Cooperative agricultural extension work

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Material Information

Title:
Cooperative agricultural extension work organization and finances
Physical Description:
35 p. : ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher:
U.S. Government Printing Office
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- United States   ( lcsh )
Agricultural extension work -- Finance -- United States   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, States Relations Service ; A.C True, director
General Note:
"S.R.S. doc. 40."
General Note:
Caption title

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029618952
oclc - 85229867
System ID:
AA00014627:00001


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i' D 'Yj"N TL%$r<




.... ..ii.;::" U. S. DEPARTME tA ., IC
.iSE 1 :;; :. : .. .. ..t:
7 'it STATES RE]tifONW.Q
A. C. TRUE, Diactzr.



OPERATE AGRICULTURE KO WORK.
ORGANIZATION AND FINANCES.

.... Exten. sion work is that phase of instruction which is carried on
0W..f people who are not resident students at an educational insti-
l i. During the past 15 years the United States Department of
g lre and the State agricultural colleges have been developing
IS ethods of agricultural extension work, and this circular is
to explain briefly the organization and financing of the exten-
.....P.. *.tow being carried on cooperatively by the department and
... ... i ...... .

.. : COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION ACT.

S a ent nation-wide system of agricultural extension work.to
d on by the State agricultural colleges in cooperation with
:" .0. ,r1 :. ... :..... .. .. .., ..
4t Mof Agriculture was provided for by Congress in the
S7 .agricultural extension act of May 8, 1914 (see p. 34).
i. tenohM work includes practical instruction and demonstra-
.,,pn::.nur. p e and home economics given to persons not attend-
h.77.. i
:it in olleg~ inthe several communities and the imparting
: .igh field demonstrations, publications, and other-
t to be carried on in such manner as may be mutually
.7i ."..the Secretary of Agriculture and the State agricul-

vide sa comprehensive basis for the cooperative
-.it.l ion r work in the several States a general memo-
.,ing: tn : between the department and the colleges
'..."I !', .inmorandum provides that each college shall
: ia definite and distinct administrative division
.t andI conduct of extension work in agriculture
: :. .. .. .







:,-l$e ctre wofas W ep director selected by
..P1 Serta oh Agie tates: Department of Agri-









made by Con"igte or the State legislature, by allotment .d.
board of trustees of thetollege, or from any other source;
cooperate with the departinent in all extension work in
and home economics which the department is authorized by
to conduct in the states. '
ORGANIZATION Or iR' E EXTENSION WORK IN THE DEPART
S- s AGRICULTURE.
The States Relations Service represents the Departmentf
culture in the adiniqAizibn and general supervision of allits.
active extenisi6ni otk:k'ia agriculture and home econofmies.
involves relations with the State agricultural colleges and the di
bureaus of the department. Before any work requiring the exp
ture of the cooperative agricultural extension funds is udert
a State the act requires that the plans for work shall have t1fnj"
proval of the Secretary of Agriculture. The director of ex
of the college must submit detailed projects covering each Jie~,i
extension work, with proposed allotment of funds for ea i:a,
approval by the department. After approval of the projeets
State is certified by the department to the United States Tfe
as entitled to receive its funds.
In addition to the funds provided by the cooperative agridt1
extension act, Congress makes direct appropriations to the D
ment of Agriculture for certain extension activities, the most'
tant of which are farmers' cooperative demonstration work (mi
the county-agent work, home-demonstration work, boys' and
club work, and farm-management demonstrations), ca
through the States Relations Service, and the several lines of e
sion work carried on by the Bureau of Plant Industry, Bu 04
Animal Industry, the Bureau of Markets, and the Ofljce of
Management. The farmers' cooperative demonstration w0ork
other extension work of the States Relations Service is adinins
through the Office of Extension Work in the South for the Sou
States, and the Office of Extension Work in the North and W tB-i
the Northern and Western States. The Bureau of Animal In.du.
is conducting extension work in dairying,' animal husbandry, :
cholera prevention, boys' pig clubs, and boys' and girs' po*.
dubs. The Bureau of Markets is carrying on extension workA
marketing and the organization of farname to assist in the soltia
of various marketing problems. The Bueau of Plant Indust i
carryig on extension work in relation to plant diseases and dise$
resisting strains of plants. The Bureau of Soils, Forest in
Bureau of Entomology, Bureau of Biological Survey, Office offi

1'a.. ......
:"; *".. '. ... .. .








Beads and Rural Engineering, and the Office of Farm Management
are also cooperating with the States in carrying to the people the
discoveries made in connection with their investigational work.
ORGANIZATION IN THE STATES.
The organization established in most State agricultural colleges
consists of an extension division, at the head of which is a director
who is in charge of all cooperative agricultural extension work in the
State. Under this director there generally are men in charge of various
lines of work. In some States a State leader has charge of county-
agent work and boys' and girls' club work, the agents in charge of club
work being subordinate to him; in other States there is a separate
State leader for the club work. The number of officers assisting the
director varies with the size of the State and the development of
extension activities. In addition to the supervising agents specialists
are engaged in conducting extension schools and in other ways coop-
erating with the county agents in the instruction of farmers and their
families.
MONEY AVAILABLE UNDER THE COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL
EXTENSION ACT.
The cooperative agricultural extension act provided that each State
should receive $10,000 annually for cooperative extension work in
agriculture and home economics, making a total of $480,000 per
annum, beginning with the fiscal year 1914-15. For the fiscal year
1915-16 it provided for $600,000 additional to be distributed among
the several States in the proportion that the rural population of each
State bears to the total population of all the States, as determined
by the last census. This amount is to be increased by $500,000 each
year until the fiscal year 1922-23, when the total amount reaches
$4,580,000. This additional appropriation does not become available
to a State until an equal amount has been appropriated by the
legislature of that State or provided by State, county, college, local,
or individual contributions from within the State. The aggregate
sums thus required to be provided by the States will be $4,100,000
for the fiscal year 1922-23, and annually thereafter.
The table following indicates the amounts the individual States
will receive from the Federal appropriation under the cooperative
agricultural extension act, provided the terms of the act are com-
plied with.











Maximum amounts of Pederal funds which each State it itmdriH
Lever Act for cooperative agricultra edmen Ojn
________________; :: *"*.-. ''; ..'^ ^


State.


Alabama........
Arizona.........
Arkansas........
California........
Colorado........
Connecticut......
Delaware........
Florida..........
Georgia.........
Idaho............
Illinois..........
Indiana...........
Iowa............
Kansas...........
Kentucky.......
Louisiana ........
Maine...........
Maryland........
Massachusetts....
Michigan........
Minnesota.......
Mississippi........
Missouri ........
Montana........
Nebraska.........
Nevada.........
New Hampshire..
New Jersey.......
New Mexico......
New York......
North Carolina...
North Dakota....
Ohio............
Oklahoma .......
Oregon..........
Pennsylvania ....
Rhode Island.....
South Carolina...
South Dakota....
Tennessee........
Texas...........
Utah............
Vermont........
Virginia.........
Washington......
West Virginia....
Wisconsin.......
Wyoming........
Total.......


Rural
population,
census 1910.


1,767,662
141,094
1,371,768
907,810
394 184
114,917
105,237
533,539
2,070,471
255,696
2,161,662
1,557,041
1,544,717
1,197,159
1,734,463
1,159,872
360,928
637,154
241,049
1,483,129
1,225,414
1, 589,803
1,984,518
242,633
881,362
175,473
629,957
280,730
1,928,120
1,887,813
513,820
2,101,978
1,337,000
365,705
3,034,442
17,956
1,290,568
507,215
1,743,744
2,958,438
200,417
187,013
1,585, 083
536,460
992,877
1,329,540
102,744
S49,348,883


Proportion
oftotal
rural
population,
census 1910.
A


Fiscal
yeari
1914-15.


Fi1sal yar
10155 I


Thi rc'ar1


V ,; :. .,,,
"- "* .':i i" :"



: .-*-qy
Ficayil
.*-*
""**-^


P I I. I .


Per cent.
3.5819696
.2850112
2.7797346
1.8395756
.7987699
.2328665
.2132510
1.0811572
4.1955782
.5181394
4.3803666
3.1551697
3.1301965
2.4250090
3.5146956
2.3503511
.7313803
1.2911214
.4884589
3.0053953
2.4831646
3.2215582
3.8390291
.4916687
1.7859817
.1388238
.3555764
1.2765375
.5688682
3.9071198
3.8254422
1.0411988
4.2594237
2.7092812
.7410603
6.1489578
.0363858
2.6151919
1.0278145
3.5335025
5.9949442
.4061227
.3789609
3.2119937
1.0870763
2.0119543
2.6941643
.2081992
99.9999999


$10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10, 000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
1.000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
40,000


$31,491.82
11,715.47
2,678.41.
21,057.45
14,792.62
11397.29
11,279.51
16,486.94
35,173.47
13,108.84.
36282.20
28,931.02
28,781.18
24,555.45
31,088.17
24,10. 11
14,388.28
17,746.73
12,930.75
28s,0o.37
24,898.99
29,329.35
33,034.17
12,90.01
20,715.89
10,8 2.94
12.133.46
17,659.22
13,413.20
33,442.72
32,952.65
16,247.19
35,556.54
26,255.69
14,446.36
46,883.75
10, 218.31
25, 691.15
16,166.89
31,201.01
45,969.67
12, 436.74
12,273.77
29,271.96
16,522.46
2,071.73
26,164.99
11, 249.20
1,080,000.00


$41, 1.A67
13,145. 05
40,577.05
30,335.33
18,786. 4
12, 561.5
12,345.76
21,892.75
6,151.36
uO699. 54
5184.E
44,706.87
44,432.16
36,685.400
48,661.65
35,853.87
18,045.18
24,202,384
15,373.04
43,059.35
37,314.81
45,437.14
52,229.32
15,408.35
29,645.80
11,527.06
13,911.34
24,041.91
16,257.54
5,978.32
52,079.86
21,453.18
56,853.66
39 802.10
18 151.66
77.638.54
10,400.24
38, 767.11
21,305.96
48,868.52
75,944.39
14, 467.35
14 168a 57
45,331.93
21,957.84
32,131.50
39, 65.81
12,290. 2
1,580,000.00


48,814.j


30, 657.
17,815.fl;
49,730.63
61,544.s9
71,424.47
17, 866. 69
38,575.71
12,321.18
30,424. 0
19,101.88
72,513.92
71,207.07
26,659.17
78, 150.78
53348. 51
21, 85.96
10 83.33
10,562.17
51,843.07

105,19.11
16,497.96
16, 03..37.



13,331.20

2,083,000.00
6 :-


I Each State must duplicate all Federal money above $10,000 per year. -ii ..t.,
2 After 1920 the allotments are to be based on the returns for rural population of the&bt'i

The totals for each State contain the basic $10,000 grn
year. To obtain the amount that the State would have to d
in any year to receive its entire Federal quota, subtract $1 J
the total. Example: The amount Alabama has to have to d *
in 1916-17 is $49,401.16 minus $10,000, or $39,401.16.- '.
The States have supplied the money necessary to offset. the Fe
Smith-Lever funds mainly through direct ap proriat.io ...
$600,000 required of the States in 1915-16, approxima l :i.

". '' ... i r.
:.. .. : .~: .""... a :1,
M : ::. ..... ..:.: :' .:.. :!'


I











I :r


State.


Alabama:
1915-16................
1916-17................
1917-18 ...............
Arizona:
1915-16...............
1916-17.................
1917-18...............

1915-16................
1916-17................
1917-18................

1915-16................
1916-17...............
1917-18 ...............
Colorado:
1915-16................
1916-17................
1917-18................
Connecticut:
1915-16................
1916-17................
1917-18................
Delaware:
1915-16................
1916-17................
1917-18 ...............
Florida:
1915-16................
1916-17 ................
1917-18...............
Georgia:
1915-16................
191617 ................
1917-18................
Idaho:
915-16 ..............
1916-17 ...............
1917-18 ................
Illinois:
-1915-16...............
M16-17 ................
1917-18...............
Indiana:
1915-1 ................
1916-17 ..............
1917-18 ..............
Iowa:
iSi-i..............
1-17................
113-11 ... ....&......


Total. State. County. College. Local. M
I I IIneous.


$21,491.82
39,401.67
57,311.52

1,715.47
3,145.03
4,574.59

16,678.41
30,577.08
44,475. 75

11,037.45
20,235.33
29,433.21

4,792.62
S,786.47
12,780.32

1,397.20
2,561.53
3,725.86

1,279.51
2,345.76
3,412.01

6,486.94
11,892.73
17, 298.52

25,173.47
46,151.36
67,129.25

3,108.84
5,699.54
8,290.24

26,282.20
48,184. 03
70,085.86

18,931.02
34,706.87
50,48.72

.18,781.18
34,432.16
50,03. 14


$5,000.00
29,325.00
46,909.85

1,715.47
3,145.03
4,574.59

16,678.41
27,177.08
31,975.75

11,037.45
20,235.33
..............

4,792.62
8,786.47
12,780.32

1,397.20
2,561.53
3,725.86

1,279.51
2,345.76
3,412.01

6,486.94
11,892.73
17,298. 52

25,173.47
46,151.36
67,129.25

3,108.84
5,699.54
8,290.24





18,931.02
34,706.87
50,482.72

18,781.18
34,432.1
50,08. 14


$15,000.00
10,076.67
10,401.67



............


............ ............
3,400.00 ............
12,500.00 ............

........ .... ............
............ I .
...... 1. $29,433.21

............ ............
............ ............
............ ............

............ ............
............ ............
............ ............

.. ........ ............
... ......... .........

............ ............
. .... .. .........


5,400.00


... .........I............I


$1,491.82


. .............. .... .. ............
.... ......................
............ I ---------- -I


............ ------------
............ ............













............ ............
............ ............
............ ............
........... ..........
......................

............ ..........


20,882.20
48,184.03
70,085.86


............ ............

... ........ ............

............ ........ .
.,........... ............


5


was provided by direct State appropriations, $68,000 by county

appropriations, $38,000 from funds under the direct control of the

colleges, $22,000 from local sources, and $12,000 from miscellaneous

sources. The $1,100,000 required for 1916-17 was obtained from the

following sources: $904,000 from State appropriations, $84,000 from

county appropriations, $64,000 from college appropriations, and

$48,000 from local contributions. In 1917-18 the States have con-

tributed $1,241,000, the counties 203,000, the colleges $83,000, and

the local organizations $72,000. Although the amounts received

from funds other than those directly appropriated by the States

have increased, their relative importance has remained practically

the same. The following table indicates the sources of offset in

the individual States:


TABLE II.--Soures of offset to Federal Smith-Leverfutds, 1915-16, 1916-17, and 1917-18.


H'";


............
............
... ... ...


............
....... .....
......,......


............
............


............
............
............


. ...........
...... .....
............


............
... .. .. ..
............


............
............
............

............
... ... ...
.. .. .. ..


