Turning “Views” into “Visits”: How Online Exhibits Can Encourage Collection Awareness and Usage Proceedings Paper

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Title:
Turning “Views” into “Visits”: How Online Exhibits Can Encourage Collection Awareness and Usage Proceedings Paper
Series Title:
ACRL Conference Proceedings 2013
Physical Description:
Paper in Conference Proceedings
Language:
English
Creator:
Jefferson, Rebecca J. W.
Santamaria-Wheeler, Lourdes
Taylor, Laurie N.
Publisher:
ACRL Conference Proceedings 2013
Place of Publication:
Indianapolis, IN
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Abstract:
The contributed paper will be presented by a curator, an exhibits coordinator and a digital humanities librarian who will discuss the results of their unique collaboration to promote access to hidden collections through online exhibitions. They will demonstrate how their institution is linking online exhibitions directly to digital collections and how the visual immediacy and strong narrative of the exhibition serves to create greater awareness and usage of the digital collection and its physical counterpart.
General Note:
Paper in the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Conference Proceedings 2013, April 10-13, Indianapolis, IN.
General Note:
Pages 605-611

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Applicable rights reserved.
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AA00014740:00001


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605 Turning Views into Visits: How Online Exhibits Can Encourage Collection Awareness and Usage Rebecca J. W. Jeerson, Lourdes Santamara-Wheeler, and Laurie N. Taylor e University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC) employ internally designed soware (SobekCM) to maintain monthly usage statistics for the digital col lections. 1 e statistics enable content managers to monitor how many times a digital item is viewed (or hit), how many viewers have visited the site, as well as a list of top titles and top items in terms of viewing popularity. 2 In reviewing these statistics for the Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Digi tal Collections in 2012, the Curator was surprised to note that one of the most regularly viewed items was a Yiddish periodical entitled Gerekhtigkayt (Justice). 3 Intrigued by the unexpected rise in interest for this foreign-language magazine, the Curator soon realized that the upsurge in viewing gures arose from the fact that the arresting front cover of Gerekhtigkayt was part of a rotating display on the Libraries homepage, and the cover was directly linked to the digital collec tion. is discovery raised the idea that if a simple, ar resting display linked to the full online version could drive up viewing statistics, then perhaps the visual impact and storytelling power of online exhibitions could be harnessed to direct viewers to the online ver sion and, by so doing, generate a greater awareness and usage of hidden collections. e Curator assembled a unique collaborative team comprised of the George A. Smathers Libraries Exhibits Coordinator and Digital Humanities Librar ian (who had worked together previously to promote access to hidden collections through online exhibi tions) in order to undertake this more formal assess ment project. e items chosen for the project, like Gerektigkayt would be scarce, somewhat un-invit ing-looking, foreign-language materials. e trick would be to prove that a strong visual and arresting story would take the reader beyond any perceived barriers with individual items to an awareness of the wider collection and then beyond that to an aware ness and appreciation of the library collections as a whole. Hidden Judaic Materials in the University of Florida Libraries e Gathering Storm: Jewish Life in Germany and East ern Europe in the 1930s an exhibition only available online, was created to prove the aforementioned con cept. is exhibition features printed items, mostly pe riodicals, produced by European Jewry in the 1930s. While the subject of Jewish experience during the war has been widely explored, life for Jewish people in the period immediately before the war is less well known (partly due to the scarcity of available material) and therefore demands greater research. 4 e items, select ed by the Price Library Curator, in German, Yiddish, Rebecca J. W. Jeerson is Curator at Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, e-mail: rjeerson@u.edu; Lourdes Santamara-Wheeler is Exhibits Coordinator in the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida, e-mail: l.s.wheeler@u.edu; Laurie N. Taylor is Digital Humanities Librarian in the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida, e-mail: laurien@u.edu

