Cattle feeding situation

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Title:
Cattle feeding situation
Physical Description:
Unknown
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029026578
oclc - 85233313
System ID:
AA00014692:00014


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U AA. 4 IC UNIZe STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
; Q24N1 BUmEAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
2r'tIVISION OF CROP XD LIVESTOCK ESTIMATES
WASPIiGTON
RELEASE AFlTOONl PAPERS
TIJRSDAY, DECMER 11, 1930.

CATTLE FEEDING SITUATION DECEt.I.E 1., 1930.

The shipments of stocker and feeder cattle through public stock-
yards into the eleven Corn Belt states in lNovember this :rear were relative-
ly large. While they '-ere 15 per cent smaller than the heavy shipments
in November 1929, they were only 5 per cent smaller than the November
average for the five "ears 195lq to 1929.

The receipts of cattle at markets during lNovember this .rear -'ere the
smallest for the month in many years. For the 7 leading markets they
- -a- .h-smallest in over fourteen :ears and i'ere only 79 per cent as
large as in.November 1929 and 69 Der cent of the 5-year November average.

The total shipments of stockers and feeders into the Corn Belt for
the five months, July to November, inclusive, this year, because of the
small shipments during the first three months of the period, were 12 per
cent or 180,000 head smaller this :rear than in 1929 and 10 per ce.t
smaller than the 5-year average shipments for the period. The.; ,- ere the
second smallest since 1920. Shipments into all of the states except
Nebraska, South 'akota and Minnesota "-ere smaller this vear than last.
There was an increase of 20 per cent in the shipments into Ue'braska and
small increases in the shipments into the otier two states.

The number of cattle fed in the western states will probably be small-
er this winter than last. As a result of heavy in-shipments into northern
Colorado during iNovember it nor seems probable that Colorado will feed about
as many cattle as in the winter of 1929-30. There will be a small increase
in feeding over a year ago in TWyoming and Nevada and a considerable increase
in California, where cattle feeding in the winter of 1929-30 was on a very
restricted scale. In all of the other western states the number will be
smaller this year than last. Shipments of feeder cattle into the Lancaster,
SPennsylvania feeding area to the end of November indicates that feeding there
this winter will be much reduced from last winter.

With shipments of cattle into the Corn Belt smaller this vear than
last, with the mnovemr.ent relatively late and with the large proportion of
calves in the total, indications are that the supply of fed cattle avail-
able for market during the first three months, at least of 1931 will be
considerably smaller than for the same period in 1930.




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