapoleon Ashby Baptiste Samuel Best Hugh ..... Julieta Branford Susana Brathwaite 'Ruby B ... Marva Clarence Buckley Annette Cordova Audley C Lawre11ce Ieven Gasphhle E ...... Evelyn Irma Harold Alvin ., .. H(\vift MilA HW1t T\fl\lC Huta f(Jix tflll )c\mu

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Page2 1 = 1 a 1 I "" ... .. Me < < I i < i l < < j l j j I > i > I < > J l < < I l i l i < i l I l i i i ; J i l l } i i l I i < i i ; I j i t I t l : j I I i f

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Ra1mld Pnrlcer Valedictorin1t Page 3 '""' I l1 fSO I L Sttldent Speaker Ja1nes Lyuc/1 Sn li 1 tnto rin11 Justin Anglin, President; Carl Dut1 Moodie, Vice-PresiLient Tames Lvnch, Treasurer Norma Ellis, Secretar'' .;

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Page 1 vita Brnt Wi iam Brnt SimO Blac m ADa B ackma oa WiHStm1

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Page3 Hector

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Page 7 M. DcHa1bsoH Phillips

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Rol a n d Josephs Val edic t o rian Page8 Pauli11.e MacFarla11.e Veronica Rosemond. Proudly standing on the shoulders of their ancestors Ca11.ute Cockburn Rolru1.d Josepl1. Ke11.eth Griffith Joselyil Lynch As we 111entio ne<..i in our Januar y 200 6 edition of our Ne,, \ rsletter, by tl'le early 1960s, the Cart a l Z o11e V\ra s a dif f e r ent t")lace tl1anks in large part to tl'le rebellious efforts o f the Crio ll o s / our Educators that lead to sotne improvements in employ met'lt 1.,racti ces o f the Pcu1.arna Canal s yste11'l for tl'leir descendant (our get'leration). Canute becrun e tl1e f irst P ru 'l an Tug Boat Engi11eer and noV\7 oversees the largest D ivisi o11. i t 'l tl1.e cat1a l o r ganizatiort. He started lus career with the canal in Jul y 1962 a.s a11 E lectricia1 1 Apprentice. Rolanc..i s erves as a Iviechru1.i cal Engineerit'lg Specialist i11 tl1e l\!Iecl1.ru1ical B r anch of tl1.e Et1git1eeri11.g Divisio11 of the cru.1al. Roland started his career "vitl1. tl1e ca11.al as a n Appre11tice J\!Ia cllinist. Ket1.11.etl1 also l1ega11. his career as an A r 1.,ret1.tice lv !acl1.inist an<..i i s curre11.tly a Pilot for the Cru1.al. J oselyt'l also starte<..i is career as a11 Appr e11tice :tviacl1inis t afte r gra dt.t ati<..111, ru1.d was a Tug Boat Captain before retiring in 1995.