............
............
.-..---..---




















Kansas:
1915-16................
1916-17................
1917-18................
Kentucky:
1915-16................
1916-17 ................
1917-18 ...............
Louisiana:
1915-16................
1916-17...............
1917-18................
Maine:
1915-16-.............
1916-17...............
1917-18.-..............
Mary and:
1915-16................
1916-17................
1917-18................
Massachusetts:
1915-16...............
1916-17..............
1917-18 ..............
Michigan:
1915-16 -...........---
1916-17................
1917-18...............
Minnesota:
1915-16................
1916-17 ...............
1917-18...............
Mississippi:
1915-16...............
1916-17...............
1917-18..............
Missouri:
1915-16...............
1916-17...............
1917-18..............
Montana:
1915-16..............
1916-17................
1917-18 ........-.....
Nebraska:
1915-16...............
1916-17................
1917-18..............
Nevada:
1915-16...............
1916-17.............
1917-18..............
New Hampshire:
1915-16..............
1916-17..............
1917-18...............
New Jersey:
1915-16...............
1916-17................
1917-18...............
New Mexico:
1915-16...:............
1916-17................
1917-18................
New York:
1915-16...............
1916-17...............
1917-18................
North Carolina:
1915-16...............
1916-17................
1917-18...............
North Dakota:
1915-16..............
1916-17..............
1917-18..............
Ohio:
1915-16.............
m116-17 ..............
1917-18.................


I I


U84,556 45
26,685.00
38,814.55

21,088.17
38,661.65
56,235.13

14,10L 11
25,863.87
37,605.63

4,388.28
8,045.18
11,702.08

7,746.73
14,202.34
20,657.95

2,930. 75
5,373.04
7,815.33

18,032.37
33,059.35
48,086.33

14,898.99
27,314. 81
39,730.63

19,329.35
35.437. 14
51,544.93

23,034.17
42,229.32
61,424.47

2,950.01
5,408.35
7,866.69

10,715.89
19, 645.80
28,575.71

832.94
1,527.06
2,221.18

2,133.46
3,911.34
5,689.22

7,659.22
14,041.91
20,424.60

3,413.20
6,257.54
9,101.88

23,442.72
42,978.32
62,513.9

22,952.65
42,079.86
61,207.07

6,247.19
11,453.18
16,659. 17

25,55 .54
46 853.66
68,150.78


814, 55&45
26,685.00
38,814.55

12,000.00
19,000.00
21,235.13

14,054.;
20,000.00
25,000.00

4,38828
8,045.18
11,702.08

1,800.00
14,202 34
20,657.95

2,930.75
5,373.04
7,815.33

..............


14,898; 99
27 314. 81
39,730. 63

5,000. 00
15,053.33
17,900 00

23,034.17
42,229.32
33,964.47

2 950.01
5,408.35
7,866.69'

10,715. 8C
19,645.80
28,575,71

832.94
1,527.06
2,221.18

2,133. 46
3,900.00
5,689.22

7,659.22
14,041.91
20,424 60-

3, 400.0 )
6,257.54
9,101.88

23,442-72
23,600.00
0. 513.92


.. .................. .. ...
............. ........... ........... i i

8,088f.17 ----------..-----.. a
5,000.00 $14,461.65 M ...00
S ,o5o$.( 14i.ofeo ...........,,.... ....
............ ... .......
5,853.87 ...................... .....
.. .... ----- ---
... ... .....................


3,000.00 2,946.73 ............ .......

............ ............ ................ ...
............ ............ ............ --- ,:.. ...... .,:!

.
.......... ............ ...... .. ...... .


............ t8,03237 ---...............
3,400.00 29,659.35 ............ ..-
10,000 0 38,086.3 ......... .. ......-

.. ............ .. .i.
............ ............ .......... ...... .......
...........- ............ ............ ......-. .:

14,329.35 .......... ---.........-. .-.i-
20,383.81 ............ ............
33,64.4.98 ----- ----ii...... .... .. *

.-- ------------.... i.. -', .,g r
............ .......... ,........... .......i:i:
27,460... 0 ....-.... -------.....--- ------

----..-- ------ ...- ...-.-.- -- -- .... --i!: I
............ ...... ...... .......i..--....- .
............ ............ ............ ..........
............ ............ ......... .... .

............ ......... ......" --.. ..,., *


......... ... i....i .. I,

i........ ... ....
............ ............ ............ ..----------- .. .: .;,
........ .... ............ ............ ..... ^...V:;,

............ ....... ........... ..... ..
............ 11.34 .. ..... ....... --..
............ ............ ......... ... .. ....
............ ........ ... ......... .... ... ..
............ ............ ...... .. ...... ..


13. 2 .......... .. .........- .-..-:::
............ ............ ............ ----- ..r ::ii


............ ............

............ ....... ..3..
. ............. W3&n


............ -.....- -. -..- *

........... .........
. .-- -t-" --- "..- .


S. ...... ........
11,478.65 ....................... ......... s U4a
42,079.86 ....................... .......... .. .... ..
61,2;7.,7 ............ ............ .......... .....---...-
6, 23-00D 11.1*.
'6,230a r 11"c ............ .......... "r.....::::::: :
11,453.18 ............ ............ ......... .I" "- ... ; .
16,68 17. ............ ............ ........... .........

25,5554 .......... .........................
46,853.66 ............ 6............ .............. ..... i.
68,10.78 ............ ...... ............... ........

I :""
,I









F
.i



A'


State.


Oklahmna:
1U.5-1 ...............
1916-17................
1Utr18&...............

S1-i6...............
1916-17 ............
10.7-18 ................
Pennsylvania:
1915-16 ...............
1916-17...............
1917-18............
Rhode Island:
1915-16...............
1916-17...............
1917-18..............
South Carolina:
015-16...............
1916-17..............
197-1-8-...............
South Dakota:
1915-16................
1916-17................
1917-18...............
Tennessee:
1915-16................
1916-17................
1917-18................
Texas:
1915-16................
1916-17................
1917-18......-........
Utah:
1915-16 ..............
1916-17................
1917-18.i..............
Vermont:
1915-16..............
1916-17..............
1917-18 -...... -........
Virginia:
1915-16................
1916-17;..............
1917-18..............
Washington:
19116..................
1916-17 ...............
1917-18...............
West Virginia:
1915-16..............
1916-17 ..............
1917-18..............
Wisconsin:
1915-16 ..............
1916-17................
1917-18..............
Wyoming:
1915-16................
1916-17 .............
1917-18 ..............
Total:
1915-16...........
1916-17..............
1917-18...............


offset to Federal Smith-Lever funds, 1915-16, 1916-17, and
1917-18-Continued.


State.


Total.



i6, 255. 69
29,802. 10
43, 34. 51

4,446.36
8,151.66
11,856.96

36,89. 75
67,638 51
98,383.33

218.31
400.24
582.17

15,691.15
28,767.11
41,843.07

6,166.89
11,305.96
16,445.03

21,201.01
38, 868.52
56,536.03

35,969.67
65,944.39
95,919.11

2,436.74
4,467.35
6,497.96

2,273.77
4,168.57
6,063.37

19,271.96
35,331.93
51,391.90

6,522.46
11,957.84
17,398.22

12,071.73
22,131.50
32,191.27

16,164.99
29,635.81
43,106.63

1,249.20
2,290.20
3,331.20

600,000.00
1,100,000.00
1,600,000.00


Count-y.




............






as, o00. 0.
30,000. CO
50,0.0000


$16,255. 09
29,802.10
43,348.51

4,446.30
8,151.66
11,856.96


37,638.54
48,38. 33


.... ....... "


15 601.15
28,767.11
41, 843.071

6,166.89
11,305.96
16,445.03

21,201.01
38,868.52
38,000.00

35,969.67
65,944.39
95,919. 11

2,436.74
4,467.35
6,497.96

2,273.77
4,168.57
6,063.37

17,109.16
33,831.93
48,564 40

6,522.46
11,957.84
17,393.22

12,071.73
18,131.50
24,621.27

16,164.99
29,635.81
43,106.63

1,249.20
2,290.20
3,331.20

459,046.00
904,090.72
1,241,266.67


2,162 80
1,500.00
2,827.50






4,000.00
7,570.00


68,004.71
83,614.35
202,846.91


College.


Local.


Miscela-
neous.


............ .....- ..... ..- .......
................ I--------- -- I -- ....


$16,893.75 .....................



218.31 ....--....... ------....---
400.24 ........... .............
582. 17 ...... ............ ............

. ........... ............ .......- ...

............ --- .-...- .... ........
.................
............ ............1--------

............. ............. ...


............: 2,.26.85 480.00


38,099.27
63,910.90
83,101.71


::::::::::::.:.::::::::..






48,384..03 ..........
72,354.71 430.00


In addition to the money directly appropriated to offset Federal

Smith-Lever funds and available under the provisions of the Smith-

Lever Act, considerable sums of money have been contributed from

various sources within the States.

SIn 1914-15 the total expenditures for cooperative agricultural

S extension work amounted to over $3,600,000. Of this $905,000

S was derived from the farmers' cooperative demonstration funds of

: .the United States Department of Agriculture, $105,000 from other



.. """.:. ....... ..:.


TABLE II.-Soures of


__


............
............
............
...........

............
...........

............
............
152,%-7.18..

............
............


I


............ ............
.........................
------------ -.-..--.--.--

............ ............
............ -. .. -


............
............
............


..........


I............
............


I
- -- - - -
- -
. .---------- ............

-- .-- .------- ------- -...-

............ ............


............

............


............
............


............ ............
..----..-.-- ---.---.---.-
............ ............

............ ............
............ ..
- .-- -.-. .









Smith-Lever funds, $712,000 from State funds, $815,000 from1i
funds, $345,000 from college funds, and $245,000 from otheri'
laneous sources.
In 1915-16 the amount increased to $4,900,000. Of this $5
was derived from the farmers' cooperative demonstration R
the United States Department of Agriculture, $157,000 from
bureaus and offices of the department, $1,080,000 from the
Smith-Lever funds, $600,000 from State Smith-Lever funds, $S'
from other State funds, $939,000 from county funds, $210,000fr
college funds, and $274,000 from other miscellaneous sources. :'''
The total amount in 1916-17 was $6,100,000 derived fo
following sources: $943,000 from the farmers' cooperative
station funds, $120,000 from other bureaus and offices of the
ment, $1,580,000 from Federal Smith-Lever funds, $1,100,000i
State Smith-Lever funds. Approximately $600,000 was-appro
by the State legislatures in addition to the money put up..l |
offset, $1,250,000 from county funds, $140,000 from college:. ...
and $370,000 from other miscellaneous sources. "
The $7,600,000 allotted for extension work in 1917-18 was deri
from the following sources: From direct appropriation for f
cooperative demonstration work, $1,040,000; for demonstration*
other bureaus and offices of the department, $185,000; from
Smith-Lever funds, $2,080,000; from State Smith-Lever
$1,600,000; and in addition to the funds for the State Smith-a ..
offset, the States allotted $530,000, the counties $1,545,000, the l :
leges $200,000; and from other miscellaneous sources $445,000 .'.l
allotted. The table following indicates the total amount availab* qi
each State and for the United States as a whole, for the four yeai
and the sources of funds:



.. ." : ...:.ii





'-il!
:M
*
.. ..... .:







Y .. ....

... :











S TABLE III.-S-ources of cooperative agricultural ext~z ion work funds, 1914-15, 1915-16,
1916-17, and 1917-18.


United States
Department of Smith-Lever.
Agriculture.

State. Farmers' State. County. College. Other. Total.
coopera-
t=a- Other
tae Other rFederal. State.
demon- bureaus. Fede
station
work.

Alabama:
1914-15....... $47,522 $4,114 810,000 .......... $28,592 $19,375 $825 $2,659 $113,087
1915-16...... 46,000 4,620 31,493 $21,493 25,000 10,00 ......... 1,000 139,606
1916-17...... 43,500 ......... 49,402 39,402 ......... 30,000 ................ 162,303
1917-18...... 43,500 9,780 67,312 57,312 2,090 25,000 00 ... 205,594
Arizona:
1914-15...... 1,858 ......... 10,000 .......... 4,444 57 ......... 920 17,279
1915-16...... 4,436 938 11,715 1,715 3,285 4,500 968 375 27,931
1916-17 ..... 5,200 2,250 13,145 3,145 2,150 8,800 700 750 36,140
1917-18.i.... 7,660 ......... 14,575 4,575 1,000 5,000 .....-... 1,600 34,410
Arkansas:
1914-15...... 41,575 2,620 10,000 .......... 6,237 43,213 4,667 3,038 111,348
1915-16...... 40,000 7220 26,678 16,678 3,318 54,52 ......... 7,137 155,183
1916-17...... 38,000 ......... 40,577 30,577 76,236 ......... 7,625 193,015
1917-18...... 38,000 6,670 54,477 44,477 ......... 68,236 ......... 3,547 215, 47
Californiam
1914-15...... 6,193 ......... 10,000 .......... ........ 22,000 27,529 2,601 68,323
1915-16...... 8,627 1,500 21,037 11,037 ......... 26,00 14,320 ........ 82,521
1916-17...... 10,620 1,500 30,235 20,235 14,320 28,000 ........ ........ 104,911
1917-18...... 15,122 1,500 39,433 29,433 ......... 28,000 14,320 ........ 127,808
Colorado:
.1914-15...... 9,884 ........ 10,000 ......... 1,441 8,364 ......... ........ 29,688
195-16...... 9,450 ... 14,792 4,72 ......... 15,700 4,920 4,250 53,905
1916-17..-.... 12,240 ..... 18,786 8,786 ......... 22,350 1,100 4,400 67,663
1917-18...... 15,140 4,340 22,780 12,780 10,000 47,50 ......... 1,500 104,040
Comseetieut:
1914-15...... 6,101 550 9,985 ......... 3,591 .......... ......... 5,000 25,226
1915-16...... 5,357 1,300 11,398 1,398 12,456 6,000 ......... 6,900 44,809
1916-17...... 8,720 1,400 12,562 2,562 14,004 8,000 ......... 9.950 57,197
1917-18...... 12,171 4,400 13,726 3,726 23,669 30,500 ........ 19,230 107,422
Delaware:
1914-15...... 2,205 260 10,000 .......... 5,000 .......... .... 1,131 18,595
1915-16...... 1,200 1,150 11,279 1,279 ......... ........... --..- .. 750 15,659
1916-17...... 900 1,850 12,346 2,346 ......... ...... ......... ........ 17,441
1917-18...... 2,500 ......... 13,412 3,412 ......... .......... ......... ........ 19,324
Florida:
1914-15...... 26,348 145 9,925 .......... 5,000 16.107 10,695 5,765 73,084
1915-16...... 25,000 ......... 16,491 6,491 5,000 23,747 8,790 200 85,719
1916-17...... 23,000 ......... 21,893 11,893 5,000 32,978 9,700 ........ 104,463
1917-18...... 23,000 ......... 27,299 17,299 10,250 32,978 ........ ........ 110,826
Georgiae.
1914-15....... 49,504 9,451 9,927 ......... 15,675 28,314 ......... 12,000 124,871
1915-16....... 50000 12,110 35,174 25,174 ......... 52,400 ......... ...... 174,858
1916-17....... 47,000 11,580 56,152 46,152 ........ 85,770 5000 ........ 251,652
1917-8....... 47,000 11,920 77,129 67,129 ......... 88,550 ......... ....... 201,728
Idaho:
1914-15....... 4,800 1,525 10,000 .......... 6,005 1,616 ......... 500 24,446
1915-16....... 4,800 1,200 13,109 3,109 10,800 7,550 ......... 850 41,417
1916-17....... 6,900 ........ 15,700 5,700 15,000 10,000 ......... 1,350 54,649
1M7-18....... 9,000 ......... 18,290 8,290 27,523 22,800 ................ 85,903
Elianois:
1914-15....... 16,727 240 10,000 .......... 14,600 50000 200 ........ 91,766
1915-16....... 17,002 ......... 36,282 26,282 30,000 16,050 ......... 23,000 148,616
1916-17....... 18,520 ......... 58,184 48,184 ........ 21,800 18,500 26,400 191,588
1917-18....- .......... ....-..... 80,086 70,086 ......... .......... 4,200 51,414 205,786
Indiawna
1914-15....... 13,066 1,614 10,000 .......... 64,145 44,935 .......... 4 498 138,259
1915-16....... 15,261 3,650 28,931 18,931 46,704 65,500 ......... 4,000 182,977
1916-17....... 15,854 3,100 44,707 34,707 27,375 70,993 ..... 3500 200,235
1917-18....... 18,507 3,000 60,483 50,483 11,157 85,500 ......... 4126 3,256
:l Iowa
14-15....... 17,217 6,070 10,000 .... 88,705 4,000 ......... 66,150 192,141
5-16 ....... 15,800 4,200 28,781 18781 83,466 4,160 ....... 74 700 2,888
16-17....... 18,440 3,000 44,432 34 432 71568 4,700 ........ 106,555 283127
S19-7-18....... 22,950 4,344 0,08 50,083 47,204 4,400 ......... 114,410 308,474
14-15 ....... 14,047 ......... 10,000 .......... ......... .......... 50,700 17,882 92,630
1 1-16....... 13,089 ........ 24,555555 14H ......... 3,e00 40,012 14,867 10,680
S 16-17....... 16,60 ......... 36,685 6,685 ......... 16,200 40,150 20,600 156,980
..1lBK...... --2,06 4,00 48,815 38.8. .. .50 30,000 6,877 173,783
Si 28942o- 18--2




















State.


