The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00058

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


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Full Text
# Jewish Floridla7/7
of MHUII ItUOW \HH
3,lime2 Number 28
Friday, December 14, 1973
Two Sections Price Si.03
GOAL FOR 1974 IS $2,500,000
UJA-IEF Campaign Passes $1.8 Million Mark
t
:'1_4 Inited Jewish Appeal-
, Emergency Fund campaign
in North Broward has
! the $18 million mark.
I, campaign chairman.

:> the entire drive raised
Si itietics issued by the
\ppeal show this
increase to be among
n the country.
Mr Gross expressed gratifica-
ihese results. He pointed
..ever, that we are in one
- .n the I'ntted States and
per "ipi'.a basis we have
.1 more to achieve in or
bi raaponilbllftlea.
faces the most difficult
- history." h said. "Al-
. .>: the shooting hai
ALV1N S. CW$$
Women's Division
Leaders Named
stopped, it is still a very tenuous
situation Meanwhile Israel's econ-
i- at a virtual standstill and
the humanitarian needs of the
country continue. Even during the
war. new immigrants arrived
daily."
The campaign cabinet has set a
realistic goal of S2.5 million for
North Broward. Mr. Gross express-
ed every confidence that this goal
Combined Sisterhoods To
Meet Jan. 7 at Beth Israel
The first Contained Sisterhoods
meeting co-sponsored by the Jew-
ish Federation of North Broward
will be held Jan. 7 at Temple Beth
Israel with all Sisterhoods in North
Broward participating.
A nationally known guest speak-
er will give a behind-the-scenes re-
port on the current situation in the
Middle Fast Participating Sister-
hoods will include Temple Beth
Israel, Temple Emanu-El, Margate
Jewish Center, Tamarac Jewish
TempV Shalom and Coral
Spi ngs Jewish Congregation.
will be reached one will be approached who has
Campaign plans and organization not yet contributed to this most
are almost completed and every-1 historic campaign, Mr. Gross added.
1974 Women's Division
Campaign Organized
At a Women's Division organiza
of America home of Mrs. Jordan
Snydcr, some 45 women from al-
most every area of North Broward
assembled recently to plan the 1974
campaign.
Women's Division chairmen
Edith Levine and Irene Snyder re-
ported that they were encouraged
by the excellent turnout.
The meeting produced a most
exciting campaign structure. This
year, for the first time, funds will
be raised by areas with programs
and functions planned by various
area chairmen and leadership.
Among those already making
plans are Woodlands in Tamarac,
Points of America, Gait Ocean
Mile. Northeast Fort Lauderdaie,
and Plantation.
Also, special plans are being
readied for Palm Aire. Pompano,
Decrfield Beach and Lighthouse
Point and Inverrary Additional
areas will also participate in the
campaign.
Mrs. Jacob Lute President Of
Federations Women's Division
' \ M:il.:. pri
.; Fe leration of S
I \'\.n S Gross
. .ii chairman bav<
; uiv Jack Levine
ad the 1974 Won
:-<> United Jewish Appeal
a Fund
hairman. Serving as
Mrs J
I tie has been Int
lerahip position! for
ij years Last year, though rel-
it North Broward
i Jack, chaire I the
' ii initial Gifts dinner al
. her native Bistn an ;
Id, Mass Itri Levim h is
i p itions of responsibil
ii Univer
is a former chairms
- Division
\ and Israel Bon
:d.
\ [ Hadasi ih, and
v ish Women.
(rved on the
the Jewish
rice presi
- liai and a direc
Spring! Id Symphony
Irene Snyder was i deeply con
nvolved leader in her
ve Pittsburgh and in Philadel
both Jewish and
organizations in
brings her many
and organisational ability
. tii. \irs Snyd<
peech therapy
from Temple Uniw rsitj
-The community ia most fortu
leadership of tl
two outstanding women in this
.,; Jewish hi*
too Gross said "The results thai
drill in- achieved in this women s
an inspiration to
;i nmunity."
UKS. 10*DAN SNYDtK
il)L Introduces Human Relations
Training Program For Teachers
lira. Jacob Lots has accepted the
presidency of the year-round Wom-
en's Division of Federation, How-
ard N. Miller, president, announced.
lirs IH'. a leader in Zionist and
ind Jewish causes since her youth
in Memphis. Tenn brings the
most outstanding qualifications and
sxperienc* to her leadership posi-
tion. She baa been president of
Young Judea, Junior Hadassah and
Senior Hadassah. and is a life mem
ber. She has served on the south-
ern regional board of Hadassah.
Active for many years in Fed-
eration. Mrs. LutJ served as co-
chairman of the Women's Division
in Indianapolis and as cochairman
of Initial Gifts here last year.
Mrs Lutz. a graduate of Mem
phis State University, where she
received a degree in education has
held leadership positions with Jew-
ish Community Centers and homes
for the aged in her previous com
munities. She is also the founder
and first president of the Holly-
wood Beach Chapter of Hadassah
and charitable organizations includ
a term as chairman of the
\merican Cancer Society campaign.
HUS. JACOB LUTZ
Bell Lutz has also served with
distinction on a number of civic
Mrs. Lutz is indeed a leader of
distinction." said president Miller
in making his announcement. "We
in North Broward are most for-
tunate to be the beneficiary of her
experience and dedication."
r.e Florida regional office of
v : .Defamation League of
B': Introduced so
: bun an relations train-
hers into Ihe
anty public school ryi
High School in Fort
lerdale is the first Broward
to undertake the trail
. which involves the use
f i.'. limulattOOS of various
?ion situations confronted in
lt;-ethn:c schools.
LDL Regional Director Arthur
Jtclbaum said the initial training
Igram will involve approximate
114 hours work for each of the
I faculty members at the school.
ch has had a recent history' of
rial tension.
Teitelbaum noted the training
. .._____
Broward school official
,ive treated this training pr
ram' laid Dr Stanley Kess
haii-mii of ADL's Broward Are
Committe
The sch to! system is granting
professional credit points needed
for periodic recertffication to the
teachers Who are taking the train
tnd supervisory personnel
who observed the opening train
ing session tell us there la the rea
Possibility that these ADL ma-
terials will be used extensively
throughout Browards public
schools "
Teitelbaum reported that similar
\DL human relations training pro
grams for teachers have been car
ried out in the school systems of
Dade Palm Beach. H.llsboro. Duval
and Pinellas counties These pro-
reitelbaum noted the training and nneiias """-"- ".
pram covers the full range of grams are P** ^.^:* f Xh
-group relations problems, in- ^^XM^^^6
img black-white relations, anti- also include trie ^'"H blica.
mt.snt and the difficulties of distribution^ Jim. -nd ^
inish-speaking students. Uons .;!.X desianed for class-
We are particularly pleased by \ t.es. specifically designer io
apparent seriousness with room use.
Chanukah Singles Party
A Chanukah party featuring
games, dancing and latkes will bo
held bv the Jewish Federation Sin
I gles of Broward Sunday from 8 to
11pm in Pompano. Donation cov-
ers Chanukah gift to the Israel
I Emergency Fund and snacks Dade
1 and Broward singles from 25-50
will be welcomed. For additional
details, call the Jewish Federation |
office.
The State of Israel Masada Award was presented to Jules
and Lenore Shapiro (center) by Robert M. Hermann (left),
chairman of the North Broward Israel Bonds board of gov-
ernors, at Temple Beth Israel's "Night in Israel." Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowitz (right), is spiritual leader of the con-
gregation. The Shapiros received the Masada Award in
recognition of their outstanding leadership on behalf of the
State of Israel and the Jewish community.


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Rabbi*. Federation Proclaim War of Generals:
Mouniiii Dav for Ben-Gurion Military Politics
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aarts of the
mwo THE fir* taa iee-
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:'. patl laaaaaal aaaaag offieeri
aac tie caac:tj of the icaaanij
and aanetj to abtarh cr*s
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froc 'Jk frees, combined
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strear-beeed and ia-

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ah:rh they were lashaed eeaed
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Tfoas uadireel and. ur.ee: Army
ehannt
a* raJed
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Friday, December 14, 1973
+JfWlsfi fhricfk^r ol North Broward
Page 3-A
Settles at the Women's Division organizational meeting.
Reporting on campaign plans i3 Mrs. Alvin Gro3s (left).
Also shown are (from left; Mrs. Jack Levins, campaign
chaiiman and Mrs. Val Silberman and Shirley Trinz of
Miami, guest speakers.
Mrs. Dcnald Mitchell Mrs. Richard Schubot, Mrs. Allen Ba*r.
flf rjij
Hostess Mrs. Jordan Snyder (right) greets Mrs. Ludwik
Brodzki (left) and Mrs. Alan Zifier.
Plantation cochairmen Mrs. Stephen Levine (left) and Mrs.
Lea-Fishman.___
"LET US SUPPORT YOU''
CAMP JOBST FREEMAN OTC and UNIVERSAL
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PHONE 764-5440
Dayan Ouster Demand Growing
JERSALEM mier Golda Men- fcelhandodaid
gota vote of confidence from
her Labor Party's Central Com-
mittee when it met here in a
grueling internal debate over na-
tional leadership in the aftermath
of the Yom Kippur War.
But while Mis. Meir may easily
fend off growing demands from
some Labor Party quarters for a
new leadership team, she may be
forced to revise the hard line
policy on territories and with-
drawal of Defense Minister
Moshe Dayan and her close ad-
visor, Minister-Without-Portfolio
Israel Galiliwhich could lead to
a Labor Party crisis of historic
proportions, observers said.
THE POWERFUL Gush" bloc
of the Party, the core of the
former Mapai faction, decided at
a meeting here to support Pre-
mier Meir rather than align itself
with Party doves, some of whom
have demanded her resignation.
A vote of confidence for Mrs.
Meir is a vote for Dayan and
Galili, as the Premier has made
clear.
The Party leadership is anxious
fo avoid a schism with election
day little less than a month
away. But there are strong ele-
ments in the Party that will seek
to have its pre-war platform
the so-called Galili document on
d efense and foreign policy
quietly shelved and replaced by
something less hard-line that will
stress peace prospects.
Then' has been talk of setting
up a new drafting committee to
produce a fresh policy plank with
all three Labor factionsMapai.
Achdul Avodah and Rafishar-
ing tlu- authorship.
NO ONE can sav for certain
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whether Mr* Meir will no along
with this 6rwhether Dayan and
his supporters will agree. If not.
and if the "Gush" bloc decides
nevertheless to support the Party
doves' demands for policy
changes, a full scale crisis seems
unavoidable. Meanwhile, Dayan
appears to be in serious political
trouble.
He has emerged as the focus
of blame for the army's state of
unpreparedness when Egypt and t
Syria attacked Oct. 6. Parti
cipants in the "Gush" meeting
stress the need for a new security
platform to present to the voters !
Dec. 31 and urge that changes I
be made in the composition of i
the new Cabinet that will take (
office after the elections. While
no names are mentioned, it is |
clear that Dayan is considered a
prime candidate for replacement.
DA VAN'S resignation has been i
demanded openly by a group of \
senior armv reserve officers com-
prising the "Etgar" (Challenge) !
faction within the Labor Party.
They said that since the Defense
Minister was responsible for the
preparedness of the army and
security network in the first
phases of the war he .should draw
m the proper conclusions.
There were some differences
within the group as to whether
Dayan should resign now or later.
The officers adopted a resolution
calling for changes in the next
Cabinet and the selection of
ministerial candidates before the
elections. Another group of some
60 Labor Party members and
supporters have signed a petition
demanding Dayan's resignation.
Blyma Group Program To
Mark Chanukah Holiday
Blyma Group, North Broward
Chapter of Hadassah. plans a regu-
lar meeting in the Margate Jewish
Center at noon Thursday, Dec. 27,
according to Mrs. M. Sellner. presi-
dent The meeting will begin with
a collation: the business portion
will follow at 1 p.m.
To highlight the celebration of
Chanukah, Mrs. Charlotte Rosen-
zweig, program vice president, has
arranged a potpourri of songs,
dances and skits dramatizing the
joyous holiday following the cere-
monial lighting of the candles and
the Chanukah story.
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Today
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Friday. December 14, 1973
+ kistncrHin,r *f North Brow.rd
Page d-A
Nibblers Make
The Party Scene
With the party season in full
wing a few ideas for some deli-
cious nibblers are in order.
It's always fun to have some-
thing different for guests to enjoy.
Dutch-inspired, these mouth-water-
ing goodies call for Holland Edam
cheese the cheese that's always
dressed for a party in its cherry
red wax jacket.
If you'd like to impress friends
and family, try the Stuffed Edam
Spread. It requires very little ef- j
fart yet makes a handsome show '
ing.
STUFFED EDAM SPREAD
Cut a two- or three-inch slice
from the top of an imported Hol-
land Edam ball. Scoop out the
cheese leaving one-quarter inch
shell.
Allow scooped-out cheese to *
come to room temperature; then
shred. Combine shredded cheese
and enough mayonnaise to moisten
in a blender or mixer. Season tc
taste with Tabasco and Worcester
shire sauce. Mix well and pile back
into shell. Use remaining mixture
for seconds.
DUTCH CHEESE TART
10 oz. Edam Cheese imported
from Holland
', cup melted butter
1 cup bread crumbs
3 medium tomato slices
3 large mushroom caps
1 tbs. melted butter
Shred four ounces of the imported
Holland cheese (to make one cup).
Thinly slice remaining cheese
Thoroughly blend the shredded
cheese with melted butter and
bread crumbs. Press onto the bot
2 cups shredded imported Holland
Edam or Gouda cheese
torn and sides of a. ivejl greased
9" pie pan.
Cover with layer of tomato slices
and the mushroom caps. Brush
. with melted butter. Bake 20 min
utes in a preheated oven (350 )
Makes six servings.
Crumb crust may be made well
I in advance of the final preparation
! making this an easy-to-prepare dish
for luncheon, supper or anytime.
Begin your next party on a flavor
j ful note with these superb nibblers.
' They can be made in minutes.
Wondertul as an appetizer or
j beverage accompaniment, these de-
licious Holland cheese fritters will
have everyone coming back for
"just one more."
DUTCH TREAT
I 3 tbs. all-purpose flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tbs. minced onion
2 eggs (beaten)
Cooking oil for deep-fat frying
Mix shredded Holland cheese
flour, baking powder and onion
Add beaten eggs and stir until
cheese is evenly distributed in thr
batter.
In a deep skillet or saucepan
heat cooking oil. about 2" deep, t;
375 .
Carefully drop teaspoonfuls of
batter into oil. Cook two to threi
minutes until fritters are golder
brown, turning once during th
cooking period. Drain on absorbent
paper Serve hot. Makes three do7
en chene fritters.
If desired, fritters can be pre
pared in advance pnd kept in tb
freezer up to three months. To re
heat and serve, place frozen frit
ten on baking sheet in 350 oven
for five to seven minutes.
A HAPPY CHANUKAH TO ALL .
Rro-tnl CMtr*< Hr*t Trmrl igmry .
r'i"" mt.
TROPICAL TRWELBIREU. INC.
3001 EAST LAS OCAS BLV0
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ri. lauHerdile CALL
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Hell man's Hearty Potato Salad For Chanukah Parties
Chances are you'll want to set
out a truly rich side dish to com
pliment your holiday buffet cold
cuts.
Here's how to put together a
potato salad with Hellmann's Real
Mayonnaise, one that will delight
all your guests with gourmet tastes.
Be sure, however, you use Hell-
mann's REAL mayonnaise the
one made with whole, fresh eggs.
Hellmann's is richer and cream
ier another one of the many
fine Best Foods products that mean
best quality.
PEPPY PARTY POTATO SALAD
2 lbs. potatoes
ha cup Hellmann's Real
Mayonnaise
2 tbs. vinegar
2 tbs. chopped onion ,
1 stalk celery (chopped)
1 large dill pickle (chopped)
1 large sour apple (peeled, cored
and diced (
1 tap. prepared mustard
1 green pepper (cored and
diced)
"i t=o. salt
Dash pepper
Boil potatoes about 20 minutes,
till tender but firm. Peel and slice.
Add vinegar, onions and season-
ings while still warm. Later, add
pickle, pepper, celery and apple,
then toss with mayonnaise and
mustard. Chill.
Set out on bed of salad greens,
garnished with bits of green pep-
per and sliced stuffed green olices
ior dashing eftect. Serves four to
six (Double the recipe for a big-
ger party.)