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T h is over a ll prese 11tatior1 is a sigrrificru1t part of our 100-year lustory--a memory cycl e of recoll ections an<..i remen1.brances--and the positive influence the edt.tcators l1aci o n our lives. What \'\'e atten1.pted to do b)7 11.1.outltit1g this exlubition here tonigl1.t is visuall y record atl<..l revive our ricl1 history, life experie11ces and education on the Canal Z o n e in Pa11ama. We trt.tly hope tl1at this event will stir ru.1.d rekindle a of pride i11 our heritage, will give us the courage to assert our rigl1.tful place i11. the history books o f Panama a11d will strengtl1e11 our resolve that our lortg-ludden l1is t o r y a11.d the struggles of our a11.cestors will not be forgotten! Fi r s t you ca1'111.o t full}' understand Panama's history without recogrrizirtg the.contri-bt.tti o n of the Si lver Iv1e n" as part of tl1.at l1istory. Tl1ey cru11.e from all over the Caribbean Is l a nds seeking b ette r opporturrities for tl1emselves and tl1.eir families. Tl1.e)r existed and live<..i under h orre ndot.ts a11d <..latlgerot.ts working and livi11.g conditions to bt.tild the Pan a nta Canal. \'Ve, as tl1.eir l1eirs/l1eiresses, cot1sider this to be tl1.e most heroic era o f West Ind iru1life in Pananla. It was 011e of tren1end()US sacrifices, a11.d cot1.sidered t o b e a major t ecl1.11.ological accon1.plishment of The vast 111.aj orit}1 "'' e r e u11.educate d and the children tl1ey brougl1t \Vitl'l them from the Islands wer e s ubject e d t o s ub-stru1.dard education i11. overcrowded and ill-equippe<..i scl'lools I .. livi11g 011. tl1e Ca11al Z o n e A fter tl1.e c otlStrt.tction era, these 111.e11 begru1. pav"'ing tlle \vay for tl1.eir fatnilies and 011.ce they t:lecided to make Panama their l1on1.e. The)' transf orn1.e d s ections of tl1.e termi11.al cities i11.to vvest Indian towt1.slups. As we l1.ave l"')ee11., "''e w ill co11ti11Ue t( ) <..i.escribe their saga i11 stories featured i11. the Rainl'1oW City Newsl ette r pttblisl1ed b) tl1e Class of 1962. For those new to our NeV\rsletter, we have been featuring artic l e s about our l1.eritage si11ce the first slaves fro111. tl1.e Caribberu1. Islands wer e bro u ght t o Pan.anw. in the 1820s i11. the Region of Bocas del Toro, on Panama's coast tl1e11 w1.de r Col ombian rule. \ V e have also published articles on our forefathers' j ot.trll.e) S t o Pa11an1a to l,uild the Panru.11.a Railroad i11. tl1e 1850s ru.1d the Frencl1.'s failed attempt t o btrilci the Panan1.a Canal i11 tl1.e 1880s. Tl1ese written articles, along with otl1.e r inte r esti11g t :lispla)' S of our heritage, legacy and culture, can be foutld at our '\tvel1site a t l1ttp:/ / g r o ups.n1S11.con1/rcl1.ssixtwo. Please take the ti111e to visit it, and join us to l o t.ige } Our comments and other allowable postings.

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We are payil1g homage to the childre11 of the "Silver ivien," those whon1 they brougl1t from the islands as well as the first ge11eration of Pcu1amartians of \Vest lnLiiru1 descent ("tl1e Criollos"). We specifically selected to honor our educators of the Rairtbow City School system, who paved tl1e way for our educational acluevetnents. Our success does not begin witl1. us--we stand on the shoulders of tl1ese extraordinary n1e11 and wome11 wl1.om we celebrate to11igl1.t. The main focus of our journal prese11tation is for the 14-year period 1949-1962 because that's when the "Criollos" came of age. The Canal Zo11.e was a c.iifferent place tl1en; a place vvhere this generation was far removed from the experiences of their graru .. iparents who dug tl1e "big ditch,11 and their pare11ts '\1\Tho toiled and labored in its operation. During tlus period, tremendous changes occurred in the \'Vest ln(.,iiru1 comnltnlity, both in the Canal Zone and il1. Pru.1atna. Changes of 11otevvortl1.y significance came about in the foresight, commitment and dedication of our educators, those we salute, recogtuze and honor. It is our intent, going forward, to 1-")ublish another journal depicting the period 1963 to 1978 about the school system in the shadovv of Treaty Negotiations; to be included as part of tl1.e story of our 100-year history cycle in Panruna. Our generatjon is just begiruUng to grasp and realize tl1e value of the gifts the "Silver Men" and the "Criollos11 left us. As vve gain knowledge of our pass, vve should not otuy use it to pass down economic resources, but also to pass alortg cognitive abilities, Lireams and aspiration, expectations, habits, and a sense of responsibility for hwnarucil1d to our childre11 as they should to theirs and so on dovvn the line. If we had established sucl1 a cl1.ain, in tl1.e beginning, vve would have inherited a stro11.g ru1.d n1.grained sense of West lndian-Pru1an1anian culture that reinforces itself ge11eration after ge11eration. Howe\rer, seekit1g better opporttn1ities tl1ru1. the motherland offered, most of our ge11eration, a great many with a strong dose of Atnerican culture artd experience opted for residency and naturalization i.I'l the U11ited States leaving a void i11 Panan1a of din1inished group identity. As sucl1, our vV est Indian culture and the emergence of the bilingual "Criollos" subculture has been rapidly fading from memory as integratio11 by the younger generation proceeds without guidance or k11owledge about tl1eir history Sadly, tnany of the younger generatio11. i11 Panama lack know ledge of tl1eir heritage, the struggles endured, the values vve stood for, or tl1e accomplishments and strides we have made upliting our culture in Pru1ama. As you know, on a wl'lole, tl1e history and contributions of blacks has been largely absent from most contemporruy teaching guides. It is our duty to reclaim our pages in history books. Our education is completed by tl1e lessons of our long-ludden history. To kno'"' 011.e's self is to know one's history!

