The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00062

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


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Full Text
& Jewish Florida a ui
3 3
Volume 3 Number 3
ot \OllTII ItllOW \R
Friday, February 8, 1974
Price 25 c*n"3
COMMUNITY LEADERS PARTICIPATE
Theodore Bikel To Headline March 3 Dinner-Dance
i *
MIS. ALLAH BAIK
Mr. and Mrs. Allan Baer, dinner
chairmen for the Jewish Federa
ton, 1974 UJA-IEF dinner-dance
have announced that Theodore
Bikel, internationally known stage
and screen star, will be the guest
ipeaker.
The black-tie affair will be held
day,. March 3, at Pier 66, be-
ginning with cocktails at 630 p.m.
According to Mr. Baer an outstand
log organization of distinguished
I'<>:iimunity leaders have accepted
key roles for the function
Honorary chairmen include Mar
tin Fridovich, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Goldfarb. Mr. and Mrs. Richard
Schubot and Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Soref.
Serving as cochairmen are. Mr
ar.d Mrs. Robert Adler. Mr and
lira. Jacob Brodzki. Mr. and lira
I.udwik Brodzki, Dr and Mrs Al-
wn Colin. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
Fabor. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Gar-
nitt, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Levin.
Mr and Mrs. Jack Levine. Mr and
Mrs. Jacob Lutx, Mr and Mrs Don-
Id Mitchell, Mr. and Mrs Benja
min Roisman and Mr. and Mrs.
Abram Silverman.
The committee includes Mr. and
Mrs Arnold Abbott. Sidney Elk
man. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Gaines.
i>: and Mrs. Saul Geronermis. Mr
.nJ Mrs. Leo Goodman. Mr and
Mrs. Robert Hermann. Mr and
THfOMME Mil
Mrs Martin Kane. Mr and Mrs.
Milton Reiner, Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Legum, Judge and Mrs. Joel Miller.
Mr and Mrs. Donald Rich. Mr. and
Hn .loseph Novick. Mr. and Mrs
Mom Samet. Mr. and Mrs. Abraham
Schankerman. Mr. and Mrs. Alvin
Siegel, Dr. and Mrs. Jack Solomon.
Dr and Mrs. Robert I'chin. Mr
and Mrs Irwin Weiser. Mr. and
Mrs Martin Yohalem and Mr. and
Mrs Allan Ziffer.
Serving in an ex-officio and ad-
visory capacity are Howard Miller.
Federation president; Alvin Gross,
general campaign chairman, and
Irving Geisser, Federation's execu-
tive director Also serving as hon-
ored members are Rabbi Arthur
Abrams. Rabbi Phillip Labowitz
and Rabbi Morris Skop.
At an organizational meeting
held recently in the home of Mr.
and Mrs Baer. plans were formu-
lated to make this the outstanding
function in the community's his-
tory'.
Referring to the dramatic situa-
tion :n th.' Middle Bast, where a
serious crisis still exists, Samuel
Soref. honorary chairman, pointed
>ut that this is no time for com-
placency. "Our community must be
aware of the dangers that face Is-
rael at the peace table, on the
Metropolitan Division Workers
Actively Soliciting Prospects
According to Metropolitan Divi-
sion chairmen Arthur Faber and
Jacob Brodzki, active solicitation
of prospects is in full swing.
A workers' meeting held at Mr
Faber's home produced a large
cadre of workers who signified
tht..r understanding of the tre-
mendous needs facing Israel and
our growing local community, ac-
cording to Mr. Brodzki. Assign-
ments were accepted full-heartedly.
and a determination to achieve re-
sults commensurate with the needs
was evident at the meeting.
A report meeting is scheduled
for the middle of February
Workers in the Metropolitan Di-
vision include Arnold Abbott. Jo-
seph Applebaum. Dr Stuart Beder
man Dr Edward Blumberg. Josh
Chadrow. Dr. Alvin Colin. Joel
Fox Sidney Frieder. l*e Jay Geis-
mar Osvar Grusky. Irving Kelman-
son. Jacob Klaimitz and Harold
Krause.
Aiso Dr Samuel Leder. Gil Mai-,
hnger. Joseph Nov,ck. Dr Samuel
Oppenheimer. .41 Rotman. Mike
Rubin Mon Sellner. Ronald
Schagr.n. Irwin Schiff. Ue Sham
man Alvin Siegel. Jack Solomon.
Murrav Spielberg. Mike Weinberg.
MartvVohalem and Alan Ziffer.
Ckmkmm.
Golan Heights, economically and
of the problems facing the state
in providing for the new immi-
grants and existing social needs,"
he said.
In view of this, the assembled
leaders urged that maximum at-
tendance at the dinner be the
goal of the committee. Mr. Baer
announced that a cocktail-cruise
report meei'.ng will be held Feb.
14 from 5 to 7 p.m. aboard the
Arrowhead IV at Harbor West.
We were fortunate to be able
to secure Mr. Bikel as our guest
speaker." campaign chairman Al-
vin Gross said.
Though Mr. Bikel is best known
for his work in films and on stage,
he has had a life long dedication
to Jewry. Born in Austria, he came
to Palestine at age 13 with his
family and lived and worked in a
kibbutz. He began his acting career
with the famous Habimah Theatre
in 1943.
Currently active in Jewish lead-
ership as cochairman of the Amer-
ican Jewish Congress Governing
Council, and founder of the A.J.C.
Arts chapter. Mr. Bikel serves on
the executive board of the National
Jewish Music Council and is a
forceful advocate and spokesman
on behalf of Russian Jewry.
Among Mr. Bikel's well known
screen efforts are "The Defiant
Ones." 'The African Queen." "The
Russians Are Coming. The Rus-
sians Are Coming." "My Fair
Lady." "The Enemy Below." and
I Want to Live."
On stage, he starred with Viriea
Leigh in "Streetcar Named Desire"
and created the role of Baron von
Trapp in "Sound of Music" His
Tevye in the National Company of
Fiddler on the Roof" was hailed
as the most enchanting night of
theatre that has ever been awarded
an audience "
Mr Bikel. an author, raconteur
and lecturer, has appeared on many
top dramatic and variety programs
on television and has recorded 16
albums of folk songs in many lan-
guages including Russian. Hebrew
and Yiddish.
Mr. Bikel will appear through
the courtesy of Stockton Briggle
Carillon Dinner Theatre, produc-
ers of i Do. I Do." in which he
will star in Miami Beach beginning
March 5._________________
10 Local Leaders
Participating In
Mission To Israel
Ten key leaders of the Greater
Fort Lauderdale area are currently ;
in Israel as members of the South
Florida Mission, including Mr and
Mrs. Howard Miller. Mr. and Mrs.
Alvin Gross. Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Levine. Mr. and Mrs. Allan Baer
and Mr. and Mrs. Abram Silver
man.
The delegates all of whom hold
key positions of leadership in Fed-
eration and the UJA-IEF campaign
are making an intensive survey of
Israel's continuing needs.
In this process the grouo will be
meeting with several of the state's
too leaders They will aWo tour
military hospitals to talk with
wounded soldiers from the Yom
Kippur war. and meet new Russian
immigrant, some of them just ar-
riving in Israel.
The participants will view mili-
tary installations, and will be made
fuliy aware of the economic im-
pact that the war has imposed.
They will return Feb. 13, and re-
port their findings to the commu-
nity shortly .thereafter.
Honorary chairmen of the March 3 Campaign Dinner are,
from left to right (seated) Samuel Goldfarb and Samuel
Soref; (standing) Richard Schubot and Martin Fridovich.
Shown at planning -nawting helcJ in preparation to* March 3
dinner are ('eft to right) Allan Baer, dinner-dance chairman;
Howard Miller, Federation president, and Alvin Gross, general
campaign chairman.
Orthodox Push Drive
To Control Conversion
JERUSALEM 'JTA) Orthodox rabbis from the United States
and other countries, seeking to preserve Orthodox hegemony over re-
ligious and personal matters in Israel, continued to attack conversions
made under non-Orthodox auspices.
here
They a'"i"kd heal Reform and
Conservative rabbis who oooose
amendina Israel's Law f Return
f rtiru'a'' nveitl o-ning
n-b*v I 'nil B York, president of the Rabbinical
Council of America, warned that
if I-rae! reconi7ed conversions
performed by Refom or Conser-
vat.v rabbis n^t in accordance
with Halacha it w>uld gravely
prejudice the Orthodox rabbin-
ate's fight against intermarriage
in the VJL and around the world
RABBI BERNSTEIN and some
of his Orthodox colleagues spoke
at a press conference following
the closing session of the RCA's
annual mid-winter convention
n Israel a= immigrants must have
ben converted in accordance
with Halacha meaning Ortho-
dox rites in order to be recog-
nized as Jews.
The so-called "who is a Jew*"
amendment is one of the key de-
mands of the National Religious
Party, in Israel lor joining a
Continued on Page 7
*
*i.'^./^.,..,.^..!. _.