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606 Polish and Hungarian, form part of a much larger col lection of un-cataloged Judaica that has remained hid den until recently. is larger collection comprising scarce publications from the 20th century consists of approximately 500 pieces. Many of these pieces, which include anniversary editions of rare German and Yid dish newspapers and periodicals, as well as ephem eral publications such as calendars, yearbooks and other communally inspired commemorative works, are in desperate need of digitization for preservation. Limited budgets, however, prevent the Curator from completing this project. In order to raise funds for the collection, the Curator needs to promote greater awareness of the collection and its needs. Twenty items were chosen from an initial selec tion of over 30 representative pieces relating to the idea of a Gathering Storm for European Jewry. 5 In consultation with the Exhibits Coordinator, the Cura tor decided to limit the items on display to 20 in order to create a more engaging and concise exhibition. e items are divided into four distinct categories, repre senting material from (a) Germany in the early 1930s (b) Germany between 1933-1935 (c) Germany during the period of the Nuremberg Laws and (d) Eastern Europe, 1935-1939. e narrative descriptions created for each item emphasized the following features (a) how the item relates to the theme and time period of the section (b) how the item relates to the overall theme of the fate of European Jewry (c) focused details of interest within each item, and (d) interesting features of the individual copy belonging to the Price Library. Each piece was placed in the context of the history of the community in which it was produced. Scarce items in the rst sectionmaterial from Germany in the 1930sinclude printed pieces from some of the major centers of Jewish life in Germany before the Second World War. Two Jewish commu nity newsletters from Berlin and Frankfurt, a commu nity festschri from Bonn and a community yearbook covering Dresden, Chemnitz and Plauen are included in this section. ese items are not only of immense importance for their content (which includes articles by leading Jewish gures, historical sketches, accounts of community members and events, photographs, lists and statistics), they are also objects of great interest in their own right. For example, a commemorative piece entitled Aus Vergilbten Akten (of yellowed documents) 6 is one of just a few available histories of the Jewish community of Bonn in the late 19 th and early 20 th century. 7 By the time Aus Vergilbten Akten was written in 1931, the Jews of Bonn numbered around 1,000. e popula tion count fell by over half in 1938 following Kristell nacht when the synagogues were destroyed and many Jews ed the city. Towards the end of the war, two hundred of the incarcerated Jewish citizens of Bonn were deported to concentration camps; seven sur vived. e Price Library copy of this work, according to OCLC, is one of just three copies held in U.S. librar ies. It therefore contains material of great research val ue which, at present, is not easily accessed elsewhere. 8 Moreover, a stamp on this copy which reads Oen bach Archival Depot bears witness to its having sur vived the Nazi destruction of Jewish books. At the end of the war, millions of looted books were uncovered by the Allies. e books were carefully sorted at the Oenbach Archival Depot by the U.S. book restitu tion task force and returned to their country of origin. e remaining items that could not be identied were found a home in centers of Judaism and Jewish learn ing throughout the United States and Israel. 9 e section of the online exhibition labelled Ger many, 1933-1935 includes items that were published in Germany following the rise of Hitler and the Na tional Socialist Party in 1933. ree of the newspapers featured from 1935 all celebrate the 800th anniversary of the birth of the famous Jewish philosopher, Moses Maimonides. Underlying the theme of celebrating a great Jewish gure, who was also of importance to Christian theological thought, one senses the ten sion of a people under threat and accused of racial inferiority. e Israelit (Orthodox Jewish weekly from Frankfurt) 10 celebrates the life of Maimonidestogeth er witharticles dealing with growing anti-Semitism in Europe. e Gemeindeblatt zu Berlin (community newsletter of Berlin) 11 produces a lavish edition in honor of Maimonides, emphasizing the Jewish intel lectual contribution to the world. e newspaper Der Schild (a Jewish veterans publication from Berlin) 12 places the celebration of Maimonides alongside a commemoration of the 250 th year of the birth of Jo hann Sebastian Bach in an attempt to demonstrate a synergy and to emphasize their German patriotism. 13 e third section of the exhibit, Nuremberg, comprises scarce periodicals from Speyer, Leipzig, Manheim and Landau. All manifest evidence of Jewish communities under stress, struggling from the hard