Kentucky:
1914-15.......
1915-16-......
1916-17.......
1917-18.......
Louisiana:
1914-15-.......
1915-16 .......
1916-17.......
1917-18...-,.
Maine:
1914-15.......
1915-16.......
1916-17.......
1917-18.......
Maryland:
1914-15......
1915-16 .......
1916-17.......
1917-18 ......
Massachusetts:
1914-15......-
1915-16......
1916-17 ......
1917-18 ......
Michigan:
1914-15.......
1915-16 .......
1916-17.......
1917-18.......
Minnesota:
1914-15.......
1915-16......
1916-17 .......
1917-18.......
Mississippi:
1914-15.......
1915-16.......
1916-17.......
1917-18.......
Missouri:
1914-15......
1915-16.......
1916-17......
1917-18......
Montana:
1914-15......
1915-16.......
1916-17.......
1917-18......
Nebraska:
1914-15......
1915-16......
1916-17 .......
1917-18.......
Nevada:
1914-15........
1915-16.......
1916-17.......
1917-18 .......
New Hampshire:
1914-15.......
1915-16.......
61i6-17.......
117-187.......
New Jersey:
1914-15.......
1m15-16.......
1910-17.......
1917-18.......


United States
Department of
Agriculture.


Fanners'
coopera-
tire
demon-
stration
work.


836,861
41,000
40,000
40,000
43,946
42,000
40,000
40,000
1,360
1,100
5,500
8,085
14,977
21,000
19,000
19,000

11,572
13,354
14,736
20,356
17,377
15,082
23,202
25,001
16,218
13,961
15,450
19,411
48,118
45,000
42,500
42,500
11,034
11,600
11,500
11,200
6,456
7,800
9,460
13,500
15,538
13,640
15,000
17,908

200
2,500
4,470
5,074
6,098
8,700
11,900
4,959
6,775
9,251
13,071


Smith-Lever.


Other FederaL
bureaus. I


State.


State. ICounty.


I ~ I i ii .1 .


53,016
8,300
4,300
4,800
1.955
20,125
2,000
3,600
460



2,861
1,320




1,809
8,000
800

240
3,700
5,432
1,900
1,900
3,700
3,076
8,440

8,8560





1,334
1,500 1
1,500
3,1 30
2,795
3,000
3,000
4,000
1,184

1,500

90
500
1,200

200
.. ,. ...0
.. .. .
"'i......


I


s9,875
31,0m8
48,662
66,235
8,623
24,102
25L 4
47,606

10,W000
14 3891
18, 045
21,702
9, 750
17, 47
24,202
30,658
10,000
12,931
15, 373
17,815
10,000
28,082
43,059
58,066
10,000
24.899
37,315
49,731

10,000
29,329
45,437
61,545
810,00
33,034
52,229
71,425
10, o0
12,950as
15,408
17,867
10,300
20,716
29,6406
38,576
7,493
10,833
11,5 7
12,221

12,133
13,911
15, 69
9,987
17,659:
24,042
30,426


..........
321,088
38,462
56,235

14 102
25,854
37,606

4,3898
8,045
11,702

7,747
14,202
20,658:

2,931
5,373
7,815

Is8,032
33,059
48,086

14, 899
27,315
39,731

19,329
35,437
51,645

23,034
42,229
61,425

2,950
5,408
7,867

10,716
19,646
28,676,

833
1,527
2,321W

2,133
3,911i
5,689

7,159!
142,42
0,426M


531,928
12,727
33,000
ao,eoo

22,588
3,358
35,646
31,560





4,566
8,050

5,838
45,000
30,000
30,000
56,346
19,540
18,000
25,002
41,664
18,286
2,000
15,000
14,500
3,811
17,982
26,134
52,570


C -Itege


85.si4
7,005
*...*.....

-6,847
2,469
400



2,800
tC00
5,700
2,675


82,611
35,175


16,816

16,400
5,400
66,989
1,450
5,260
6,799

1,988
3,600


2.0
........





3,000
18,120
30,080


'11,497
35,302

3,424


21,270
39,812
19,970
..........
800
35,807


32,016
17360


4,101
18,282
19,446

75,000

6,364
4I,44i


,300


2,308
10,800
18, 000
6,200
1,200
1, 900
22p9W3


1




6,800
38,l00


I......., P


8,u6 15300

'75 i 200


5,384






15,950


I i;
I;.


17..EaW'

g""ar








-pa... *


22,400
51, 100

3,340:1


32, 583
8,800
9,100
10,20


6 87




2,650
1,550


600


47,450
53,350
64,000


6.,29 ....-..
2,p0 1,013
400 ,000
1008
i nT33


.


: ."** 1:


i..


-- r --------,. ~.~~.~


17,410 452 :
,800 8,s650 .
,20 ......... I,
........... 6,410


...M.f"


i


........ .


rrL-LLlrl

)1






TP









. .....


III.--ouc o/f operative agricultural tenasian work funds, 1914-15, 1915-16,
1916-17, and 1917-18,--ontj ned.


Ite.


New Mexico:
191-15.......
193--15-.6......
_16-17.......
i 7-18.......
lbw York:
114-15 ......
1935-16......
191--l17......

1914-15.......
Sw195-16......
18-1 .......
19. 7-18 ......
WNtrh Dakota:
1914-156.....
1915-16......
1914--17.....

7.1a--1.....
Ohio:

19T14--15 .....
19145-16.....
191-16......
1917-18.....
Oklahoma:
1914-16.....
1915-16......
1916-1 .....
1917-18.....
Oregon:
1914--......
1915-16......
1916-17......
1917-8......
senmsyvania:
1914-15......
1915-16......
1916-17......
1917-18.....
Rhode Island:
1914-15.....
1915-16 .....
1916-17......
1917-18 .....
Both Carolina:
*l 1915-16.... .
i 1916-17 ....
I 1917-18 .....
S south Dakota:
1914-15......
S1915-10......
S 1916-17......
: 1917-18......

|i 1914-15.....
S 1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18......
I" 1914-15......
S 191 41 6......
1i i8-17......
i 1917-18......
1..-. ......

[l9"-- '..i 4s......


United States
Department of
Agriculture.


Farmers'
tive
demon-
stration
work.


$6,833
7,617
10,060
13,800
26,587
20,041
24, 377
31,527
4,0800
41,000
40,000
43,120

9,449
7,101
10,410
11,150
2,182
7,369
13, 900
17,110
41,003
41,000
39,000
39,000
7,787
8,975
9,202
12058
18,442
12,981
..........
11,701
2,243
3,700
3,950
5,401
43,635
40, 800
40,400
40,400

6,153
10,100
11,660

31,201
39,000
37,000
37,000
72,403
71,500
67,000
68,784
9,678
-657
10330
15,013


Other
bureaus.




$479
1,500
1,400
1, 500

1,500



11,283
15,860
15,860
13,408
726
1,100

1,100
700
1,400
1,500
3,300
234
4,920
5,920
6,840
2,774
6,000
6, In0
890
2,500
13,000
2,620
210
500
1,000
12,254
14,440
13, 720
19,270


1,350
1,350

6,150
9,688
11,440
12,490
6,447
4800

5,016

1,400
6,600


Smith-Lever.


Federal.


$10,000
13,413
16,258
19,102
10,000
33,443
52. 978
72,514
10,000
32,953
52,080
71,207
10,000
16,247
21,453
26,659
9,931
35,557
56, 854
78,151
9,462
26, 256
39,802
53,349
10,000
14,446
18,152
21,857
10,000
46,894
77, 639
108, 383
10,000
10,218
10, 582
10,000
25,691
38,767
51,843
10,000
16,167
21,306
26,445
10,000
31, 202
48,869
66,536
9,979
45,970
75944
10i 919
lo, oo
2,437
14,467
16,498


State.


..........
38,413
6,258
9,102

28,443
42,978
62,514
..........
"22,95
42,080
61, 207

6,247
11,453
16,659

25,557
46,864
68,151

16,256
29,802
43,349

4,446
8,152
11,857

36,894
67,639
98,383

218
400
582

15,691
28,767
41,843
.... ..ii ..
6,167
11,306
16,445

21 202
38,869
56,536

35p970
65,944
95,919

2,437
dB8 g~


11


State.


$298
57,200
69,241
69, 066
56, 997
31,900
16,424

17, 'D65
13,270
20,983
21,969
20,000
38,085
74, 516
75, 891
52,019





56,087
53,236
56,124
48,033

o10,138




3, 175
3,300
3,750


2, 613

20,000
18,833
18,917
13,555
1,716



17,474



35,384
2,876
15,388
10,555


County.







'SO
11,166
12,700
17, 800
82,818
69,207
102,883
147,670
38,000
62,715
75,000
95,000
31,606
28,746
30,530
30,160

1, 700
22,300

9,935
20,000
31,750
61,560
15,827
18,300
24,651
25,822





858
..........
2, 550
3,500
17,401
21,442
40, 492
46,868
2,098
13,610
19,260
21,562
28,882
33,674
17,883
6,935
76,097
76,007
88,620
10 292

2,089
"3, 355
12,660
20 ON

1 6


College.


540
800
7,000
6,416
5,141
1,500
1,525












18,115
15,000
8,000
i.........





5,268
14,984
6,401

1,380
1,200
1,018
20,290
20, 050
7,958
7,245
S 610



6,895



13,581





iuisa.
.. .. .
.... ....


Other.


M604
120
1,800
500

35
35


22,988
20,050
16,300
3,850
266



3,008
........


5,225
4,045
2,345
6,001

21,650
7,755
5,081



1,754
3, 8901
4,351


5, 567
16,065
1,718
464
1,000
1,200


TotaL


$18,456
37; 229
49,015
62, 902
183,604
221,825
297, 428
374,222
133,508
191,905
225,019
31, 742

65,050
80, 424
95 815
105,828
50, 89
146,098
194, 998
241,031
101,736
143, 482
170,574
207, 948
92,741
104 804
122,280
125,807

47,639
114,253
158,280
227,488
13,310
24,416
25, 845
28,178
109,581
134,114
194, 367
215,224
42,857
62,279
82, 239
91,017
86,597
134,765
157,951
183,848
195,981
234,337
303,075
393,995
51,558
49,270
50,407
4,484













**


State.


Vermont:
1914-15......
1915-16......
1916-17......
1917-18......
Virginia:
1914-15......
1915-16.....
1916-17......
1917-18......
Washington:
1914-15......
1915-16......
1916-17 ......
1917-18......
West Virginia:
1914-15......
1915-16.....
1916-17......
1917-18......
Wisconsin:
1914-15......
1915-16 .....
1916-17......
1917-18......
Wyoming:
1914-15......
1915-16......
1916-17......
1917-18......
Total:
1914-15......
1915-16......
1916-17......
1917-18......


United
Depart
Agricu


Farmers'
coopera-
tive
demon-
stration
work.


$10,088
13,260
13,501
15,260

38,420
39,000
37 000
37,000

8,902
8, 434
11 940
17,458

23,284
25,000
23,015
23,000

11,422
11,010
11,100
11,601

5 817
7,060
8,450
12,430

905,782
914,290
94,088
1,037,501


States
nent of
Iture.



Other
bureaus.


Smith-Lever.


Federal.


State.


State..


County.


S1 .1 .1 1


$3,387
4,260


3, 781
2800
2,700
2,780

1,603
2,270
2,640
2,640
1,155
1,260
1,359
2,570

388
1,200
1,200
2,000

1,125
1,500
1,500

105168
157 621
121,609
182,708


310,000
12,274
14,169
16,063

9,997
29,272
45,332
61,392

10,000
16,522
21, 958
27,393

10,000
22,071
32,132
42,191

10,000
26,164
39,635
53,107

10,000
11,249
12,290
13,331

474 935
1,080,005
1,580,000
2,080,00


12,274
4,169
6,063

..........
19 272
35,332
51,392

6,522
11,958
17,393

12,071
22,132
32,191

..........
16,164
29,635
43,107

.........
1,249
2,290
3,331

600,005
1, 100.OCO
1,600,000


$7,571
8,576
3,831
1,937

26,661
2,891
45oo
4,500
2,436
3,009



34,402
22,929
23,942
15,379

19,766
31.902
179687

5,000
16,901
27, 335
39,306

711,516
696,405
597,105
530,564


10, 800
12.000
15,400
14;400

25,471
28,550
30,242
38,758

19,034
20,600
23,570
50,968

411
25,668
27,548
31,836

10,046
16,320
19,875
26,150

3,800
5,445
9,550
14,750

815,733
939 668
1,24 288
1,544,366


- .1 "" -


:.13.984.
u..,..



. ........


10,25M
5,30
S13,330








583,29





346,750
209,682
142,524
198,644


i 6



iT ...


4 ..


3,1W JR

1 M4








Se'
lAP1]



2 an ..'-


I t


*. .'M. : i








1A
..







. I


* ... lip






... .... .. : .. ... :


:L..::: : EE. .":. ..: I:. ,


__


~


Collng


.*


"::




-- -- ----------------- ---- --- ..-------- ----- -------------------------- ---------------- -- -----------------------------------------------------............................




13

The data given in the preceding table are summarized and classified
according to original sources of funds in the following table:


TABLE IV.-Funds available for cooperative agricultural extension
original sources.


work, classified by


;.

