Cattle feeding situation

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Title:
Cattle feeding situation
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Unknown
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029026578
oclc - 85233313
System ID:
AA00014692:00021


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16"ti W UNITED STATES DEPARTICET OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
S. WASHINGTONI, D. C. Release, Noon
Monday .,
I!t **December 11, 1933

CATTLE FEEDIiNG SITUATION, DECEDU3ER 1. 1933

SShipments of stocker and feede: cattle into the Corn Belt States in
S November. were larger than the small shipments in November 1932 and were re-
latively large in relation to the total shipments for the 5 months, July to
November. They were, however, below the 5 year average (1928 to 1932) for
November and the third smallest for the month in 15 years.

The increase in November compared with November last year brought the
total for the 5 months, July to November, within about 10O0,00 head of last
-years small total. The total this year is about 8 percent below last year,
while for the three months, July to September, the total this year was 3C
percent below last year. This year's total is the smallest for the 15 years
for which records are available. The five months total into the Eastern Corn
Belt is much below the large shipments of 1932, but somewhat above the record
small shipments in 1930. The total into the Western Corn Belt is consider-
ably larger than the record small shipments in 1932 but s-Laller than any other
year.

The declining prices for stocker and feeder steers during October and
November caused many raisers of such cattle in the range States to seek cutlets
in the Corn Belt whore they could have their cattle fed cut on shares in hopes
of increasing their net returns. While there was probably sime movement of
such cattle direct to feed lots, the relatively high level of corn prices in
relation to cattle prices and the practical guarantee of a maintenance of present
corn prices through the 45 cents a bushel loan privilege has had the effect if
limiting the Corn Belt demand for cattle to be fed on shares. There has, however,
been a fairly heavy movement of cattle direct to feeders sold through the local
auction markets in Nebraska and some other States which rmay have been somewhat
larger than last year.

etord-s of shipments of stocker and feeder cattle from 4 leading
markets indicate that for the 5 months, July to November, the proportion of
light weight steers (under 700 pounds) and of feeder calves, was larger this
year than last, and the proportion of steers above 7CC00 pounds correspondingly
smaller, with most of the decrease in steers over 900 pounds. In all cases,
however, the total numbers were less than last year. Shipments of stocker and
feeder cows and heifers from these markets, however, were iaot only a larger
proportion than last year but were larger in actual numbers.

Information available about December 1 as to the volume of cattle
feeding in the Western States this year indicates that a smaller number will
be fed in Colorado and the Rocky Mountain States this year, but that the States
west of the Continental Divide will feed about the same number as last year.
The number of cattle fed both at oil mills and on farms in Texas is expected
t'o be considerably smaller this year than last.




7/


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

31262 08867 1770




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