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Page 2
*Jei**n*rlcl*>r *"* **w'rd
Friday, February 8, 1974
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Israel Bonds Launches Billion Dollar Loan
The Israel Bond Organization
this week launched the State of
Israel Reconstruction and Develop-
ment Loan. The $1 billion financial
offering is the largest amount of
bondwgfc .floated tnet Ik*
(Independence) issue was initiated
in the United States in May. 1951,
by the late Prime Minister David
Ben-Gurion.
During this historic $1 billion
campaign, the Greater Miami com-
munity will be responsible for
a quota, not a goal, of $30 million
which the Israeli government has
indicated must be met.
ISRAEL Finance Minister Pin-
chas Sapir presented the bill be
fore the Knesse last Nov. 14 to es-
tablish the SI billion loan.
In addressing the Knesset, Ssoii
noted that it should be remem-
bered that the costs of the Vom
Kippur War do not include only
diiect security expenditures but
also iie loss of productivity in the
economy.
. ."Jlfcfc^camjpt finance Um. iteiil
and economic investments from
our own means. The economy
which succeeded admirably ia'
standing up to the war despite
problems is a result of the in- ;
refitments made in the economy
It appears to me that no one has
any doubt that our economy stood
the test."
Ze'ev Sher. Israel's Economic
Minister to the United States and
I rael. has stressed to the bnel
Bond Organization that, in order
for Israel to offet the economic
dislocation caused hv the war and
to maintain Israel's economic de
\clopmen program to create jobs
for new immigrants, Israel will
require the full amount of the
new $1 bullion Israel Bond issue.
The ReronsirurHffi and Hcvelop-
meat Loin *ill be utilized 4o e*
pand the country's infrastructure.
enlarge transportation, especially
loads and railways: construct a
nuclear power station to offset
petroleum shortages: increase its
petrochemical, metal, and elec-
tronics industries: explore for new
oil resources: and improve com-
munication systems.
ACCORDING TO Sher. sharpl>
cut tailed industrial production re-
ulting from large-scale mobiliza
tion during and since the Octobei
war is reflected in a reduction of
.lie 1973 Gross National Product
1 0111 a projected 18 billion to ap
proximate!) ^8 billion, which
: 11 sits thai there has been almost
no increase over 1972.
In a statement on the new is
liairmaa ol tip Israel Bond Organ-
ization, declared: "The year 1973
produced a n. cord breaking tota'
M S502 million compared to $271
million in 19-2
This decisive expression of
solidarity and brotherhood must
continue on a scale necessa j ta
meet Israel's heightened needa and
responsibilities. Israel mu-i re.
build her war-torn econonn ;,rae|
must have economic strength ln
the difficult year of the Geneva
peace negotiations.''
Since fhe lirst Bond issue was
inaugurated in'the I'r
in 1951. the sale of I
".as produced a total of I
for every maior phase of the coiin-
I y's development.
Braadeifl Lniversity Women Will
e/
Honor National President Feb. Itt
Th- Fort Lauderdsle-Pompsno
B h (hspi of the Brandeia
University Women' Comm '
sponsnrinc a "Winter Luncheon'.'
ho: 9 MM m St r.i, the
n:iii 'ill 'it of the Women's
Commrtte Hondey, Feb. 18. at 11
a.m. fl ilirris Imperial House.
North Ocean Drive at Atlantic
Boulevard. Pompano Beach.
Mrs. Stern served three years as
national vice preaidenl before be
in-1 elected president and has been
an active member of the national
board and executive committee for
many years. She also served as
national chairman of the New-
Books For-Old program.
For reservations call Mrs. Oscar
C.ruskv. 3750 Gall Ocean Dr.. or
Mrs Roger Odwak. 2881 NE 33rd
Ct., Fort Lauderdale.
IKK. SOLOMON STftN
Saudis Bar Jewish Writer
PARIS (JTA) A French
journalist. Le Monde's Eric Roul-
eau, was prevented from accom-
panying French Foreign Minister
Michael Jobert to Saudi Arabia
because of his "Jewish origin."
Rouleau, who on his Saudi
Arabian visa application had Riv-
en "Jewish" as his religion, was
refused an entry visa in spite of
his reputed pro-Arab stand and
the intervention of the Quai
LE MONDE foreign editor.
Michael Tatu, told the Jewish
Tvftrane.
Telegraphic Agency that the
French Foreign Ministry had ap-
proved Rouleau's aoolication to
join the press party traveling on
Jobert's plane and had forwarded
his name to the Saudi Arabian
Embassy in Paris.
Tatu said that the Saudians re
fused the visa after Rouleau de
scribed himself as Jewish.
The JTA learned that four
other Jewish journalists accom-
panying Jobert were granted visas
when they either claimed to be
Christian or said in their appli
cations to be "non-practicing."
THE FOUR other knowr. Jews
are Edwin Forte, of the Agence
France Press: Edouard Sablier.
of the French Broadcasting Cor-
poration; Mrs Hubert-Rodier, of
the Gaullist paper. "La Nation";
and Rogert Pinto, of the French
Radio.
The first
Riverside Chapel
inBroward County
is now open
in Hollywood.
5801 Hollywood Boulevard
Telephone 920-1010
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAm. I1C fUNtHA^. omic'Ois
Off'*fi jt C^etH "< ><* ;
Utm. Itm Bt*C* fl tJuJftf.'f M*T*oo9 /
)680NE 19tnAvfnu*.Nom'Mu- 4ac>-- 947-CttI
ISmStrMtiAiiiyftMtf M.r-, Sf*:'-'if I nil
1ZS0 Normandy D"rt M,m, Bfc4j 1 II51
OouflM "0*0 Jl S W 17thSt'f Mj~ JtlllSl
..f t-Jt tnrt f "tw *"*' i
:"> CijoCi Hfilttr 'wl/yi B'oenm.
ri* Hoc fmn**w **-v
Mwray H. Rabin, f J. ________________
By RABBI SAMUEL J FOX
(<) ij :i J< i.' '.
whv is it tustemarj in some
plires for the groom to e\|Mi:ind
somi treatise having t> d> 'vith
Jewish law before the proces-
sion takes pla to the nuptial
canopy (the chupah >'.'
Some claim that this was done
-o as not to lo-e sight of the peren
nial Jewish commitment to tin
study of Torah. Even before thi
evening of celebration and merry
making begins with tiie chupah .
the groom sets the tone for th< !
occasion with some word of Torah
Others claim that this practice
is reminiscent of the Revelation ol
ihe Torah at Mount Sinai. Many
of the customs of the weddine
ceremony reflect the manner in
which the union between tiie Al-
mighty and his people Israel took
I lace ai Sinai.
Having the groom expound some
To: ah thought before the weddine
Indicates that one is aware o: :he
two parallel unions on which the
future of the Jewish people de-
pends, i.e., the union between the
Almighty and His people and tin
union between husband and wife.
Why are the groom's remarks
int lurteri after the beginning
ef his dissertation and he there-
fore rarely finish-s what he be-
gan to say?
Some contend that this is done
, so as not to embarrass a groom
who might not be so learned. Head
ing him off soon after he begins
avoids criticism by his peers and
-upcriors. Thus, all are alike when
they a e marriedthe more schol-
arly and the less scholarly.
Others claim that since the dis-
sertation in the first place i~
reminiscent of the Revelation at
'I -um Sinai, the intenuption is
made to represent the smashing of
the tablet! at Sinai after they were
first given to Moses. This is
ymbo.ic lesson to the new couple
o have them undei stand that even
if there is a failure to understand
each other at times, they must al
ways try again to reconstruct and
rebuild.
Why does Jewish tradition re-
quire marriage to be a formal
matter duly witnessed and made
known to otiiers in this way?
Some claim that this is done so
that people will not arrange pro
, m mar ia-es which will mislead
jthers. Further, when one marries
someone, one c.OSes the door upon
the rights of o:hers"to mam thi-
saw p-rson. Wher? one's action
is limiting the rights of others.
ormai recognition is required b\
formal action Were there no such
o mality. either of the partners
might have affairs with others
since their union is not a matter j:
:record.
Meetina in New York last month to discuss camp
egy (o the SI F Uion Reconstruction and Developr
iie are from left Samuel Rothberg of Peoi
cene: in cf the Israel Bor.d Organisation;
Lee:-. Kronish oi Miami Beach, national campaign c;
man; end Zo ev She.-, Israel's Economic Minister :
Unil M and Canada
Halcyon Cove A Sparkling
New Star On The
Antisruan Horizon
A S Travel Report by
! en lacobsen prepared exclu-
sively f,ir The Jewish Flondian
Of North Broward
When describing a vacation
spot, this traveler often finds
the word "memorable" to be
overused i-: I undeserved Row-
evei. .'" I :' I MM ItS) at the
m wlj 0| cyoB C ve on
Ant: the best i
and adverbs come into p!a>. it
li truly a n We resort,
and one plan to visit often'
Honeycreepe- to Rumi
vatei ski ng and powei
are also offered, and Ian
ben can hate their dl
ing tennis, pitch-and put-
horseback rrdtaf, pins pong and
shuff.eb>ard
Sun aril iurf and tl
trade winds Invariabl)
person safer to dine
lining! The
i ant. perched on the hi
and r ached by a "hill e\ il r"
cable car. features the
On ipecial memories American, European an,!
is the sheer beauty of the set tempting iiland cuisine
Dg As I basked on tl.e com bread, ro.h and pastries
lortab.y sett and clean beach right fiom the oven to )
of the Cove, mazing out on to really set up the testebu
the Dicken on Bay of Admiral the gou-met treats that I
Ho Btio Nelson, time and na- There's al-o the Warn Res-
tore Seemed in perfect harmony.
Turning the other way, one
could take in the modern resort
it->lf iet :i'!:ong tropical foii-
and the green hillside be-
yond.
The Halcyon Cove's 104 rooms
are conveniently situated jut a
sho.: rtro 1 from the beach and
the int iguiagly curved swim-
ming pool. The rooms, offering
furniture of native rattan, are
delight ully cool and affoid
panoramic views of the bay ln
cidental.y. a nature lover mu-t
have named each of the living
areas from Parakeet to IV,i-
ean. Weaver to Woodpecker.
taurar.t and Pier Bar. set
breeze-kissed pier Mrtendmi
out into the bay It ip
in delicious steak and lob.tl
dinners and is a populai
for luncheon and snacks
Iv entertainment tat the
rams Restauranti is l| rkel
by live bands, floor shows, I ''
band and fashion show-
Perhaps one can best
the success of the Hai
by ci .ng management
tion to detail: telepho:
rVoms fttil width -
gla*s, doors for lea *'iea
. co.j iui little Jitnej
complameat the "hi!
to
For complete packages lo Halcyon Hotel in
Antiqua and St. Lucia call 371-6301 in Mia"''
1 my favorite: j.
Several hours of pleaant
mini-sai. boating on the bay wee
fcllowed by a snorkeling expe-
dition. Because the ba> 1. crys
tal clear and p-otected from
the open sea by an offshore
coral reef, the gamut of Ami
guan marine life can easily be
seen and enjoyed. Scuba diving,
. wine lists with SCtui
bell in-tead of printed n^mes
and so much mo. e
the
like
-ij
Of course, there con-'
time for going home Bn'
Chrs-tophtr Cohimbu-
p-obaWy won't depa-t without
first promising you'll return
at tie very first chance'