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607 ships inicted by the Nuremberg Laws. A rare issue of the Leipzig community newsletter ( Gemeindeblatt der Israelitischen Religionsgemeinde zu Leipzig ) from Feb ruary 1937 betrays, through its notices and announce ments, the harsh nancial conditions facing the com munity, particularly through the winter months. In 1925, the Jewish community of Leipzig had num bered over 13,000 members making it the largest Jew ish community in Saxony. 14 Aer the rise of the Nazis to power in 1933, numbers began to dwindle and, by 1937, a diminished and beleaguered community was having to take measures to tackle these economic pressures. is eight-page issue of the Leipzig news letter (previously only available on microlm) con tains three separate notices for the Judische Winterhil fe (Jewish winter aid)a Jewish organization founded in 1935 to help needy Jews get through the winter by providing food, medicine and heating. 15 e Jews had been excluded from the general German fund aer the Nuremberg Laws were instituted in 1935. e sec ond page opens with a reminder to members to pay their community dues to assist the general welfare, and the third page has a section dedicated to the his tory and importance of mishloach manot (the distri bution of food parcels for Purim). Page six has a large section listing Jewish crasmen and their trades, and the nal two pages list Jewish businesses and rooms to let. Just one month aer this issue was published, in March 1937, as revealed in a now iconic photograph, three prominent Jewish businessmen were marched through the streets of Leipzig wearing placards that read Dont buy from the Jews! Shop in German busi nesses! 16 e following year, during Kristallnacht the 1855 Moorish Revival synagogueone of Leipzigs most architecturally signicant buildingswas de stroyed, as were the other centers of Jewish communal life in Leipzig. 17 Deportations from Leipzig to concen tration camps began in January 1942. e nal section, entitled Eastern Europe, 19351939, contains materials that originate from Roma nia, Poland, Hungary and Latvia, comprising three journals, a calendar and a yearbook. A commemo rative issue of the Polish periodical Glos Gminy Zy dowskiej (the Jewish Community Voice) celebrates the 75 th anniversary of the Polish Uprising in January 1863, and the part played by Jews in supporting their countrymen, thereby emphasizing Jewish loyalty to Poland during a time of rising anti-Semitism. 18 Issued monthly (and occasionally bi-monthly) between Au gust 1937 and June 1939, this journal provides impor tant data for research into Polish Jewish history. For example, during its two-year existence, Glos Gminy Zydowskiej published 6,000 names in its marriage an nouncements section: important data which is now incorporated into the JRI-Poland database for genea logical research. 19 is particular issue from 1938 is held at just four institutions worldwide. Online Exhibitions at the George A. Smathers Libraries Online exhibitions are more than a marketing tool: they are another way to grant users access to unique and/or hidden collections. Many academic institu tions are already providing access through curated digital collections, yet this is oen insucient. Cu rated digital collections do not provide the interpreta tion or background necessary to further understand an object. Many collections have a home or landing page that serves as an introduction to the materials, but oen this only provides a general cursory view of the collection as a whole. Online exhibitions linked to full resources within digital collections thus provide the ideal vehicle to highlight and explain rare materials. Online exhibi tions also serve as a great companion to physical exhi bitions, whether as precursors or complements, since they allow access to the full resource. e Gathering Storm is a good case in point. is exhibition is only available online due to the fragile nature of some of the objects, as well as the display limitations of a single page or double page view. Fur thermore the foreign languages utilized in the news papers and journals provide a barrier to the majority of local visitors. e Gathering Storm gives access to and provides context for 20 rare newspapers and journals through carefully constructed interpretive labels written by the exhibition curator. e 20 items are divided into the abovementioned four sub-groups, and each subgroup has its own page and introductory text. From the sub-group page, one can click on the thumbnail of an individual item within that group. Each individual item is represented by four or ve representative pages which are linked to a zoomable image of the corre sponding page within the University of Florida Digi tal Collections (UFDC). Additionally, there is a link to view the entire item, from the beginning, also in zoomable form and, when available, a link to other issues from the same publication which are not a part