Publicity Chairmen Asked!
To Limit Number in Picture I
Publicity chairmen are re
quested to limit the number of 1
persons included in photographs I
submitted to The Jewish Florid-1
ian for publication. Inclusion of
more than six persons in a sin-1
gle picture does nt permit J
I satisfactory reproduction.
- Ml -i'J.m:
I
Women's Division Calendar
Jan. 7 Combined Sisterhood dessert meeting at Temple Beth
Israel.
Jan. 8 Woodlands Function
Jan. 9 Points of America Function
Jan. 10 Gait Ocean Mile Function
Jan. 16 Woodlands Function
Jan. 23 Woodlands Function
WWWWWMWWWWWVW^^^^^**************************'
OUR 27th SEASON
BLUE STAR'S SEVEN CAMPS
A, FOR GIRLS and BOYS
XX in the Blue Ridge Mountains
v^ Hendersonville, North Carolina 28739
Invites
Campers (7 to 17 years of age ) Parents and Staff
to attend the
Annual Get-Together _
ro be held for the South Florida Area *^
SUN.. DEC. 23rd
#
AT THE DUPONT PLAZA HOTEL, BISCAYNE BLVD., MIAMI
fir ft ft ft ft ft
2:30 P.M. 4:30 P.M.
for New and Prospective AND for former campers,
Campers and Parents parents and staff
REFRESHMENTS WILL BE
SERVED AT 4 P.M.
ft ft ft ft ft ft
PLEASE CALL -854-1970 or 367-1485 FOR RESERVATIONS
OR AN APPOINTMENT INTERVIEW
'mm
MT
$
-tV
tV
BLUE STARS DIRECTORS HERMAN AND RODGER POPKIN, WILL BE IN THE GREATER MIAMI
AREA AT THE COMMODORE CLUB ON KEY BISCAYNE FROM DEC. 3-31. CAU. FOR AN
APPOINTMENT OR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 361-1485.
BLUE STAR'S SEVEN COMPUTE AND CREATIVE PROGRAMS ARE LIMITED
TO 100 CAMPERS FOR EACH AGE GROUP IN
Counselor Trainees (25 Boys and Girls)
12th Grade'
Junior Camp (48 Girls and Boys)
1st, 2nd and 3rd Grades*
'as of the Fall of 1974
Six Weeks or ft Eight Weeks ..
Pioneer Boys 4th, 5th and 6th Grades* #
Pioneer Girls 4th, 5th and 6th Grades*
Senior Boys__7th, 8th and 9th Grades
Senior Girls 7th, 8th and 9th Grades*
Prep CTs 75 Boys and Girls
10th and 11 Grades*
Campers May Enroll For -V Four Weeks
COME TO THE DUPONT TO:
Meet the Directors
See our 1974 NEW Film Presentation
Ask Questions
Talk with Camp Friends
Enjoy Refreshments
Renew Friendships with Staff
Make Personal Appointments
Get the Facts about Our 27th Season
ft ft ft ft ft ft
// parents or campers ean'f attend, please send for our 1974
catalogue ami literature:
BLUE STAR CAMPS
Kanuaa Road, P.O. Box 1029
Hendersonville, N.C 28739
or Call
305-361-1485 (During December only
305-854-1970-Our Greater Miami Office
704-692-3591 Our Camp Offices (Call Collect)
jljyyvv^''t'',-,-,''t*t',-(*~*~r***~***************************** ****** *************
*
$
J



?*ag 5-
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1UM EJFKT9
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Labor Part*
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^Tiat Israel
Great Debate Fizzle?:
Will and Won't Trade
JBCULEX Mi itur
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POMPANO BEACH 33060
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w^T v^/Tapoy 0/ijfej/i /c a// ^*^ yJtmppp V-./i.tmji/mA Ii a//.
GRAMCE GEYERINC THI\DERB1RD SWAP MEET
248 L SUNRISE BOiHEVAKO 3121 W. SUNRISE BOULEVARD
FOtT LAUOEIDAiE 33304 FORT LAUDERDALE 33316


Friday, December 14. 1973
+Jewish fhridkhir *North *">*>
Page 7-A
Day an Analyzes Yom Kippur Campaign
y YITZHAK SHARGIL
and DAVID LANDAU
TEL AVIV Israeli Defense
Minister Moshe Dayan, in two
separate speeches last weekend,
said that little or nothing has
been accomplished in the cease-
fire talks and warned that the
failure to reach a compromise
with Egypt augured ill for the
general peace conference in
Ulpan Classes
Meet at Temples
Registration is still open for the
Ulpan classes sponsored by the
Federation in cooperation with the
Central Agency for Jewish Educa
tion of Greater Miami and North
Broward temples, according to an
announcement made by Ludwik
Bmkki. chairman of Federation's
Jewish Education Committee.
Classes begin at 7:30 p.m. Th.-
Ih inners course at Temple
Bmanu-El is conducted each Toes
da> evening, the intermediate class
meets there on Thursdays. At Tem-
ple Sholom, Pompano Beach, both
beginners and intermediate clMsei
-r.. el Wednesdays.
Registration may be made at the
temples on class nights. A moder-
ate fee covers the entire course,
, includes between 20 and 30
its of instruction.
Geneva.
The Geneva conference, if it
takes place, will find the two
sides locked in confrontation po-
sitions, he said. He warned that
the resumption of fighting was
by no means to be ruled out. The
Arabs are "tough, stubborn and
ambititious this time as never be-
fore. They feel strong militarily
with their replaced equipment
and politically with their oil
threats and cutbacks and their
achievements in winning world
sympathy away from Israel,"
Dayan said in addresses to a Joint
Israel Appeal mission from Brit-
ain and the Israel Bar Associa-
tion here.
ACCORDING TO Dayan. Israel
has made strenuous efforts to
reach a compromise with Egypt
but to far has failed to negotiate
a breakthrouRh. Egypt apparently
is demanding a major pullback
of Israeli forces from the west
and east banks of the Suez Canal
to the Mitlah and Hiddi parses in
nid Sinai which would put the
canal out of range of Israeli ar-
tillery.
it was learned that the latest
Israeli proposal is for Egypt to
withdraw its heavy armament
from the east bank of the canal.
reptacinf t with a lightly armed
policing force. Israel would agree
tn E nding technicians and
management personnel to the east
bank for the purpose of clearing
the Suez Canal and restoring it to
operation. Israel for its part
would withdraw from the west
bank and allow lightly armed
Egyptian policing forces into the
area it now controls.
IN HIS speeches. Dayan took
a very hard line on Israeli with-
drawal from occupied Arab terri-
tories, defended Premier Golda
Meir as one of "the best leaders"
Israel has and said he was not
contemplating resignation. He al-
so assailed what he called inex-
pert and ill informed media writ-
ers who drew unfavorable com-
parisons between the Israeli
Army's achievements in the Yom
Kippur War and what it accom-
plished in the Six Day War of
1967.
DAYAN CAUTIONED Israel
against accepting something call-
ed peace which would in fact
undermine Israel's security. He
said he did not believe the Arabs
have changed their aims or mo-
tivations in the shirt weeks since
they launched their war. and
what they failed t > achieve by
military means they now seek to
achieve through a peace confer-
ence.
"We have no control over the
launching of war by the Arabs or
their assassination of our prison
ers, but it does depend on us
whether the rush to Geneva will
produce a conference of retreat
or capitulation," Dayan said. The
fate and future of the Jewish
state hangs in the balance, he
noted.
"We must not agree to the
shrunken and twisted pre-1967
lines if we do not want to see this
country doomed," Dayan warned.
He said Israel must decide now
what it will not give up under
any circumstances whether under
pressure or in return for guaran-
tees.
"Why do the Americans talk
of offering us guarantees?" Dayan
asked. "Because they know as
well as we do that the borders
they contemplate will not be de-
fensible." he said.
DAYAN PRAISED U.S. mili
tary aid which he said was plen-
tiful and very much appreciated.
But he expressed apprehension
over the dilferences with Wash-
ington on political issues and
nreed Israel to stand firm for
its basic interests. He said in his
pen >nal view, Israel must under
all circumstances retain the Golan
Heights, military control of the
Jordan River, Sharm el-Sheikh
and the radar network on the
Nablus (west bank) hills. He said
that Israel has the military
strength to stand fast on its es-
sential security requirements. "It
is the spirit of the nation that will
determine how we go to Geneva,"
he said.
He conceded that Israel could
not ignore the Arab oil pressures
and the consequent U.S. efforts
to come to terms with the Arab
world. "I hope the key to U.S.
peace ideas is not to force Israeli
withdrawals." he said. "Israel
must not be the victim of Japan's
or any other nation's need for
oil. For Israel the question of
withdrawal and boundaries is one
of life or death." D;yan said.
ACCORDING TO Dayan, Israel's
military victories in the Yom
Kippur War were on a much
larger scale than in the Six-Day
War. He said that in 1967. Egypt
lost 750 of 1.000 tanks and 180
out of 750 planes. In the Yom
Kippur War, it lost 1.000 of 2,850
tanks and 240 out of 680 planes.
Syria's losses in 1967 were 100
out of 460 tanks and 45 out of
95 planes.
This time, the Syrians lost 1.100
of 2.700 tanks and 200 of 410
planes, Dayan said.
But he warned that both Egypt
and Syria were returning to full
strength thanks to the resupply
of the Soviet Union and "other"
nations which he did not name.
Nevertheless, he said, the Israeli
forces were strong enough to
maintain their present positions
and defeat all of the Arab states
combined if another war broke
out.
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altamontt springs