Friday, February 8, 1974
* flm#ii Fhoridfisr North 6>oward
Page 3
if
North Broward Israel Bonds
Delegates Return From Israel
C7 .... ..... ,V|
Six delegates representing the
Fort Lauderdale-Pompano B<
area returned this week from I-
racl after attending an eight-day
Internationa] brae] Bonds Prime
Minister's ('(inference.
-Mr and Mrs. Robert M. Hermann.
Mr and Mrs. Morton Pine, and Mr,
and Mrs Oscar Sindell were among
500 delegates from the United
States and Canada who received
"personal invitations from Mrs. Meir
to participate in the launching ol
the greatest effort in Israel's his
tory, the Si Billion Reconstruction
and Development I-oan.
In addition to meetings with the
Prime Minister and Finance Min
ister Pinchas Sapir. the delegates
conferred with Israel's President
Ephraim Kat/ir, Defense Ministei
Moshe Dayan. Foreign Minister
Abba Kban. Chief of Staff I.t. Con
David Elazar and many other lead
ing government dignitaries.
The North Broward delegation
also toured major economic instal
lations, and sites for new recon-
struction and development projects.
in addition to visiting the battle-
ments of the recent Yom Kippur
War in the Sinai and Golan
Heights.
Hermann, who is chairman of the
North Broward Israel Bonds board
of governors, asserted that he was
greatly moved and impressed bj
what he witnessed throughout Is-
rael from the moment the Kl Al
Airlines plane landed at an Air
Force Base in Israel. He added
that the Prime Minister's Confer
ence brought him a new conscious-
Bess Of the country's economic
needs and the enlarged scope that
that the Israel Bond program must
attain in the coming year.
Smdell. honorary vice chairman
of the board ol governors, and Pine.
Temple Emanu-El Israel Bonds
chairman, reported that one of the
highlights of their visit was a
special ceremony at which they
participated in the start of con-
struction of a new harbor in Haifa
which Israel Bonds is supporting.
They arrived at Haifa by sea and
landed at a special harbor site
where the government will begin
to reclaim land and build a new
deep-water harbor to supplement
the port now in existence.
During the business sessions of
the conference, the delegates held
discussions on ways and means of
providing the most effective aid
to promote the economic develop-
ment of Israel as a basis for
strengthening its efforts for peace.
Special emphasis was placed on
the new $1 Billion Reconstruction
and Development Loan, which is
the largest issue of bonds ever
floated by the State of Israel since
the first Independence Issue was
initiated in 1951 by the late David
Ben-Gurion. (
Israel Bonds are the principal
source of funds for the develop-'
ment of the country's industry
and agriculture, the exploitation of
natural resources, construction ot|
highways, housing, harbors and the
creation of jobs for immigrants.
New-Book Fof-OW Seminar
Members f<"om Miami. Fort Laud
erdale. and Atlanta. Ga. attended
the Fort Lauderdale Pompano|
Beach Chapter of Brandeis Univer .
sitv National Women's Committee
New-Beok-For Old seminar for the
southeast region of Florida last
month at the Annacapri Motel.;
Fort Lauderdale. Mrs. Lisberg,;
from the North Shore chapter oi ]
Illinois presented many worthwhile
and helpful suggestions on running
book sales. _______
'Silent Auction' Feb. 12
The Sisterhood of Margate Jew
Ish Center will hold a "Silent Auc
tion" Tuesday at 1 p.m. at the
center, 6101 NW 9th St. Everyone
is invited to come enjoy a fun aft
ernoon and bid on many inter-
esting items. Coffee and cake will
be served.

. m
AM. AND MRS. OSCAR SINDtU
m \m/.-.
MR. AND MRS. ROBERT M. HtRMAN i
JOIN NATL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN GROUP TOURS
GROUP TOURS
Brochure Available on Request Everyone V/elcome
RHEA D. NATHAN Telephone 9421449
Ml. AMD MRS. MORTON UNI
British Board of Deputies
Joins World Jewish Cong.
LONDON (JTA) The
need to conform with changing
times won over hidebound tra-
dition in an historic vote by the
Board of Deputies of British Jews
to affiliate with the World Jewish
Congress.
It was the first time in its
more than two centuries of exist-
ence that the representative body
of British Jewry crossed fron-
tiers, so to speak, to join another
Jewish body beyond the boun-
daries of the United Kingdom.
IT DID so only after receiving
from the WJC president Dr.
Nahum Goldmann written assur-
ances of its autonomy in the af-
faire of British Jews and preser-
vation of the tradition that only
the board speaks for British Jews
to the British government.
The board, now affiliated with
the WJC, will replace the British
Section of the WJC. which has
become unnecessary according to
its chairman. Jacob Halevy. "I
am very happy that it should
have become unnecessary in this
way and that I should be the
final chairman," Halevy said.
The overwhelming 224-28 vote
in favor of affiliation reflected
the views of both the new Board
of Deputies that took office ht
year under the presidency of Sir
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Samuel Fisher, and the old board,
under the leadership of Michael
Fidler, which had recommended
joining the WJC.
BUT THERE remained a hard
core of opinion in opposition to
the move. Its spokesman, Solomon
Teff, a former board president
now in his 80s, voiced the oppo-
sition views in the discussion that
preceded the voting.
"After 214 years of existence,
fh- BoaH of Dermti* has de-
veloped its own traditions and
methods of work wbich are tinv-
kallowed and should not be
cfungea," Tarf said.
He contended that joining the
WJC would entail a loss of inde-
pendence of action by the board
because Dr. Goldmann dominates
the Congress and thereby domi-
nates all of its affiliates.
BIT SIR Samuel said, "Re-
cent events have convinced me
more than ever of the need for
were "ample safeguards" in the
terms of affiliation "for our in-
complete Jewish unity on an in-
ternational scale." He said there
dependence as the reoresentative
body of British Jewry."
The same view was expressed
by David Tack, chairman of the
Association of Jewish ex-Service-
men and Women, who was the
first speaker to preent the views
of supporters of affiliation.
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Page 4
+Jcnist fkrik&tr of North wrd
Friday, February 8, 1974
Largest Bond Loan
The Israel Bond Organization this week announced
what amounts to the largest loan in Israel's history.
To be called the SI Billion Reconstruction Loan, of-
ficials of the organisation haye already assigned, a S30
million guota for the Greater Miami area.
The magnitude of the loan can be judged by the fact
that since the inception of the Israel Bond Independence
Issue back in 1951, some S2.8 billion in funds have gone to
Israel for a variety of capital investment purposes designed
to give the fledgling nation a sound financial basis.
The new issue represents a little less than half that fig-
ure, and Finance Minister Pinchas Sapir wants it to be sold
out by next year.
Another way of looking at the urgent need that Israel
has in these months immediately following the devastation
to her economy from the Yom Kippur War is that Israel
Bond sales in 1973 amounted to 3502,137,550.
This means that the SI Billion Reconstruction Loan is
seeking to double this figure during 1974.

Economic Needs Defined
Certainly, readers of these columns do not have to be
told once more about the impact on Israel's economy of the
Egyptian-Syrian attack last October.
Not only has the nation's Gross National Product de-
clined, but so has construction and expansion on every
conceivable national level.
During the past 23 years, the Israel Bond Organization
has been the central source of funds for the development
of irrigation projects, industrial and agricultural develop-
ment, the exploitation of natural resources, the construction
of public housing and highways, telecommunications, and
the creation of jobs for new immigrants from the Soviet
Union and other countries.
Any curbing of these critical activities would be as
devastating a blow as the war itself.
That is what the new Reconstruction Loan is all about,
and that is why there is the urgent tone attached to the
announcement of the goal and the time in which it must be
met in Miami, nationally and throughout the world.
What Ebe is New?
We think it is significant that Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger has told a press conference in Washington that
the United States is not a "guarantor" in the Middle East
disengagement between Israeli and Egyptian forces.
After all the hoopla, this flat-out Kissinger assertion
speaks a volume of words.
The United States is not a "guarantor" in South Viet-
nam either.
So what e!se is new?
Cause-f or Celebration
At its annual Jewish National Fund banquet Sunday
evening at the Fontov.ebleau Hotel, the INF will celebrate
the near-campletion cf its Gov. Reubin Askew Forest Park
project outside of Tel Aviv undertaken here last year.
In addition to helping Israel with its ongoing afforesta-
tion programs, the park will ssrve as a major recreation
area for Tel Aviv residents and environs.
JNF officials here say that the park is three-quarters
finished and that a dedication ceremony is planned in
Israel this summer.
That should be a major cause for celebration at the
Sunday banquet.
wJewisli Floridian
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Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
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Second-Oas* Pc The Jewish FloriC-an hat absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
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sociation of English-Jswish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year S4.00. Out of Town Upon
Reauest.
Volume 3
Friday, February 8, 1974
Number 3
16 SHEVAT 5734
A Crisis of Minority Energy
Cl'PPOSED shortages of fuel oil
^ remind me of an infinitely
more dangerous >hortage.
A number of years ago, I coined
the concept of the conservation
of minority energy in which I
suggested that Jews ought to
exercise increasing care about
the causes they publicly espouse.
THERE IS no doubt that so
many of them are worthy, but
there is also no doubt that so
many of them are unpopular:
while others, both worthy and un-
popular, are often championed by
non-Jews, who ought to be given
the opportunity to be champion
without competition or with only
an ancillary' assist from us if we
feel that we simply have to be
represented.
The question, put bluntly, is to
what extent we must identify our-
Mindlin

