Cattle feeding situation

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Material Information

Title:
Cattle feeding situation
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Cattle -- Feeding and feeds -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, <1947>-1953; by: Agricultural Marketing Service, <1954->

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029026578
oclc - 85233313
lccn - 2011229345
System ID:
AA00014692:00019


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Full Text
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sL .'cai /^tTE STATES DEPARTff-iFIT OF AGRIC-ULTUPEL
BU EAU OF AGRICTJLTUJRAL EC0rO:1,ICS
WASHINGTON, D. C.

Release October 10, (12:00 noon E. T.)

CATTLE FEEDING SIJATION OCTOBE3R '. 1933

Developments in the cattle feeding situation, to the *-nd of September
pointed to a relatively small volume of cattle feeding in the winter of 1933-34
both in the Corn Belt and in most other important feeding States. The short
corn crop in the Corn Belt, the relatively high prices of feed grains, hay
and other feeds compared with fat cattle prices, the failure of the fat cattle
market to make any seasonal advance since June, the generally unfavorable returns
from cattle feeding during the last 12 months, and in some States, difficulty in
financing-feeding operations, have all been factors discouraging cattle feeders.

Shipments of stocker and feeder cattle, inspected through livestock
markets, into the Corn Belt States during the three months, July to September,
this year were much the smallest for this period in at least 15 years. The
small movement in July and August was probably due in part to the shortage of
pastures generally, but the continued small movement in September represented a
general lack of demand. Compared with the shipments in these months last year,
when shipments were large due to the unusual movement of heavy feeders, the de-
crease this year is about 30 percent; compared with the next smallest shipments
in 15 years (in 1927) the decrease is about 17 percent.

The sharpest decrease from last year was in t'he movement into the Corn
Belt States east of the Mississippi River. Only about half as many cattle were
shipped into these States during the three months period this year as were shippe&
in last. Shipments from central markets into the States west of the Mississippi
were about 15 percent smaller than the small movement of list year. There was,
however, a relatively heavy direct mov.-'"cnt largelyy by truck) of cattle from
local auction markets in iTebraska and so,.i other States, Vhere this method of
marketing continues to expand. Hence, as indicating the probable volume of cat-
tle feeding, neither records of inshipnents from central markets nor records of
car-lot receipts at feeding stations arc comparable with f,:':.er years when most
of the cattle fed were shipped by rail from central yair1-t.

In other recent years in which the inshipments of ',cckers and feeders were
small in number for July to September there was a rol,.: .1" heavy movement dur-
ing the last three months of the year. Market suppliui c, nil cattle from
October to December are expected to be relatively large uhis year so that there
Swill be ample supplies of unfinished cattle to meet any imprw-vement in demand for
stockers and feeders, which will depend largely upon the trends of prices of fat
cattle and of feed grains during the next six months.

Such evidence as was available at the end of September indicated that
cattle feeding in most of the Western States and in Tuxas vould bo on a reduced
scale this winter. In most of these States feed prices arc much higher than a
year ago and returns from cattle feeding last winter were not such as to encourage
feeding operations this year.


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