Page 8-A
+.!.!# fyridknr Of Worth Be^.rd
Friday, Dcmbr 14, 1973
C
E
V
I
n
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I:
S.
];
T
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s
Bab el Mandeb Sivap On Tap Question Box
London Chronicle Syndicate
There Is a widespread notion,
much vaunted abroad, that
wjjth the impwatjon of, an effec-
tive Arab naval blockade at the
Bab el Mandeb entrance to the
Red Sea. Israeli control of Sharm
el Sheikh as a safeguard for Is-
rael's shipping routes to and from
Eiath is a tactical anachronism.
A deeper understanding of
SharnTs place in Israel's strategic
thinking illustrates both the
truth and yet the superficiality
of this assessment.
i THE FUTURE of Sharm el
Sheikh is one of those issues now
undergoing furious reassessment
(which was under the influence
of the Left-wing kibbutzim), and
the Irgun (the military arm of
in Israel. The final importance
placed on it is likely to be deter-
minedmore than with most of
the other -territories in dispute"
by the kind of peace offered
to Israel and the end settlement
she can secure.
Sharm is where two previous
wars have started. Since then, it
has virtually been accepted that
there must be an Israeli presence
to protect the free passage of
shipping through the Straits of
Tiran and a land corridor along
the Gulf of Akaba linking Sharm
to Israel proper.
Tnis was previously the cate-
goric position of the dominant
.ment of the Labor Party, and
it reflected the almost instinctive
response of the general public.
In this last war. Israel did pos-
sess Sharmyet Elath has been
subjected to an effective block-
ade which has choked the town's
economy.
THE STRATEGIC implications
of the closure of Bab el Mandeb
the Gateway of Tears by Arab
gunboats go beyond the im-
mediate Arab-Israel conflict since
the implication is that the Suez
Canal, if reopened, could also be
closed off at some future time,
and this fact is not lost on the
Soviet Union or the West. As the
Communications Minister, Shimon
Peres noted. "If you close your
eyes to one blockade, you are
inviting others elsewhere in the
world."
But within the specific context
of freedom of navigation to and
from Elath, the idea put forward
by some Israelis prior to the war
and now gaining ground is what
is vital for Israel about Sharm
is not an Israeli presence, but an
Egyptian absence. When limited
simply to freedom of navigation
through the Straits of Tiran, a
token Israeli presence would be
insufficient to deter the Egyp-
tians in some future conflict
VITAL, IN this view, is that
Egypt would be deterred from
attempting to manipulate Sharm
for hostile ends only if it was
made sufficiently plain to her
that such a blockade would be
considered by Israel a definite
"casus belli"with the corollary
that Israel's deterrent capacity
be sufficient to make any Egyp-
tian leader think again about the
advisability of taking such a step.
Within this framework, certain
Israeli military analysts stress
that Sharm assumes significance
as pait of a potential offensive
thrust to be employed against
key elements in Egypt's own
strategic arenas, such as freedom
of shipping in the Gulf of Suez
up to a reopened Suez Canal or
against vital areas of Upper
Egypt, along the Red Sea, and
deeper inland.
Even if the present blockade
were to be eased," future at-
tempts to exploit either South
Yemeni designs on Bab el
Mandeb or control of the Red
Sea as an -Arab lake" barred to
Israel, would be. if not counter
balanced, at least tempered by
a strategic Israeli presence at
Sharm.
ALTHOUGH the entrance to
the Red Sea is 1.500 miles away
from Elath and difficult (though
not impossible) for Israeli units
to reach, the Gulf of Suez and
adjacent areas, are as it were,
only "around the corner" from
Sharm. Such a consideration is
made more significant by the
apparent weakening, through the
collapse of her ties with Africa,
of any possibility that there
might be an Israeli strategic
presence in countries around the
horn of Africa, particularly
Ethiopia.
Hanuka
Greetings
Harden Salon of Beauty
3351 B. Golf Ocean Drive
Fort Lauoeroale 33308
SABOTS
HARBOR BEACH HAIR DRtSSIRS
Harbor Beach Shopping Center
Across From "Pier 66"
"SANDY"
2226 S.t 17th St.-524-8807
Israel's public stance on the
importance of Sharm remains
unchanged. But many officials,
in both the military and political
spheres, suggest that Israel's at-
titude in the future is very much

dependent on the kind of settle-, shawl)?
Bv R*BBI SAMUEL J. FOX
(c). 17S Jewish TlwPl<- AK^ncy
Why is it customary to have
some ornament or trim at the
edge of the tallis (prayer
ment which can be effected with
Egypt.
GIVEN ONLY partial Arab
willingness to accept Israel's
existence as a factor in the Mid-
dle East, Sharm remains strate-
gically important. Israel, then,
would be unready to abandon
her military presence there. She
might, however, as some Minis-
ters have privately suggested, be
prepared to go along with an old
American idea of entering into
some sort of "leasing" arrange
ment which acknowledged Egyp-
tian sovereignty.
Only in the event of real peace
does total demilitarization of
Sinai outweigh other strategic
factors enmeshed with the con-
tinued control of Sharm el
Sheikh The realization is begin
ning io gain ground that, if th<
Egyptians can convince the Amer
icans that they really want a
This trim indicates which part
of the tallis should be placed over
the head. The rabbis were espe
.any caretui to make sure that
once a certain patt of the tallis
was worn at the head it should not
*>c reversed and worn towards the
>ottom (Magen Abraham).
This kind of attitude towards ob
ects of worship and holiness was
lerived by some from the manner
n which the boards were laid for
he Tabernacle. The Talmud in
dicated that a board which was
,,'aced in the north of the Taber
nacle should always be placed i
there while that which was placed |
in the south must always be placed
in the south. In this way each
board has its respective position
which it never loses.
The same logic applies to the
tallis in the sense that once a cer-
tain portion of the tallis was used
permanent settlement. Israel' for the top, it should not be re-
would have difficulty in securing i versed to be used for the bottom
demilitarization of Sinai. whil< If. indeed, rabbis were so sensi
continuinc to maintain an armed live to the placing of physical ob
hold on Sharm. Ijects, how much more s.nsitn,
should one be to the honor and
dignity of human beings.
Why are tb?re five knots in
(he frblges which come oat of
the four corners of the tallis?
Some claim that these five knots
represent the five books of Moses
which in turn represent basically
all the commandments of the
Torah. The purpose of fringes,
therefore, would be to keep us
ever mindful of these command
ments.
The Talmud also states (Berakot
12:A) that the portion in the
Pentateuch < Numbers 15:38) which
.(escribes the fringes refers to five
:hings: the commandment to put
.n fringes, the exodus from Egypt,
iccepting the responsibility of the
commandments, a warning not to
,uin to heresy and a warning not
0 turn to immorality and idolatry
The Jewish Calendar
5734.
1973
PBa BB moav>i t T
USA MWJ> 1tv I *
Vd.
0. .1}
All Sarm4 Occasion* commute*
on the j>r

December 14, 1973
* ^HitthflfrHiicir) of North Broward
Page 9-A

nuckle Under, or Else, Europe Told m-El-n^&t
M/ B'nai B'rith Fort Lauderdale
By EDWIN EYTAN
TA Eurooean Bureau Chief
Ip.VRtS (JTA) West Ger-
\n ThariceUor Willy Brandt has
iinch'cd an appeal for European
idanly "in the face of the
Itenge which threatens our
iM Jiroughout- his talks with
^inpidou and in the toast he
roposed Nov. 25 at the Elysee
alace state banquet, Brandt
lied for a joint West European
land.
HE SAID that such a stand was
lecessary to resolve the energy
[risis and for the sake of further
h)k< with the United States. The
French position, as made known
ly official spokesmen Nov. 28 is
fr.orr reserved.
France feels that European
nity must be treated as a whole
nd not u>al exclusively with the
|.l shortage." the spokesman said.
The French also made it known
Brandt that Holland has usu-
ally in the past opposed European
political unification and had al-
rtteVitaated its currency, the
Ik n*i> 10 in ifi:p
GtORGCS POMPIDOU
florin, a few months ago without
taking into consideration or even
consulting its European partners
The French thus feel that Eu-
rope should strive towards great-
er political unity and that other
questions would thus resolve
th'-m selves.
It is believed that West Ger-
many has partially agreed to the
!hanukah Dishes For
*Hostess-Iii-A-HuiTv'
It seenn> women are more In-
ihcd tian ever these days
ith fundwaiiinc Chanufcafa ba-
it temple* or things like
n's eorpools.
means that the time you
spi nd on" supportive efforts for
naturally leaves you less
It for meal -planning Yet you
|- wantTto prepare extra-special
]' la> meals fr youi family, and
[ ?ttt*sts too.
am some ideas that make
r-id use fl ingredients you prob-
I alreaji- have right on your
pantry sheff
For this 'luscious dinnertime cas-
serole, you'll need a package of de-
licious Suftsweet Pitted Prunes,
and two cans of yams. The result
Jtes like tairomos. but doesn't
take the titfe (and tsimmes) your
rrama expended on this sweetly
remembered dish
SINSWEET PKl'NE AND
SWEET POTATO CASSEROLE
1 pkg. (Q oz.) Surrsweet Pitted
Prunes
2 cans (1 lb. 8 oz. ea.) yams or
sweet potatoes
': cup dark brown sugar
'-. cup margarine
'-. 1sp. salt
I* tsp ea. pepper, cinnamon and
ginger
Cut potatoes Into thick slices
Combine brown sugar, margarine.
volt and spices. Place half of po-
tato slices in a^rcased one-and-one
half quart Peking dish. Sprinkle
with some of Mown sugar mixture
Top with half of prunes, sprinkle
with mixture, repeat layers. Bake
in a preheated 375 oven about 35
routes until brown on top
Serves eigh4*
And here are two novel goodies
that also make use of those won
' srr a housewife's best friend
Packages of-pie-crust mix are also
recommended, for time-saving and
(i nvenienee.
HONIED Ffel'N AFF1.E rTE
Pastry for:JVcrust pie
h cup cut-fj Sunsweet Pitted
Prunes
cup sugar
2 tbs. floor
cup honey
|4 or Start apples
2 tsp. lemon juice
1 tbs. margarine
I1-, tsp. rinnjmen
|' tsp. nutmeg
Roll half the pastry, fit into 9"
e plate. Scatter prunes over pas-
try.
Mix sugar whh flour, then blend
in honey and api< rs Core, peel and
"line apples Arrange over prunes,
sprinkle with lemon juice, pour
Honey mixture Over all and dot
vrth
Cut most o( n'st of pastry into
strips and arrange lattice-fashion
over filling. Fold edges together,
seal and flute.
Bake in I 425 over about 45
minutes, till apples are fork-tender
and pastry a golden brown. If
you've popped in your pie as you
-it down to dinner, you can serve
it warm perhaps drizzled with a
mix of honey and grated lemon
rind to the accolades of your
guests!
And here's an idea on using your
left-over prunes and pastry to de-
licious advantages ... if not for
dinner, for another special occa i
sion.
PR I'NECHOVY CAN4PES
Add equal amount grated cheese
to pie crust mix. Roll out. Cut in'
3" circles Place pitted prunes
stuffed with rolled anchovy on j
half of circle. Moisten edge, fold
empty half over prune and pinch,
together firmly. Set on cookie
sheet and bake in 425 oven for
10 minutes. (If not brown, bake,
five minutes more.)
These are so tasty, you may
want to start with full packages of!
Sunsweet Pitted Prunes, and pie-
crust mix to be sure you have
enough!
French thesis and will support
this stand next month in Copen-
hagen at the forthcming,,EMK>-
pean summit conference.
Meanwhile, two Arab oil min-
isters called here Nov. 29 for
more direct European interven-
tion in the Middle East "to force
Israel to withdraw" from the oc-
cupied territories.
THE TWO, Algerian minister
for oil production and OPEC
President Belaid Abdessalam.
and Saudi Arabia's minister for
oil industries Ahmed Zaki Yam-
ani. made their position known
during meetings with President
Ceorges Pompidou. Foreign Min-
ister Michel Jobert and on a num-
ber of radio and television inter-
views.
Abdessalam and Yamani ar-
rived here on the first leg of an
"explanatory trip" which will
take them to London. Brussels,
Rome, Bonn and Washington.
In the course of a television in-
terview. Abdessalam said. "I
would not be shocked to see Eu
ropean troops militarily intervene
in the Middle East to evict Is-
rael from the occupied territories."

The two warned that unless Is-
rael withdraws or at least hands
over a withdrawal timetable, the
Arab countries will continue to
reduce their oil production by
five per cent per month. The
two ministers said that the Brus-
sels resolution issued by the nine
EEC members earlier this month
is too weak and too ambigious."
"THEY CALLED for "more en-
ergetic and concrete action." They
refused to spell out what meas-
ures they had in mind saying
only "it is for Europe itself to
decide."
When told that the rest of Eu-
rope has a certain responsibility !
towards Holland, the Algerian
minister said. "We also feel soli
darity towards our Palestinian
brethren and their situation is
far worse than that of the Dutch."
Practically all the French of-
ficials they met. including the
newsmen who interviewed them,
stressed that the oil embargo |
hits mainly Europe and Japan and;
leaves practically untouched Is-
rael's main ally America.
The ministers said that Amer-
ica will increasingly feel the em-
bargo and that "in any case it is
Europe's task to make it feel re-
sponsible for the world shortage."
THEY ALSO said that Japan
will henceforth enjoy the treat-
ment accorded to Europe and
will not suffer any special short-
ages.
They warned that should any
country take counter-measures
,0,11 production would, be irruae
diately further reduced and could
be cut to zero." They also said |
that the Arab states could use a'
"monetary campaign" to hit
American and European econo-
mies unless a solution to the Mid-
dle East crisis is found in the'
near future.
It was announced Nov. 23
in Brussels that the two minis
ters, are expected to hold talks
with the foreign minister, the
economic affairs minister, EEC'
Commission president, and EEC.
Commission vice president who
is in charge of energy problems.
Before this was announced, Bel !
gian Foreign Minister Renaat van
Enslande told the Belgian Parlia
ment that the government is call
ing on Israel to withdraw from
all occupied territory.
HE ALSO called for a "solu-,
tion to the Palestinian problem"
and recognition of Israel's sov
ereignty in conformity with
United Nations Security Council '
Resolution 242
In Bonn. Dr. Erich Riedl. oppo
sition Christian Social Union MP
called on the West German gov-
ernment to review its relations
with the Arab states in view of
recent events.
He said delivery should be
Israel should not be tampered
with, however. Riedl. who had
talks last week in Cairo with
Egyptian leaders, said that thf
Arab states wanted to use the
oil threat to get West Germany
to apply its influence on the U.S.
and Israel.
At the same time. Kurt Thurrk.
opposition Christian Democrat
MP. urged the European commu-
nity not to supply Egypt with a
promised 451.000 tons of wheat.
A HAPPY CHANUKAH TO ALL .
THE WOOD LEDGE
3010 E. COMMERCIAL BLVD.
PffONf 772-1214
JAMMED WALL FURNITURE
DO YOUt WALLS HAVE "SHELF RESPECT?"
WE DO CUSTOM WORK
.
SEASON'S GREETINGS
A Home Health Service By
Qualified Aides
Trained by our R.N.s
4 to 8 hour shift
24-hour Live-Ins
VISITING REGISTERED NURSES
VISITING HOMEMAKER SERVICE
OF BROWARD COUNTY, INC.
Established 1*5*
J524-5582
1101 E Broward Blvd.
Fort lauderdale
925-8643
2121 Hollywood Bivd
Hollywood]

Lodge 1438 will hold its annual
distinction," declared Miller
dinner-dance Sunday, Jan. 13. nin
the Venetian Roortr-of Pier 66, 2801
SE 17th St. Causeway, Fort Lauder-
dale. Cocktail hour (optional) will
start at 5:30 p.m.
No fund-raising or appeals for
funds will be made.
There will be a full course steak
dinner, dancing to a top profes-
sional entertaining band, and enter-
tainment by Tuxedo Junction.
Tuxedo Junction, consisting of
four talented and exciting young
musical comedy performers, pre-
sents a complete, fully costumed,
streamlined musical comedy re-
view. This review was originally
presented at the best resort ho-
tels in the New York area and was
so successful and was received with
such acclaim that it not only play-
ed repeat engagements at these ro-
tels, but it has been continued as
a permanent company playing
nightclub dates, cruises, etc.
Tickets for the dinnerdance in-
cludes everything (tax and gratui-
ties) except cocktails, which will
be available but optional. Tickets
can be obtained by calling Jacob
Brodzki. Harry Genin, Jack Klai-
mitz or Jerry Sherman.
We do
business the
right way.

