Cattle feeding situation

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Title:
Cattle feeding situation
Physical Description:
Unknown
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. ( Washington, D.C )
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029026578
oclc - 85233313
System ID:
AA00014692:00011


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436 C:2'I
<., UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
V ASH I IGT ON

RELEASED TO AFTERNOON PAPERS
MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1929,

CATTLE FEEDIITG SITUATION OCTOBrR 1, 1929.

The movement of stocker and feeder cattle into tYe Corn Belt States dur-
ing the three m-nonths July to September inclusive, this year, points to sore
reduction in fall and winter cattle feeding this year from last. The number
of cattle and calves shipped from markets into the Corn Belt this vear for
these three months was 20 per cent smaller than for the same months last year
and 13 per cent smaller than the 5 rear average shipments for this period.
The number this year was the second smallest for the period in 12 years.

The demand for stocker and feeder cattle during Aug'.st and September
this year was much below that during the same months in 1928, the 20 per cent
reduction in shipments being accompanied by prices from 10 to 15 per cent
lower. This falling off in demand was due to the much poorer prospects for
the corn crop this year than last, the lower level of fat cattle prices this
year, the much less profitable results from cattle feeding during the first
half of 1929 than for this period in 1928, and to the absence of the specu-
lative activity in cattle that was generally prevalent in the summer of 1928.

While shipments into nearly all of the Corn Belt States this year from
July to September were smaller than last 'rear the largest reductions were in
the shipments into Missouri and Kansas, where corn crop prospects this year
compared to last are the poorest of all the Corn Belt States.

With the improvemer.t in the corn outlook during September, as evidenced by
the increase in the October estimate of corn production compared to that of the
September estimate and with lower winter corn prices in prospect than seemed
probable in August and September, some improvement in the Corn Belt demand for
unfinished cattle seems likely The movement of stockers and feeders into the
born Belt during the last quarter of 1928, October to December, was the smallest
in over eight ears, and was also an unusually small proportion of the total
movement for tt-.e six months, Jul- to December. The move.nenit during the last
quarter of 1929 will probably be at least equal to that of last year, and may
exceed it if cattle supplies the balance of this year are as large as for the
same period last year.

Records of the kinds and weights of stocker and feeder cattle shipped
from four leading markets show a continuation of the growing preference for
light weight cattle that has been in evidence for some years. For the three
months Jul, to September this vear compared to last year these records show a
drop in the proportions of feeders weighing over 900 pounds and of cows and
heifers, but a sharp increase in the proportion of feeder calves.




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