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608 of the exhibitionas seen in Der Israelit 20 Future fea tures within UFDC to enhance the usability of these materials will include the geographical locator and, with the ongoing development of foreign language OCR, the ability to search the materials for specic content. Online exhibitions from the George A. Smathers Libraries are publicized much the same way as physi cal exhibitions; although digital collections are not oen given the same treatment. For e Gathering Storm the Exhibits Coordinator worked with the Li braries Director of Communications to write a press release which was then widely distributed to local, state, and national media outlets, as well as cam pus faculty. e exhibition was also featured on and linked from the Libraries home page, the Libraries exhibits website, the Price Library of Judaicas website and their corresponding social media accounts. e Gathering Storm was also included in the Smithson ians Library and Archival Exhibitions on the Web da tabase. Furthermore, the exhibitions URL and a brief description were included in postcards and publicity materials for a future physical exhibition on a related theme, entitled Testimony e various methods of promotion and the provi sion of multiple links increase awareness of the exhi bition and the materials. ese methods of outreach also increase search engine optimization (SEO) for e Gathering Storm with a knock-on eect of en hanced visibility for the previously hidden items fea tured in the exhibition. Digital Collection Development at the George A. Smathers Libraries e University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC) grew out of early and ongoing eorts for digital pres ervation at the George A. Smathers Libraries, a process which began in the 1990s. In the following years, the Libraries developed a robust system (technologically with a rich set of features for the digital library system and integration with other systems, as well as sociotechnically with governance models, sustainability planning, stang for support and outreach, and in tegration with collection development and scholarly production) to support preservation and access to dig itized materials. e same emphasis on digitization for both preservation and access continues today. 21 is commitment to both preservation and access is necessary. As the Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access states, Without preservation, there is no ac cess. 22 e reverse is also true for digital library ma terials: without access, there is no preservation. e Committee for Film Preservation and Public Access before e National Film Preservation Board of the Library of Congress clearly states this in speaking about lm preservation: Preservation without access is pointless. 23 Aer building a system for preservation and ac cess of digitized materials, the George A. Smathers Libraries extended the digital library support to serve larger scholarly needs and thus serve as part of a scholarly cyberinfrastructure. In order to support larger scholarly needs, the Libraries ensure all ma terials are readily ndable through integration with other library and scholarly systems like NINES and 18thConnect as well as through search engine opti mization. Building from this accessibility, the Librar ies support broader impacts by framing fully digi tized materials within aggregations or collections to provide the context necessary for understanding the materials once located, by creating additional mate rials to increase impact (e.g., lesson plans, teaching materials, online exhibits, and other scholarly works), and by frequently conducting training and outreach (Broader Impacts Support). Supporting broader impacts is part of the George A. Smathers Libraries overall commitment to digi tal scholarship and data curation lifecycle support (Digital Scholarship Lifecycle Support). e Librar ies are active scholarly partners with other scholars in developing digital collections, digital scholarship, and other scholarly forms using the robust scholarly cyberinfrastructure from the libraries to ensure that the scholarly works are accessible, preserved, ndable, and integrated with the larger scholarly communica tions landscape rather than existing as separate silo projects. Additionally, the Libraries support usage tracking with monthly and total usage counts avail able for every item, title (supporting multi-volume and serial titles), and collection, and with the usage information readily available online for ease in re porting and promoting collections and materials. Scholar-curated digital collections and exhibits are thus core to the work of the George A. Smathers Libraries for access, preservation, broader impacts, and digital scholarship and data curation lifecycle support. To ensure the scholar-curated digital col