ITOOWttlOatUndta-kaitd .
fl lud*'dl fi* 333"
pnon rjs ijjo
OAKLAND TOYOTA
^Ar UNITED STERN DRIVE
SERVICE INC.
3941 5.E. 12th COURT
FORT LAUDERDALE 33312
S
^/Q JOHN F. NICKOLA JEWELRY
1530 N. FEDERAL HIGHWAY
POMPANO BEACH 33062


Page 10-A
bHlstifkrH*** North Bfoward
Friday, DacBmber 14, It73
LEO MIMlLIN
Continued from Page 4-
. the recommendations and
,promptly approved a government-
backed scheme for the city's cen-
ter consisting of a collection of
18- and 20-story office blocks.
| IN FACT, Arthur Kutcher's
book, "The New Jerusalem."
which is the subject of the TLS
review, is a detailed study of
what the review calls the "con-
flict between planning precept"
as offered by Sharon and ac-
cepted by the authorities, "and
municipal and government prac-
tice "
As the Times sees it, as I have
seen it for myself again and
again, as any perceptive visitor
to Jerusalem can see it. a number
of development projects that are
"the result of official initiative or
blessed by official support,
threaten to destroy the delicately-
balanced historic view both from
and toward the Old City."
In last week's column. I men-
tioned the Omaria project a
tower block of luxury apartments
erected without a building per-
mit on public open space by pri-
vate developers with Israel Gov-
ernment backing.
THE OMARIA development is
crowned by a 16-story tower and
would have been joined by eight
more such publicly-unauthorized
towers, plus two hotels, expect
for the outcry that followed the
erection of the first tower be-
cause it virtually obliterated the
view across the Old City toward
the Mount of Olives.
There are other similar mon-
strosities soing up (or that would
go up except for public outcry)
and that will contribute to de-
stroying the historic balance of
the city.
There is the Plaza Hotel on
high ground west of the city.
This will soon be joined by the
Commodore HoteL
ONE DAY a >ear or so ago. I
picked my way through a con-
struction site on French Hill,
where a friend was looking for
an apartment she could not af-
I ford but that her American
grandfather would buy for her
when the building was finished
I recall looking at the site
With something like an ache be-
cause I saw it as a rank pollu-
tant.
Now it is finished and my
friend installed in what amounts
to a municipal housing estate of
multi-storv blocks sprawling along |
the skyline and overpowering the
Dome of the Rock as seen from
the Mount of Evil Council.
It is a project for the wealthy
foreigner or the Israeli sponsored
by friends or family abroad
not for the ordinary Jerusalemite
The abomination of the city i:-
in behalf of its olitc
There are others:
PROPOSED PRIVATE de- \
velopments on Abu Tor. just
south of the Old City near Talpiot.
a site of profound historic signifi ;
cance;
The scheme for a 22-story
annex to the King David 11
that would obscure the exquisite
view across the valley and up
toward the Old City;
The Hyatt HoOM H itel pro
poaal for Mount Scopus, a 23
ry monstrosity that would,
d'.varf the Erich Mendelsohn ar
ehitected Hebrew Universttj
buildings there building! that
M of now merely "accentuate the
hilltop," as the Times puts it.
"and mark its place in the rhyth-
mic succession of hilLs and val-1
leys without reducing the domi-
nance of the key element in the
whole landscape."
IN THE case of the Hyatt
House, bulldozers prepared the
ground even before the Munici
pal Council approved it, and the
Minister of Tourism even took
part in a cornerstone-laying cere-
mony.
The Times quotes Kutcher in
his "New Jerusalem" as observ-
ing that the rape of the city is
becoming so matter-of-fact that:
"Ministerial officials receive
19 KISLEV -
f
Religious
Services
FOST LAUDIRDAll
BETH ISRAEL (Temple) 7100 W.
Oakland PrK Blvd. Rabbi Philip
A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice Neu.
EMANU-EL. S25 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Arthur J Ab-
rams. Cantor Jeroma Klemer.. 48
word that a foreign investor is in
town who is interested in build-
ing a large luxury hotel. The man
-is invited to lunch, and after they ;
have been assured to their satis-
faction that he is actually pre-
pared to build a mammoth luxury
hotel ... the officials take the j
man for a little drive around the j
city."
HE IS shown, says Kutcher,,
"four or five of the city's breath-
taking panoramic views, all on |
public space, and is then asked
which he would prefer. He
chooses, the deal is sealed, and
shortly thereafter the legal plan-1
ning committee make their mark | pompano beach
on the official documentation." sholom (Tempie. 1S2 s* i:tn Ava.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Remember that this is not the Cantor Jacob J. Remer.
Times talking; it is Kutcher. Butj masqATI
imagine its vast negative public mArqate Jewish center. (Con.
relations on Israel particu- aervative) 6101 nw 9th st.
, ., ___.5 ,_ Friday. 8 i> m I If ftUnnls Neumann
larly Israels presence in Jeru-,will ,.Iuiuc,; cantor Hu Oalliin iii
cajem deliver the sermon Satarday, 9 am.
regular Sabbath mnrniim ervteaa
When the Times comments, as fflt*! ftniaff
I observedI to the first of these ^^ 8pRiNM HEBREW CON.
columns, that the Jewish occu- gregation (Reform) 3501 uni-
pation of Jerusalem amounts to ver::y ^r.. Coral springs. Racor
"the stigma of one materialistic .JJ tSSa. Sabbath aarrloaa.
Western culture based on such ----------
typically Western initiatives as vouno^^l fr.""*
property aggrandizement." the
anti-Semitic effect is one that, at
least for me. can only be met
with rage.
BIT IT is Kutcher, who in the
process of describing the death
of the Sharon Master Plan, warns
us that the fate of Jerusalem
may be to put it on a par with
Miami Beach.
That hits ni" particularly hard
I can think of nothing more ugly
and vulgar than the destruction
of Miami Beach by selfish, in-
CANDLEIIGHTING TIME C^f mmMMffeftf
1Q VTCT V\T 19 V
New Baers
Store For
Boca Raton
Baer's Furniture, which pro<
ently has two showrooms in Brow-
ard County and three furniture
showcases in Northern Indiana, is
gain expanding, according to an
announcement made by Kelvin H.
sensitive exploiters in, eahooIs B president
with a greedy and callous city
council all of them experts in, A contract has been signed with
Obscuring the natural beauty ot Marinoff Construction Co. for the
a city and with total disregard erection of a Baer's showroom on
for the public, its rights and. i/.s. 1 in Boca Raton. The building
yes, even history. Florida's his js scheduled for completion in early
tory. its subtropical aura. spring.
That being the case, as well Heading operations at the new
as the depressing fact that some \ store will be Allan F. Baer. vice
of the exploiters of Miami Beach president of the firm, who is also
are also exploiters of Jerusalem.; in charge of the Fort Lauderdale
Israel's architectural record in store.
Jerusalem will do her no good I
when Messenger Boy Kissinger "This new Baer's facility will be
and. indeed the world, finally one of the outstanding furniture
call in their IOU*s.
rjEFFER
^^FlM-RAl. HOMES, INC.
DIRECTORS
Irwin Jsffer
Utdwm Jefler Alvin Jeller
188-11 HILLSIDE AVE HOLLIS. LI
1283 CONEY ISLANO AVE .BKIYN.
212/776-8100
13385 A DIXIE HWY MIAMI
305/947-1185
Represented by Sonn lev*!, f 0
625 S OLIVE AVE ,W PALM BEACH
305/833-4413
Represented by Prahp Wnnslem. F 0
Chapels available in all
communities in New York and
throughout the Miami
W Palm Beach areas
Repre
showrooms in the whole country
and will feature more than 200
room group settings of the latest
styles in the finest quality furni
ture." declared Allan Baer. "The
new showroom will follow the same
policy' as Baer's Dania and Fort
Lauderdale showrooms do now. of-
fering quality, name-brand furni
ture at a low price."
'We want to thank the people
of South Florida for their wonder
ful acceptance of Baer's chain,
which is now in its sixth year here."
added Lucille Baer, corporate sec-
retary Baer's n.'w Palm Beach
County store will also be a full
service store, offering free deliv-
ery and set tip with the assistance
of a qualified decorating staff, as
do all of Baer's existing show
rooms "
WINKLEY ARTIFICIAL LIMB GO.
29 N.W. 33rd A.e. Phone 581-1301
A FULL SERVICE CERTIFIED FACILITY
!-'* fLASTIC STOCKING?
BRiCES TRACTION EOUIPMENT
AHCM SUPPORTS CONVALESCENT AIDS
SURGICAL SUPPORTS TRUSSES
WALTER H. MAHNKE, MANAGER
CERTIFIED PROSTHETIST b ORTHOTIST
Prescription* jnd
Appointments Preferred
Ste Us He Ytur
Prosthetic 4 Orthot.c Needs
QUIET
JJL
HAPPY CHANUKAH TO ALL .
and SAFETY for YOUR CAR
- MUFFLERS-
STANDARD or CUSTOMED TO FIT
WHILE-U-WAIT
LIFETIME GUARANTEE (Ordinal PurctijMr)
FREE INSTALLATION
GtVE US A JINGLE ASK FOR MANAGER BOS
524 0417 m SJ2 338I
DICK WILSON &. SONS
THl Oil* SHOT V 110 N HO HYWY FT LAUOENOALC
O
r. s
> i-
a C
c o
r. 5
X m
SAJVRAAXt DECEMBER 15
TemDle Emanu-El Couples Club Chanukah Dance
Fort Lauderdale B'nai B'rith men's fund-raising
MONDAY, DECEMBER 17
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood study group 10 a.m. to noon
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood Chanukah party
Brandeis Women study group
Armon Hadassah board meeting
Northeast Area Men's UJA workers at Inverrary
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood board meeting
Masada B'nai B'rith Men
Temple Sholom Sisterhood general meeting
Fort Lauderdale B'nai B'rith Women general meeting
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19 (1st night of Chanukah)
Golda Meir Hadassah general meeting. Southern Federal Sav-
ings Bank. 1 p.m.
THCRSDAY. DECEMBER 20
Temple Emanu-El Men's Club board meeting 8 p.m.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22
Temple Emanu-El Men's Club dance with Sisterhood
MONDAY. DECEMBER 24
Brandeis Women study group
Temple Beth Israel Men's Club meeting
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26
Ahavah B'nai B'rith general meeting
JWV and Auxiliary 730 board meeting
Coral Ridge CRT board meeting
Port Lauderdale CRT general meeting
THCRSDAY. DEC EMBER 27
Brandeis study group
Blynui. Chai, Sabra Hadassah gioups general meetings
SATURDAY, DKCEMBLR 29 .
Temple Emanu-El cultural program, Jan Pecrce in War Me-
morial Auditorium
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30
Temple Kmanu Kl duplicate bridge 7:80 p.m.
MONDAY. DECEMBER 31
Temple Sholom New Year's Party
Temple Beth Israel New Year*! Party
Coral Springs New Year's Party
'*'
- *
NANCY LAFUENTE, M.D.
Family Physician
wishes to announce the acquisition of
Dr. John Henry Rowland's
Prjclice it 4001 N. Ocssn Blvd.
Ljuderdjlc-B-Th*-S<*
etfecti.s December I, 1973
Phons 776-1412
Hyr kv Appointment