-Hp,










I







' Il:



Nii...,


Source of funds. 1914-15 1915-16 1916-17 1917-18

Federal Government:
Farmers' cooperative demonstration work.......... $905,782 $914,290 $943,088 $1, 037,501
Other bureaus...................................... 105,168 157,621 121,609 182, 708
Federal Smith-Lever............... ............ 474,935 1,080,005 1,580,000 2,080,000
Total............................................ 1,485,885 2,151,916 2,644,697 3,300,209
Within the State:
State-- 1,241,266
C.-.et ....................................... ........... ... 459,046 904,090 530,564
Other State .................................... 711,516 696,405 597,105
1,771, 830
Total....................................... 711,516 1,155,451 1,501,195
County-
Offset.............................. .... ........... 68,004 83,614 202,846
Other county................................. 815,732 939,668 1,246,288 1,544,366
Total....................................... 815,732 1,007,672 1,329,902 1,747,212
Collere-
Offset..................................................... 38,099 63,910 83,101
Other college................................ 346,750 209,682 142,524 198,644
Total...................................... 346,750 247,781 206,434 281,745
Other:
Offset.............................................. ............ 34,850 48,384 72,784
Miscellaneous................................... 247,352 273,951 372,546 443,307
Total...................................... 247,352 308,801 420,930 516,091
Total within the States............................. 2,121,350 2, 719,705 3,458,461 4,316,878
Grand total........ ......................... 3,607,235 4,871,621 6,103,158 7,617,098


In 1914-15 the Smith-Lever funds comprised 13 per cent of the
total- funds available for cooperative agricultural extension work.
In 1917-18 the percentage had increased to nearly 50. In 1917-18
the funds contributed by the counties and other local organizations
comprised one-fourth of the total.
If the funds contributed to the State Smith-Lever offset by the
States, counties, and other authorities within the State are combined
with State, county, and other funds not used as offset, they exceed
one-half of the total funds for extension work. In other words, the
funds contributed within the State exceed the funds contributed by
the Federal Government at the present time.

ALLOTMENT AND EXPENDITURE OF FUNDS, BY PROJECTS.

The project now receiving the largest amount of the cooperative
agricultural extension funds is the county-agent project. In 1914-15
the total amount spent on this project was approximately $1,925,000.
iy 1917-18 the amount had increased so that it exceeded $3,825,000,
r an. increase of nearly 100 per cent during the four-year period,
1914-15 to 1917-18.



.... :: .....























Alabama:
1114-15. ......
1915-160.....
191-17.....
1917-18.....
Artkana:
1914-15.....
1915-16.....
19Co 6-17.....
117-18.....
Arkansas:
1914-15.....
1915-16....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....
California:
1914-15.....


Colorado:
1914-15....


1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....
Colorado:


1914-15.....
1915-16.....
1916-17. ..
1917-18......
CDeaetiuet:
1914-15.....
1915-16......
1916-17.....


1917-18.....
Flridare:
1914-15.....


1915-16.....


1916-17.....
1917-18.....
FlGeoria:
1914-15.....
1915-16.....
1916-17 ....


1917-18.....
Georgia:




1914-15.....
1915-16.....
1916-17....
1917-18....

1914-15.....
1915-16....
1916-17.....
1917-18....
Indianaois:
1914-15....
1915-16....
1916-17......


1917-18....
1914-15.....


1915-16.....
1916-17... .
1917-18.....
1914-15.....
1915--16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....
1914-15.....
1915--10.....


1916-17.....
1917-18.....


IC


I i I I I 1 I I


$113,087
139,606
162,303
20, 594
17,279
27.931
36, 140
34,410
111,348
155,183
193.015
215,407
68,323
82,521
104,911
127,808
29,688
53.905
67,663
104,040
25,226
44.809
57,197
107,422
18,505
15,659
17,441
19,324
73,984
85, 719
104,463
110,826
I


124,871
174,858
251,652
291,728
24, 446
41,417,
54, 649!
85, 903
91,766,
148,616
191,588
205, 786
138,259
182.9771
200,2351
233,256
192,141
229,8881
283, 127
303,474
92,30
10,680
156,980
173,78%
87, 533
117,888
1716231
211, 770


1, 545
5,591
, 066
13, 698

5, 33
6,323
6.370
6,580
3,937
13.150
15. 42
20,033

8,517
22.499
25, 60N


2.835
5.2M,
7,3891
10, 25
3.292
6,564
3,900;
4,500
2,939
954
2,260
3,070
3,713
4,281
3.560
8,090
2,911
15,481
19,501
23, 500

4,310
6,400
6.500
10, 080
1,385
10,000
9, 584
4,300
17,662
6.291
6,343
11,298
22,717
16,329
29,075
35,040
5, 231
9740
9,174
3,427
13 975
10,821
14, 139


5485
1, 206
1,706
3,35 s
ra
1, 074
1, 000
1, 100
1, 472
2,256
1,074
4, 948


141

1.500
258
225
600
706
405
252


391
600
1.600
2,225
843
3,000
5,000
7,000
575
550
1,000
1,200
11
2,482
2,300
2,636

1,831
1,000
1,000
1,000
7,414
7,974
8,000







3,000
2,000


$79,.32
89,413
102, 776
10 851

3,320
9,779
15.500
15,560
78.619
97,487
113 243
120, 056

57, 472
67,372
79,502
18.262
32,00
4L00O
60,260
8,440
24,542
34,291
60,97Z
9,286
8,642
8.306
8,850
46.404
44.772
54.680
52, 081
75, 839
95, 727
138,521
153, 578
8,948
1, 142
26,150
44, 090
83,965
92, 02(
137.284
160,900
71.71t
110, 771
123,024
153,757
39,685
49,276
68, 30
100,500
32,251
3, 71
61 534
72,83
61,34
65,0401
99,400
117 470


$16, 156
19,510
28, 870
35, 805

1, 558
1,100
920
11,262
20,767
44,628
47, 485

2,626
5,000
6,300
3.752
3,250
3,334
6,535


1, 726
2,000
2,000
2, 000
500
525
900
1,175

.......
.......
1, 575









823
678
A"


11,841 6
643.......
1,899.......
2,100 .......

22, 211.......
32.135 .......
40,373 .......
41,920......

28.3211 5,900



3,450 2,150
4,W 00 2,49900
MS,S 2, 0(]

2, 978......
15, 450 15, 000
16,2@9. 3,-4M
18, 250.......
4, 780 3,3",
4, 10, 70
4, 700 7, 1001
5,050 4,400
19,082 36,295
28,800 39,058
3193, 90 2 78
37,000.......


6,897
uo33<
12,351

,732
19,054
26,250
43,060


O4,
6390

23M
98
1,500
2,000


is, 9Wi
6.960
5.1 O
5,726
1,717
3,345
3,100
5,825
2,353


aLasa
2,500
1, 920
3,720


2,275
600
2,500


4,023 2,142
6,220......
13,906 ......
3,280......
2,500 ......
4,860]......
7, 660......

3,123......
4,3171...
5,760......
7,0601 2,700

655 .....
40;......
5001......
2,950 ......
540......
3,330......
2,750......
6.51 ......
18,700 1. 98
2.262 2,720
2, S ,300

3,634 ......
4., 47......
5,3 ..

688......
3,400......
4,400 .-...

3, m4 1, 261
15, 380.....
23, W ......
18,801......'


8,338
13, 482



3 39


1,WB
3 100
3,8620


2,430


L 151
2.180
2,180
-.....



* ...*


...... ......



S J






2,882


3,N
2,131
8,300
3,100
98o
2,725
300
5,740


2, 710
2,775


.......
. a
5.005

5,050
7, 3..
7,380


1,178
1,350









4,900
4. 000



ip






.o.
06 ,
000
Egw




15


i I





A.
.- ....

F.
......5:4


St
.... q.. 2:


-.....
...., a

a-.--.i. p
.. ii..
.






3,








L 1L1
.5..... 1




.l...; 4
[, 2S



..,,. *OqJ
':.:... .. .


lI



2,250



41M
' a


I

B
814

I



a


I




I


It'


I'

*SE


-{I
Sir
7:

a~


... : : ":'.-
.... :.i:i
..1
.. :"
: :. ...II


iS


dF~;


i,

P









15


agriculdral eatnsion worfoarfrtyears ending June80, 1917, by projects.


Sit
C~
R4


I,
0

USE
-o

I
' 4
tll


C
S-


DI


...... $1,600
...... 1,750
...... 2,900

------ -------
...... .......
...... .......

...... .......
...... .......


ii


2804
2760
4,100
6, 570

1,505
3,650




2,720







1,400


3,571 $528
4,800 2,340
3,800 2,300
3,800 2,500

7,874 .......
7 950 .......
9,00.......


,... .......
1,453 .......

2,0 .......
2., f .......


88
1,414
1,62C


$1,200


....... 1 iW
....... 3,820
....... J.......


2,100
2,300

5,725
6,700
7,500
9,526
10,760
12,091
5,913


3,449
5,000
4,300
4,980
2,134
3,650
4,170
4,230
1,484
2,499
2,831
3,425


50


P4




r00
700


:1





1,050
3, 400


1,817
1,845
6,930


2,000
6,800



4,400


1,400


3,000
3,750


2,575......
3,528. ......
8,600 ......
4.. ......

114 ......
594 ......
....... 10,061
....... 11,120


U)



Wl
a
S
0,

I4
[X


.3 0
s C







..... i .....


$-2,800 ......
$161 ...... ......
150 : ...... ......

15... ........ ......

::::: ::::: .:i :::


2,025
2,000
1,500


2,243



1,375


7,;7391------:::::: ::::::: ...
S...........2000 1,820
.... ...-- I ..... .... ...


I ..' 810
...... ............ 1,000

-- --- .. 977
...... ...... ...... .......
600 ...... ...... .......

............. ...... 1,3S9
...------. ---. ---. .. ...... 133
...... ...... ...----- 144


: I :: III ::::i : ::




. ..... ...... ...... ,.5 .
..... ....-.-. ...... 5,000
. ..... ......
..... ... ... ..... .......

......I ...... ...... 2,400(
S-..----.. ..-.. -,000


...... ...... ...... 15,000
...... ........ ----
---------------..-----...
T ------ 2,923

8,000
-I--- ------I--- 15ii 000
...... ...... ...... 1 ,00

...... ...... ...... 1...5

... ..------- ----


.-.... 2,424

21,046! 6,999
10, 864 8,413
12,17012,137
9,345 u, 895



......1......


2,340
2,900
2,400
1,500

......


45,340
16,156
15, 000
4,000
3,251
82


4
*


81,800


2,520


I


,.....
3


is;

.....
.....


506
"'Q


.... .
......













fr-
^450
*4t...



4850


,...
)- I**
. .. t
1.AB
..... *

SlC


I
*4
t>


---- ----- ------------

....... ....... ....... ...... -....... I


-- 7 -.......- ....... ...... ....... 3,660
. -. ....... 2 ..... 3,360
785. ... ..... ... 3,196

....... .... ........... ....... 3,58035

892 .... ....... ... ....
-- ------------- .. -----
....... ....... ...... ....... .......


:: :: !: :: ::::i:::::::::: :::::::::::::
--------i-----*I-------------
* I 1
450- ....... l ....... ....... ., ,.

S----- -- ... .... .......


2,000 ....... ...... .... 2000 .----...
4,21 ....... ....... ...... 2,200 -...-
394 ....... .. ..... ....... 131
3,700 .......
3,400
4,250 ....... I ...... .......

i 2 -


..... 3,100


1,069


3,301
2,400
2,600


3,800
4,100


467
5,800
6,800
7,950

1,371
9,075
17,40

2,626
2, 834
3:537
310
1002
3175
581


a ^










2,5N)
i








1,550
......I 1,750
..-.... 2,500
...... 1, 119
...... 469
...... 1,070

......i 11,08.5
...... 12,034
...... 15,903
.............


....... l......
....... .......
.. .. ....



....... ..I.....

....... .......


,1.-.
,I*c.


















State.


Louisiana:
1914-15.....
1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....
Maine:
1914-15.....
1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....
Maryland:
1914-15.....
1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....
Massachusetts:
1914-15.....
1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....
Michigan:
1914-15.....
1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....
Minnesota:
1914-15.....
1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....
Mississippi:
1914-15.....
1915-16-....
1916-17.....
1917-18;..--
Missouri:
1914-15.....
1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....
Montana:
1914-15.....
1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18...
Nebraska:
1914-15.....
1915-16......
1916-17......
1917-18......
Nevada:
1914-15......
1915-16......
1916-17......
1917-18......
New Ham -
shire:
1914-15......
1915-16-....
1916-17....
1917-18-....
New Jersey:
1914-15....
1915-16.....
1916-17...
1917-18.....
New Mexico:
1914-15.....
1915-16....
1916-17...
1917-18.....


0



$83,958
126,157
141,613
160,372

11,820
26,078
37,090
45,989

40,843
58,927
79,520
109,698

119,183
109,390
100,979
191,734

64,562
85,910
140,962
181,937

170,783
127,721
131,310
144,072
. 93,791
127,760
155,583
232,755

71,111
114,718
155,158
152,010

29,673
56,232
62,622
91,709

79,533
115,856
148, 495
196,367

8,677
17,334
21,514
32,941

32,976
33,509
52,222
83,348

30,096
56,709
77,092
92,998

18, 456
37,229
49,015
62,902


d








81,668
6,399
6,040
12,607

773
5,954
6,440
8,479

5,868
5,340
5,350
14,358

19,160
11,670

10,470

3,421
4,421
3,300
6,800

22,055
10,780
13,840
17,541

2,064
4,216
4,841
4, 200

1,167
9,952
7,387
7,420

4,438
9,632
7,122
13,423

8,163
10,481
11,482
14,180

2,865
3,350



4,040
1,673
1,111
7,600
2,473
7,880
6,520
9,314

3,739
4,302
4,120
3,800


8




$518
1,450
1,220
1,450

276
400
800
800

157
1,000
2 720
2 500

500
1,300
1,600
1,900

486

1,500
3,100

17, 825
15,630
12,610
4,020

96
615
2,056
4,275

556
2,800
4,722
5,839

327
500
700
1,286

4,426
3,000
2,558
3,431

60

1,400
1,000


515
1,533
911
1,298

493
883
1,765
1,521
911
770
1,665
2,210


L)







$56,476
64,747
89,378
87,645

8,950
11 178
18.083
23, 760

16,175
24,430
42,352
56,440

54,255
58,574
65,949
112,846
40,175
53,559
78,101
100 987

64,915
69, 228
56 750
62,201

60,139
66,00
80,926
123,670

46,401
58,050
65,650
62,225

16,712
29, 000
30,100
50,000

33,053
29, 670
39, 580
42,853


4,000
11,250


11,042
18,794
27,000
49,100

20,584
31,459
41, 418
42,530
7,389
21,919
27,700
37,1001


S






89,058

22,805
28,980

1 425
2,966
3,900

4,102
11 230
12880
18,020

4,636
4,667
4, 888
22,440

1,518
4,474
7,000
11,400

4,756
7 715
8, 390
11,510

18,553
25,964
34,288
56,200


8,500
13,460

1,804
5,700
5, 600
5,300

5,057
4,950
7,600
18, 171

1,844
1,050
914
6,315


978
2,150
5,600

1,774
4,099
4, 800
12,301

1, 474
2,300
2,400
4,740


'I.

I.


1,100
800

1,441
467
400

29,861
700
700
600

1,817
1,500
6,170
3,200

15,227
1, 731
867
867

500
3,500
3,500

10,453
11.846
2,850
2,500
92


27, 950
37, 150
41,80


1,248
600
20C
600


1 4
2,430


-0
Pa





$13,385
11,915
11,905
16,170


159
3,030
3,970
3,500

4,673
10,431
11,991
8,020

3, 77C
3,817
7,826
13,050

5,473
4,788
9,190
12, 580

5,274
7,387
15,719
11,400

4,696
9,150
10,400
10,520
1,823
2,800
3,600
8,350

3,333
16,590
22,840
30,937

2,934
- 4950
4,570


3,267

8,560l
15,000


1.
"3
"Nsp
p4


$2,200


1,294
3,000
3,000
3,500


......
......
......
......


7,801......

2. : .....*
,7 ......
4,512 ......
6,24 ......


I8

C
P4


......
..I.I.





....=..

