How teachers in rural elementary schools may use Farmers' Bulletin 711, the care and improvement of the wood lot

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Title:
How teachers in rural elementary schools may use Farmers' Bulletin 711, the care and improvement of the wood lot
Physical Description:
2 p. : ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- States Relations Service
Publisher:
U.S. Government Printing Office
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Forest management -- Study and teaching (Elementary)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Title from caption

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029619266
oclc - 85229176
System ID:
AA00014623:00001


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su r .- -xi.




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT
STATES EtLATIONS' VICE. t
A. C. TRUE, ire t "




S I
ROW TEACHERS IN RURAL ELEME t.f:ti U E
FARMERS' BULLETIN 711, THE CARE AND T
OF THE WOOD LOT.
Range for use.-States east of and including Minnesota and Texas,
sections where there are farm wood lots.
Relation to the course of study.-Material in this bulletin will be of
use in the study of farm management and forestry in elementary
agriculture, in botany and nature study, also by correlation in other
school subjects.
Topics for study.-(1) Essentials of a good wood lot; species adapted
to the locality, rate of growth, value for wood and lumber, etc.; pages
1-8. (2) Improvement and care; cuttings, cleaning, thinnings, pas-
turing, and protection; pages 9-18. (3) Perpetuation and regenera-
tion; by seed, by sprouts, artificial sowing or planting; pages 19-24.
These topics should be taught when the application,is most seasonal.
Study questions.-Topic 1. What is the chief aim of the farm wood
lot ? What has the density of stand to do with the quality of timber ?
How dense a stand is desirable ? Compare some local wood lots with
the stocking table on page 2. What species of timber are native to
your district 1 What species not listed on page 3 are found in local
wood lots ? Were they introduced naturally or artificially ? Which
local species are favored for building timber? For furniture ? For
firewood Which are commonly planted in reforesting? Discuss
other merits of any species.
Topic 2. In what different ways may wood lots need improvement ?
What should'be done in cases where old trees predominate ? How
secure a natural reproduction in such cases ? What are the different
types of improvement cuttings ? In making cleaningg" what should
be removed? Why does it pay to do this? When are "thinnings"
needed-? What trees should be selected in thinning? What use
may be made of the trees thinned out? What are liberation cut-
tings and why necessary ? What harm may vines do in the. wood
lot? Discuss the harm done by pasturing wood lots and compare
this with the value of the pasturage. What different forms of
damage result from fires in the wood lot? What evidences may
there be of damage by insects or fungi? How may the' farmer-
obtain advice. about these pests? What methods of cutting and'
logging the timber -will best preserve the younger growth ? To what
'extait do -local farmers use good methods ?
T"opie 3. How encourage the growth of young trees to replace old
growth How assist in the natural seeding? In what cases will
reproduction by sprouts be feasible and what advantages has this
method ? In what; eases may artificial planting or seeding be prefer-
able Where -:l Qw should new wood lots be established? To.
what extent ar new seedings or plantings needed in the district t




.. .. *w .: :







'hat arrangement as yopr tteo for .his ii
plaating'? Is th<^ nastaj 111 jtwnifstric
r.foreted. (SbeTFaie L,%k[' .HN'1Er ''t
iillustrative.m4eLtal.- ae pupils as*st in p
" for a school collection to it a for eacLrspecies bt l
leaves1 flowers and frui-l bark, twigs, sectliieii
show various grams 4d, s ed specimens. Po
.obtained t show bkt4acI bits and forms of tr'
:sketches or as printed 'iate :Consult the co.un
; iii of schools or the State forestry as to sources of :su
'i tures from farm papers will show good and poor m4i
practice. The Forest Service of the U. S. Departmie
loans photographs of forest conditions and forest W'oS ]
commercially important woods and related data, ..an4di
slides with accompanying lecture outlines to responsible
cost of transportation only. Details may be learned by
the Forester, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Was
Practical exercises.-Prepare specimens of woods at s
the class plant trees as a windbreak or a background foat |
(with the permission of the school officials). Where.fo9
are available they should be visited or; in the abs n .Of.-
tunity, itmay be possible to learn nursery mejthoriat
ornamental and fruit-tree nurseries. Have the ppiip~tl inq i'
farm in the district and report for each the acreage Iof the W
the number of trees to the acre, the age of trees,
methods of care, undesirable practice observed, average
ting, use of wood and lumber on farm, wood and lumber soe
prices, and total income from this source, market conditi
markets available, amount of seeding or planting done
planting to trees.
Correlations.-Arithmetic problems will arise in, :i
survey data and also by applications of the tables on
23. The measuring of wood-lot products is dealt w~ith
Bulletin No. 715. Compute for actual rather than. m
where possible. In geography classes locate the woo'd.;I"
map of the district, indicate on the State map the faotoriL
local wood products. Find what sections use most of
from this section, the routes of transportation, uses and min...
at its destination, competing sections.
Civics studies include names of forest wardens; their dl
State laws on forest protection; the duty of each itiz
particular; the name, location, salary, and duties of th&
ester. Obtain from the State forester all the material I
his office for the use of schools. Drawings to show* the.-.
habits and other features of trees of local importance :may
with sufficient accuracy to make a valuable collection.for ..
material.
F. E.
Specialist in Agriculturaz
Approved: *i
C. H. LANE, .
Chief Specialist in Agricultural Education. ,:Li
JANUARY 1, 1917. :
W*s G O : *oV""" :" *:
WASHINGTON: GOVERNMENT PRiNTINVOfCf
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
IIIIIIIIIII II II ll llll11 111111 11
3 1262 08928 7873
M A -- .--- -- -.




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