DR. LOUIS A. MAZZELLA
CHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIAN
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING
OF HIS OFFICE FOR
THE PRACTICE OF
CHIROPRACTIC
AT 34S1 N. ANDREWS AVE.
OAKLAND PARK. FT. LAUDERDALE
OFFICE HOURS DAILY
TEL: 566-8559
A HAPPY CHANUKAH TO ALL
UW i
:Cp*PACTlED.SOfl.
CROCKEH-BRADLEY. INC
PRESSURE GROUTINO
SOIL STABILIZATION FOR NEW
CONSTRUCTION-SLAB RAISING
-SEAWALL RESTORATION
4200 Ravenswood Rd. 514-6620
h
'
Of s
coni
'
r
(
free
rerte
bi Lb

ndini
I "
BOgU
erat/v
r
coir 1
horc
tvithoi
i e at
town
II
the st
im


Friday, December 14, 1973 ..*// fh,H,tr Page 11-A
*- *i
*JcwwoMr man
Two Ruths: They Gave of Themselves as Sacrifice for the Land
THE LAST Escape," by Ruth
Kluger, and Peggy Mann
jubleday & Co., S10. 518 pp.)
line story of Ruth Kluger and
|r role in Aliyah Bet, the Il-
ls] immigration which was
of B'riha. "The Last Es-
" has all the elements of a
r-nseful novel with one
Ifference; it is essentially true.
JPeggy Mann, the comely and
llcnted young writer and corn-
ier of th** account, obviously-
fit a great deal of empathy with
ie real heroine. Ruth's exploits
re concerned with the acquisi-
lon of the secret ships which
trought 200.000 illegal immi-
[rants to Palestine during the
ro years prior to the establish-
ment of th.' state
THE LAUNCHING of this
krgeft secret rescue mission of
II times succeeded because the
Inssad membership knew no
fear, were daring and because
tuth p Heated a regal bearing
he knew how to manipu-
late people
Ruth Kluger was born in Rus-
sia in 1914, learned to speak
eight Isnsuages and studied law
at th: University of Vienna.
She then came to Palestine to
be a kibbutznik. She married
and left her kibbutz but con-
tinued to work for the Rlsta-
drut and resided in Tel Aviv.
The first two chapters strike
the note of the book.
For me. the resume of the
Evian Conference on Refugees
(Jewish) and the narration of
the hypocritical comments of
the 32 Christian nations, (in-
cluding the U.S.A.) as to why
they could do nothing to save
the Jews, deserves to be retold
so that all may be reminded
that much of the blood of the
six million stains the hands of
these Christians.
THERE IS a certain amount
of pretentiousness in some of
the personal accounts which is
abetted, we believe, by the
imaginative co-author. The 19
appendices make an invaluable
addition to the book. The last
of these concerns Rumania and

fjen LjalloD
Conference of Small Town Jews
Viclds Battery of Conflicting Data
QOME FIVE ;>er cent of American Jewry between 250.000
and 300.000 Jewsmost of them third generation Americans.
in mall towns and their proportion has b.'en "reatonablv
In recent year;." a conference of 150 representatives of
town Jewish communities wai told recently by a sociologist
The conference attended a three-day meeting, aponaored at
the University of Maryland at College Park by B'nai B'rith, to
IS 'h status and future of Jewish life in such towns. The
nts incl'ided teen-agers drawn from the small town chap-
B'nal B'nth.
THE SOCIOLOGISTS, Dr Jacob Lindentha], of Rutgers I'ni-
Id said that too little was known about Jewish life in
-uch .-. 1 it .1 communities "to jump to easy conclusions or sweep
" raUzations'1 about Jews in such communities.
His warning was dramatized by th" frequently opoosing
inti expressed on the problem- of such Jewries by the
i' e participants. These views ranged from "there is more
per square Jew in the small town than in th- big city"
I torn) predictions that rural Jewries faced ultimate disap-
:iee.
Agreement was expressed thai there was a strong will for
lurvivaL One-third of the participants reported their fe!
lews were "very active" in Jewish affair-, two thirds said
ewhal active" and only one participant said his Jewish towns-
:e "not involved."
IN MANY small towns, the confers nee was told, every Jew-
family responded to fund anneals for Israel in the current
i rhrfa. and it was indicated that much higher proportions
nm Jews supports! United Jewish Appeal emergency
drives and Israel Bond campaigns than did urban Jewa. But the
rees also agreed that pro Israel activity alone was not
to sustain a viable Judaism.
Apart from that area of agreement, the participants ex-
pressed considerable differences One overriding concern was
of "dwindling numbers." But, while one-half of the con-
I their communities were losing p n the others
: either stable or irciva ed COmmun
ilysii of such report* reetri ited to "autonomous com-
- self-contained towns where Jew* both work and
* again-t "bedroom communities" which are satellites of
II [C cities -seemed to Indicate that the growing con
' s were often college towns or those to which a mijor
istry or plant had moved, bringing with it Jewish scientists,
'tis and administrative employees.
CITED AT almost every conference workshop was th-
ai environment for small town Jewish youth, leading to
Ive In! rdatlng and Jewish losses to aasimiiation, with mush
mixi mje nut 0fher conferees said that was a tWO-Way
in which the non-Jewish ipousi more often than not con
Wed to Judaism. One part e. Id that "the converts nay
!'-' the reason our town has a Stable Jewish population."
>mall town Jewries were reported to be surprisingly innova-
tive Conferees were toU about local arrangements for circuit-
nding rabbis and teachers, the busing of children to towns with
1 '" r Sunday School facilities, shared time use of the same syna-
gogue fer traditional and liberal worship services, and the coop-
irative purchase of kosher food from distant cities
Dr. I mdenthal proposed a system of regional cooperation,
cm-),d with intensive research on sma" town .Tewi-h 111*. a>
more meaningful than the conference, which he called "a clinic
uhou'. experts," in which "both patients and doctors were prac
1 < ng a kind of folk medicine" to solve the problems of .-man
t-'wn Jews. .
He said his regionalism approach Invoiced an organized pooi-
f laligifm educational, cultural and social resources to ease
the shortage of facilities and activities needed to keep a Jewisn
Community viable.
will be revelatory to many read-
ers. %
*
"AND PERHAPS The
Story of Ruth Dayan." by Ruth
Dayan and Helga Dudman (Har-
court, Brace, Jovanovich, $8.95
236 pp.) is the account of Moshe
Dayan's first wife as a pioneer,
wife, mother, and fund-raiser for
Israel. This Ruth was born in
1917 and was educated in Lon-
don and Jerusalem. Her co-
author is American-born and
educated and presently works
for the Jerusalem Post.
Ruth Dayan's account is more
'prosaic and less self-adulatory
than that in the first book men-
tioned. Mrs. Dayan is prone to
enumerating insignificant de-
tails. Being the wife of a living
legend and the mother of three
precocious children, Yael and
sons, Ehud and Assaf. she had
to make a place for herself in
order to preserve her identity
and avoid being relegated to
the status of a non-entity. The
book has a few interesting pho-
tographs that enlighten the text.
Little has been spared from
the biographical account of her
life, not even the incident of
her divorce. Neither Ruth. Dayan
nor Kluger, are sabras. Each
gave of herself to "binyan ha-
aretz," the upbuilding of the
land. The stories of the lives of
these two women run the gamut
f the lives of so many other
Israeli women without whom
there might not have been a
State of Israel
f\.ebcrt t^ecial
T
Drugs and the Nightmare Scene
VOW THAT the State of New York, under vigorous
1 prodding by Gov. Rockefeller, has put into op-
eration its new anti-drug law, we seem to have
opened a new chapter on the drug scene.
Apparently the hardest of all drug laws yet
enacted, the New York measure provides mandatory
life sentences for sellers of narcotic drugs. Mi'lons
who favor the law. including friends and relatives
Df innocent bystanders assaulted or even killed by
addicts, heap enthusiastic praise on Mr. Rockefeller.
A sma'ler group, but perhaps just as vocal, cry out
that society's real need anent the drug problem, is
to rehabilitate drug addicts, not jail the.n for life
or even years.
THE CURRENT drug scene runs a long gamut
of drama. When we talk of the problem today, we
no longer concentrate o.i the flower children of
Haight-Ashbory. This doesn't mean that young peo-
ple have all kicked the habit. Pills arc still popped,
and marijuana and hashish continue in vogue on
many campuses', but in the 1970s, preoccupation
with drugs is not clearly as marked as it was in
the 1960s.
cently, unable to post large bail after his indictment
on charges of selling cocaine to police undercover
men.
And oldtimers in Poughkcepsic now recall that
G. Gordon Liddy. convicted pacesetter of the Water-
gate burglars, liked to sniff out drug users when
he was assistant district attorney in the Vassar area.
BUT THESE are side issues. Two new consid-
era'.ons stand out: (1) President Nixon is authority
for the recent statement that the nation has turned
the corner on drug addiction; (2) Armed with the
power to appoint up to 100 new judges to make the
New York anti-drug law effective. Gov. Rockefeller
may either prove to the country that harsh, harsher,
and harshest sentences are the answer or else play
into the hands of those who continue to argue that
education, treatment for addiction, and rehabilita-
tion must not be abandoned in favor or such a stern
crackdown.
When he declared that the federal government
has turned the corner in its war on drugs. President
Nixon pointedly included education on the dangers
One widely publicized figure of days not long of drug use and the provision of better treatment as
gone Abbie Hoffman has been in the Tombs re- essential measures for drying up the problem.
(__,arl ^z/ilpcrt
Peace But Israel Still on Alert
Haifa
1
SRAEL REMAINS on an emergency footing. No
de-ired peace more
ever ae^ireo pnea ardently, dui
bitter experience has taught the Israelis to mistrust
vague promises. At the ceasefire lines and on the
mighty United States leads me to observe: Seldom
have so few owed so much to so many.
Emergency supplies: Since the war began, the
army chaplain's office has had requests for "sup-
from soldiers who had never before beea
Besides prayer books and Psalms, the
plies"
religious.
h.me front vignettes illustrate the mood ana in, chaplajn hM nad ,0 furnUn about 10,000 "talesim"
spirit of these days.
Those who can be trusted: From a
in the Jerusalem
d
Post:: "They sold us tanks for
many millions, and then refused to supplj spare
f0r them when the need are.e. Can you trust
,hem io pay Claim*In th future on insurance pol:ci"s
you now? Mazada Insurance Services Ltd.
, to notify its clients who carcv insurance with
BriUsh earri. rs that, on expiry, these policies will be
,.,..,! with Israeli and'or U.S insurance compa-
rer wor possible on the same terms.
Israel's i ncle Sam: The timely help provided to
little Israel during the fighting by the big and
and 3.000 sets of "tefillin "
Exodus, XII, 31-32: Sadat's immediate program
for the Israelis is drawn from the Bible where, un-
der other circumstances, Pharaoh told the Israelites:
Rise up and get you forth from out of Egypt .
be gone:
I'niqne crime wave: Israel
with
1 J
struck
Practi-
has been
i literal plague of Btomobile thefts,
all the cars are quickly found near or around
army posts. The police know that now, as in the
Six Day War. thf BUtOS Bt horrou id" by soldiers
on short hare, who are in a hurry t, get back to
their units in time.
They Were Just Plain Old Folks
i
They
j thinking about papa ana mama. Tney PAPA AND mama, as I say. were just plain
ii-t plsin people, We are a'-'-s redi-_; old-fashioned Jews. Papa came to America with
bout people at the top or at the bottom. Nobody mania, two children and a set of the Talmud 10
an\ thing about the people in the middle, but big volumes of the Gemara, which followed him like
great lottery. The people
the
truth is that life is a
nl t^e top are not always, or most of the Ome, the
The race is net to the swift nor the battle to
he strong" as the Bible aays, bul "tima and chance
,......,eth to all." When we aay we are in the
middle of a thing, we mean the most important
p.rt Plain middling people are very important.
Anyway, right now, a.lcr you read in the papers
about the top. the middle would appear to be re-
freshing.
his children wherever he went. They came in one
of the earlier waves of Jewish immigration from
Russia There were the first pogroms and the later
pogroms.
Now idaya, Jews (as in Israel) may be killed in
battles, but then killing was all one-sided. The en-
emy was not hurt only the Jews. Golda Meir, as
a child, came in one of the earlier waves after a
pogrom. Papa and mama came during the adminis-
tration of Grover Cleveland. Funny thing. During
those days, there was a national political scandal too.


Paae 12-A
jvifiijw jsi**r+
Of North Biowarrf
Friday, December 14, 1973'
P
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Deity 9:90 la 5 90 Monday and Friday Night Til 9-
1 to 4



The Making of the Chamika Festival: You are There

By DAVID SCHWARTZ
iv'E ARE pleased to present
one of the most sensational
f:ids of modern archaeologists,
the accounts of the story of the
ibean struggle as told at the
time in the Judean News and Ob-
at the very time of the
nrence of the even's. The
tolling the story were
found in a sealed bottle in an
old synagogue, unearthed at
Modin. While most of the print
has faded, except sonic advertise-
ment for babies" food, th
count of the Chanuka rtorj
niraculously well preserved, it
lat the paper v..,
: essed by the Syria::
ring into the und >rground,
were drcoiitod
isly.
*
Gloom in Judaea
... i ovei the
si ad) barshening of the d
of Antiochus, seeking to
As (he Judea News Reports II
the Jewish religion. The hopes of
time, tne Syrii a
e more .
. .- 'ii and (
the | : are now
the responsible Ju i
lie; conti nd thai Antic
inning true to th
tators. As one of
it: 'The gods ol
leth not an
no God bu
ever} thing."
in; -' I Vnti
.1 Asia, : :
I '. i'ii- h m to k with
upon the little lano
.1 At present, v
: more immersed in :
the conquest of Egypt. U is
I ired thai furth* r successes
:.n even less disp< sed u
conciliate the Jew i.
*
Dictator Suffers Setback
JERUS vl.FU-The long series
of conquests \ itiochus, mat
him the dictator of Asia
Minor, was given a check when
the Syrian despol was told by
Rome it "pack up" and go home.
According to the story which
has every carmak of authentic-
ity, as Antiochus was standing
on the battlefield in Egypt con
templal n : tJi >. prospect of anoth r
triumph, the conquest of
Egypt, he was visit* l by pop.
Laenas bearing an urgent mes-
sage from the Roman Senate.
The substance was that Rome
desired Antiochus to abandon his
i tian campaign and return to
Syria.
Completely taken by surprise
and shock. Antiochus faltered, "I
would like a little time to con-
sider." he said.
For answer. PopUas Laenas
drew a circle about himself in
the sand. "B < I sip out of
this circle," he told Antiochus,
'"I must have an answi
lHe answ< i in thi affirmative
- was given in the specified time.
* *
Antiochus Vesta Spite
JERl 5A1 EM The setback
Antioi iius in Egypt,
v hen 01 Ii i 'i b) Rome to d<
.it! (I t ie S) rian ruler to
ion on the Judae-
ai -. in) of whom, ii is said,
were athetii with Rome.
: p Syria
Continued on Page '.'>
iiil,.