'"s"'
......

..... 20


b
8's


.-
OI



...



.....C

..f.-..
Q'


* '^ t


2,900
1,255

2600
2,746

506
86S

9,850





2,290
5,001



200





3,206
"600








8,50
886
2.000





5,700(
* 1 50
706


31--


a" *
...


.I .




2:1

. 2.
..... r
...-" ..:g





.-- .,
......
...U..jf:)B


. -- *



..U...


-"..
i. ': .
* tlIH
* WI.
w j....
k*L"*!!


"'K"W
...... ....
*.... W -...... O siJ *S q
...... ......... .....

............ ..p.rlS

.. ." .. .....
. im'.* i




.. .. .. ... .
". ":.: .'EEE" :


....... ......









17


-eatension Wvrkfor four years ending June 39, 1917, by projects-Continued.


...... 32,033




1,,



..1,698
..1,600
2,900
2,700

---- ------











I
...... .....9
30...... 11,35


...... 2,800
...... 4,700



...... 1,100




8l...........


7,000::...:-
8,300! 11,350
5,800 10,270
.'.'.."..' .....


2,550


1,900
2.750
4,950


1,318 399
5, 9001....
3, 000 ......
3,200 .......


.... 3,280
.... 2,400
...... 2,400



'...... 3,976
.. 7,020
2,600 2,500




I::...::.:::::::


31,209
2,750
4,840
5,200


4,692
2,424
2,752
2,800

995
3,033
3,225
3,070

4,494
5,241
6,450
10 900



1,733
1,733


2,000
4 000

675
3, 200
5:050
3,110


2,475
3, 92a
4,17S


gobA

la'

0
n9


2,000
2,100


aoo

C13
a,

. in

0~s
0


3225


1'i,699
1,075
1, 250


2,900
3,500
3:370


2,300


3,165.....
2,300.......
2.,00.......



2,532.......
2.870.......
6, 220.......
.. .


__________________________*


.-4

i


-4





...... ....... ....... ....... 00







...... ....... $1, 360 i ....... ......

...... ....... 400
...... ....... 750 ....... ......
Hi I









...... ....... 1 046 ....... ......
.... 41,800 300 ....

............. ...... ...... ...

...... ....... .......1....... 1,180

...... ..... 1,834 ....... ......
...... ....... 2,490 5,27.... ...
........ ..... 3,320 ..... .....
.... ....... 3,424 6,87 3,610

1,.965 1,000 2,112.............
2,300 1,34 2,997::::....... ......
400 1.,00 3,100....... ,100
2,250 2,250 3,650....... 6,450

............. ,111 14,335......
...... ....... 648..............
...... ....... 6,090' 1,800 ......
...... ....... 13,44 00!6 ..

...... ....... ...... ....... ....299
...... 1,733 1,297 1,300 2,230 0
2,200 1,8331 1,800 2, 00
.3,100 1,850 ....... 4,600

...... 30 8350 31......
...... 420 ... ..' 2,35 ......
...... 3,150 3,000 3,400 ......
...... 2,700 3,060 6,110'

...... ....... 2 083 ...:..........
...... ....... 600..... .....
2.... ..... 600 ..... ......
2-2 29?------- 6
...... .... 132,50 1..... 3,600

3,716'....... ......
...... 900 8.390..........
...... 3,150 7,960... ......
...... 5,700 7,970 ....... 2,000

...... ....... ....... ....... ......
....... ....... ......
...... ....... ....... ....... .. ...

...... ....... 2,600 ........ .


...... .........1679........I.....
...... ....... 2,100 ....... 200
200....... 2,700 .......

...... ....... ....... ....... ......
...... ....... ............
.... ... ... .... ......
...... .... .... 411 ....... ......


...... ....... 2. 90 ....... ......
..... ....... 920 .............
1 ....... Is,3801'


Sn1 ril


651

1,350
800


28942-18----3


91,0 4 1...... ...... ......
500......L33,2001......
.. 6 .... .. .... .. ......
501 ...... 3,460......


...... ......
...... ......
S11300 ......
...... ......

...... ......


a,
So
. A
*-0
&)



$2,500


3,666


1,000
'5
04





590




1,200
175
1,000


C4

-E a
0 .


0






...... ......


--- -- .o...


...... ......

...... ......I
...... ......

"""-- ......


9,433
9,401
6,380


3,650
1,587
1,156


..- .- .I.. .....
71200 ...... ...........
.7,200...... ...... .......

10,000 ........... 8,987
.I.-
.. ...... ...... .......



.I.^J^^ 1,350
::::: ::: 1,650
......... ... .............
... .......


...... ...... ...... ... ,::

...... ...... ...... 2,50

..... .... ...... 4,5079
.......... 2,968
...... .... %' "50
...... ...... ...... 2,50O
I.... 2558
............. ...... 3,011

...... ...... .......2,095
...... ... ... .......
.I.....I 4,392


1,...


--


476



.... .ii
4171
544
875


I


. .. .. ... .
...... ......
...... ......

------ ------
.
. .. .. .. .. .


"""
"""'
"""
"""'

















State.


-II -


New York:
1914-15-


I3
-i


1915-16....1
1916-17.....
1917-18. -...i
North Caroin:
1914-15......
1915-16.-...
1916-17 ..
1917-18-....
North Dakota:
1914-15.....
1915-16-.....
1916-17.....
1917-18....
Ohio:
1914-15...-..
191-5-1 .....
1916-17 .....
1917-1 s.....
Oklahoma:
1914-15.....
191.5--!6 ......
1916-17 ... .
1917-18..
Oreso:.
1914- 15.....
1915-16 .....
1916-17.....
1917-18 .....
Pen] ylania;:
1914-1-...-
1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18....
Rhode Island:
1914-15....
1915-16....
1916-17. ...
1917-18.....
South Carolina:
1914-1......
1915-16.....
1916-17 .....1
1917-18..
South Dakota:
1914-15....
1915-16 .....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....
Tennessee:

1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....
Texas:
1914-15 .....
1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....
Utah:
1914-15.....
191516 ....1
1916- I7 .....
1917-18.....
Venmont:
1914-15.....
1915-16.....
1916-17.....
1917-18.....


183, 6014

297,428
374,222
133, 08
191,
225,019
301,742

65,050
a8,
96.815
105,

50,4898
116.098
194, 998
241,031

101,736
143,482
170,574
207, 948
92,741'
104, 904
122, 280
125, W.7

47.639
114,253
158,280.
227,488,

13.310
24,416:
25, 845!
28,1781

100.581;
138,114:
191,367
215,224:

42,8571
62. 279
82.239
91,017i
83.597i
134.765t
157,951
183,848,

195,981:
234.337
3M3.07-5
393,995a
51.5-'
49, 270:
50.407
81, 434
41, SI
55, 713
51,08!
57,323


11,868
16,645
14,10
24,221


4,65000
7,755
10,3m5
5,857
7.170
9.620
10, 000

9,058
21,916
22,530
32, I680

12,408
13, t39
11,81
15, 713

10,497
7, 311
9,131
8,156


5,589!
11,42
11,888
13,4
4,336M
4,341
5,900
4,832
4.402



6171
5.294
5. 20M
7.564
7,065

7,936i
26.8781
16.315:
23,150
29.614
21.253

21,415

4n206
6.112
6. 851
7.880

6.195
5.446
5,800


$1,600
30,000
700


227
2,795
4,708

540
3,300
3,975
6,000
3, 3001
8, 760
S. .
3,1
5, ,I
961
2, S0
s43,

3, W2




3451
2,.375
3,-.7


5.800
2,2
8,200
449,
175
450

52.00

2,0001
2, i
42

4971
1,200
1.5841
2.600
4.1 I
5,2
2.3
4.097
7.0933
10,0901

1,056|
1. Is

2.
I 0


i3




$104,583 $5,0
119,024 6,2515


1.55.86 15,005
212, 2 35,11

76,22i: 25,71
96,9601 43, 65-
MU, 0 53,2
2, ,20o0 23,2
53.5811......
5.tt4 m5,3Mo
60.630 7,990





1
2.IV U51
38,3114 1,40
55,4 19,495
81,081 18,138

0, 87" U,123
8r,330a 24,0
102.745' 30,076
1285 3.50,e
36, 4,016
44,691 3,15
57,180 3,835
S, 214 5,261

25,40: 1,767





9,300 1.600
10,751 2,00'
64.4 7" 20.565
62.081. 41.390
73.4r. &1, 87
67.422. 76,177
i


11,667 2.11
34.621 ......-
42.809 1,685
46.500 4.625

52.975 12,231
58,282 25.55
61.236 43,093
61,88i 55,59
132.801 17.04
140.726 .28
171,950 36,2
233,887 51,521
19.538! 2,191
18.073 5,287
21.45 I 5,82
36,058 8,151
23,274'......
30.173, 2.50
32.237; 2.7
35.3351 3,15


I4






I,




10,375












$3


3,3
4,


8,279
27,509


2,002
2,000
1,200


14,0I
9,825
7,017


1.,261.
2,3071.
3,0 WO
3,009.
7,491
16,240
14,


13,1
5,

1, w

6.08
2,7

65W


32





2,3BO
7,195
5,781
7,422
7,796

14,9 6


I


11,583
1,3)N


4,3 3.-.--.



3,2 ......
6,447......
14, 4 .. ----


2,340......
4, 1,m80
4,68 2,6
5,0 2, N0
7, 9......
6,4 2,300
7,3 2,400
9,735 3,21


3, 00......
9w -------

4,325......
5.445 .-..-.
5,645......


---- -----


2.4 8
2, 1no
3.00
4,800


2,300


a










6 I
1,0
_ I
... --


911
2,80
3, 00


iI 1







.,0
ea.
i 4






2.q
1.. .


.... .


...----.


2,755
a


4,000


.-.... ...-... .....


1.7
1,38


..... 2.366


------ 2,650
...... 2,00
...... 3,00(


5.284
8,.200
8,505



2.W50
3,330
2,322
5,050
6,38075
6,330


<:1


.









*.. -..


a-Li


.9....





3,619

3,0B0
4..IS.
3-M
4,10
0-
8,20s


1,850s
SN

1,758
3,000



*...a


2,a43 1 .. ...... ...

5,O...... ....... ......

8,S7 : .. ....... ..-- ....

, ---. ....- ......


4 ..... ...... ....... .1 5
1! ..... .... -..
,7-.- -....
IMP 1 ---- -- -- -- -- -- ii


^..II
*k*.i
: *:*


a
I...a*

.4"


1
1

t


...


664









19


extension workfarfour years ending June 30, 1917, by projects-Continued.





Sa o -> "

S M ( | 3 S3 m
0 bo 4A 90D
e ~0 -o Q '*
0+ Lud F
FA a4 A. 0l 4 0 ba


-* a -'





3.M
...- .


*6. ---




-a-----


26988


$9,000
11,437
8,630
10,677


5, 400
8,860
7,580


4,35C0
13,040


3,'900
4,1a10

1,314
1,450
1,350
1,450



2,100


1,870


1,200

2,180
3,260
6, 26C
0, on


2,LP5
3,650
5,100
7,300

1,193
2,180
2,500
2,600


9, 564


..i.P i6
3.810
3,400
4,737

.....S50


2175
2,00
2,774
7. 00


440

2,100o



1,16i
.......


...... .......
...... 2,300
...... 2,225
...... 2,3--

------ ---
-------- ---
..-----------.
----------...


84,400
7,250
6,060
8,O50


400


2,500
5,200


-- 171.i:::::::


$3,900
4,600
5,000
5,200

.......

1,000
2, 440




2, 40(


3,'10
I--- -


1,500
2,500


$2,000
2,200
3,300
3,700




3,'000


2,950

2,200
2,400
2,200
2,400


...... .......
...... .3,636
...... 4,050

...... 2,242
...... 2340
...... 2,480


1,575
2,100


580
1,250


$5,336
6,900
7,770
10,300


1,700
5,000
5,000


3,886
5,955
5,340


2,648
3,000
3,339

2,338
3,960
2,000


3,300
5,260


8,v120



1,579
2,550
2461
4,400


1,960
2,240
3,917


....=...


33,45o

.......

800

8....

...-..
.......

....-...
.....
.....
8O


I------.

4.......
i.......


4,200


1i;3


3. 000C
4.20C
4,20C


3,000
3, 00(
7,000


O. ..... ......
--.... .... ---
2,200 .......
3,660.....


....... .....;
13, 31......
18,116......




2753,400


-.----- 3 450

....... ......


$2,500! $700
1, 000 .......
650 ......
750.


...... ......
..... !......
2. 800.






75027, 153
.......34.800
..... i25, 080
I





------1------
------Q-----.
3.10


S3,968
2,838


9,995
3,420


7,000
9,839


4.,750 35.000
6. 000 4,750
6,916i 2,350
...... 1,450

...... .......

...... 24,289

...... "i,700
..... ... .....
...... .......


8,390
...... 5,516
...... .......

2.840 .......
2,840 .......


S13,409
...... 8.210
...... 9.450
4.580


2.000 ...... ....... ......
2,000 ...... ..... ......I 5.000
2,900 ...... ...... ...... 21,900

............ ...... ...... .......
...... .. ... ...... ...... .. ....

. i.. ... I .. I ...


...............................
...... ...... ...... ...... 22,127
...... ...... ...... ...... 1,757

...... 20,000 ........ ..... 5,978
..... .. ... .......
...... ... ... .... ...... 36

............... ...... 83
...... ...... .....I...... 6,
-... ...... ...... ...... ......


......... ............ ... 730
S...... 000...... ,309.
1,0 ...I... ...... ...... 6
...... ...... ...... ...... .......
.",3i5 ...... ...... ...... .......
..... ...... ...... ...... .......



...... ...... No0 ...... 1,730


1108 ...... ...... 96.::

100 ...... ...... ............











TABLE V.-Total offunds from all sources for coopeatie a..


State.




Virginia:
1914-15... $108,598 $2,429 $154 $78,846
1915-16... 130,295 8,748 538 84,017
1916-17... 160,876 11,333 1,540 87,386
1917-18... 202,515 17,870 2,870 107,281
Washington:
1914-15... 58,119 8,108 1,826 30,900
1915-16... 64,599 7,599 1,486 32,624
1916-17... 79,515 7,275 1,500 40,190
1917-18... 130,435 12,900 2,239 71,760
West Virginia:
1914-15... 80,886 8,649 2,289 39,617
1915-16... 121,849 8,996 2,790 67,228
1916-17... 145,701 10,544 1,960 76,580
1917-18... 155,503 12,512 2,310 76,563
Wisconsin:
1914-15... 51,621 1,944 5,074 33,206
1915-16... 103,960 6,740 1,300 46,1801
1916-17... 120,131 7,360 1,980 56,000
1917-18... 194,244 16,451 2,655 76,822
Wyoming:
1914-15... 26,442 5,442 1,695 9,314
1915-16... 44,005 6,492 1,850 25,007
1916-17... 61,415 7,491 2,024 38,700
1917-18... 86,903 8,290 2,360 54,394
Total:
1914-15... 3,607,208 298,493 72,115 1,922,751
1915-16... 4,871,620,422,078 100,735 2,488,756
1916-17... 6,103,146 445,720 137, 187 3,102,883
1917-18... 7,617,098I599,107 138, 323 3,833,396


*1
Q


0



$15,438
24,337
33,357
46,499
2,429
3,092
4,300
5,700
7,630
13,946
17,413
21,529

9,000
8,160
6,120
2,958
2,800
2,950
2,700
319,779
538,061
756,050
1,043,560


8975
300
3,516


$6, 530
3,540
5,370
7,491
9,760
14, 776


1, 573
2,235
2,950


C .

a'


$2,940
4,810
8, 740



8,6830


I M
,-I


1,


4,721 5,582...... ........... ....
4,840 12,175 ...... ........... .....
1,885 16,080...... ..... 4,55....
2,510 16,592 ...... ..... 5,49....
6,590 1,455...... ...... ....... .....
7,500 3,300 4...... ... 4,300...
8,975 8,570 ........ ...6, .....
6,000 5,350 ............ 5,00...
2,007 2,707 .......... ....... .....
400 3,150................. .....
200 .6,550'...... ..........
200 8,659............ 3,200....
194,640167,654 9,385 10,003 31,966 9,92
212,763229,90520,760.12,933101,71130,4(
193,713 340, 877 15 630 15,5900126,815 44.6E
135,624412, 599 28, 90117,260 176,18865, 74
I i 'L'i'I'


The next most important line of work, as far as allotment of f~nd
is concerned, is the work for farm women, the allotment for whid
increased from $320,000 in 1914-15 to approximately $780,000 :
1917-18, an increase of nearly 200 per cent during the same peri
The next in importance is the boys' and girls' club work. Durif
the four-year period this had increased from $170,000 to $475,00
In the Southern States the girls' clubs are included with the ho4
economics project, and the boys' club work does not include the
and poultry clubs. The amount used in this work exceeded $45,
In the Northern and Western States the girls' clubs are inlt
under the boys' and girls' clubs project. The projects, in addition?4
those named above, in which over $200,000 were spent, were admra4
tration and dairying. Those in which over $100,000 were spent


:i
s~a;


-:


*
.


