Cattle feeding situation

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Title:
Cattle feeding situation
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United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
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U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. ( Washington, D.C )
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aleph - 029026578
oclc - 85233313
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AA00014692:00022


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U!hITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRI CULTURAL ECONOMICS
WASHINGTON, D, C.
Release -
12:00 Noon (E.T.)
October 15, 1934.


CATTLE FEEDING SITUATION OCTOBER 1, 1934

Although the condition of pastures in the Corn Bolt States during
the sumner was the lowest on record and prospects for focod grain anld hay
production about the poorest ever known the shipment of stocker and feeder
cattle into these States has been relatively large. Total shipments,
inspected through markets, for the 3 months, July to September (with
September estimated) were about 650,000 head. This number was about 50
percent larger than the very snail shipments for these months in 1933,
about 18 percent larger than the 5-year (1929-33) average, and the largest
for the period since 1928.

In July this year, when prospects for a corn crop were still fairly
good over rmch of the Corn Belt, the movement into all the States was
relatively large, -with the total over twice as large as in 1933 and the
largest for the r.ionth since 1925. In Aupust and Septeober the movement
into the States where the effects of the drought vcwere r.nost serious dropped
off sharply but into other States it continued large. For the three months
the 5 Eastern Corn Belt States received over twice as nmany" cattle as in
1933 and the largest number since 1926. In addition there was a rather
heavy novemont of "Govornnent" cattle into these States for pasture.
Of the Western Corn Belt States Iowa and linnesota arc the only ones where
receipt of cattle this year during the 3 months exceeded last years -with
the novnemnt into Iowa especially large.

To what extent these increased receipts of stocker and feeder cattle
in the States where there have been increases will be reflected in enlarged
feeding operations, this winter is uncertain. The character of the cattle
shipped from 4 large M.arkets would indicate that a larger than usual
proportion of these cattle wore bought for stockers, rather than for feeders.
The numbers of heavy cattle (over 900 pounds) shipped from these marketss
during the 3 months was belol- the very srall shipments of last year and the
largest increases over last year were in steers under 700 pounds, it calves
and in cows and heifers. In the drought States undoubtedly, cattle feeding
during the next 12 months will be on a greatly reduced scale.

Reports from the western States are to the effect that cattle feeding
in all of these, except possibly California, will be reduced as a result of
the small supplies and high prices of grain and hay and feeding at cotton
seed mills in Texas will also be sharply curtailed.




ULIriVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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UITI=TD STAT 'S D-PARTr lNT 07 AGRICTUTT _RS
5UR, TU OF AC-RICUT.T .I. L CONTOVICS
WAS.t:INCTOU. D1.:. ",..* Release-
S. ..,12:00 C (N'oon)
October 15, 1934

IAi.B FEEPIG' SITUATION OCTOBER 1, 1934

The totpl nu=.iber of lambs fed for market this season will probably be
considerably sr'aller t-an last year or any other recent year, but there will
be a considerable difference in the changes this year frdni last in different
areac3. The C-'rn-Belt States east of the Missoulri River as a. whole will
rrob.abli feed riore lambs 'this vr.ar than last, .but-there is expected to be a
sharp reduction in the nunbcrs fed in the western Corn.Belt and in the western
Stctos.

S:,il:1ents of feeler la;-:s, inse- octed -through markets, into the Corn
Belt States for t'-hec throes months, July .to Se--tembor, (-ith Serternber estimated)
wore about 800,000 head, an increase of nearly 40 rcr cent over the small ship-
ments in 1973 and 19,52, but 10 rer cent-smaller than the fivo-yuar (1929-33)
avcr.t'o for these :o,-.ths. Snirncnts into the Statcs east of the Mississippi
were ncarlv, 2-" tir.cs as large this ,year as last ari thor: wore also :,arked in-
creasos in then'...b-rs going into Io'"a and Minnesota. Shipnecnts into the
States rest of the IFissouri River, however,, wore nmuci smaller this year than
last. Direct s hir:....-.nts (nnt going throu-gh stockyard. rnarke.ts) into the western
Corn Belt will also be mucb smaller this y-ar than last.

The l.rgcr shipment this year to the end of September reflect, in part,
the larger number of feeder lar..bs available early ir the *season, resmilting
from the unusual -reportion of "cst'-r:i lamibs markotcd during these months that
wore only in feeder condition. It is not ox-nbctcd that shipr.ients of feeders
into the Corn Bolt from mare_-uts during. the r.-st of the season '-ill be rela-
tively as largo as during the 3 months, July to Septenber. Because of the re-
duced number of labs that will be m-oved direct to feeders in the western Corn
Bolt, however, it is probable t'Lat a larger than usual prccortion of the western
feeder lambs .yet to be moved \il). go through stockyard markets and the shipments
from those mTrkets will continue large.

While the movement of feeder lsiwLbs into feeding .reas in the western
States will not be in large vol',une until the end of October, reports from
these States shoe. that thz total number of lambs fed will be considerably
smaller this year than-last. In Colorrdo present indications ere that the
number'of 'limbs fed will be considerably below last year with reductions of
from 20 to 30 per cent in Northern Colorado and 30 *to 40 per cent in the
Arkansas Valley. Feeding in the other Rocky Mountoin States and in the Inter-
Mountain States will also be on a much reduced scale but there will probably
be some increase in all of th-e Pacific Coast States, .-hcre feed supplies, al-
thoiugh relatively hifh priced, 'are m.orc plentiful.




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