....
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5 |
Struggles for Religious Freedom
Continue Even in Our Own Time
1
By PHILIP RUBIN
'T'HE CHANUKA week, which Jews all over the
world are now celebrating for eight days by
the lighting of candles, by special prayers and by
the giving of gifts, once again serves to remind us
that Jews were the first nation known to history
who put up a fight for religious freedom and
won.
Chanuka celebrates the revolt led by Judas
Maccabeus and his four brothers in the year 163
B C E., more than 2.000 years ago. against the
tyrannical Greek-Syrian king, Antiochus Epiph-
anes. who was then ruling Palestine and wanted
to impose Greek pagan rites upon the Jews and
destroy their own monotheistic religion. One of
Continued on Page 13-B



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Friday. December 14, 1973
ktHgtl fhrk/hm *" North Broward
Page 3-B
In What Order Should Candles be Lit?
By AARON R1MON
rpHE SAGES of the Talmud, we are told, de-
bated the question of the Chanuka candles.
Beth Shamai. the more conservative school,
held to the view that on the first nlgjg of Chan-
uka. all eight candles should be lit progessively
reduced by one on each succeeding night. This
was in accord with the doctrine of the Beth Sha-
mai, which stated that Israel must always look
back to the old as the time of greatest splendor.
Beth Hillel. however, held to the contrary
view. On the first night of Chanuka one candle
should be lit and on each succeeding night an-
other candle added, as the house of Hillel be-
lieved that Israel must always look to the future
js the time of its greatest glory.
THE ADOPTED rule is in accordance with
the liberal school of Hillel; that the past however
treat that past was, is to be eclipsed in the future.
The doctrine of Hillel is radical. Israel has wit-
nessed many great miracles. The Bible and the
prayer book recite the stories of these miracles
of the past. Yet Hillel, the great man among the
rabbis of 2.000 years ago, went so far as to sug-
gest that they were to be outdone in the future.
And indeed the course of history seems to
Miagest that man is ever witnessing developments,
one more miraculous than the other. We talk of
laser beams of light performing surgery, of reach-
ing the moon and what not. We are told that
these are not miracles but the works of science
buns that more than a matter or terminology?
Eliyahu ha Navi, the mystic of old, said he
could in several steVs traverse the whole space of
the earth. Now science contemplates such reli.
gious visions as possibilities. Either we must con-
clude that science has an element of the religious,
or religion an element of science.
HOW SHALL we explain the miracle of the
Maccabean victory? Was it due to science or re-
ligion? Here were a small number of Jews facing
the dictator of Asia Minor, equipped with the
most expert war instruments of his time.
The Jews seemed about to be wiped out. But
in a little obscure town some 20 miles from Jeru-
salem, there was a devoted Jew. Mattathias, who
raised the banner of resistance. He but lit a
sr/all candle and the enemy was done for. The
weak made strong and the strong made weak.
One little candle may light another, observed
the rabbis of old.
We have witnessed in our own day a miracle
equaling that of the glorious Maccabean victory.
Some might even say that in accordance with the
doctrine of Hillel, that it even transcends it. A
whole host of nations this time, abetted by the
powerful Kremlin state, sought the destruction of
Israel. But God has not ceased to work miracles.
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EDDYS
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1110 N.E. 4th Avc.
Fort Lauderdale 33304
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What's in a name0 Well, if the
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savin? a lot! Case in point:
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v. itii gol Ion Maa '11 Coi
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'. i
i h muka i thi
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(1IAMKAH POTATO I.ATKES
2 eggs i beaten)
3 cups grated potatoes 'drained*
4 tt>. mated onion
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Marga me
I tsp sal)
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,,-. >M i pepper
xture by
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pplesauce, de
igb for i
Ooubi recife" for latke
^9 s*_J~lappu \^*hannltah to all .
w,y
BRUNA
Screen Enclosures
631 N.L 45th Street
Fort Lauderdale 33308
we
send
you
GREETINGS
DURING THIS HAPPY
FESTIVAL SEASON
JUNGLE Ql EEA
BAHIA MAR YACHT BASIN
ROUTE A1A
FORT LAUDERDALE BEACH 33314



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Mtftt
-
Friday, December 14, 1973
+Jcnhtrkrkfer Of North Broward
Page 5-B
An Israeli soldier gives water to a thirsty Syrian.
have believed that a man could
exist for seven days without .sl.-cp
or food. There was simply no
time to eat or sleep. I saw the
enemy through the sights of our
eannon. When any of their tanks
caught fire, I felt glad; I knew
that we had scored a bull '
' No. we had never established
personal contacts with the enemy
One time we halted beside a
group of Syrian prisoners I'm a
university graduate in Oriental
studies and have a (airly good
knowledge of Arabic. I asked
them: Why are you fighting."
They replied: They robbed our
brethren of their land.' Someone
also said something about the
Palestinians and the rrfugees.
No, I don't hate them. But 1
knew that no amount of explana-
tion could bridge the gap between
us.
THEY LOOKED so forlorn
Some of them were wounded.
Two medical orderlies and a doc-
tor treated them. I heard over
intt
in
Hanuka
Greetings
SHAW MATTRESS CO.
720 N. Fiogler Drive
Fort Lcuderdale 33302
ronn

^y^t CAFE DON JUAN
460 N.W. 40 Avenue
Plantation 33313
the radio that a helicopter had
been summoned to take them to
hospital. For a moment I toyed
with the idea of asking one of
them: If we had been wounded,
would vou have treated us like
JJi*'B,.t 4-fold.hack. '
"I fought in the Six-Day War
Then the war had a deep senti-
mental and traumatic significance
for me. When we liberated Gilgal
or Givon or when we passed
through the Valley of Dotan, I
heard a flutter of the wings of
history. Don't get me wrong, this
is not a religious sermon. I didn't
feel that we conquered territory:
I felt a reunion with my own
people. This time its different.
The Syrian territory we con-
quered is just empty, rocky ter-
rain with signs here and there of
unimaginable penury of the Syr-
ian peasants.
"What troubles me, you ask?
Evervthing. The war. The ter-
rible price we are paying. The
fact that we were caught unpre
pared, the lack of sufficient warn-
ing. I have a wife and two daugh-
ters at home. They are in need
of support. This worries me no
little. The 'regulars' run to the
hospitals to their comrades; wc,
to our homes, to our families.
"We nad an argument here
with someone who said we didn't
do enough for peace, that when-
ever they stretched out their hand
in peace, we rejected it. Such
talk sets my blood boiling."
HIS BEARED face, suddenly
grew somber, His fists were
clenched. "Here our boys gave
everything, whatever they h"l 1
most dear, and here is one who
accuses us. When 1 heard Ifeir
Wilner speak in the Knesset. I
felt like emptying my gun into
him. I would like to invite all
these 'wisecracks' into my tank
which was hit twice by enemy
shells, and to this day has stains
of my comrades' blood on its
walls. This sight, maybe, would
make them a little more balanced.
"Was I afraid? Of course I
was. You sit in a tank, and all of
a sudden four MIG's swoop down
upon you. What did I do? I fired.
No. I didn't hit them, but they
missed, too. The fear of death
was not so terrible as the
thoughts about the wife, the chil-
dren, the parents.
"I contacted my home for the
first time two days ago. When
my wife heard my voice over the
telephone, she began to sob hys-
terically. 1 couldn't stop. her. All
the time that brave woman of
mine had kept control of herself.
This time I couldn't calm her
down. Suddenly 1 found myself
weeping together with her. Why?
What for? I don't know. There
were enough reasons to sob. The
Continued on Page 12-B
,-Dun1? d^tik
CHftNHJCAH
'^:.?^V
RINKER MATERIALS INC
2000 GRIFFIN ROAD
FORT LAUDERDALE 33315


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Gianukah
Greetings
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MTRlTUn
COTTAGE



Friday, December 14, 1973
+>A.ntsZ ficrtdHan of North Broward
Page 7-B
Vab states and other developing
nations.
HE BEGAN a new diplomatic
and economic strategy for Argen-
tina following the March 11 elec-
tion victory of Hector Campora
and other Ptroniat candidates in
the first national election held in
that country in nearly 10 years.
Peron may use the Arab govern-
ments as a key vehicle for redeem-
ing his coalition's election cam-
paign promise to revive Argentina's
deteriorating economy, which has
been beset by a loss of investment
capital due to rampant inflation
I76 per cent in the last 12 months)
and political instability.
The Arab states, with a popula-
tion in excels of 100 million, are a
l>otential export market for prod-
ucts of Argentina's farms and fac-
tories. Moreover, the oil-producing
countries are also a potential
source of desperately needed in-
vestment capital.
Peron and then Vice President-
Vicente Solano Lima met with
I Arab ambassadors in his man
sum April announce "Opera
tion Arab World." The ainb.ivs.i-
dors from Algeria, Iraq. Kuwait
Lebanon, Libya. Saudi Arabia,
Syria and Tunisia reaffirmed
"the friendshio of the Arab work*
for Argentina" and invited Peron
' i visit their countries,
THE SECOND phase of "Opera
Arab World" began Apr, -.">
ubeii Peron dispatched Dr. Faysal
K Moufouri, an expert in nolitica
rrrr and the Consul of Kuwait
in Buenos Aires, on a six-week
rial mission to Arab capitals,
Noufouri, an Argentine citizen
emigrated from Syria 35 years
was instructed to promote di-
rect trade between Argentina and
thi Arab countries, to procure in-
vestment capital, organize Argen-
tine-Arab companies for the pro-
,m and marketing of Argen-
Itim petroleum, and establish per-
I manent routes to the Arab world
I for \erolineas Argentinas and for
IKI.MA. the Argentine national
I -hipping and air lines.
According to news reports. Nou-
I fouri will BUM promote Syrian
las a bridge" betwe ;n South Amer-
Lebaneae emigration to Argentina
ind the Arab world.
\ lufouri was ouoted as saying,
' v. e are going to strengthen the
Itra litional links of blood and
friendship which exist between
I countries and South America
li general, and with Argentina in
cular, in order to complete
formation of the Third World'
I onclude mutual collaboration
If defense against common en
I
WHILE ARGENTINA seeks to
; eotiata trade deals with the
Arabs in the next few years. Bra
f has already consummated large
Ik ile agreements. Brazil'-, govern
nent-owned oil firm, Petrobras,
knd its international subsidiary
Br.i-petro. recently signed an agree
kem with the Egyptian General
Fctroleum Corporation which gives
Braspctro rights to pro-,pect for
1:1 in a promising area of 12.500
Iquare kilometers. The Brazilians
will provide about S10 million in
financing and. if they find oil. will
et 50 per cent of the profits This
I- the first time that Egypt has
liade a 50-50 arrangement with
Bny oil company.
I Braspetro has also completed ne-
gotiations with Sonatrach, the Al-
gerian oil company, making it the
iUerian company's sales agent in
leiith America. In addition, the
Brazilians have completed agree-
ments with the Iraq. National Oi'
Bompanv. With these deals con
mled and other large scale oi)
agreements with other nations still
ring negotiated. Brazil is emerg
W :is an important factor in the
International oi' market.
I A Brazilian-F.gyptian trade agree
Bent signed in Cairo last January
B Brazilian Foreign Minister
Bario Gibson Barboza was an-
unced in a joint statement with
fcptian Foreign Minister Mo
mmed Hassan el-Zayyat. The
two officials expressed satisfaction
at the signing of the agreement to
crease the volume of trade be
tween the two countries. Unex
pectedly, their statements also re
ferred to the Arab-Israeli conflict
Citing the present situation in
the Middle East as a threat to
the Middle East, the Brazilian for-
eign minister called for implemen
tation of UN Resolution 242,
which lays down the framework
of principles for peace in the Mid
die East. Because both Israel and
Arab states have accepted this res-
olution, with important differ-
ences as to its interpretation, Bar-
boza's statement also lent itself
to varied interpretation. Some Bra-
zilian newspapers said he called
for an endorsement of the Arab
position. The Feb. 7 edition of
"Opiniao," which often reflects a
pro Arab point of view, said that
Brazil has. without saying it openly.
Come close to the position accepted
by the Arabs and refused by the
Israelis ." The paper suggested
that Barboza's statement was care-
fully planned move linked to Bra-
zil's interest in Arab oil and the
vast Arab market.
SEVERAL RECENT announce
Dients Indicate that other energetic
- are being taken to tap that
Vrab market. Monetary authorities
in Brazil recently approved a plan
to link Brazilian capital with Com-
pagnie Arabe et Internationale
d'Investissement which has heal
quarters in Luxembourg; Banco do
i
.
"With these deals
concluded and other
large-scale oil agree-
ments with other na-
tions still being ne-
gotiated, Brazil is
emerging as an im-
portant international
oil market."
^r w
LAWRENCE DRUG
624 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, 33312
Brasil will invest $900,000.
The first Brazilian trading com-
pany to operate in the Middle East,
I'niao-Triad, was recently orga-
nized by the Triad group, reputedly
the biggest financial and industrial
conglomerate in the Middle East,
and two Bra7ilian groups Uniao
and Sadina.
These developments make Is-
rael's position in the wake of the
Yom Kippur war more precarious
than aver.
MORTON M. ROSENTHAl Is director of
of the Anti-Defamation League's Latin
American Affairs D?oartment,
ttfc* ttt<
^tt ,%
RIE'S
505 N. State Road 7
Plantation 33313
roiin
KENNETH
of Plantation
Formerly
CHEZ RENEE BEAUTY SALON
5219 W. Broward Boulevard
Plantation 33314
^y*r ^Jlappu {^/nuiiikalt to all
'PPH
Schramm
Galleries
1507 E. Las Olas Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale 33301