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609 lections and exhibits are as successful as possible, all materials for the online exhibit are added to the UFDC and, whenever possible, the full materials for an online exhibit are digitized. For instance, when a book cover is needed for an online exhibit, the full book is digitized and available online in the UFDC. is approach ensures that users viewing the exhibit have access to the full book, the catalog record for the book is available through traditional library systems, and search engines can nd the full metadata and full text for the book. Integrated support for digital col lection items with online exhibits ensures that materi als are placed in context, making the materials them selves more useful and more usable for search engine optimization and for future scholarly works. Instead of acting as a closed or silo work, the online exhibits and materials are provided as part of scholarly com munications for engagement by the public as public scholarship and for engagement by scholars that may lead into other opportunities for research and col laboration. Conclusion e online exhibition e Gathering Storm is serving as a test case to determine the extent to which online exhibitions can help drive greater awareness and in creased usage of digital collections and hidden physi cal collections. In order to take a true reading from the monthly viewing statistics for the digital objects included in e Gathering Storm it was determined that the materials would be digitized and uploaded to the general Judaica Digital Collections, of which there are over 350 items, without creating a sub-collection or landing page. Aer the release of the online exhibi tion and its promotion, the viewing statistics for both the exhibition and digital resources will be analyzed for quantitative impact, and feedback from faculty, students, donors and general users will be assessed for qualitative outcomes. Once the data has been ana lyzed, a sub-collection and landing page will be cre ated for e Gathering Storm so that the digital col lection may also be discoverable in traditional ways. At the time of writing these pre-conference pro ceedings, there are no statistics on the eects of this exhibition available to report. Unfortunately, the proj ect experienced a delay due to the osite relocation of the Digital Library Center during October to Decem ber 2012. However, statistics will be available for pre sentation at the ACRL conference (Indianapolis, April 2013), and it is hoped that a follow-up publication or report will be possible with recommendations for im plementation and best practice at other institutions. Nevertheless, data to support the eect of online exhibits linked to digital collections can be mined from existing statistics. us, for example, e Rever end Benjamin Safer collection 24 a digital collection of primary source materials pertaining to the Jew ish community of Jacksonville, Floridawas viewed 122 times through 12 visits to the website in January 2012. is gure shot up to 1489 views through 98 visits in April 2012 following the launch of the on line exhibition Jewish Jacksonville 25 As a result of the exhibition, the Curator now receives regular queries about the items in the digital collection and requests for access to more materials pertaining to the history of Jacksonville Jewry. Another unexpected outcome has been an increase in material donations to boost this collections holdings. In sum, the idea of linking items in online exhibi tions to full digital copies is a simple one, but one that is surprisingly under-used. To this end, we believe that sharing our experience of working collaboratively will help other institutions to realize the potential in har nessing the immediacy and visual impact of exhibi tions and linking them to digital collections to engen der greater awareness and usage of hidden collections. Notes 1. http://ufdc.u.edu/ 2. Top Items, Usage Statistics: Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Digital Collections. http://ufdc.u.edu/judaica/us age/items 3. Gerekhtigkyat 50 th anniversary of the Great Revolt, 1910. New York: International Ladies Garment Workers Union, 1960. http://ufdc.u.edu/AA00000171/00001 4. A growth of interest in this area is evidenced by the recent publication, On the Eve: the Jews of Europe before the Second World War by Bernard Wasserstein (2012). 