selves with every principle and
every movement that recommends
itself to our moral imperatives.
The conservation of minority
energy argues that we should be-
come choosier in the exercise of
these imperatives.
IF WE say "yea" to every op-
portunity to demonstrate our mi-
nority right to free speech and
assembly and the dissemination of
noble ideas, a public easily
wearied by prophets and do-good-
ers may at some time turn a deaf
ear to us when we need its sup-
port most.
This is not the "sha-sha" modus
operandi of Jews of an earlier
generation in an anti-Semitic
galut."
It is not spoken in fear or out
of suspicion that an obsequious
Jewry is more likely to survive
in the hostile wjrld of the Gen
tile.
IT IS simply a way of -.
that we have been talking too
much of late about too many
things, and it does seem to me
that we are running out of steam
We are on the brink of an en
ergy crisis peculiar to a voluable
minority.
The proof Is that some of our
IOL'*s are already being called in:
we are being asked to say "thank
you" for debts we should never
even have incurred
A case in point is Vice Presi-
dent Ford's appearance at an I
Anti-Defamation League meeting
in Palm Beach, where the Vice
President accomplished a number
of things.
His praise of President Nixon
was predictable: Ford's new role
as Spiro Agnew's successor is to
do just that to praise the Presi-
dent at the same time that most
of the nation wonders whether or
not to bury him.
BIT THE rest of what occurred
at Palm Beach was not nearly so
predictable. Or. put more pre-
cisely, it was predictable, but one
hardly expected it so soon:
Henry Kissinger is a "vision-'
an- of peace" all right, but we
must be grateful that the Jew.
Kissinger, was appointed to head
the State Department because
there were so many "lifted eye-
brows" when the appointment
was first contemplated;
Nixon helped Israel main-
tain a balance of arms with a
S2.2 billion emergency aid bill at
the same time that the Soviets'
began to resupply Egypt and
Syria in unprecedented amounts
of sophisticated weaponry:
The administration will see
to it that the redeployment of
Israeli troops (from her salient
In Egypt and along the Suez
Canal to Gidi and Mitla) does not
mean negotiations for peace from
weakness.
THERE WERE others. These
are enough.
I certainly don't see why Jews
should be grateful that Dr. Kis-
singer is secretary of state. It may
make Anwar Sadat and Pn m
Nixon comfy; it doesn't uDpearl
that anyone else, here or ... I
is particularly cheerfu;
What he has achieve I u> the'l
Middle East has yet to be dem-|
Continued on Page 0
** As. ?. .
Max Lerner v
Sees It
.2***
NEW YORKThe stories from Washington about nilltary
spying inside the federal government during 1971 don't mean
that the military elite is about to take over the civilian govern-
ment.
But they do mean that no government today can be complac-
ent about the role of its generals and admirals, not even the
United States, which has prided itself on an unbroken tradition
of civilian control of the military.
In their larger outline the stories seem to be saying that :w
Joint Chief of Staffs, along with the Defense Department, were
pretty unhappy about what might be going on inside Henry Kis-
singer's office in the National Security Council.
IT WAS the time of the secret preparations for the detent*
with China and Russia, which couldn't have added to thev
felicity. So they took the course of using their liaison people U
spies.
Some material seems to have reached Adm. Thomas H
Moorer. the head of the Joint Chiefs. When President Nixon
heard this so the story goes he was in a rage and wan
fire Moorer. but was dissuaded No one was punished. It would
have broken too many things wide open.
IT IS a tangled story, pieced together by New York. Vf
ington and Chicago papers. Some details may be off. but the
main thrust has the sound of truth. It was not spying in the traii
tional sense, involving the tapping of one nation's secrets by .in-
other. It was high-stake infighting between agencies of the
government, using sneaky, covert means.
Call it interagency spying Those who commanded It
as part of a power struggle to influence high policy, doubt
out of patriotic motives. That may be what a Washington off
meant when he said that the Pentagon people "simply wan
know what the state of play was."
^ ET FAR more was involved than idle curiosity. The n
story shows that government isn't a polite textbook oper
Any administration in Washington is a lethal jungle whei
Hcials appointed by the same President, waving the tain
banners, playing golf and drinking cocktails together, I
and claw on high-stake laattea
Whether in Paris. Bonn. Moscow, Peking or Washii
l"tw Wing is pa: for the course, as it Is
porat
But when it involve-; 'he military it gets more d.in
The;, hare the arms, and with nuclear powers the ar
nuclear and the -takes are accordingl) sky-high.
I H.WE talked with enough defense officers in ever;. -
to kno thai they take the tradition of civilian control -
But if you are one of the Joint Chiefs or high in the Defen\
Department mote the recent figures on the growing numb
generals and admirals holding high posts in the pre*
in Pentagon), you will worry about the state of Am
arms, And your worries may touch a sensitive nerve.
Call this the battle point the point at which a militate
gets aroused enough to do battle for his beliefs about Am
military strength. It is the point where he may feel that the Rus-
sians are achieving weapons primacy over the Americans
EVERY MAN has a don't-touch-me point. This is the military
man's don't touch-me. Thus, the key to military-civilian p
is no longer what Madison or Hamilton thought it was.
In the years ahead, it will have to do with the nuclear
arsenals t,f the great powers their competitive race, their
efforts to reach agreements as in the SALT talks, their residual
threats to each other.
Mostly, we have done our thinking about military takeovers
in terms of the military regimes in Latin America. Asia and
Africa, and in Greece and Spain in Europe. But none of these
are nuclear powers. The United States and Russia and China are.
WHEN r.EN. Lin Piao plotted to join Chinese with So
power, and his plot failed, Mao Tse-tung and Chou En-Iai hunted
him down until his plane crashed.
Gen. Grechko goes along with Leonid Brezhnev's American
detente, but only because of Russia's economic need. If thi
tente threatened the demand of the Russian military elite for a
two-front nuclear force that could overpower China's and
America's on at least an equal basis, Brezhnev would be done tor.
The battle point of the American military will come if and
when they are convinced that the civilian leaders have tu
America into a second rate power and given the Russians prii
over the United States on land and sea, in the air, in nuc ear
weapons.
That was what the spying was really about. And if that poinl
really comes, they wont stop at spying, and I fear they will >iave
a big segment of opinion behind them.


Friday, February 8, 1S74
VJenistlfhridHail of North Broward
Page 5
No Secret Deals, Leaders Say
WASHINGTON ,JTA) Key U.S. Senator* 5aid here after
meeting for two hours with Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger at
rtre Wrh> Ho'u. merits' with Israel or Egypt in bringing them to agree on separating
then- military force, along the Suez Canal and in the Sinai peninsula
Majority Leader Hike Mansfield i D.. Mont.) and Foreign Rela-
tions Committee Chairman I. William Fulbright sive interviews with the Jewish Telegraphic Agency immediately
after the meeting said that, in Mansfield's laconic statement, There
are no secret agreements."
Fulbright. who like Mansfield has steadfastly ooposed American
aid to Israel, said that the United States served as "an intermediary'
and that it would do so wherever we can be of constructive assist-
ance."
in the h^lts established eat of
Suez and to the west of the Sinai
pas*.
KISSINGER HIMSELF, in an
allusion to the "understandings"
or acreements" told the news-
men accompanying him on his
travels that the United States is
'(listed by both sides to repre-
sent their point of view accurate-
ly ." A spokesman for the Kis-
singer group denied that "any
tricky business" was involved in
these "understandings" some of
which reportedly were in writing.
Hi' said Intervention by Kissinger
was essential to bring about an
accord on dise.igacement. Most
of the understandings, he said,
MINORITY TRADER Hu-h
Srott (R PO told newsmen that
"no secret gnaw****" were
"mentioned" it th Wb'te Ho-ie
meetinc and "I don't beli-*v they
exist He de*criHd t* "eight or
nine a liclv by U S. source as "various
nawwri riven to each nartv bv
Kissinar in tho cour-e of h;s in-
t'Tcvinn with F:\ot aid Israel
to obtain ment "Ea^h one ha* a feM'ng of
securftv fir-i" Reott observed
from K;ssinoer's briefin" to the
coneres-ionai laders about his
tr;o in th" presence tf Pre=id"nt
N Ij n and Vice Presid ml Gerald
Ford.
5pn str ..., Thurmond R.
I member
pi < \ ] '(| >;,>r\ ice
Committee, replied under ou 'S
JTA ''"' '
should be "n i fears" of '*.S "in
"iust set d :> i n and
that : "n >1
tig on any
trj
The '>eeame
known '> tnterican newsmen
while were on Mien- way Invitations have been sent to
back to Washington in Kissinger's iver 100 churchwomen, represent
plane. They reported thai a hiih inu some 57 Protestant and Cath-
offici.'l in ".he Klssiri p olic churches throughout this area
said there were ei^ht or nine se- to be guests of the Sisterhood for
cret "understandings" that Kis- this annual event which is always
singer hail reached with both Is- held in February Brotherhood
ind Egyptian offic Month.
Earlier the Kissinger group had The program theme is: "Unity
insisted thai the only "agree- without Uniformity." A panel of
ments" reached were those di- American women from varied reli-
rectly pertainin I i gious and ethnic backgrounds, will
menl and thinning out of t ak and answer questions. All
Sisterhood members are urged tj
end.
The Interfaith Committee In
Roxanne Shafer, Sylvia Kutz
Fl irenci Hirsch, Thelma Gora and
E\ pr sident in
nl f J
hail i ire
phine Nev
Sisterhood
Interfaith
Luncheon
The annual Interfaith Luncheon
and meeting sponsored by the Tern
nl- Bmanu-E] Sisterhood will be
held Tuesday at 11 a.m.
wt re soughl by Israel includ ig
a continuing pledge of U.S. sup-
pcrf.
The substance of these under-
standings were not disclosed
either by the Kissinger group to
newsman or by the Senate and
House leaders after their m?ethg
with Kissinger. Aides to Kissin-
ger, however, stressed that they
But neither Scott nor any of
the other senators mentioned the
reported veto pledge to Israel or
the Fgyptian promise to rebuild
a civilian economy along the Suez.
Both the veto and the civilian de-
velopment are factors known to
be ardently desired by Israeli of
ficials a security measures. Scott
specifically mentioned the Bab
el Mandeb blockade, however. He
said that it would "no longer be
enforced" once the agreements
are signed. This left the impres
sion that the blockade continues
and that the disengagement by
itself will not result in it being
lifted.
did not include any departures
from previous U.S. policy or in-
volve any formal U.S. commit-
ments to either Egypt or Israel.
This much was corroborated by
the senators who were willing to
discuss them. The Jerusalem
Post, however, said that the
United States would exercise its
veto should the Security Council
ever vote against Israel's wishes,
to remove the UN Emergency
Force (UNEF) from the buffer
between '." i Egyptian and
Israeli lines 'inner the disengage-
ment agreement.
KISSINGER ALSO was report
ed to have received a pledge from
Egypt that it would restore the
Suez Canal and the canalside
towns and that it would no longer
pose a blockade threat in the
straits of Bab el Mandeb.
Enmities Brake As
Knesset Sworn In
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
new Knesset Israel's eighth
was sworn into office in festive
ceremonies presided over by
President Ephraim Katzir during
which inter-party rivalries were
set aside for the moment at
least and gregarious good-will
prevailed.
"It was like shul on Yom Kip-
pur with everybody shaking ev-
erybody's hand and saying maze!
tov.' one observer remarked.
The MKs discarded the casual
attire that distinguishes Israel's
parliament from most others in
the world and attended the open-
ing in jackets and ties.
WOMEN MEMBERS and the
wives and daughters of MKs were
resplendent in their finery.
Premier Golda Meir. as the old-
est member, was sworn in first,
and she administered the oath to
the other 116 members present.
Three MKs were absent.
In the first order of business,
the new Knesset reeleeted Labor-
ite Israel Yeshayahu as speaker,
something of a surprise in view
of reported wide-ayiead dissatis
faction with Yeshayahu's alleged
lack of control over the last
Knesset.
He was supported bv all parties
i xi p| the Rakah Communists,
and Likud which voted for its own
cand date, former Supreme Court
Justice Benjamin Halevy.
KATZOI HAD all members rise
in memory of Israel's war dead
and David Ben-Gurion. He of
fered a prayer that all Israeli
prisoners in enemy hands and
the war wounded still recovering
in hospitals will "soon be with us
again."
The President also spoke of
"a ray of ii..p. emanating from
the disengagement agreement
signed with Egypt and the Ge-
neva peace conference.
He noted that this Knesset was
considerably younger than any of
its predecessors and included
many more native-born Israelis.
MRS. MEIR spoke briefly and
in general terms, reserving her
major political statement on dis-
engagement and related matters
for the first debate of the new
Knesset. She said it would be in-
conceivable if the "get-rich-quick"
mentality and social inequities of
the 1967-73 period returned now
with the trauma of the Yom Kip-
pur War still fresh.
She said much needed to be
changed. Above all a willingness
was required of each individual
citizen to make sacrifices on be-
half of the state and the nation.
Mrs. Meir called for high stand-
ards of debate and behavior in
the new Knesset.
Jewish Federation Singles
Plan Houseparty, Lecture
The Jewish Federation Singles
of Broward plans a houseparty at
').i') Sitiudiy in Hollywood. Jew-
i-h sln?les from Broward and Dade
23 to 50 (women) and 25-58 (men)
are welcome.
Wednesday, Feb. 20. Dr. Ray ftic
vut >r, an oceanographer, will
give an illustrated lecture at 8 p.m.
in the Jewish Federation office,
7(i7 N, Federal Bwy., Foil Lauder-
dale.
'W w
IMPORTANT
NOTICE!!
Effective Nev. 11, 111 windows Self er Instaifad HOST be +
Tested Approved IGAiNST Forced Entry ... J
| Security Windewi booed Ike WaauJTMnsats... | 4
Publicity Chairmen Asked
To limit Number in Picture
Publicity chairmen are re-
quested to limit the number of
pei-ens includ -I iii photographs
ubi i i ["he Jewish Fl rid
i.,n f'.i : ubli all m. Im lusion of
Dion than siv persons i'i a sir,
gle picture d i s nol perntil
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Page 6
>hnUtrhri Friday, February 8, 1974
March 3 Dinner-Dance Planning Committee Member*
t ii
ni
I i
Jen
lai.
Jen
Mrs. Howard Miller, (left) Mrs. Samuel Scref,
Mrs. Samuel GoJdfarb and Mrs. Richard
Benjamin Roisman (left) and Mr. and Mrs. Abram Silverman.