I :


.;..;...;I
"" :


i;

..li

"







921

a.ste on work forfour years ending June 30, 1917, by projects-Continued.

1. ., -.. ..





.... 310 S1 .9. ... b. 6 .. -3 0 o .. .
a I-



1 --. ....... ....... ....... ....... .... .............. ....... ......... ... ...... ...... ........7,948
....... 3 225.... ....... ....... ...... 75 .................. ..............
-..- $1,000 5,565.............. ... .... 2 .. ....... ............... ... ..............
...... 3,100 6, 815 .............. ...... .... 620 ....... ...... ...... .. .... .. .... .........
...... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... 04.... ...... .... ...... .. .... .... .......
...... ....... .... ....... ...... ....... 2,776......... ... ..... ... ... .. .. ........
S2,40 .... 2, ....... ...... ....... 2,72 ................. .. ...... ...... .......
-.. ... 3,01D .... ....... ....... .. ....... ....... 2 .. .... .... .. ...... ...... 1 ,007 45 .... .
--- --- --- ----,360 8 ,00....


...... ....... ....... ....... ....... ...... ....... .. ....... ..........1...... $3.... 708 .......

00...... ....... ....... ....... ....... ...... ...4,800 2,84....... ....... ..... ...........360 890 103..0 ...........
S.3,6 00 3 ,24 3 ......... ...... ....... ...,070................ ...... 5,650 880 900 .......
...... 120 3, 270 .. .. ..... ...... ...... ...... ........ ...... 4010 7 450.......
B. ..... .. ..... .. ..... ...... ...... ... 705 2,257 ....... ...... 2 1 0 .... .. .......
9,00 2000 2 9 ............. 4,800 2840....... ............ ...... ...... .......
...... I 7,.58 2,000 3,536 ....... ...... 5,150 5.5070 ....... ...... ..... ..... ...... .... .......
S .. 6 010 4,050 3,986 ....... .... 48050 2,550 ....... ... ......... ...... ...... .......



...... ....... ....... ....... ....... ...... ....... ....... .... ... 300 700 ...... 200 ......
...... ....... ....... ....... ....... ...... ....... 3,100 ....... ...... 100 600 ...... ...... 100
R30 78,5 6534 15,442 1,086 6,058 37,829: 85,657j 24,96417,6341 8,06754,90627,12115,810 92,591
%4% Fl 4 3 5,741 4923 3,904 3,965 14,041 44,428 14,016133,662

2,3451 3,48 8,40 35,139 13,485 3, 700 52,281 97,155 34, 08235,3561 7,775 72, 420 38, 713 15, 256 113,429
S6649,148,023 23,886 31,00 9,1 512,212.112,515 47,276!82,750 9,600 39,6520,565 1,950118,801


p publications, extension schools, animal husbandry, agronomy, horti-
culture, agricultural engineering, and farm management. There are
certain items in Table V, which should be carefully interpreted.
For example, the work undertaken on the projects for extension
schools and miscellaneous projects would seem to have decreased.
The decrease is due primarily to the assignment of the specialists to
'i individual projects rather than putting the different lines of their
work together in miscellaneous projects. The decrease in the funds
for extension schools is due to a similar cause-the specialists partici-
pating in extension-school work are having a larger proportion of
their expenses charged to subject-matter projects than formerly.
Table V, pages 14 to 21, indicates the allotment of funds from all
sources to the different types of extension work by States.








COUNTvAGEN will. w
The county-agent work grew out of the farm de otra
ducted under the direction of agents covering aP br
these field demonstrations the farmer undertookt. wit h h
and entirely at his own expense, to gmw on fom 1 to IQ aels
particular crop ander the agent's supervision. The seleg~eti
crop depended entirely upon the needs of the community. t
account was kept and a report made at the end of the season..
agents were required to arrange for as many demonstratia p
could supervise properly.
About the year 1906 counties began to contribute to...i
salary of the agents of the department, and their work becaMSi
intensive and the work of each agent was confined to a single, iM
With this limited territory they could arouse the inte e.t 4o:i.e
generally by greatly increasing the number of examples or
stations of better methods of farming. The scope of the htaimWl
tions was enlarged to include all of the standard farm crops,. "
pastures, and in later years the breeding, raising, and feeding :of
stock.
Meetings were held at the demonstration plats for the plrpan
giving information to a large number of farmers. At these i
the agent would go over the farm with those assembled,
operations informally, and invite questions. The farmer sewM
value of the better methods and gradually applied them to tb
farm. Demonstrations varied in size and character, dpndi
the problem to be met. The results of hundreds of these din j
tions in a county gave the farmers confidence in the ability
agent, and thus grew up a great variety of work on the part 4i
county agent in giving general instruction and advice to faiu
where he was unable to visit their farms regularly.,
It was noted a number of years ago that where the county a
could secure the cooperation of aa organized body of farmers
community in conducting demonstrations and giving information
work became more effective. Out of this experience has dev.
a systematic effort on the part of the county agent to work tI
organized bodies of farmers and to create orgaizatiom-S in comn
ties where there are none.
Prior to 1912 practically all of the extension work of the dep
ment of this character was carried on in the 15 Southern Stu
This branch of the work is growing steadily.' In that year $165)
was made available to extend the work into the Northern and West
States, and the work in those States was placed under the supervu
of the Office of Farm Management. The work in the North I
grown rapidly and now has more than trebled its original FM
appropriation: Out of the work in the South and the North::I









23


ww a large field of activity now generally known as county-agent
k or demonstration work through county agents. On -July 1,

p7a, 1,474 men county agents were employed in the United States.
T:. he county agents are employed cooperatively by the county, the

SState agricultural college, and the United States Department of
iAriculture, assisted in some cases by other cooperating parties.

The: extent to which the county agent comes in contact with the
itrmers in his community is indicated by Table VI.


TABLE VI.-Work of the county agents.


State.


I:Aabama.......
, ri.. JwHZon .............
------------
Arkansas .........
Colotsra ............
Caua eotait.......-
-elawa........
t Era .....-........




Geloiya.......
i se M i ..............
: l _lS ............ .


im;o ss s -....-....
Y 161m11IS .........
-using s ...q........




N Ne W...........
S asyl............
.MElCtaina...a.....


m 0nteots.........
SN-..-. ....-
Misoon...........


Nebr0eiaka..........
NOW Jerey-.........
NRh Mlandc......
w Y..k....m.....


..L ...........



anth Dakota......

Uiah................
i :"2, llf "
' exSau. S .......f.

ma ..........


Farm visits made.


1914


23,377

35,518
4,468
4,258
459
181
17,241
53,142
1,459
2,836
9,681
6,931
4,858
16,043
23,900


-.6192
9,715
37,059
3,503
2,388
3,512
958
2,221
90
11,880
47,061
16,500

32, 382
3,431
5,017

1,500
2,584
60, 14
3,108
4,9 0
33, 825
676,
8,736
1940
1,201


1915 : 1916
i


64,932
2,098
34,598
9,105
5,610
2,945
1,793
25, 179
67,432
2,049
5,856
11,592
6,400
6,684
25,698
36,658
3,275
8,503
6, 241
9,063
9,326
2, 328
4, 658
3, 559
4,586
4,125
5,598
4,902
18,543
70,350
11,593
4,068
36,894
6,326
9,000
44
4,719

4%,777
8,386
7 402
47, 25
6,018
17, 034
5, 718
2,964


lDifferences in. methods


79,380
4,035
61,014
8,822
4,842
3,284
1,605
22,624
101,767
5, 405
6,532
8,1530
9,357
8,456
34,707
59, 400
4,034
12,808
5,182
13,077
7,172
56,357
4,732
3,984
5,275
84
4,781
8,347
3,906
19, 797
85,437
13, 493
4,928
62,528
7,298
15, 517
486
50 ,80
5,194
35,452
64,683
6,90,
7,793
55,408
5,844
27,289
7,507
4,826


Meetings held.


Attendance.


I _____________ -I-- _________________


1914


1,733
641
628
36
37
330
480
138
565
4,138
606
820
916
206

138
762
4,343
602
1,077
163
359
37
282
6
1,361
1,188
1,055
1,925
363
790
6
213
318
2,236
200
338
655
347
1,143
220
99


1915


263
1,770
1,585
736
379
179
508
1,036
305
761
3,674
899
1,039
2,000
1,321
206
792
1,280
1.046
1,965
193
9,997
241
587
350
343
488
2,926
3,257
831
864
2,981
601
1,372
19
612

459
2,839
887
843
1,972
588
152


1916


4,171
526
3,459
1,784
1,084
675
163
596
3,596
451
1,027
3,250
2,538
1,941
2,541
1,107
352
947
942
1,790
1,503
3,813
1,448
392
729
60
654
752
549
3,235
2,883
823
1,323
3,388
916
2,863
207
1,326
1,002
1,629
3,948
536
1,149
2,550
694
3,212
875
484


1914


178,278
23,927
42,974
2,600
387
13,280
4,688
7,656
45,159
270,241
66,401
48, 414
42,839
13,734
..........

7, 279
S67,115
130,595
55,876
108, 990
9,002
15,686
2,828
14,489
300
102, 820
60,763
94,033
67, 001
24,404
48,722
540
9,930
22,465
88, 546
15,282
13,363
34, 362
20, 16
62.432
4,800
7,183


1915


27,291
9,306
81,310
64,419
45,393
18,240
8,414
23,168
101,800
16,423
53,621
267, 126
83,462
61,818
130,952
47,410
7,247
42,715
41,102
58,737
113,775
104,680
109, 183
19,904
24, 430
20, 819
16,181
22,323
168, 211
171,739
83, 046
83,442
141,413
35, 637
124,053
953

44,901
..........
113,538
23,014
23, 750
149,217
39,615
78,880
44, 651
8,390


1916


149,080
14,114
159,089
89,576
54,349
34,257
6,987
35,593
183,429
29,921
83,162
247,753
116,082
104, 189
167,879
57, 731
12,420
35,494
51,382
84,187
116,032
147, 464
89,032
35,180
26,237
1,370
33,429
37,151
33,955
174, 463
1,902,085
56,544
92,304
227,297
29, 137
230, 783
6,318
94,125
51,757
82,981
210,815
45, 112
39, 130
140, 122
35,698
165,787
59, 470
12, 99


in being strictly comparable. For example: In 1914, in Arkansas,

pI Tn of counting every person who attended any session of the
etinagwas followed, but in 1915 only the persons actually in attend-
se tOroughout the meetings were counted. This will no doubt


of recording the


data prevent the figures


.









meetings. in ueorgia, in 1m14, tne record snowect only -
who happened to attend the county-agent field: meet
in 1915 the total number of persons attending all th& F
were counted.
It is recognized by all engaged in the work that the cot
-should be a man of practical experience in farming and ..
sonality as to enable him to become a leader among the f,.
his county. He must also have such agricultural ed
technical training as fit him for this important duty. Othei
being equal, preference is given to graduates of agricultural'
who have the proper personality and practical experience,.:, .i::
It will be seen that one of the duties of the county agent is0
to the farmers of his county on their own farms the resultso4:
tific investigations in agriculture and the experience of'a(M
farmers, and through demonstrations to influence the farnra .
these into practice. In his organization work, as explain:e4
he assists in reorganizing and redirecting the agriculture of t
munity, and assists all economic and social forces working ':
improvement of agriculture and country life. He gives in.tre.
not only in those subjects which are generally recognized u4ifr
head of improved agricultural practices, but also in farm mau
ment, marketing, and purchasing supplies. In all of thisji aW
conducts a large number of demonstrations and gives ui1
valuable information. He works, as far as possible, with eq
organizations, such as granges, farmers' unions, alliances, org
farmers' institutes, community clubs, etc., but may also aid in t
new organizations especially suited to support his work.-
South great emphasis is laid upon community organizations of:l
ers. These are increasing rapidly and involve both the work dl
men and that among women. The tendency 'and general |
of the work in most of the States in that territory is gradually
central county organizations composed of representatives
community organizations to deal in cooperation with theif 1.
agents with such problems as are county-wide in their nnaMit
In some of the Northern and Western States county orga
called farm bureaus have been developed to support the countyti
in their work. The farm bureau may include in its memberah
person who is interested in better farming. Its officers are ;gs
selected annually. It has an executive committee which :
responsibility of arranging for the selection and financing
county agent, and its committees, both central and local, s
county agent in carrying out the program of work.for thej:.j
The growth of county-agent work is indicated-in Table ...





I;.;1*.


25

H'' TABLE VII.-Number of counties with men agents.

Counties with men Counties with men
SAi- agents. i- agents.
_:.:_., .. ... cl_-_ cul-
SState. tural State. tural
Scoun- July July July July coun- July July July July
ties. 1, 1, 1, 1, ties. 1, 1, 1, 1,
,: ,,:: 1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. 1914. 1915. 1916. 1917.

i Alabama......... 67 67 67 65 62 Nevada-........ 15 ...... ...... ...... 6
Arisona ......... 6 ...... 3 6 7 New Hampshire. 10 1 5 8 9
Arkansas......... 75 45 52 53 61 New Jersey..... 19 4 7 11 10
CaliforniaL ...... 45 4 11 13 17 New Mexico..... 26 ...... 8 9 11
SColordo......... 35 13 13 19 16 New York........ 57 25 29 36 41
C' anecticut..... 8 1 6 7 8 North Carolina... 100 51 64 65 69
SDeaware......... 3 ...... 3 3 2 North Dakota-... 51 17 15 15 17
.Ft rida........ 50 25 36 33 37 Ohio............. 75 8 10 12 20
Georgia.......... 150 80 81 83 117 Oklahoma........ 77 40 56 59 62
Idaho ........... 30 2 3 7 11 Oregon............ 35 10 12 13 14
Illinois........... 102 14 18 20 22 Pennsylvania.... 67 10 14 22 45
. Indiana.......... 92 27 31 32 40 Rhode Island.... 5 ...... ..... 4 4
Iowa ............ 99 9 11 16 26 South Carolina... 44 43 43 42 40
K *Kansas............. 105 9 39 56 53 South Dakota.... 66 3 5 11 13
Kentucky........ 120 28 39 47 45 Tennessee........ 96 36 38 48 57
SLouisiana ....... 64 41 43 43 42 Texas............ 250 98 99 90 92
S Maine............ 16 ...... 3 4 9 Utah............. 28 8 10 8 15
Maryland-....... 23 8 13 16 23 Vermont........ 14 7 9 11 11
Massachusetts_... 13 1 10 9 11 Virginia.......... 100 53 55 51 53
Milhigan........ 84 11 17 22 30 Washington...... 37 7 10 13 22
S Minnesota........ 86 27 23 19 16 West Virginia... 55 13 27 29 45
B, l Missippi....... 80 48 49 44 53 Wisconsin........ 71 9 12 13 22
I1issoun .......... 114 13 15 14 15 Wyoming........ 21 3 6 8 13
Montana......... 41 4 8 7 12
:, .Nebraska....... 93 5 8 9 8 Total....... 2,920 928 1,136 1,225 1,434

BOYS' AND GIRLS' CLUB WORK.