Page 8-B
Jmist fkrkMor
of North Browerd
Friday. Decembwr 14, 1973
Ma By ROBERT SEGAL
WITH THE Yom Kippur war.
so costly in blood and defen-
sive resources, weighing on one
hearts in this Chanukah season,
we can profit by recalling how-
much we owe to the Maccabean
uprising with which the Festival
of Lights is associated.
In the more than 21 centuries
since Judah Maccabee and his
valiant brothers stood up to the
overwhelming forces of Antiochus
Epiphanes. might has often tri-
umphed over right, smaller na-
tions have been crushed without
merc>. and millions of innocent
peopie have felt the tyrant's sting
and lash unto death.
But for Jew s immemorially and
fortunately. th successful Mac-
cabean f:-:ht for freedom has al-
ways lighted the skies of hope
even when defeat seemed inevi-
table
THE OCTOBER war :n Um
Middle Bui ira Israel assail?d
in the north by Syria and in the
southwest by Egypt Roll back
the pages of time and you find
the Jews in the days of the Mac-
cabees caught between the Ham-
mer biows of Syria under the
dynasty of the Seleucids in the
north and Egypt under the Ptol-
emies in the southwest.
Between these brackets of his-
tory, many wars have been fought
for territory, for booty, for trade;
yet few save those into which the
Jews of antiquity and the Jews
of today have been drawn are
marked by battle cries in the
name of liberty.
Some among us who note sim-
ilarities between the battles of
the Maccabees and the tank and
Phantom let battles of present-
da] lantUi wiD call attention to
the need, and the right, to de-
fend a people with arms on holy
days
For just as the Arabs' uncon-
:.ble attack upon the 1
Line drawing bv Ismar David, which illustrates a new
English translation of the Book of Psalms under the aus-
pices of the Jewish Publication Society of America From
the times of David, the spirit of the Jewish people was ex-
pressed in song. Even when Adolf Hitler killed six million of
them. Jews went to their deaths chanting "Aid Maanin."' the
title of a dramatic poem by Qie Wiesel with music by Darius
Milhaud which accompanies the new Psalms translation.
^At ^Jlappu ^^hamihah to all
*ppy
TREILLAGE
3337 N.E. 33rd Street
Fort Lauderdale 33308
^^r *^/lappu Kmt^manumah to all .
rpy
REASONS SHOE SALON
702 E. Las (Mas Boulevard
Ft. Lauderdale 33301
on Yom Kippur obliged those as
sailed to leave the synagogue and
go to the front on that holiest
day of the year to did the patri-
arch of the Maccabees Mat-
tathias find it necessary to go
into the fray on the Sabbath.
"IF ANY one be zealous for the
laws of his country-. and for the
worship of God. let him follow
me." cned the fearless Matta
thus. And later when Apelles.
the Syrian king's general, at-
tempted to pressure the Jews in-
to submission on the Sabbath.
Mattathias told his trusting fol-
lowers that they must fight on
the Sabbath rather than yield on
that solemn day to those who
threatened their right to wor-
ship as they desired.
' I'nless you go into battle on
the Sabbath. Mattathias remind-
ed those who put their trust in
him, you become your own en
rving the law while
your adversaries still assault you
It may b? that wo have i mc
to look upon Chanukah as a fes-
e celebrated largely by
I
to di importance
- for our (OU anJ
..
But
tested in the l'n ted
:ht to
Maccao ta
that tells
their ir reasons reaching

liberty.
FOR THE Maccabees -
- the first martyrs
for freedom of conscience in his-
tory Antiochus called upon the.ii
to desert the alters they had
buiit to God; but he had wider
of persecution in
His Syrian nationalism was tj be
their nationalism: his trust in
arms was to be their depository
of hope: his word was to be their
law.
By not submittinc. by darin?
death rather than yield, the Jews
of that turbulent era raised an
ensign inspiring to us all in these
days of electronic snooping and
undemocratic commands to con-
form. When we oppose uncalled-
for censorship today, we can do
it in the SDint of the Maccab?v
When we object to illegal vtrp-
tiDoine. we follow a Maccabtin
principle. And when we demand
OH valued freedoms of assembly,
press, and association, as well
as freedom of religion, we honpr
the Maccabees and celebr.iv
Chanukah as truly grateful rr.en
and women
nDnn
^*r ^.slappif {~~hanitf:ah to all .
CHICKEN
UNLIMITED
8271-Sunset Strip, University Plaza
Sunrise, Florida 33313
I
CHANUKAH
GREETINGS
FROM
APOLLO MASONRY INC
2332 N.W. 30 COURT
OAKLAND PARK 33311


Friday. December 14. 1973
A
'.Jb'f> fhrHitr of North Browird
*
i
MM
i: ... t

*S /

^
Mr. Louis J. Echarte
and entire office staff of
ECHARTE DEVELOPMENT CORP.
extend best wishes to all
Jewish families residing in
Broward County, for a
ami a :
Page 9-B

M
_.


Page 10-B
+ kMlstrkridnnr of North Broward
Friday. December 14, 1972
Tradition Behind the Chanuka Menorah
/-HANUKA MENOROT are
^probably the best known and
most widely used kind of cere
monial objects Lamps in shapes
similar to the seven branched
Temple menorah. which Judah
Maccabee had placed in the Tem-
ple for the one stolen by the
Greeks, are found in innumer-
able Jewish households. Most
Jews believe that the present gen-
eral shape of the menorah has
been traditional since the days of
antiquity, but this is not the case.
Because of the Talmudic pro-
scription which forbade the fash-
ioning of any of the objects which
were part of the Temple. Chan-
uka lamps in the periods follow-
ing the destruction of th second
Temple had quite a different
j-hape.
DURING ROMAN and Byzan
tine period* simple one-wick cla>
oil lamps served as Chanuka
lamps. During the Middle Ages,
it became customary to fashion
a metal container for all light-
and to hang thi< metal bench typ<-
lamp with a triangular back ami
trefoil at its apex on the 1 -f door-
post of the house. This form of
Chanuka lam? maintained
with variations for nnny centur
i. Only from the 17th century
on (iui it become a custom io fash-
ion large Chanuka lamps in
snap.- ibling Um *
branched Tempi- menorah. This
type of Chanuka menorah. of
course, had two additional light
arms, and the Hebrev Union Col
lege Museum in Cincinnati has a
rich collection of such menorot.
From mid-18th century Poland
comes a rare and unusual lamp
of this type, a Chanuka lamp
whicn once graced the home of
a wealthy Jew in Lemberg. Gali-
cia. and is now produly displayed
in the Hebrew Union College
Museum
Maxim Freeze Dried
For Coffee Mayvins
Your holidav cuests are bound
to include some very fussy people
who insist they can't drink coffee
unless its freshly perked
Now there's an anv.ver to tbJl
problem one which truly helps
the extrabusy hostess. It's quite
simple too ... just keep plenty of
Pree-Drkd Maxim on hand, and
strve this delicious colfee right
through the holiday
Know hat They'll never guess
is wasn't fresh-brcved in a perco
later!
r ;n i i~ Maxim is actually perco-
lated coffee that > fa>t frozen the
instant it's full) ;)>-rk<-c! the
fresh coffee flavor being captured
at its very peak.
These chunks of freeze-dried cof-
fee are "activated'' the instant jroa
pour boiling water over them It
all happens right ;n your cup! You
don't even have to use a full tea
spoon, as a little Maxim truly
goes far
Kosher Maxim Freeze-Dried Cof
fee. Add it on your holiday shop
ping list, won't you?
'Igloo'-Type Buildings
Withstand Earthquake
Haim Hefetz. the Israeli archi-
tect who invented the -igloo-style"
concrete building, has received
warm congratulations from Shiraz.
Iran, where several hundred dwel-
lings built according to his model
successfully withstood a moderate-
ly powerful earthquake (5.7 on
the Richter scale) last month.
Hefetz said that he had also re-
ceived inquiries about his igloos
from builders in earthquake prone
areas in Nicaraqua and Guatemala.
la Israel, about 800 of the struc-
tures have been built, including
100 which serve as homes.
hunter, kneeling behind the tree,
with gun aimed at the bear.
A hi I alive with many varied
creatures hares, dogs, squir-
rels, and worms rests on two
joining silver bowls supported
by eight lion bodies. Out of thi
whimiscal hill rises a sturdy oak
tree who** boughs and branches
carry leaf shaped holders for the
eight Chanuka candles The trunk
of the tree carries at its very top
the servant light, which, accord-
ing to ancient usage, must occupy
a more elevated place than the
other lights. In the foliage itself
a climbing boy is hidden. Most
charming and delightful is the
bear climbns the trunk of the
tree and anxiously peering at the
honey pot with the buzzing bee
in front, completely unaware that
it is a trap set by the waiting
THE EAST European peasant
motif of the bear and the honey
must have given the children us
ing this Chanuka lamp a great
deal of delight, for this menorah
is a truly remarkable combination
of the holy and the profane: the
pietistic and the secular. In a
sense, it embodies the very es
sence of the Jews historic experi-
ence his ability to laugh in the
context of solemnity.
Many other interesting objects
of Jewish ceremonial art are to
be found at the Hebrew Union
College Museum. Leon J. Ober-
maver. of Philadelphia, is chair-
man of the Hebrew Union Col-
lege Museum Committee, and Dr
Joseph Gutmann, of the faculty
of the College Institute, serves as
curator of the museum.
^/f DAWKS REST41 RAW
2871 N. FEDERAL HIGHWAY
FORT LAUDERDALE 33306
^y-r \J~Lappu C-_^/ii7;jifA*u/i to all .
AMAR HARDWARE
809-11 W. Sunrise Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, 33311
^f ^JliippU K-~rh*1IIIIKilh to 47// .
vpy
ART CENTER WORKSHOP
1401 N. Federal Highway
Fort Lauderdale 33304
TOM DeMAY
Contractor
1621 E. River Drive
Margate 33063
. *-
tttkill /
FAIRCHILD
Funeral Home
299 N. Federal Highway
Fart Lauderdale 33301
c/l Uiappu C^LimtLi/, to .ill
CHRISTINE
CANDLES
806 L Las Olas Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale 33301
-i


1| n II 14, 1973
+JenlsHnbriJton of North Broward
Kage I IB
4 f~ .
+ 31
1,'.
r -r
\ ammo themselves to tk.ru 'j Af"
,0 fAVi MM I aw xnti customs '. i *. fl \
I
tn
to
of iht" coo th*\ knew \s.\s Qii.ht
w
* LftJ'.4./-.
untOAinto Ano RAGQ60 as they wcue
these peaceful, pniesUy men
enQAoeO the foe and toiumpheo
ap.0 ce^AineCi theiR mortis AOAin
e First Mighty Challenge to Judaism
RABBI SAMUEL UMEN
E YEAR 168 B.C.E. is one of
M most memorable in Jewish
ry. The fate of Judaism d'
ed on the decision made in
til hand of Jaws in thai year
|no lime previously did Juda-
rmfront a force deliberately
lit to deitrov it. H when it
. Hellenism, brought into the
by the niece's rs of con
b>r Alexander the Great.
m were never afraid of new
rexardh -- >f their aw
I which
m and i *: h they bwo
>
hi .1 tran fu n i
6 ref "
- own.
LsT. I!
I irbed by
L ,.,. of th< Ir out
I but was rather Imital
?.detail T ,f ""'
led to the i
U and th pradual i n
|of i new hut not Impi
,.f behavior.
jnd. while Hellenism v
loft 11 Usplace J idaism bj
|n-n appeal and peneti
l(.r. because of Antiochus
J to hasten the or
hizatlon, it was declared a
r,. by lecree, the ol
nf th" land Hence. Ju '
I In two i
was fash
I | tli" other which
from the outside.
Hhe one h ind, Jew >b
Lai numbers weakened the
(of then- fathers bj adoptin
[well House... A
litional Choice
re are many beautiful tradi
a family enjoys at this time
which has been faithfully
id for over half a century
fish homes is the serving of
ill House Coffee That's be-
nt's "good to the last drop"
(hasn't varied over the years'
_ family and guests know you
^hen your choice is delicious
ell House Coffee. At meals,
between, everyone enjoys
cheering holday cup of MM
(ouse Coffee.
Be sure you have plenty
j, when planning for the holi
laxwell House Coffee in both
; and regular, is certified
the year "round.
Hellenism as their mode of life.
and on the other hand, the con-
queror imposed this culture by
force on the entire citizenry.
EVEN THOUGH it must be said
In all fairness that Hellenism had
much to offer in enriching Juda-
ism bj its phibsophv. drama, poe-
try, architecture, and sports, it at
the same time lacked much to
make it completely desirable.
Observing the amphitheater
where human beings were done
to death for the amusement of
bloodthirsty mobs, the Jew con-
cluded, as Walter Pater did cen-
( fc^
Gr FIE E TIIST Cr S
SCHROTH JEWELERS
2773 E. Atlantic Boulevard
Pompano 33062
(Gliamifeali ?9G5
KRAFT
Landscape Nursery
1315 N.E. 12th Avenue
Fort Lauderdale 33304
turies later, "what was needed
was ihe heart that would make
it impossible to witness all this;
and the future would be with the
forces that could beget a heart
like that."
Jewish culture developed such
a heart, and it is this heart that
made itself felt through the he-
roic decision of the Hasmonean
family and a small group of
staunch supporters of the Torah.
to free Israel from its Hellenistic
enslavement.
War to the end was declared
on Hellenism. The battle lasted
three years. ludea regained her
soul. Judaism triumphed.
Through the ages, the Hasmon-
ean victory is commemorated in
the home and the synagogue for
eight days as a festival of light
and gladness, a festival which
does not especially pay homage
to leaders of the battle, although
their heroic feats of courage are
not forjrotten, but rather one
which stresses the value of light
and freedom of the soul.
LIKE OUR ancestors under the
impact of Hellenism. Jews today
find themselves living in two cul-
tures, their own and that of their
environment. They have a choice
to make.
They can either turn to the
majority culture for their pattern
of behavior and thereby lose their
identity, individuality and self-
respect, or they can absorb the
finest elements of the majority
culture for the enhancement of
their own spiritual treasures, and
thus remain true to themselves.
The Chanuka lights speak
softly and confidently the prom-
ise of victory to the brave, free,
independent souls, who under test
and trial, choose to remain true
to themselves, and thereby prove
to the world that life can be rich
and meaningful only when it
stands for something that is even
more precious than life itself
^Af ^Jiappxf \m-*hctnuman /o all .
HIB
Office Supplies
6305 Miramar Patkway
Mirimar 33024
^/4 KjXappyt \__manukak to all .
*PP9
Davis & Craven Inc.
1699 E. Oakland Park
Oakland Park 33308