Jack Levine (left)) Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Gross and Mrs. Jack Levine
Leaders of the Women's Division are shown with Marcy Le'-
ton of Miami, guest speaker. At left are Mrs. Jacob Lutz and
Mrs. Jack Levine,- Mrs. Abraham Schankerman is at right.
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Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Novick (left) and Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Abbott.
DR. LEONARD M. COHN
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practice or
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Friday, February 8, 1974
*Mnistfkrid!iaiti Of North Inwuv
Paqe 7
V
Shown at a Women's Division Campaign
meeting at the Woodlands home of Mrs.
Leo Goodman are (from left) Mrs. Jacob
Lutz, Mrs. Leo Goodman Mrs. Robert Adler,
Mrs. Jack levine, guest speaker Goldie Gold-
berg, and Mrs. Israel Shapiro.
Among those who attended the Lighthouse Point-Pompano
Women's Division luncheon at the Lighthouse Point Yacht and
Tennis Club were (from left) Hilda Robbins, Dorothy Morel,
Magda Ginnis and (standing) S/lvia Lewis.
Pictured at the Lighthouse Point-Pompano Women's D,vision
luncheon are Mrs. Richard Rosen cochairman; Mrs. Jacob Lutz,
Women's Division President, and Mrs. Abraham Schankerman,
chairman of the division.
Guests at Lighthouse Point-Pompano campaign
luncheon included, from left, (seated) Mrs.
Bernard Millrran, Mrs. Donald Konicoff. Mrs.
Seymour Hersher, and Mrs. Jerome Soowal;
(standing) Mrs. Felice Pargh, Mrs. Lilyan
Glaser ana Mrs. Stephen Tolces.
Orthodox Rabins Eye
Conversion Control
Continued from Pazc 1
Labor hd coalition government.
bit RABBI Bernst (in Insist I
.is speaking ills for the
non-political RCA not the Mta
rachi of which he Is vice preji-
d( :it that Mi ren arks wi r i
not inspired by the NRP
i R (form and Con*
1 limits in America have
i I raeli adcrs nol 11 sur
: '.i Orth dox d<
the conversion issue on grounds
that it would alienate the mil-
I in the I S and
"her countries who are not
Orthodox.
bit rabbi Bernstein,
ing that a majority of world
. waa Orthodox, pressed his
claims on grounds th it Orth idox
lews in the U.S. were most faith-
ful to Israel, had the highest A!i-
yah rate and were most active in
find raising and political lobby-
in.: for Israel.
Rabbi Bernard Casper, the chief
rabbi of South Africa, claimed
that Orthodoxy's alleged majority
pave it rights. But he conced >d
that these did not include the said,
right to force its views on others. U C
He said that in South Africa by Torah Fund luncheon Mf
no means all Jews were observ Temple Sholom Sisterhood's reg
ant. Nevertheless, he said, a vast ,.]ar meeting has been changed to
>rity recognized the authority Wednesday, Feb. 20 at 10:30 a.m.,
of the rabbinate and the rabblnl- in the temple. 132 SE 11th Avr..
cal tribunals in matters of con pompano ueach. TBe Torah Fund
ton and marriage. i uncheon will follow the short
Ireland sa.d there were Reform :he>r TonhFund boxes. Mrs. Ida
and other Jews in his country Levey is chairman.
t that uzed the need
for ui in h > cru ial ques
r-ion and personal
- lid thai Intermarrla !e was
: blen Ireland
its pred iminantly
i i: i claim i
. rabbis would
II "irresponsible impert-
i- groups
nipt to in-
ieli affairs and in-
li e rontroversj
R\aBl i WEIi sai the b
; ; bl m *-as that Orthodox? de-
n a convert a sincere
erve Halacha
Reform and Conservative
I repared to dispense
with
V another press conference.
David B. Hollander, presi-
,:, nt of the Rabbinical Alliance of
::,.,.. claimed that if Israel
accepted non-Ortholox marriage
and divorce, it would spell the
disintegration of American Jewry.
what's good enough for Israel
|s g( od enough for them." he
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Fage 8
*Jewistincric1k>r of North Brow*M
Friday, February 8, 1974
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CLOSED ALL DAY SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS


[Friday, February 8, 1974
LEO MINDLIN
* kwislhfF'r.ir/irtiftip of North Broward
Pago 9
We're Creating a Minority Energy Crisis
Continued from Page f *
onstrated. Americans who happen
to be Jewish see his handiu rk n
Vietnam and hope that the crum-
bling won't begin all that quickly
in the Middle East. too.
And the Israelis, for all the-r
rubber cement smiles, have yet
to be photographed kissing Ki$-
singer the way the Egyptians did.
AS FOR the military assistance
we "ja*e" Iaael and wr Nafe'ti
on her future negotiation' from
strength, that may sit well n th
Senators Pulbrightand Mansfield,
but it should cut no ice with us.
The truth is that if Israel had
failed to turn the war around it
would have been a disaster for us
as a nation far great*.- in magni-
tude than our failure in South-
east Asia.
Why then should Ford in Palm
*Bch Mw> c*fc! upoiffem "*r
he more grateful than any other
AnprwH for whit was after a'l
a mi'itarily sound administration
deoii THE REASON is that wo gave
him and others th? ont>ortur,ity.
aid ^ot only at Mm Beach Dur-
ing the Yom Kir pur -or. we im-
rorUined not as Americans but as
Jews.
In ni-r -;o9r>h for a'l's arm ".a
our neiAbors^w*" wV,eT not the
flag of American solidarity with
the cans-/ of freedom and free de-
t-ntr nation hut of "galut" an-
gulsh. begging for "rachmonos"
a once Jews did in the atmo>-
rhere of pogrom. We acquiesced
to the Arab princi-1? that the war
t>ey launched was mt an Amer-
ican concern but a Zionist one.
A r>aral!el her' would be our
rea?t!?!! t0 lne Krei-ky clo^in? of
Fullback 'Only Alternative' to War-Golda
By DAVID LANDAU
JTA Jerusalem Bureau Chief
JERUSALEM (JTA) Pre-
mier Golda Meir has strongly de-
fended her government's disen-
gagement agreement with Egypt,
declaring that the only alternative
was a resumption of war, that its
aim was to advance toward a per-
manent peace settlement and tiat
it was signed out of Israeli
strength, not weakness.
Mrs. Meir spoke at length dur-
ing the first working session of
the new Knesset. Her remarks
were followed by a grueling 10
hour debate during which Likud
opposition leader Menachem Bei
gin denounced the agreement as
capitulation and castigated Pre-
mier Meir's government in gener-
al and her top-ranking ministers
indivdually for being party to it.
BUT THE fiery Likud spokes-
man could offer no viable alter-
native when he was asked point-
edly for one by Defense Minister
Ifoahc Dayan. His Likud col-
league, Gen. Ariel Sharon, at-
tempted later on to answer the
key questions, but his ideas were
vague, and Likud's policies re-
mained unclear to objective lis-
teners.
At the end of the debate, '.he
Knesset voted 76-33 in favoi
Libertarian Party
Chapter Organized
In Ft. Lauderdale
I. month in Fort Lauderdale.
interested person- from I).i !'\
Broward and Palm Beach couni -
participated in the organization of
the Libertarian Party of South
Flor
The Libertarian Party, establish-
ed as a national organization in
Colorado in 1971 and currently
ranked third among America's six
significant nationwide minority po-
litical parties, was created to pro-
Vide a political vehicle for Am. :
icans who believe in the import
ance of individual liberty both
civil and economic.
The party currently has over
President and Vice President nf
the United States in 1972. and was
the only minority party to receive
any electoral votes in 1972.
The party currently has over
6.000 dues paying members nation-
wide, and plans to field numerous
candidates throughout the country
in 1974. Its goal is to become a
major political force in the United
States by 1980.
Officers elected for the South
Florida Chapter are John E. Bailey :
MI, Davie, president; Jim Suit.
Lauderdale Lakes, vice president-
treasurer, and Myra Potosky. Fort
Lauderdale, secretary Carl Hast-
ings. Davie, and Paul Phillips. Fort
Lauderdale. were elected members
at-large of the executive committee.
Luncheon, Card Party Set
B'nai B'rith Women of Fort
Lauderdale will hold a petite
luncheon and card party at Gait
Ocean Towers. 4280 Gait Ocean
Dr.. Fort Lauderdale, Wednesday.
Feb. 27, at 12:30 p.m.
the accord. Mrs. Meir referred
to the agreement as "the fruit of
our victory in the war. but we
do not ignore the fact that it also
reflects Egypt's achievements
during the first days of the fight-
ing."
SPEAKING OF the danzer of
escalation, she revealed that since
Oct. 22 there had been 1.079
shooting incidents on the Egy>
tian front costing Israel 22
dead and 107 wounded. As to the
future. Mrs. Meir said the mili-
tary and strategic position along
the new line to be held by Israel
would be "suitable to their mili-
tary purpose in the event of fight
in; "
She added: "Throughout the
entire region east of the Gidi and
Mit'.a passes tht Israel: army
will remain deployed in all
strength required, prepared for
any eventuality.
"The forces stationed in the
restricted rones complement the
basic military deployment of the
Israel army and their capability
ti meet any violence and It! ca-
pability to meet any violation of
the ceasefire."
REGARDING THE role of
UNEF. the Premier declared:
"We are not relying on the UN
forces, but on ourselves." Never-
theless, she continued, so long as
there was no permanent peace
the UN role was important in
maintaining the agreed buffer
zone. Any unilateral indication by
Egypt that it wanted the UNEF
force out would be taken by Is-
rael as evidence of "menacing
plans." she warned.
Mrs. Meir praised the U.S. gov-
ernment and President Nixon's
help for Israel and particularly
Secretary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer's personal effrts in bring-
ing about the agreement.
"He. unlike previous middl?-
rr.en. had not taken a position
himself but had remained the
hone=t broker." faithfully explain-
ing Egypt's considerat;ons to us
and also making clear to Egypt
Israel's positions," the Premier
said.
DAYAN SAID that Israel's
prime motive in accepting the
disengagement agreement had
been that it was based on an
Egyptian undertaking to reopen
the Suez Canal and restore nor-
mal life and commerce in the
towns that flanked it. Despite con-
tradictory statements from Egypt.
Dayan believed this was indeed
President Sadat's intention and
that he sought if not peace at
least the restoration of peaceful
life in the canal zone.
Dayan conceded that the new
Israeli lines were not as good M
the canal line but afforded good
defensive positions.
Sharon joined Beigin in de-
nouncing the disengagement'.
agreement. In his maiden Knes I
set speech, the former division
commander on the Suez front re ,
peated his charge made at a press
conference that the government
relirquished militariy vital topo
graphical areas of the Sinai j
wheh had cost hundreds of cas
uaities to defend in the Yora.
Kippur War.
He said the new lines were rel I
atively unimportant in military i
terms. He said Likud wanted
peace or other arrangement with
Egypt no less than anyone else
and that his party had a peace
rdan which involved fewer risks
for Israel. He did not say what it
was.
He insisted that it was a grave
mistake for Israel to regard the
reopening of the Suez Canal and
the rehabiHaiion of civilian life
in the canalside towns as an indi
cation of Egypt's peaceful inten
tions.
Schoenau and our hysterical in-
fies ;i"o:i making free emi-
grat'on from th" Soviet Union a
uniquely Jwih cause wh^n Alex-
r Sohbenityn and other So-
viet h*mps willing to stand up to
"- RuAtan knout have long since
eivsfn us '', opportunity to join
the r-st M the V irld in showing
th? Soviet' for what they are
( l vHou*. fascist oppressors
of HUMAN dignity, not just Jew-
ish dignity.
THIS STRANGE compulsion
w have ti narry causes even
where, skilfully, we could at
la t have others help us carry
t%\an\ or no-i^ib'" oven eaiTV them
FaR u- more effectively than we
enuH earn- them for ourselves,
is what drain* us of our credibil-
>tv a- -vinoritv and therefore of
our vital minority energy.
At Pa'.m Beach that compulsion
was esnecial'y disastrous. We gave
Vico President Ford the oppor-
tunity to collect Nixon IOU's
fr->m a Jewish electorate that has
givn him little support through-
out his political career and that
h". in turn, has largely ill-used
politically.
W accepted yet another bur-
den that should not be ours alone.
For a beleaguered President
Nixon who nends points wherever
he can find them. Ford's Palm
Beach performance was a tri-
umph. For Jews, it was another
short circuit
Heritage Theater Group To
Present Chayefsky's Play
Th H-ta Thoater Group of
TT-ip Frn-iin-Fl is now rehears-
al p*v*fkvN olay. "Mid-
H'o o' Ht N'"ht." which will be
nrentH n the '"male's auditor-
ium "turday and Sunday. Feb. 18
and 17.
The d^ation for tickets is $2.50
oa^b. Mail vnur check and a self-
addrnseed ctamoed envelope, with
the date you plan to attend, to
Terr">l= Eimnu-E!. 3245 W. Oak-
'nd Park Blvd.. Fort Lauderdale,
FR 33311 to the attention of the
Th"at-r Group.
Rationing your coffee?
You can enjoy all the great-tasting Brim' you want.
"ft you've been rationing yourself to-
half a cup of coffee because you're worried
about caffein. forget it. Decaffeinated
Brim* is for you-wonderfully rich
coffee that's 97% caffein free-
Get some today-and enjoy! Regular or
Drip Grind, Freeze-Dried, or Electric Perk.
Rich in Colombian beans
hrin brim
MCAMCINATEO C0*"
K
Certified
Kosher
kaffeinated coff
FHOWGINCRAl'"'00*