..Extension work among young people usually has been conducted
Through clubs organized for that purpose.
i" .Boys' corn clubs and other agricultural clubs have been in existence
for over 10 years. The department, in cooperation with the State
.. agricultural colleges, has done much to popularize this demonstration
i 7 work and make it effective through acre contests in corn growing.
S Boys and girls between the ages of 10 and .18 are admitted to these
S clubs, the work being conducted very largely in cooperation with
school officials and teachers in the rural communities. These clubs
a re supervised by State agents or assistants located at the agricul-
tural colleges, who represent both the college and the department.
: They are assisted by county agents, who aid in the organization and
S maintenance. of the work, and by club specialists from the States
SRelations Service and the Bureau of Animal Industry of the United
StCates Department of Agriculture.
S By far the most widespread and numerous organizations of this
haracter. are the boys' corn clubs. The members enter into con-
ptetition in corn growing on an acre of ground, on their fathers' farms,
ais.a rule. Prizes are provided and the basis of award is the largest
ipiod tion at the lowest boost, with best exhibit of 10 ears and best
f auIy on. their year's work. Definite instructions in preparation of
li :.:::soil; planting, cultivation, etc., are given to the members. They
....:.. taught valuable lessons about the handling of the soil, selection


... ..:.. .. .













oiDus nave educational value, such as slolarsKmtps aa the
colleges or- at short courses, trips to points- of interest, e.
Boys' pig clubs have been organized tn stimulate interest
production, and to. teach boya profitable methods of fe- l
value of the best breeds,. anc the hemel production of meat
family. This work supplements ths boys' oern clubs by
the boys that it is profitable to- sell crops by feeding theat
stock. Members of the clubs, are taught also the -ouring of.
at home, the judging of hopg,, and their selhbtion fon bre
marketing purposes. Consideration is given to management;
ing, sanitation, and to the prevention of diseases of swine1.
hog cholera. Prizes are awarded on the basis of excellence ...
fed for purpose intended, gain in weight, cost of pduc i
record of feeding and care. Prizes are offered for animals r
breeding purposes and for slaughtering, and for the best brood:i:::
with litter.
The objects of the boys' and girls' poultry clubs are to teach
poultry raising, handling, and marketing; the value of .aiih
product of high class for cooperative marketing, better earem ot f .@
try and eggs, and the increased revenue derived from. better:b
and management. Members of the olubs raise a certain nmb
fowls, keep accurate~ account, make e hiits at the fairs, asnd w
a composition on some phase of their work.
Girls' clubs have been formed to teach gardening and caiaCg
vegetables and fruits for home and market and thua p rote. ..
utilization of the surplus and waste products of the farmi and. gad
to teach profitable farm poultry raising; to provide a means fo'IR
to earn money at home; to pave the way for practical! daoatrti
in home economics and:. stimulate cooperation. am ong- R Wi
the family and in the community; and. to, furnish teachers a p lM
correlating home work with school work.
This work was first begun with the canning club. Girls fis'o
to 18 years of age are enrolled to plant anu& cultivate a gardAmof
tenth of an acre. The most important. part of th training,
ever, is the canning of products of the garden;,I homai ank mar~i
Prizes ar awarded' on the basis of the qnuatyt and quw"tity~- A
products of the garden and the variety, quaMlity; ~4d quWa1Wii
the canned produce, the profit show by cost oew eating and a-
written account of how the emop wasamae. A sioaiom hlai
.. .. .: .. '.. i...






27


provided and a standard weight and grade of canned product fixed
for marketing purposes. Encouragement is given to cooperative
-Inatetjing
HOME ECONOMICS EXTENSION WORK.
SAll of the extension work described in this circular is conducted
bi i the interest of all the people on the farm. However, it is as
Important to provide special extension work for women and girls on
the farm as it is for men. This special work is now being developed
according to the same general plan as the extension work in agri-
culture.
Out of the girls' canning-club work in the South has grown the
employment of women county agents, or home-demonstration agents.
SWhen sufficient funds are provided, a well-trained woman is employed
to give instruction in home economics to farmers' wives and daugh-
Sters throughout the county. The woman agent organizes clubs of
Women and girls, gives them instruction, conducts demonstrations,
Sad superintends the putting of the lessons into practice in the
homes. Women agents now are being appointed in some of the coun-
ties in the North and West. On July 1, 1917, there were 537 counties
!with women agents in the United States; 24 were in the Northern
. States.
Tn home economics, as in agriculture, there are in addition to the
county agents or leaders specialists who conduct extension schools,
general neighborhood meetings, conferences, etc., and assist the
A: women county agents. Among the problems now being taken up
e children's welfare, selection, preservation, and preparation of
food, canning of fruit and vegetables on the farm, the selection and
protection of water supply, sewage disposal, house ventilation, house-
Shold equipment and management, use of labor-saving devices and
mi hiaery, control of insects and other pests, etc.
The number of women agents employed July 1, 1914, 1915, 1916,
and 1917 is shown in the table following.










....... ....1 1 J.0: 1'. P
Pi g -P
Hd"I :"E E::
i! e::. ... E ,
HP ... : :. :





















Albama.........
Arina....---......
Arkanmas.........
Calfornia........
Colorado.........
Connecticut......
Delaware ........
Florida--...........
Georgia ...-.....
Idaho........-....


K an a .......
Kenta k .......
Loiana........
Maine.............
Maine -----------
Maryland........
masamhuat -..
Mikbigan.........
Minnesota ........
MissiUppi -.......
Missouri..........
Montan a.........
Nebraskaa........


mral
Iomm-July July July
ties. 1, 1, 1,
1914. 1915 1916.

67 18 19 27
6 ...... ...... ......
75 15 20 31

4 ------ --.. -.. -----
35 2

50 24 27 28
152 29 48 45
30 .. ...----1 .
102 ..... ...-.. I
92 ...... ...... ......- ---
99 ...... ...... ......-
r- i- i
105 -----...... ---......-----.....----
120 9 19 24
64 13 13 18
16 ..-.... ...... ......
23; 5 6 10
13 ............ 1
82 .....--- .... i
8i -.------...-...-...
801 331 331 32
114 ...... ...... ......
41 .
s .....,......;......


ti .


"-41 4 S


a
28
47

5
1
57




2--
20
13i
6
1


-.-...


New amapshire.
New Jesey......
New Mnexo...
New York.......
North Caroina...
North Dakota....
Ohio .............
O alda .. .......
OffiBB---.------
Sm 'ylvama" "
2hode IsJa...
Sonth Carohna..
South Dakotma...
Tenne .es -........
Texas --............
Utah. ---.-- .... -
Vrmant -........
Virginia ...-...---
Washhngtona---.
West Virgnia....
Wyomling-........
STotal......


15
10
19
as
S6
100
51
75
77
67
5
44
96
250
14
37
55
71
21
2,=20


"1
1914.J


C'
I WM
A..



.... .......
N NO






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27.5.


FARM-MANAGEMENT DEMONSTRATIONS.


A farm-management demonstration aims to teach a farmer
tical method of summarizing and analyzing his farm bsin ....
means of determining the profit or loss incurred in cond
and of deciding upon modifications which promise to increase ti
income of the farm. These demonstrations are conducted i:t
cases by county agents, with the assistance of a farm-
demonstrator, who is cooperatively employed by the college a
United States Department of Agriculture. On July 1, 191L4I
work was in progress in 300 counties in 27 of the Northern and 1
ern States.
EXTENSION WORK THROUGH SPECIALISTS.
!!.. '-;::.lip

Both at the State agricultural college and in the Dep
Agriculture are specialists in various branches of agriculture and
economics who aid county agents in their work, and also give Fi
instruction to farmers in counties where there are no county
A specialist is generally an extension agent who has a very tho
knowledge of some particular line of work and who is oici
presenting his subject to the county agents and the farmers.
may be differentiated from the county agent in that the o
agent has to cover in a more or less thorough way the entire
agriculture, whereas the speialst's field of work is.ger
to a narrow field, such as dairying, horticulture, poultry, et&i.:
The principal lines of extension work of this character
duted in the Department of Agriculture are hog-cholim .r

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iJuly






*. 29

J.d- poultry clubs, dairying, and animal husbandry, through the
Bureau of Animal Industry. All of this work is conducted in coop-
efation with the agricultural colleges in the several States under
project agreements mutually entered into as a part of the general
system of cooperation under the general memorandum of under-
l standing between the Secretary of Agriculture and the colleges of
. agricult ure.
In- hog-cholera work veterinary field agents have been appointed
:to cooperate with county agents and demonstrate to them and to
Local veterinarians and farmers the prevention of loss from hog
:; cholera and of the spread of the disease from herd to herd by the
: use of the serum treatment and proper quarantine and sanitation of
Premises.
S In the dairy-extension work specialists are appointed to conduct
Work in the various States through county agents and otherwise by
. organizing cow-testing associations, bull associations, teaching the
7 keeping of herd records, planning the construction of silos, the remod-
Le: sling of dairy barns, milk houses, and other dairy buildings, estab-
Slishing feeding demonstrations, management of herds, and othei
special dairy-farm problems.
: In soils, forestry, plant pathology, marketing and rural organiza-
::tion, etc., -specialists are also employed to carry on extension work.
EXTENSION SCHOOLS.
I. .Short, practical courses of instruction, accompanied by demon-
.I rationsn, illustrated lectures, and exhibits, organized and conducted
Sby specialists attached to the agricultural colleges, are given in
different localities. The local arrangements are often made by the
: county agents, and these schools usually are planned to assist the
county agent in the development of extension projects undertaken
SInf the county. The schools commonly occupy one week, but in some
cases s a somewhat shorter or longer period.
EMERGENCY DEMONSTRATION WORK.
: In addition to the fund provided above for the regular cooperative
agricultural extension work, Congress passed the food production
set, which includes an item of $4,348,400 for increasing food pro-
Aduction, eliminating waste, and promoting conservation of food, by
:!ieducational and demonstrational methods through counties, districts,
io and urban agents, and others. Under the provision of this act
aier 1,600 emergency demonstration agents have been employed,
i.d for the first time agents have been designated to take up work
the larger urban centers.
fThe following tables show the number of persons connected with
41) county-agent work, (X) home-demonstration work, and (XI)
.and girls' club work, who are paid some part of their salaries













oeuatre lor regular or war emergency wrK. ana ws em
in the States: ...
TABLE IX.-County- gant work (men. .

T...s .i.

Class of agents. 1917, .
regular. Regular. Easi 4


soUTH.
Directors and State leaders ................................... 28 27
Assistant State leaders -......................-...........-......- ...-...... .. ....
District agents..................................--......... -----46 44
County agents and assistants .................................. 745 831 I '"
Local agents (colored).................................... ...5. 56 -t
Totl-----------------------------------74 -765 -518
Total............................ ..... ........... 374 765 518 '.
NORTH AND WEST.
Directors and State leaders '......-.................-..--...... 29 33 ..
Assistant State Iladers......................................... 22 6 ...,. :.
Assistant State leaders- ---------------------------------------a ---
County agents and assistants..-....-...--....--.....-.......... 438 408 01
Total..................................................... 48g 467
UNITED STATES. 1
Directors and State leaders.................................... ---7 6 ... .
Assistant State leaders...--.........-- .......--..-...-.......-. 22 33 .....
District agents..... ----..........-- ..--........--... ........ 4 44 iit
County agents and assistants................................... 1,.18 1,
Local agents (colored) ......................................... .55 5- 41

Total............................................................. 1,36& 1,232I2 I1,MIa ; I
Total ------------------------------------------------1,369 s1232' 1, 'A0

1 The extension directors receiving part of their salaries from department appropriations have c uiM i.
all lines of the cooperative extension work. In the Northern and Western States 31 extension d .reil.
receive no part of their salaries from department funds.

TALE X.--Home-demonstration work (women).


January, 19mSt
January,
Class of agents. 1917, .......
regular. regular. r-
gupar. ge ..ney.
I-I
SOUTH.
State leaders....... ............................ ...... ... 13 14 ..........
Assistant State leaders..............--............-.......... 18 14 ..........
District agents..-------------------.......................... 14 17 29 ,
County agents................................................. 425 41 3B
Local agents (colored).......................................... 7 10 61
City agents-.............--..... ...-................--..-...... .....--...--.. .-. 65
City agents (colored)........................................... .......... .......... 8
Total.................. ............. .... 477 476 4d I:I


NORTB AND WEST.
State leaders............................................
Assistant State leaders.....................................
District agents....... ...................... ...................
County agents..................................................
City agents........................................... ......


4 11'. le, I-i
4-. 3 : ,
1 .......... 30
.......... .......... ........ j
15 25 1282
.......... ..........7 7 .


Total........ ...................................-.......... 2f. 48t
UNITED STATES.
State leaders ................... .............................. IT 2 3
Assistant State leaders............................. ...--- ....- 19 14 asl
District agents................................................. 1 1-t A
County agents ................................................, 440 446 310
I~t~c ior d)-------------------------------7 19 9-
LOeaIagents(colered) .......................................... 10 I -
City agents........................................................ ... .... -...-. 1
City agents (colored) ...................................... ............ ......... 8F
Total. ................................................ ... 49 ,

1 130 of these agents cover more than aon county.,









31


TABL8 XI.-Boys' and girl.' club work (men and women).


Class of agents.


I.. lear SOUTH.'
leaders....................................................
l leader s ..................................................

* Total.............. .... .................. ............
NORTH AND WEST.
i ate leaders....................................... ,..........
isistant State leaders.......................................
i4 ty leaders.................................. ..........
district leaders.................. .............................
Total ...................................
Total--------- -------------------------------------
UNITED STATES.
State leaders..................................................
Assistant State leaders........................................
County leaders................................................
District leaders.............................................
Total ...............................................


January,
1917,
regular.


January, 1918.


Regular.


29 62
28 27


57 | 52


S.......... .


84


29
69
43
........
141


136


45
38
105
..........188
188


Emer- Total.
agency.



19
27i 33
........ 27


27


2
36
140
52
230


2
63
140
52

257


79



21
61
213
52
366


47
101
245
52
445


1 In the Southern States the men county agents supervise the boys' club work in local communities
and the home-demonstration agents conduct the girls' club work.

HOW TO GET IN TOUCH WITH THE EXTENSION SERVICE.