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1JJ Centto de I SeiD, Documentaci6n. Imp res/ones lntemet de Ia Unlver.sid.ad do La EntpJ-esa saluda los Grndu11ndos de los distintos anos de Ia Escuela Supe1ior de owe y felicita a los 71lieJJtbros del COM OR ZA.DOR al celebrar de PROMOVER LA H RIA de la Escuelas de las contunidades LatinoaJneJicanas errla Zona del Canal de Panama. Somos una empresa de Ia Sociedad, Panama On-Line, S.A.t que es un mode lo de ta participaci6n comunitaria en proyectos econ6micos de desarrollo sostenibJe Nuestro grupo de accionistas son panamer\os afro-antillanos en su mayorfa, residentes en Panama yen el exterior, que tomaron Ia iniciativa de c9nformar el capital financiero de la empresa, mediante Ia inversi6n de sus ahorros y aportes de sus fondos de jubifaci6ri que recibieron del Gobierno de los Estados Unidos al retirarse de sus trabajos en el area del Canal de Panama, y formar parte activa del desarrollo econ6mico de Ia naci6n. In g. Juan G. Fagette, Gerente General; Uc. Roberto Alleyne, Gerente de Opetaciones. t Nuestros teiMonos: (507) 283-94561 264-6417/Fax (507) 264-0973 Web alte: E-mail: .............. .. ........ :""-'""" ... __ ,, __ ,., ....... .. .. _.,, ____ ., ............. ... .... --.................... ............................................................................. ........... ___ ... o o o o,.. o o o o o o o o o o o oo o o 0o ---oooo O
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,..,..._.. -----.. --..._ __ ..., _____ \&lJr Q[otnntittct' of t(Jf l'inbotu ([itp ;1l)i!JIJ is lp tnbclltt'b to ll tlJos'r vcrs ous lli()o ronttlJutrb tow,lrbs tht' llhll,tncr ,1nb pnblrs hing of tl}is journal, n,ltnrlp: Jtontsr rrnrrl Jr,lin(.( anb 3G: IDra}?ton, G6; nb 1\oariJ, QCI,lss of l 971. ill tl)ilHI\5 ts cxtrnbrb to QC[,lrt'ttil jfrrbrrirl\ .tJrrsrott for ht'r ex.pcrtisc, {Jrr inbispcnsablr anb truilrious support <1nb rontrillntion towarbs tlJr brurlopntcut anb proburtion of tiJr jnurnill. prrial ar(\nollilcbutncnt is also ttt'Ct'55arp to Dubois for [Jis ualn,liJir in ilttb ntos't iulportilntl!', for us to "ptcl\ hiS' tntntorP bani\" In t(Jr brpirtion of our rbu r,ltlo ual rxprrirn re. \Co thr rbnr,ltors' in ttt'nbnrr tho5t' who wrrr nnniJle to ,lttt'llb, it511Jrll aS' t}Jost' no lonurr witt us rur brbrratt' tfJIS journal. 1Lt't us u o t f o r (It' t to u r 1\ no UJ I r but' o u r it n c rs tors lU lJ o s lJ I o o b slur" t a n b t r ,1 r s IJ u H t t 1J r a n ,11n il l \ n li r o <1 b '1 n b
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