Page 10
+ Umistncrid&r OfN-tf.Biwrrf
Friday, February 8, 1974
Not the Last Nail in President's Coffin
By JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTON The strange
business of -the enr-ied White
House tape may not be the last
nail in the Presidents political
Coffin. But in the mild language
Of the new Republican leader of
the House. Rep. John Rhodes of
Arizona. It certainly isn't going
to help."
There are other developments
in the wind that are not going to
help, ,eiUe*..Jor uewnphj, a
friendly warning has now been
passed to the President by influ-
ential members of the Joint Com-
mittee on Internal Revenue Taxa-
tion.
The warning was that he really
n.....mm
i ..41
JUVMHB'IVflirc
.......tu ari i .
Jhe tKavbi <3pciTV> jf-rom Jhe f^nlpil
M MMUWt V M .....
By RARBI MORRIS A. SKOP
Temple Sholom
One of the most fascinating
stones in the Bible is the one de
scribing the visit of Moses' father-
in law. Jethro.
Most in-laws
] are ready with
comments and
criticism at what
they see after a
few days arrival.
Some can be
quite frank and
outspoken. But
Jethro's criti-
cism seemed log-
ical to Moses
and he did not
resent it.
'You work too
hard." said Jethro to Moses Why
sit all day and late into the night
to hear the problems of your peo
pie why not get help .
tome assistants who will hear the
little problems and you take
the more serious situations and
you will have some time for your
self."
Moses considered this advice and
appointed men of integrity and
wisdom to handle the small cases,
while he acted as a supreme court
to make judgment and decision on
serious cases.
Most people are quick with their
..... .....:i Ui:'i ......"i1
Rabbi Shop
criticirm and advice. Many who are
quick In jive advice are quite sen
sitive and aggravated in having to
hear another's comments, and too
often refuse to take it.
One of the teachings in our Eth
ics of the Fathers advises, "Ayzehu
chochom ha roeh es ha nolad"
Who is a wise person? He who
considers the consequences of his
advice."
This teaching emphasizes the im-
portance of evaluating both the
i giving and taking of advice. Rea
| sonable people will not only listen
but take advice and after evaluat-
ing it will act upon fair criticism.
Many people are more concerned
with the source of the advice than
with the import. If an in-law make^
the criticism or gives the advice,
there is often an immediate resent
ment. To unthinking students, a
teacher's sdviea will he ignored.
But the Bible lesson indicates
that the tource is not important,
it is the evaluation of the advice
or criticism which is important
One should always stop and con
sider not who gives the advice,
but rather, is it true, good and
beneficial? Is the person giving the
criticism or advice being fair or
right in his observations?
Giving advice is easier than tak
ing advice. Wise people will be
careful by doing both, with reason
and evaluation.
Koch Bill Seeks Oil
Depletion Allowance Cuts
NEW YOR& Rep. P-dward I.
Koch (D., NY.) has announced
he will introduce legislation to
rescind the oil depletion allow-
ance as it affects oil produced
outside North America.
"It is absurd for the American
taxpayer to continue to subsidize
the production of Arab oil that is
denied to the United States." he
By Special Report
said at. a news conference in
Stephen Wise Congress House
here, national headquarters of the
American Jewish Congress.
REP. KOCH said he would seek
to close a "loophole" in the In-
ternal Revenue Code, which
exempt; from taxation 22 per
cent of American companies' in-
come earned from oil and gas
wells.
The depletion allowance covers
earnings from all oil and gas pro-
duction. Rep. Koch's bill, now in
preparation, would rescind the
allowance as it applies to income
earned from production outside
North America.
As a result of the present de-
pletion allowance. Rep. Koch de-
clared, "we are now in the anom-
alous position of underwriting oil
production in Saudi Arabia, Ku-
wait and other Arab countries
whose kings and sheiks, in their
insatiable greed, have declared
an oil embargo against the United
States."
KOCH SAID the measure to
deny the depletion allowance to
income on foreign oil production
would be "felt first and hardest
by American oil companies overly
invested in foreign oil proper-
ties." He declared:
"It will encourage such compa-
nies to make efforts with the
Arab oil monarchs to end their
embargo on oil to the United
States.
"At the same time, it will stim-
ulate the development of domes-
tic oil reserves, on and off shore,
even at increased cost and some-
what diminished profits. It has
been their lust for profits that
has until now encouraged the oil
companies to seek oil where pro-
duction costs are cheaper. The
availability of the depletion
allowance on Arab oil has been
another influence.
"THE DEPLETION allowance
for oil production outside North
America must be ended. It is
clearly intolerable that Americans
should help to pay for economic
reprisals aimed at their families
and their pocketbooks."
Rep. Koch was introduced at
the news conference by Phil
Baum. associate executive direc-
tor of the American Jewish Con-
gress and director of its Commis-
sion on International Affairs.
At the news conference, Baum
noted that Section 613 of the In-
ternal Revenue Code, providing
the exemption, did not differenti-
ate between income earned front,
wells in this eotmtry or anywhere ;
in the world. He declared:
"The original intention of this
provision was to encourage inves-
tors to look and develop new oil
sites in the hope of making this
country self-sufficient and se-
cure.
- THE FAILURE of the tax law
to restrict this depletion to the
development of domestic oil and
gas reserves has historically al-
lowed major companies to dedi-
cate most of their investments to
the development of foreign oil
properties and thereby has
rendered this country even more
vulnerable to external pressure
"The end result is our present
fuel crisis."
must "get his tax problems solv-
ed" before the committee goes to
work in earnest.
THIS COMMITTEE was chosen
by the President as the one most
likely to be favorable to him. Yet
on the evidence disclosed by the
President himself, leading com-
mittee members more and more
lean to the view that there was
no justification for the large tax
deduction taken for the Nixon
vice presidential papers.
The view is based on the teclii
cality that the gift of the papers
was not "completed" prior to the
cutoff date for gifts of this type.
Unfortunately, the technicality
is very much part of the law; and
a gift that was not "completed"
until after the 1969 cutoff date
is undoubtedly nondeductihle. If
the President heeds the warning,
therefore, he will have to make
a horribly unpleasant choice.
EITHER HE must admit error
and belatedly pay the resulting
taxes and penalties, or he must
simpiy hope against hope for a
different kind of committee re-
port, despite the intimation that
an unfavorable report is a sen
ous likelihood.
To make this matter worse, the
joint committee is expected to
Complete its work as late a-
April So u report that the Presi-
dent has failed to pay a very
large sum owed to the Internal
K"\enue Service if this is in
deed the outcome will almost
exactly coincide with the pay
ments of painful sums to the IRS
by just about all the voters in
this country.
IT NOW seems to be the rule.
in truth, that each great trouble
encountered by the President is
hardly out of the way before an-
other tiouble. equally great, crops
up to make new headlines.
Meanwhile, another dangerous
aspect of Richard M. Nixon's po-,
litical situation is now beyond
any reasonable possibility of
doubt. In brief, the President can
no longer count on real aid or
support from the majority ofU
Republicans in the House and
Senate.
Rep. Rhodes, for instance,
spoke at a fund-raising dinner for
a fellow Republican in Pennsyl-
vania over the weekend. This was
prior to the hammer blow of the
erased tape, and the House Re-
publican leader is one of the
more old-fashioned partisans in
Congress.
YET RHODES spoke of Repub-
licans running in this year's con-
gressional elections as member*
of a "new coalition" having no
special link with the President.
According" to the Philadephia
Bulletin, Rep. Rhodes continued:
"Republican congressmen and
senators didn't get any help from
Mr. Nixon in 1972."
For any practical politician such
a statement from such a source.
i- i rigna] that can be read across
a continent. It means that in Con-
gress the aim of most Republican
members will be to put the maxi-
mum amount of space between
themselves and the White House.
HENCE IT is even clear that
at least one or two Republicans
on the House Judiciary Commit-
tee are thinking about casting
favorable votes for a bill of im-
peachment.
Here, of course, is another
dreadful hurdle that is looming
higher and higher before the
President.
In sharp contrast to the Sen-
ate Watergate committee's Sam
Dash, the Judiciary Committee's
majority counsel. John Doar. is
plainly going to conduct a most
sober inquiry. He has firmly cut
off himself and his staff from
any kind of public contact, for
instance.
BUT IN the present poisonous
atmosphere. it Is doubtful
whether the Judiciary Committee
would heed John Doar. even if
he advised strongly against a pro-
JOStPH ALSOP
impeachment vote. The best no*?-
counters have in fact concluded
that a majority of the commit-
tee already wants to vote a bill
of impeachment. The White
House has been so advised.
How the whole House will vote,
if and when a bill of impeach-
ment is brought before it. is cer-
tinly a much more open ques-
tion.
The point here is that a great
many members of the electorate
understandably have a genuine
horror of the whole impeachment
procedure.
Moreover, these people who
hate the idea of impeachment in
elude large numbers of those who
would be both pleased and re-
lieved by the President's volun-
tary' resignation.
THE TRUTH seems to be that
a majority of the voters would
much like the President to resign.
Whereas nothing like a grass-
roots pro-impeachment majority
has emeraed as yet The dilemma
for the House is obvious.
'..
c
ifu walendav
Religious
Services
FO*T lAUDCtOAU
IETH ISRAEL (Tampla) 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip
A. Labowlts. Cawtac klaurtaa Na*>.
EMANU-IL. 3MB W. Oakland Park
BWd. Raform. RabW ACthaw J A-
rinx. Cantor Jarama Klamar_
POtrHNfl tCACH
HOLOM (Tmmpm>\. ? SB 1
Cawrvat.v. Rabbi Marrta A. Skop
Or-tor Jaoab J. Raaizar.
MAMATI
SAROATB JIWtSH CIWTIR .
aarvativa) OWH NW tth St.
Friday. S P.m Dr. Mannm Ni-amann
will conduct: Cantor Max GaHub will
dllTr fh wrmon Saturday. Sara.,
regular Sabbath morning arrvlrea.
CMAl SPRINGS
CORAL SPRING* HEBREW CON
OREOATION (Reform) 3501 Uoi.
varatty ar Coral Spring*. Rabvr
Max Waltz.
Prld'y. S p.m. Sabbath aervWa.
YOUNG ISRAEL of HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodox). sWI Stirling Rd. M
*^WV^*<**TV cm muni
SUNDAY., FEBRUARY 10
Margate Jewish Center, special membership meeting. 10:30
a.m., color slides of "Jerusalem," 7:30 p.m.
MONDAY. FEBRUARY 11
Temple Emanu-Kl Sisterhood, study group, 10 a.m. to noon
Brandeis Women, study group
B'nai B'rith, board meeting
Temple Beth Israel Men's Club
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood, mah jongg marathon
Coral Springs Hebrew Congregation, general meeting, 8 p.m.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12
Fort Lauderdale B'nai B'rith Men
Brandeis, study group
Margate Jewish Center Sisterhood, general meeting
Margate Jewish Center Sisterhood, silent auction. 1230 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood, evening group 8 p.m.
Brandeis University. life membership
JWV and Auxiliary 730
Coral Ridge ORT, general meeting
Fort Lauderdale ORT, board meeting
THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 14
Fort Lauderdale Hadassah. study group
Sabra, Blyma, Chai Hadassah, board meetings
Temple Beth Israel Men's, board meeting
Workmen's Circle 1070. evening
Federation, cocktail report meeting. Harbor West. 5 to 7 p.m.
FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 15
Alpha Omega Dental Fraternity, board meeting, 10 a.m.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16
Ahavah B'nai B'rith, Chinese auction
Temple Emanu-El. show, evening
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17
Temple Emanu-El, show, evening
B'nti B'rith. meeting, Margate Jewish Center, 9:30 a.m.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18
Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood, study group. 10 a.m. to noon
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood, Torah Fund
Brandeis. study group
Armon Hadassah, board meeting
TUESDAY, FRBBUABY 19
Temple Sholom Sisterhood, general meeting
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood, board meeting. 9:48 a.m.
Masada B'nai B'rith Men
Fort Lauderdale B'nai B'rith Women, general meeting
Margate Jewish Center, board meeting, 7:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 29
National Council of Jewish Women. 1230. Wilton Manors
Women's Club
Jew>h Federation, singles meeting, Federation Building
707 N. Federal Hwy.
Golda Meir Hadassah Grouo, general meeting at Social Center.
Palm Aire Country Club. 12:30 p.m.
THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 21
Fort Lauderdale Hadassah. Tomar Group, luncheon
JWV and Auxiliary 1W, general meeting, Temple Sholom
Alpha Omega Dental Fraternity, dinner meeting, 6:30 p.m.