If the farmer or members of his family desire the cooperation of the
Itate agricultural college in solving any of the farm or home problems,
application should first be made to the county agent, if there is one; if
there is no county agent, then to the director of extension at the State
agricultural college to get in touch with the extension organization in
order that the services which this organization is prepared to give may
be secured.


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OFFICERS OF THE STATES RELATIONS S = '..

A. C. True, director. "
Bradford Knapp, chief, Office of Extension Work in teI
J. A. Evans, assistant chief, Office of Extension Work inii4e
C. B. Smith, chief, Ofice of Extension Work in' the Ni
West.
L. A. Clinton, assistant chief, Office of Extension Wei
North and West.
STATE OFFICERS.
.~ ~~.?.. ..


State.


Alabama.........
Arizona.........
Arkansas.........
California........
Colorado .........
Connecticut......
Delaware........
Florida...........
Georgia..........
Idaho............
Illinois...........
Indiana .........
Iowa............
Kansas...........
Kentucky.......
Louisiana........
Maine............
Maryland... .....
Massachusetts.... -
Michigan.........
Minnesota .......
Mississippi.......
Missouri ........
Montana.........
Nebraska........
Nevada..........
New Hampshire.
New Jersey......
New Mexico......
New York.......
North Carolna...
North Dakota....
Ohio............
Oklahoma ......
Oregon...........
Pennsylvania ...
Rhode Island....
South Carolina...
South Dakota....
Tennessee .......
Texas ...........
Utah.............
Vermont........
Virginia.........
Washington......
West Virgima ....
Wisconsin.......
Wyoming........


Officer in charge of
extension work.


J. F. Duggar.'.....
E. P. Taylor......
W. C. Lassetter...
W. T. Clarke......
H. T. French.....
H. J. Baker.......
H. Hayward.,....
P. H. Rolfs.......
J. Phil Campbell..
Lee W. Fluharty..
W. F. Handschn.
G. I. Christie......
R. K. Bliss........
E. C. Johnsofn....
Fred Mutchler .. -
W. R. Perkins....
L. S. Merrill.......
T. B. Symons.....
A. D. Kilham ....-
R. J. Baldwin.....
A. D. Wilson......
E. R. Lloyd.......
A. J. Meyer.......
F. S. Cooley.......
C. W. Pugsley....
C. A. Norcross....
J. C. Kendall......
Alva Agee........
A. C. Cooley......
A. R. Mann.......
B. W. Kilgore.....

C. S. Wheeler.....
J. A. Wilson......
O. D. Center ......
M. S. McDowell...
A. E. Stene.......
W. W. Long.....
G. W. Randlett...
C. A. Keffer.......
T. O. Walton 1....
J. T. Caine, HIII....
Thomas Bradlee..
J. M. Jones........
W. S. Thornber...
C. R. Titlow......
K. L. Hatch......
A. E. Bowman....


I : N.
......; .: l


Address.


Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn. ::
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona, Toes
College of Agriculture, University of Arkansas, Fy
College of Agriculture, University of California Be
State Agricultural College of Colorado, Fort CoiaSing.. i
Connecticut Agricultural College, Storrs. ,:
Delaware College Newarkl. .
College of Agriculture, University of Florida, Gae i
Georgia State College of Agriculture, Athens. .il
The State House Boise. "... .
College of Agriculture, University of Illinois, Urba:.
Purdue University, Lafayette.
Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic A
Kansas State Agricultural College, Manhattan.
College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky,
Louisiana State University and Agricultural d
lege, University Station, Baton Rouge.
College of Agriculture, University of Maine, Orono.
Maryland State College of Agriculture, College Pai.t
Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst.
Michigan Agricultural College, East Landing.
College of Agriculture, University of Minnesota, UnT.
St. Paul.
Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College,
lege.
College of Agriculture, University of Missouri, Coa
Montana State College of Agriculture and Meac
m an. ..... ;:.:.,-:* i
College of Agriculture, University of Nebrsaka- iacint Sw
College of Agriculture, University of Nevada, Reno. ;
New Hampshire College of Agriculture and the Ai
Durham. .;
College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, State uJ
New Jersey, New Brunswick. 9
New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Si
lege.
New York State College of Agriculture, Ithaca.
North Carolina State College of Agriculture and E
Raleigh.
North Dakota Agricultural College Agricultural Col0 ..i
College of Agriculture, Ohio State University, CoIliW .
Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 8t
Oregon State Agricultural College, Corvallis. .:
Pennsylvania State College, State College.
Rhode Island State College, Kingston.
Clemson Agricultural College of South Carolina, C
South Dakota State College, Brookings.. .i
College of Ariculture University of TennesseeKnoil.
Agriculturaand Mecanical College of Texas, Cllege
Agricultural College of Utah Loga. .
University of Vermont and State Agricultural CoeaD B
Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Blacksburg.
State College of Washingon, _ullman.
College of Agriculture, est Virginia Uniersity Mo
College of Agriculture, University of Wisconsin, ad
College of Agriculture, University of Wyoming, Lrawi.::


1 Acting director.


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833


i TABLE XII.-Nuwnmber of extension worers July 1, 1916 and 1917.1


S: State.
7 :


Full time. Part time. Total.

Men. Women. Men. Women. Men. M Women.


I?








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S1916 1917 1916 1917 1916 1917 1916 1917 1916 1917 1916 1917

t :asa............. 86 93 39 39 12 11 3 3 98 104 42 42
.................. 9 9 1 4 6 1 1 ...... 15 10 2 1
Aransas.............. 74 107 37 60 10 14 10 1 84 121 47 61
Qularado................... 19 ...... 3 ...... 5 ...... 2 ...... 24 ...... 5 ......
C~Oa eaetiut.............. 12 ...... 1 ...... 3 ...... ...... ..... 15 ...... 1....
Delaware................ 4 4 1 2 6 6 5 1 10 10 6 3
Florida.................. 38 44 33 32 12 13 2 12 50 57 35 44
eorga.................... 93 126 54 66 2 ...... 1 ...... 95 126 55 66
Idabho.................. 13 16 5 2 15 11 6 4 28 27 11 6
nas .................... 25 32 3 7 9 5 2 2 34 37 5 9
Endiaa..................... 58 72 7 7 29 73 6 28 87 145 13 35
owa .................... 45 57 9 11 34 54 6 32 79 111 15 43
Kansas'.................... 40 45 8 11 ...... ...... ...... .. 40 45 8 11
Ieiatucky................ 55 ...... 35 ...... 2 ..... 3 ...... 57 ...... 38.....
Louisiana................ 50 72 22 26 3 2 ...... ...... 53 74 22 26
Main...................... 8 11 1 2 1 1 ...... ...... 9 12 1 2
Maryland................ 33 36 13 34 11 6 ...... ...... 44 42 13 34
Muassachusetts ............. 24 27 4 14 8 7 ........... 32 34 4 14
Mithbigan.................. 35 45 5 6...... ................ 35 45 5 6
nimnesota.................. 35 32 4 4 9 28 2 8 44 60 6 12
issppi................. 56 82 24 38 1 2 14 20 57 84 38 58
.................. 33 43 3 6 30 3 7 ...... 63 46 10 6
M l n ................... 16 24 2 4 ....................... 16 24 2 4
.................. 31 26 5 12 5 14 ...... 6 36 40 5 18
Nevaa.................. 4 6 1 4 5 4 2 2 9 13 3 6
N Ha.. mpshire........... 13 18 4 3 2 15 ...... 1 15 33 4 4
New Jersey.............. 22 28 ...... 7 3 2 .......... 25 30 ...... 7
New Mexico.............. 13 36 3 13 6 5 ..... ...... 19 41 3 13
Mew York................ 62 73 4 7 16 16 1 2 78 89 5 9
Neart Carolna........... 83 106 32 43 20 9 14 20 103 115 46 63
North Dakrota..... ...... 21 27 4 3 8 11 1 3 29 38 5 6
ho....................... 26 48 9 11 66 66 11 13 92 114 20 24
Oklahom ................ 73 81 29 37 2 3 2 1 75 84 31 38
Oeg ........ ........ 32 35 12 16 19 19 1 2 51 54 13 18
Mfnsylivania.............. 30 49 2 3 22 ...... 2 ...... 52 49 4 3
hed Island.............. 6 ...... 1 1 3 6 1 ...... 9 6 2.....
aut1 Carolina. ........... 59 ...... 38 6.......... 1 ...... 65 ...... 39 ......
Biouth Dakota............. 18 20 ...... 1 ...... 6 ...... 8 18 26 ...... 9
as ee.................. 61 82 13 70 8 6 31 ...... 69 88 44 70
fV S...... ......... ... 97 160 17 46 1 ...... 27 ...... 98 160 44 46
....................... ... .. .... 6 ....... 21 ...... 5 ...... 38 ...... 11 ......
emW .ot................ 15 15 1 1 9 9 1 1 24 24 2 2
iVginait................. 41 64 3 19 29 27 53 107 70 91 56 126
hiat~: on.... ........... 3 41 3 10 ............ 1 ...... 36 41 4 10
t Virgini.............. 34 77 7 5 36 61 8 13 70 138 15 18
MIr m................. 19 28 4 4 77 75 3 1 96 103 7 5
pW nhaig.................. ''12 17 3 2 8 8 4 2 20 25 7 4
:. -n... ..... ........... -..
Total................ 1,68 ...... 515...... 580 ...... 239 ...... 2,266 ...... 754 ......

SReturns for 1917 incomplete.





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Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Represetatives of the Ui ted B.Q.i..
in Congress Casembed, That in order to aid in diffuing among the people of i
States useful and practical information on subjects relating to sgiilium
economics, and to encourage the application of the same,. there may he
in connection with the college or colleges in each State now receiving; or
hereafter receive, tihe benefits-of the act of Congress approved July seeeei,
hundred and sixty-two, entitled "An act doaatiag public lands to the savai
and Territories which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture
mechanic arts" (Twelfth Statutes at Large, page five hundred and three), a ..
act of Congress approved August thirtieth, eighteen kundead and aniu"ty
siKth Statutes at Large, page four hundred and seventeen and chapter eigfith
and forty-one), agricultural extension work which shall be carried on In ee
with the United States Department of Agriculture: Pwnvid, That in any
which two or more such colleges have been or hereafter may be establiaded t
priations hereinafter made to such State shall be ministered by sck td..
colleges as the legislature of such State may direct: Provided further, That,
the inauguration and development of the cooperative extendon work herein 4
ized, nothing in this act shall be construed to discontinue either thea-f f
ment work of the farmers' cooperative demonstration work as now conducted
Bureau of Plant Industry of the Department of Agriculture.
SEC. 2. That cooperative agricultural extension wor absll consist of thei
of instruction and practical demonstrations in agriculture and bonme Caii
persons not attending or resident in said colleges in the several communimtis|M
imparting to such persons information on said subjects through field da, 01a0
publication, and otherwise; and this work shall be carried on in such Mas
may be mutually agreed upon by the Secretary of Agriculture and the Statin j
cultural college or colleges receiving the benefits of this act.
SEC. 3. That for the purpose of paying the-expenses of said cooperative agdieutM
extension work and the necessary printing and distributing of informatioPa.. j
section with the same, there is permanently appropriate, out of any MBmey
Treasury not otherwise app ipriated, the sum of $480,000 for each year, SJ ...
which shall be paid annually, in the manner hereinaoter provided, to eaml:c,".
which shall by action of its legislature assent to te provisions of this act: P ,u.
That payment of asch installments of the appropriation hemidbefom mnPaaeii
become due to any State before the adjournment of the regular session of thei".l '"
ture meeting next after the passage of this act may, in the absence of p ie
assent, be made upon the absent of the ovemar themio, dly -editied. to ....t b
tary of the Tresuy: Provided fi rMr, That Gtese ieal.e- appeared a d fi
sum of $600,000 for the fiscal year foelwisn-hat in whidh the foregoing approprli
first becomes available, and for each year thereafter for seven years a sum exce
by $500,000 the sum appropriated for each preceding year, and for each year thenief
there is permanently appropriated for each year the sum of $4,100,000 in ad.di.jv
the sum of $480,000 hereinbefore provided: Provided further, That before theft
herein appropriated shall become available to any college for any fiscal year
for the work to be carried on under this act shall be submitted by the proper l
of each college and approved by the Secretary of Agriculture. Such addititonal
shall be used only for the purposes hereinbefore stated, and shall be allotted anni

4. ...
L., :.,"i! i'i







35

: each State by the Secretary of Agriculture and paid in the manner hereinbefore
.vided, in the proportion which the rural population of each State bears to the total
s population of all the States as determined by the next preceding Federal census:
toWidfurther, That no payment out of the additional appropriations herein pro-
e shall be made in any year to any State until an equal sum has been appropri-
aior that year by the legislature of such State, or provided by State, county, col-
,local authority, or individual contributions from within the State, for the main-
an ce of the cooperative agricultural extension work provided for in this act.
v. 4. That the sums hereby appropriated for extension work shall be paid in equal
.ann.ual payments on the first day of January and July of each year by the Secretary
if.e Treasury upon the warrant of the Secretary of Agriculture, out of the Treasury
S:he United States, to the treasurer or other officer of the State duly authorized by
- laws of the State to receive the same; and such officer shall be required to report
kh.e Secretary of Agriculture, on or before the first day of September of each year,
L detailed statement of the amount so received during the previous fiscal year, and of
6 disbursement, on forms prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture.
;I.vc. 5. That if any portion of the moneys received by the designated officer of
iy State for the support and maintenance of cooperative agricultural extension
"rk, as provided in this act, shall by any action or contingency be diminished or
a or be misapplied, it shall be replaced by said State to which it belongs, and until
Srplaced no subsequent appropriation shall be apportioned or paid to said State,
Sno portion of said moneys shall be applied, directly or indirectly, to the pur-
a'Ie, erection, preservation, or repair of any building or buildings, or the purchase
rietal of land, or in college-course teaching, lectures in colleges, promoting agri-
ltumral trains, or any other purpose not specified in this act, and not more than five
b': centum of each annual appropriation shall be applied to the printing and dis-
l ttion of publications. It shall be the duty of each of said colleges annually, on
before the first day of January, to make to the governor of the State in which it is
ed a full and detailed report of its operations in the direction of extension work
lfldined in this act, including a detailed statement of receipts and expenditures
:I all sources for this purpose, a copy of which report shall be sent to the Secretary
agriculture and to the Secretary of the Treasury of the Cnited States.
S6. That on or before the first day of July in each year after the passage of
act the Secretary of Agriculture shall ascertain and certify to the Secretary of
ifreasury as to each State whether it is entitled to receive its share -of the annual
tion for cooperative agricultural extension work under this act, and the
nt which it is entitled to receive. If the Secretary of Agriculture shall with-
Aa certificate from any State of its appropriation, the facts and reasons therefore
ibe reported to the President, and the amount involved shall be kept separate
e Teasury until the expiration of the Congress next succeeding a session of the
ure of any State from which a certificate has been withheld, in order that the
e may, if it should so desire, appeal to Congress from the determination of the
of Agriculture. If the next Congress shall not direct such sum to be paid,
ail be covered into the Treasury.
.7. That the Secretary of Agriculture shall make an annual report to Congress
..he :ceipts, expenditures, and results of the cooperative agricultural extension
Sin" all of the States receiving the benefits of this act, and also whether the appro-
:of any State has been withheld, and if so, the reasons therefore.
:.. That Congress may at any time alter, amend, or repeal any or all of the
of this act.
j., May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. L., 372).
TO : T PFF : 1.)

WASHINGTON: GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 191S
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