Cattle feeding situation

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Title:
Cattle feeding situation
Physical Description:
Unknown
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. ( Washington, D.C )
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Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029026578
oclc - 85233313
System ID:
AA00014692:00020


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J4 2 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
,.( ^ 2 ^yV-'f BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOM1ICS
wAS-INTON, .C. Release, iToon
Thursday,
Tovermoer 9, 1933

CATTLE FEEDINI SITUATION DTOVE1fER 1. 1933

The shipments of stocker and feeler cattle froa livestock markets into
the Corn Belt States in October were larce relative to the very small shinments
in the preceding 3 months and were considerably larger than tie very small
shipments in October 1932. They were, however, much below the avera-e October
shipments for the 11 years 1921 to 1931 and were the third 3.Iallest for
the month in the 15 years for which records are available. This increased
movement in October, even though prices of fed cattle wcro doclinin- steadily
to the lowest level reached in the fall for many years, can be explained in part
by the declining prices of corn and other feed grains, increased supplies of
fall feed resulting from favorable moisture and weather conditions in Sertemrber
and October, lower prices for stocker and feeder cattle, and the large supply
of cattle coming to stoclkards markets in October.

Total shipments of stocker and feeder cattle from rjarkcts into the
Corn Belt for the 4 months, July to October, were the smallest for the period
in at least 15 years, being about 100,000 head or over 10 percent smaller than
in 1927 when the next smallest shipments occurred. Compared with last year,
all of the decrease was in the area east of the l.ississip-ui River, where the
shipments last year were quite large. The total into this area is abor.t the
same as the very small shipments in 1930, -hon, as this year, the corn crop
was small. Shipments into the area west of the Tisrissippi were not much
different from the record small shipments cf last year. Precent indications
are that cattle feedin, this winter will be in sLaller volume t:an a year
earlier in all Corn Belt States except possibly Iowa and Nebrasla..

Reports from the Western States indicate that in nearly all of those
States cattle feeding will be in smaller volume than last year, and the movement
to feed lots and pastures up to November 1 was small. However, the supply of
beet pulp in these states, resulting from a record production of sugar beets,
will be very large and it is possible that the various su-ar companies later
in the season will feed an increased number of cattle to utilize this feed.
More than in most other years feeding in the West will be in the hands of
packers and other large operators.

Compared to the fall of 1932, the prices of stocker and feeder steers
this fall are from $0.75 to $1.00 lower and at the lowest level in over 25
years. Corn and other feed rains and hay are considerably higher than a
year ago. If corn prices in the Corn Belt States during the next 4 or 5
months continue at about the same spread above a year earlier that they -ere
in October, the increased cost of corn for feeding will be about offset by
the present decreased price of feeder cattle.




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