Friday, February 8. 1974 Jfew#^ fkrkHun
Page I]
aDct via <3c wa rtz
Energy Crisis Not New How Others Dealt With It Before
^PEAKING about the energy
crisis, Samuel G#mpe:--
fir-it president of the American
federation of Labor, once to'd
low in his early days as a cigar
:aker a fellow worker solved
; problem of keeping warm.
Is particular problem was
?eping warm in winter when
Kitside. The usual method is to
liave an overcoat.
However, Gompers tell] ti;
its fellow. Al L'nger. found a
leapcr method: making 1
ims. L'nger figured it out this
way.
IN SPRING and summer, h?
mini need an overcoat. Th-
orny time he needed it wai in
the ihort winter period. But a
drink of whiskey, he reasoned,
kept h m Just as warm as an
overcoat and a drink only cost
10 cents. By takin- five drinks
a Jay he wou'd keen warm all
day. This would be cheaper than
buying an overcoat.
Rut times have changed inc?
G m ers told this st try. T
a drink of whiskey costs much
more than 10 cents.
But the linger, system .ifc'.l
has some advantage. Whiskey
does more than keep you warm.
If overcoats could do what whis-
key does, people would wear
overcoats even in summer.
i
OUR GOOD cabbie friend.
Gideon, cilled us up the other
day to suggest that if al! the
people who have gai in the
stomach or suffer from heart
burn woulJ make their supplies
available, that might help solve
the energy problem.

The great Hassidic RaWLeiv
Yitzchok of Berdichev would
perhaps have welcomed the en-
ergy crisis. He thought people
rushed around too much One
time he saw a man running.
"Why are you running so?-'
he Baked.
"I am going after my liveli-
hood." said the map.
'"How do you know that your
livelihood is not behind you.'"'
asked the rabbi.
WE LIVE in a world where
everyone seems to be tn a hurry.
For what? Newton discovered
th? Law of Gravitation while
sitting under an apple tree. As
we recall, we remarked once to
our good editorial friend Philip
SI mowitz, the cause of litera-
ture has been vastly retarded by
an excess of energy. To write a
book one has to be able to sit
st 11 or as Sinclair Lewis put it.
one has I fasten one's rear to
the bottom of a chair and keep
it fastened.
>arl ^Z^-flpcrf
layboy Magazine Stirred Feeling
'SPECIALLY IN timi
i) the tensions. Gi li -- ki
too much to
\ -. hence the Pla> andal
onsiderabl
I
I ision bt: t een Mrs. N
i and American >i Kenneth
Presumably Ih > a,
.re Mine problems of the a! the
SOMEONE SUGGESTED
>ya to while away the li \ Id leaf
ft Ugh copies of Plaj b >)
atin; said he thousht he CO
Katcir gave the project her blessing and her
i-pices.
Announcement that the President's wife was
iig the distribution of ''.one copies of
Iayboy brought bnmediat* reactions ranging nit
way from indignation < enthusiasm. For
lys the papers stR fl'led with letters
MIR A ETTAN. a girl serving in "he army,
111 upset at the 'diserimi-iti She dmandd
. il m of magazines -..
* I. Dr. A' il Cohen.
i- a thing, an i
..-. ,,, _.,,. Bs .
" b in" How couLi the 1
ler.t's wife ol p ...
Zevulun ; uty Minister of E lu-
frounds that the nude
h Plsyb iy is famous would corrupt
the :i OR li To be sure, he did not
-I the wife of th.- President
i i-vir- Hie friendly relations between
U.S.
THE SOI PIERS themselves cave a mixed
u have so little faith in us as
think that pictures of naked qirls would lead u,
astray? If we could stand firm in the face of tie
enemy, we certainly won't buckle before a few
pictures even in color.
Another jo'dier, member of the chaplaincy
coro. sermonized sadly. A h;eh sense of moralitv
is what distinguishes our soldiers from those of
oth?r armies, he said. >
je'eph j- Li ho It
'Chip' Bohleihs Clear View
Of Soviet Jewry's Plight Touay

j.': "
, i..... i
admired as Chai i E i-'
- a genum liplomal
' -o pxpertl te on the Soviet
Uni i is no i li gendary.
B l-m. who dld of cancer at
09 on N >v Year's
ci l : in e>'ting ."1 >ng w'th So-
ffi ials aid had a aenius n
precise roorting of what they
were saying.
HI* EXTENSIVE knowhdre of
the Russian lan;uag\ together
W th bi^ enormous oopularit- >n-
ah'd him. after becoming U.S.
ambassad >r to Moscow in NN to
rank as one of the world's ft-"*
0\ >st specialists on the Soviet
Union.
Unon his dath. diDlomat= and
p'-v-m^n mined in me-moriarzin?
hi= outstanding perwnal and of-
f-"'!a' qinlitio Reeretarv f Stste
Henry A. Kissinger wrote Mrs.
L^eumeiir ^A). *L*Ub
aM
Social and Economic History of Poland's Jews
frnard D. Weinryb's "The Jews
of Poland" (Jewish Publ'ca-
(n Society $10. 409 pp.. plus
tzj is a social and economic
>ry of the Jewish community
'>land from 1200 to 1800
Hie book is not a rehash of
MO Dubnow's three-volume
lory of the Jews in Russia and
lead. Weinryb writes in tl.
Mern historically scientific
Re and supplies ample tool-
lea to indicate his sources.
MANY OF these sources are
primary and were unknown to
Dubnow. The book is a signifi ant
account of the community that
became, in less than 300 years.
the backbone and fountain if
A hkenari culture secular and
religious.
The chapters on Messianism,
Hassidism and Hiassidim will be
of great interest to the laymen
who are nor. historically minded.
The author draws upon Gershom
Scholem for the Messianic chap-
ter, as well as utilizing his knowl-
edge acquired from new sources
and his profound grasp of Polish
history.
From all points of view,
Weinryb has produced a book
that blends the important con
cepts invohed in Jewishness and
Poiishness. t

BALM IN Gilead." by Martin
Levin 'Schoo.en Books. $7.5.
174 pp.) with a forward by Goldu
Meir. is the story of Hadassah. It
i = primarily a "house history"
since th'- au'lior w8s commis-
sioned by Hadassah to write it
He has earned his fee since h?
ha- Interwoven the history of the
Y'shuv with Hadassah's growth.
Of course, the relationships with
other Zionist groups, inter-organi-
zational strife, and other affairs
of the external or extra-curricular
activities of some of the past >f
[leers whi acted in the name of
the memoership is either omitted
or barely mentioned.
en: Your husband's mem-
r. in inspira-
n and example to those who
fo 1 !ii:n in the American dip-
HIS ( REIM.NTIALS. therefore,
a 1 the mare impressive his
ioviet | ii ernment's
il attitude I >wards Jewry
ar.d 1 irai I A year after his re-
lent from the service. Boh-
!en expressed those views at a
dirner of the Washington Chap-
ter of the American Jewish Com-
mittee
Bohlen was plain and clear
that there was very little chance
mat the Soviet government, in
its thrut into the Middle East,
would look upon Israel with
sympathy even though it had So-
viet -uoDort. for political reasons,
at the time of its creation in 1948.
"I wish with all my heart I
cul i give you hope for Jews il.
the Sovit Union." Bohlen de-
clared. "But the lo?ic of devel-
opment in the Middle East where
the Soviets are digging in deeper
and deenr. especially in Egypt,
means that they will become
more and more anti-Israel."
Two elemnts. he said, were
responsible for the Soviet gov-
ernment's attitude towards the
n people "One.' he said,
"is th? basic ideology of the Com-
munist Party in the Soviet Union,
and the other is the State of
Israel itself.
THE DEEPER the Soviet Union
became involved in the Middle
Fast the worse anti-Semitism
wouli get in Russia, he also said.
The history of events have proved
him right most of the way. In his
official time in Moscow, emigra-
tion was virtually nil. The night
he spoke. Jewish emigration had
begun at the rate of about a thou
sand a month.
Many Day School Administrators Work Toward Graduate Degrees
)N THE premise that Jewish day school administra-
tors can handle their responsibilities more effec-
rely if they are trained in modern management and
[Imir.istrative skills, 33 men and two WOUMa are study-
. in New York for a master of business administra-
on degree in what the sponsors called the first pro-
hm of its kind in the day school movement.
All of the "students' are members or associate
"mbers of the National As-ociation of Hebrew Day
(chool A'1 ninistrators (NXHOv-M. an B late of
inesorah, the Rational Society for Hebrew
Jay Schools.
THE TWO- year course is being given in conjunc-
Ion with the New York Institute of Teehnolvrv. a
|usino=s school accredited bv th? Middle States A*socia-
Ion. according to Dov ITIHT who i- eiecutiv- co-
|rdinator of NAHDSA and director of Torah Urn -
Brah's professional enrichm?nt department. Tbe
courses began last September.
The courses, which are taught at Torah UmesoraVs
Manhattan headquarters by institute faculty members.
i

J^cn L^af/ob
r
are given on Sunday afternoons from 12:45 p.m. to
7:13 a.m.
The class schedules were set Tip-to assure th-re
WoU-d '-, no int rference with the administrator',
duties. One of the two women students il a day school
admi-i-trator and the other plans h enter the fi^d.
TORAH I'MESORAH experts check out the teach-
er; for the classes to assure a. sympathetic understand-
ing of the Orthodox outlook of the Hebrew day school
philosophy. The institute checks out the teachers for
their qualifications for the courses, Milians said.
Many of the participants have rabbinical ordination
but lack the requisite secular knowledge. Others have a
bachelor of'arts degree but lack such required skills as
accounting, calculus and statistics.
Accordingly, there are alternating Sunday sched-
ules. Tho^e r^quirin; special instruction for secular
knrwl-dge,attend classes on odd Sundays.
IN TWO Mars, the students can acquire the r
graduate credit* needed for an MBA 45 without a.
fhesfa^Whfie iI'jo making up undergraduate credits
they need Mo: of the SB are enrolled in both cate-
gories of courses, Milians said.
Th- students with associate membership in
NAHDSA are "ouns oeo-l w>th bachelor's degrees artd
an intensive Hebrew school background
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Pa.
Pag* 12
*Ji f* i f rkridiar of North Browrd
Friday. February 8, 197/
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