How teachers in rural elementary schools may use Farmers' Bulletin 771, home-made fireless cookers and their use

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Title:
How teachers in rural elementary schools may use Farmers' Bulletin 771, home-made fireless cookers and their use
Physical Description:
2 p. : ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- States Relations Service
Publisher:
U.S. Government Printing Office
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Cookware -- Study and teaching (Elementary)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

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Title from caption

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029620846
oclc - 85229351
System ID:
AA00014626:00001


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UNITED STATES PEPARTM


STATES RELATIONS SERoICE.
A. C. TRUE, Director.


HOW TEACHERS IN RURAL ELEMENT ARY SCHOOLS MAY
USE FARMERS' BULLETIN 771, HOME-MADE FIRELESS
COOKERS AND THEIR USE.
Relation to the course of study.-The bulletin is useful in the cook-
ing classes and provides useful correlations for other school subjects.
Topics for study.-Three topics for study with the related practice
are suggested: (1) The principles of the fireless cooker, pages 3-4;
how to make a fireless cooker, pages 4-8. (2) How to use the fire-
less cooker, pages 9-10. (3) Recipes for use with the fireless cooker,
S pages 11-16.
-z Study questions.-Topic 1: What is the principle of the fireless
cooker? What is the source of the heat used? What crude methods
have formerly been used to apply this principle? What are the three
chief advantages of the fireless cooker? What other advantages?
What are the materials essential for the making of a satisfactory
cooker? What different materials may be used for the outer con-
Stainer? What is the most essential requirement as to this outer con-
Stainer? How much space will be required? What are the essen-
Stials of the inner container and the cooking utensils? What ma-
terials are best? Why should tinned iron not be used ? What sources
of extra heat may be used What danger may this involve ? What
different packing material may be used? What very cheap material
is good? How pack the insulating space? If extra heat is to
be used, how avoid danger of fire? What is best material?' What
cheaper? How insulate the top?
Topic 2: The fireless cooker is best suited to what foods? How
much baking may be done ? What kinds of cooking can not be done ?
Under what conditions may different foods be cooked at the same
time? How large a container should be used in each case? How
shall foods be prepared for the cooker? How long cooked before
being put in the fireless cooker? How long shall they remain in
Sthe fireless cooker
Tj opic 3: Discuss the recipes which may have local application.
Si which recipes permit the long-time or overnight cooking? Which
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are adapted only to short-time use of the cooker?' How P
stocks prepared ? Ho. t are soups made? How ook bre ki
cereals? Fresh vegetables'?. Meat and vegetable combinat A. .
Dried fruits? Puddings and 'teamed bread?
Illustrative material.-A well-constructed homemade fireless :co'ke1
\ should be examined by the pupils before they attempt to make br iusev i
one. Plans and pictures of various types may be collected. Recipe
books and instructiohs furnished ;y manufacturers will be helpful. ; ':i
Make a chart containing a list of cautions.
Practical exercises.-This subject is of little value except as it as :::;
applied to real practice, whi' should include both home and school
work. Fireless cookers',r be. made by pupils either at school or :
at home. The cooking of a school lunch may be greatly simplified::.::
by the use of the fireless cooker. (See F. B. 712.) Soups and other-:
warm dishes prepared early in the day will be ready for the lunch.:, l: I
The cooking class should become skilled in using this method of :;,
cooking. Arrange that each pupil shall practice at home the lessons ,:
learned at school, thus spreading the use of this article. .
Correlations.-In manual training classes make a fireless cooker.
Have the plans drawn in class. In language classes write descrip-
tions of the making and using. of the cooker.
In the physiology class discuss the relative food values of some '
,cheaper foods which are rendered available by the cooker.
In this class or in elementary science show the close connection
between this topic and that of refrigeration. Pupils should under-t
stand that insulation by means of nonconductors is the same in each. .
case. Since both must be used in the summer season it may be wise
to lay emphasis on this application also. Some families- may profit -
ably construct homemade refrigerators. Show the application of
the same principle to the ice house and to the thermos bottle. '
The recipes, cost of material, saving in fuel, etc., will, provide
interesting problems in arithmetic.
F. E. HEADD,
Specialist in Agricultural Education.
Approved:
C. H. LANE,
Chief Specialist in Agricultural Education. .
MARCH 31, 1917. ,. ',






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