5. For details of the works included, see the primary sources listed above and the online object list that accompanies the exhibit: http://ufdc.u.edu/AA00013891/00001 6. Max Cohn, Aus Vergilbten Akten: Zur Geschichte der Bonner Synagogue. Zukunsaufgaben der Bonner Synagogenge meinde Bonn: Gemeindeblatt der Synagogengemeinde 4, no. 47: 1931. http://ufdc.u.edu/AA00013438/00001 7. For an overview of Jewish history in Bonn, see Zeev Wilhem Falk, Bonn. Encyclopaedia Judaica Ed. Michael Berenbaum and Fred Skolnik. 2nd ed. Vol. 4. Detroit: Mac

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610 millan Reference USA, 2007. 63-64. Gale Virtual Reference Library 8. Some of the periodicals included in the exhibition have been digitized as part of the German Compact Memory database: http://www.compactmemory.de/ is is a com mendable and highly useful project. Its only drawback, however, is the fact that the scans are produced in black and white. It is possible that the images were derived from microlm and not actual hardcopies, which renders them less distinct than the copies produced from the originals by UFDC. 9. Martin Dean and Susanne Brose, Oenbach Archival Depot: antithesis to Nazi Plunder Online exhibit: http://www. ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/online/oad/ 10. Der Israelit: Ein Centralorgan fr das orthodoxe Juden tum 76, no. 15 (April 1935): 1-16. http://ufdc.u.edu/ AA00013432/00001 11. Gemeindeblatt der Jdische Gemeinde zu Berlin 25, no. 13 (March 1935): 1-24. http://ufdc.u.edu/AA00013422/00001 12. Der Schild 13/14 (March 1935): 1-8. http://ufdc.u.edu/ AA00013421/00001 13. For more about this group of veterans, see: Reichsbund Juedischer Frontsoldaten. Encyclopaedia Judaica Ed. Mi chael Berenbaum and Fred Skolnik. 2nd ed. Vol. 17. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2007. 201. For more details on the Jewish press in Germany, see: David Flinker, Shalom Rosenfeld, Mordechai Tsanin (eds). e Jewish Press at Was: accounts, evaluations and memoires of Jewish papers in pre-Holocaust Europe Tel Aviv: World Federation of Jewish Journalists, 1980. 14. Jacob Rothschild and Larissa Daemmig. Leipzig. Encyclo paedia Judaica Ed. Michael Berenbaum and Fred Skolnik. 2nd ed. Vol. 12. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2007. 627-628. Gale Virtual Reference Library 15. Ruth Gay, e Jews of Germany: A Historical Portrait New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992, 260. 16. See: e Boycott of Jewish Businesses United States Holo caust Memorial Museum Online Learning Site: http://www. ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007693 17. http://www.hgb-leipzig.de/kunstorte/sd_gemeinde.html 18. For further reading, see: Magdalena Opalski and Israel Bar tal, Poles and Jews: a failed brotherhood Hanover: University Press of New England, 1992. 19. http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jriplweb.htm 20. http://exhibits.uib.u.edu/gatheringstorm/israelit.html 21. University of Florida Libraries. Preservation. http://ufdc. u.edu/sobekcm/preservation 22. Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preserva tion and Access. Sustainable Economics for a Digital Planet Ensuring Long-Term Access to Digital Information: Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access. Feb. 2010. Washington, DC. 1 Dec 2012 . 23. Committee for Film Preservation and Public Access. State ment by e Committee For Film Preservation and Public Access before e National Film Preservation Board of the Library of Congress. 12 Feb. 1993. Los Angeles, California. 1 Dec. 2012 . 24. e Reverend Benjamin Safer Collection: http://ufdc.u. edu/iuudrev 25. For the Jewish Jacksonville online exhibition, see: http://ex hibits.uib.u.edu/jewishjacksonville/ Bibliography Primary Sources Cohn, Max (ed). Aus Vergilbten Akten: Zur Geschichte der Bonner Synagogue. Zukunsaufgaben der Bonner Synagogengemeinde Bonn: Ge meindeblatt der Synagogengemeinde 4, no. 47: 1931. http:// ufdc.u.edu/AA00013438/00001 Frankfurter Israelitisches Gemeindblatt 9, no. 4 (December 1930): 93-148. http://ufdc.u.edu/AA00013440/00001 Gemeindeblatt der Israelitischen Religionsgemeinde zu Leipzig 13, no. 3 (February 1937): 1-8. http://ufdc.u.edu/ AA00013431/00001 Gemeindeblatt der J dischen Gemeinde zu Berlin 22, no. 4 (April 1932): 71-10. http://ufdc.u.edu/AA00013439/00001 Gemeindeblatt der Jdische Gemeinde zu Berlin 25, no. 13 (March 1935): 1-24. http://ufdc.u.edu/AA00013422/00001 Gerekhtigkyat 50 th anniversary of the Great Revolt, 1910. New York: International Ladies Garment Workers Union, 1960. http://ufdc.u.edu/AA00000171/00001 Gezunthayt-Kalendar, Vesilibas Kalendars Jubilejas Izdevums, 1934-1939. Riga, Latvia: OZE, 1939. http://ufdc.u.edu/ AA00013426/00001 Glos Gminy Zydowskiej 2, no. 1 (January 1938): 1-38. http://ufdc. u.edu/AA00013425/00001 Goldberger, Salamon (ed). A Pesti Izraelita Hitkzsg Gimnzi umnak rtestje az 1937-1938. Iskolai vrl Budapest, 1938. http://ufdc.u.edu/AA00013427/00001 Der Israelit: Ein Centralorgan fr das orthodoxe Juden tum 76, no. 15 (April 1935): 1-16. http://ufdc.u.edu/ AA00013432/00001 Israelitsches Gemeindeblatt: Ozielles organ der Israelitischen Gemeinden Mannheim, Heidelberg, Ludwigshafen A. Rh. und des Verbandes der Israelitischen Kultusgemein den der Pfalz Sondernummer die Gemeinde Mannheim,

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611 14, no. 17 (September 1936): 1-34. http://ufdc.u.edu/ AA00013435/00001 Jdisches Jahrbuch fr Sachsen und Adressbuch der Gemeinde behorden Organisationen und Vereine 1931/32. Ausgabe Dresden, Chemnitz, Plauen: Hanns Lowenstein und Wili Tisch Verlag fur JahrU. Adressbucher, 1932. http://ufdc. u.edu/AA00013437/00001 Jdische Rundshau 27 (April 1933): 131-136. http://ufdc.u.edu/ AA00013429/00001 Jdische Schulzeitung 11, no. 4 (April 1935): 1-8 http://ufdc.u. edu/AA00013436/00001 Der Orden Bne Briss: Mitteilungen der Grosslage fr Deutchland VIII U.O.B.B., 9 (Festnummer zun Ordenstage) (October 1933): 95-114. http://ufdc.u.edu/AA00013428/00001 Rabbinatsbezirk Landau/Pfalz Rundschreiben 6 (March 1936): 1-4, http://ufdc.u.edu/AA00013430/00001 Reinhold, Herz (ed). Gedenkschri zum 100 Jahrigen Beste hen der Synagoge Zu Speyer Speyer: Israelitischen Kul tusgemeinde Speyer am Rhein, 1937. http://ufdc.u.edu/ AA00013433/00001 Der Schild 13/14 (March 1935): 1-8. http://ufdc.u.edu/ AA00013421/00001 Tchernovitser Bleter 6, no. 200 (November 1934): 1-4. http://ufdc. u.edu/AA00013424/00001 Tchernovitser Bleter 7, no. 204 (January 1935): 1-4. http://ufdc. u.edu/AA00013424/00003 Unzer Express 16, no. 195 (September 1935): 1-16. http://ufdc.u. edu/AA00013423/00001 Secondary Sources Falk, Zeev Wilhem. Bonn. Encyclopaedia Judaica Ed. Michael Berenbaum and Fred Skolnik. 2nd ed. Vol. 4. Detroit: Mac millan Reference USA, 2007. 63-64. Flinker, David, Shalom Rosenfeld, Mordechai Tsanin (eds). e Jewish Press at Was: accounts, evaluations and memoires of Jewish papers in pre-Holocaust Europe Tel Aviv: World Federation of Jewish Journalists, 1980. Gay, Ruth. e Jews of Germany: A Historical Portrait New Ha ven: Yale University Press, 1992. Gross, Walter (Shlomoh). Weltsch, Robert. Encyclopaedia Judaica Ed. Michael Berenbaum and Fred Skolnik. 2nd ed. Vol. 21. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2007. 9-10. Opalski, Magdalena, Israel Bartal. Poles and Jews: a failed broth erhood Hanover: University Press of New England, 1992 Reichsbund Juedischer Frontsoldaten. Encyclopaedia Judaica Ed. Michael Berenbaum and Fred Skolnik. 2nd ed. Vol. 17. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2007. 201. Rothschild, Jacob, and Larissa Daemmig. Leipzig. Encyclo paedia Judaica Ed. Michael Berenbaum and Fred Skolnik. 2nd ed. Vol. 12. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2007. 627-628. Wasserstein, Bernard. On the Eve: the Jews of Europe before the Second World War New York: Simon & Schuster, 2012. Online Resources Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access. Sustainable Economics for a Digital Planet Ensuring Long-Term Access to Digital Information: Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access. Feb. 2010. Washington, DC. 1 Dec 2012 . e Boycott of Jewish Businesses United States Holocaust Me morial Museum Online Learning Site: http://www.ushmm. org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007693 Committee for Film Preservation and Public Access. Statement by e Committee For Film Preservation and Public Access before e National Film Preservation Board of the Library of Congress. 12 Feb. 1993. Los Angeles, California. 1 Dec. 2012 . Dean, Martin, Susanne Brose, Oenbach Archival Depot: antith esis to Nazi Plunder Online exhibit: http://www.ushmm. org/museum/exhibit/online/oad/ Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica. http://www.uib.u.edu/ judaica Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Digital Collections. http:// ufdc.u.edu/judaica Top Items, Usage Statistics: Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Digital Collections. http://ufdc.u.edu/judaica/usage/items University of Florida Libraries. Broader Impacts Support. http://ufdc.u.edu/sobekcm/broader University of Florida Libraries. Digital Scholarship Lifecycle Support. http://ufdc.u.edu/sobekcm/lifecycle