ti
o
1;
it
a
a
1.
ti
F
(
v
i
c
i
I
1
Page 12-B
+ kni Friday, December 14, 1973
1J'
Sanka Brand Decaffeinatea OtfWe
Modern Maccabees: Again They Fight For7n Y..r i^e Hoday pa.tie*
.__ ,L. ...__ -J Ik. ficrKlina >lu.. lnmntc that Call SDOIl
Continued from Page 5 B
pent up tension had been let
loose in both of us ail at once.
"WHAT NEXT? 1 don't know.
I now see everything with differ-
ent eyes. How wil! 1 return to
routine? That's a disturbing prob-
lem. But the fact that I have a
wife and two sweet daughters to
maintain that will no doubt
help.
i know that in a year's time,
on Yom Kippur. when I again
stand in the synagogue and re-
cite the 'Ashamnu' confession.
I'll be a different mm It had as-
sumed a new and deep signifi-
cance in my lif. and. I think,
also in the life of our people.''

I'M A driver. I have sat at
the steering-wheel for over 20
years. Do you know how manv
tanks I transferred in my semi
trailer? Look, I'm no longer a
child. Tflfs i? ffly" fourth war. Db
you see those Egyptians encircled
there on the east bank of the
canal? Most likely they are the
sons of those who had been en-
circled in the Falujja pocket.'
I'm not sure you know what I'm
talking about.
Today, we are entrenched here
on the west bank of the canal.
But do you know what it is to
load a tank and to race down line
mad so as to halt their advance?
Tiie young tankists mere chil-
dren sitting beside you saying:
Grandpa, by your life, a little
more speed, else we won't man-
age to fight .' These chaps did
manage and how.
And afterwards the rafts
They hitched 80 tons of cast iron
to your 'horse,' and you know
Hcartv Holitlav Side Dishes
Add Flavor to Yonitov Meals
Enliven potato and vegetable ed two-quart baking dish. Bake in
dishessrith the tang of Mo.ts Ap- pn heated 375 oven 3o40 jmnute*
Ble Sauce un,il set and top 1S g0,dcn-
Either or both of these recipes at ^ Jerves six to eight.
mm help make the most of this APPLE GLAZED CARROTS
year's rjiday roast. They're also 1 lb. carrots (peeled and diced)
ideal for dressing up milchig
meals So easv and thrifty too!
APPLE SAUCE POTATO PI FF
1 jar (15 oz.) Motts Ap; le
Sauce
2'_ cups (instant) mashed potatoes
i cup melted pane margarine
] tsp. salt
]4 tsp. each pepper, nutmeg.
paprika
4 eHS iseparated)
Combine apple sauce with mash
ed potatoes. Add margarine and
seasonings. Blend in esg yolks.
Beat egg whites until .-tiff; fol I in-
to mixture Pile lightly into grea
Check Your Stock
Of Krispy Crackers
Tarty time is coming round
which means time to check vnur
k of unsalted crackers. (Win
knows how many have van
the Kit1- nosh >d them s
' out of the box? I
You know how in'
Sunshine Crackers are. for serving
with lox. herring, tidbits and cl
ped herring not to mention your
own acclaimed homemade gehak/c
leber.
Famous for crispness. and their
under-salted flavor. Sunshine Kris-
py Crackers are ideal with many
delicious toppings. Smart host
like to team them up with th"ir
cheese service, because Sunshine
Krispies so nicely enhance the
tray.
It's nice to note also that these
crackers are double-wrapped
so they stay fresh and crispy
even after you've opened up a box
Be sure to pick up several b v-
"of Sunshine Krispy Crackers n v.
time you shop.
't cup parve margarine
1 small onion (chopped)
1 jar (IS 01.) Mott's Apple Sauce
2 tbs sugar
U tsp. salt
, '-p. cinnamon

arrotr in boilint. suited
water until tender. Drain. Heat
margarine and cook onion for fi\>'
it > Add carrot*, apple MUC?
and seasonings. Cook uncovered.
tccaskmally until sauce h
thickened and carrots arc glazed.
Serves six to eigV.
that-the outcome of the fighting
depends on you. Yeu've got to
establish a bridgehead. You lis-
ten to the purr of the motor, and
for a moment you think it's not
responding properly. But you pay
no attention and press upon the
gas. All the time shells keep on
"dripping" upon you. Beside you
there, the young chaps from the
"engineering corps" are pale, and
silent. One shell bursts upon an
armored vehicle not 20 meters
away. But you dare not halt.
Forward." shouts a young MP.
and tense officers standing be-
side him wave you on with their
hands.
"MY DEAR young fellow. I
saw a lot happening in this war.
More than once the front and
back lines changed positions. All
the time I kept on commuting
backward and forward, brin
tanks, supplies and ammunition.
"And when you reach the home
front you melt. On the highway
from Rafa to Beersheba the kib-
butzim and the moshavim opened
food stalls and you're actually
forced into eating. Take it from
me, I'm not a sentimentalist. I
don't look it. But when a young
woman approaches you. a girl
with two black locks and dreamy
eyes says: Haver, you look tired
and dirty. My husband is about
your size; he's as stout as you
are. Now he's in the Golan. Will
you allow DM to bring you a
change of clothing0'
"That little one had the better
of me. I turned away so as not
to show my tears.
"I hardlv ever reach home No.
It's 'i"t easy. There are three
missing boys in my kibbutz. Their
parents are my neighbors We
brought the children up together.
I may be courageous at the steer
heel but no. not at home,
beide my friends"
EARUS SMOKE SHOP
Lauderhill Mall
Fort Lauderdale 33313
Brim's Ideal For
Your Percolator
When you w;mt to serve \
poliday company fine, frah-po
in perke'd | Brim
perfect choi e.
Since Brim is 'd. you
fan serve it in the late hours, con-
fident that you won't be lot
with anyone's sleep.
And now. Brim offers a
especially adapted to electric per-
colators, so you're assured your
toffee will have a just right con-
sistency.
: What's more. Brim is made from
Choice Colombian coffee beans
klavor your guests- will rave about'
Put Brim on YOUR holiday shop
ping list. And use freeze-dried Brim
decaffeinated coffee the year
'round.
GRE
BRICHARD DESIGNS
2330 N.W. 30th Court
Fort Louderdalo 33311
At this festive time^ of year,
many parties seem 'to go- tm till
the wee hours a tribute, of
course, to both host and hostess.
And that's when the well-organ-
lied balaboosta is happy for her
stock of Sanka. the d-eaffeinated
coffee most people welcome when
they don't want to interfere with a
good night's rest
Sanka is also the ideal coffee to
offer family or guests with the
hearty delicatessen sandwiches and
cold cut phtters you'll be serving
at "midnight supper" not to
mention your roast at dinner
.Fact is. you don't have to add
cream to Sanka to make it taste
good!)
You see. when they remove the
caffcin from Sanka. a lot of the
bitter elements that can spoil the
taste of coffee are also removed.
Whether vou brew regular Sanka
coffee in the pot, or use Instant or
Freeze-Dried coffee for impromp-
tu entertaining, be sure you have
plenty on hand right through the
holiday.

Publicity Chairmen Asked
To Limit Number in Picture
PubMcity chairmen are re
quested to limit the number of
persons included in photographs
iilumM'-d to The Jewish Florid
ian for publication. Inclusion of
more than six persons in a sin-
gle picture does not permit
-atisfactory reproduction.
-..
ETINGS
CORAL RIDGE
INSURANCE AGENCY
2441 N.E. 26th Terrace
Fort Lauderdale 33305
TEMPLE EMAM-EL
3245 W. Oakland Park Boulevard.
Fort Lauderdale 33311
I
GlianuMi
SUNRISE ART GALLERY
2396 E. Sunrise Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale 33304



^"BBBBI
December 14. 1973
+Jmisii nOFtcMam of North Broward
Page 13-B
ru^Ie Never lets Up Even in Our Day
Continued from Page 1-B
meant for accomplishing this which Antiochus
pted was to order some of his soldiers sta-
ined in Jerusalem, to defile, the Jewish, Temple
re, since the Jerusalem Temple was the very
nter of Jewish religious in the country.
AFTER A short but bitter struggle, the Mac-
..us won the fight against hordes of Anti-
|us, cleaned the Temple and relighted there
randies, which by a miracle, so tradition has
burned for eight days instead of the one day
j.> would normally burn. That is why we call
tnuka the Festival of Lights.
Th" lory of the Maccabean revolt is told in
!'. ink of Maccabees, one of the Apocryphal
Ik- wlik-h did not get into the authorized Bible
' me it was decided which of the writings
cal, legalist c, prophetic, poetic v
accumulating in the Jewish reli
over many centuries, should be canon-
. art of the Jewish Sacred Scriptures, the
Bible, which Christians later called the
Testament
[pparentljr the Book of the Maccabees was
considered too recent, too new, to be included in
the Hebrew Bible. But it is a curious fact that the
Roman Catholic Church does include the Book of
the Maccabees and other Apocryphal writings in
its Bible '
Though the Jews did not take in the Book of
the Maccabees in their Bible, they did decide to
commemorate the Maccabean revolt and the re-
dedication of the Jerusalem by celebrating an
eight day semi holiday every year, beginning with
the 25th day of the Hebrew month of Kialev.
STRl'GGI.E FOR religious freedom, for the
right to worship according to the dictates of ones
conscience, haa been going on for the past 2.000
year- at various times in various parts of the
wo,hi The early Christians were persecuted by
th- pagan authorities of the Ronun Empire be-
cause they wouldn't regard the Roman Emper >r
a- a sort of nod and wouldn't bow down to his
image.
In later ages Orthodox Christians themselves
began persecuting all who dissented from the
officially endorsed Christian creed, and that in-
cluded not only Jews and Moslems but aLo
Continued on Page 14-B
May the Lights
You kindle during the
Chanukah Festival
Shed the light of
Freedom and Liberty
Throughout the world
A Joyous Chanukah
to all ourfriends"
ROBERT
CASTEL
3116 Andrews Avenue
Fort Louder dale 33316

INGS
HOE CREME LABS, INC.
4190 N.E. 5th Avenue
Fort Lauderdale 333C8
We Wish All
Jewish Families In
Broward County a
Happy Chanuka and a
Healthy New Year.
THE STAINED GLASS PUB
5216 N. FEDERAL HIGHWAY
FORT LAUDERDALE 33308
Phone 772-4495
Good Food Cocktails
MICHELOB & DRAFT BEER
Open JMon. thru Sat. 11:30 AM. to 2 AM.



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TONY ROMA'S P ACE
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K**ANO BEACH 33062


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Friday. December 14, 1973
In this 20th century the struggle for religious
liberty has suffered some severe reversals, par-
ticularly in Communist Russia, where three mil-
lion Jews are the main sufferers from the fanati-
,i,m of a secular religion the religion of Com-
munism which is the official creed and per-
I tctitM the older theistic religions. Ju>ism. which
in the Soviet Union remains entire*/ Orthodox,
is the greatest victim of this persecution because
the Communist regime is afraid of Judaism's in-
ternational connections and so it tries to pulverize
.luri.-iism by denying rabbis the right to be pres-
ent at international Jewish conferences and by
even forbidding the formation of a national fed-
eration of synagogues, an intercommunication of
Jewish congregations within Russia itself. Why
it forbids the Jews to form such a national federa-
tion and to communicate with their brethren
abroad while allowing these things to such Chris-
tian sects as the Greek Orthodox, the Baptists and
the Armenians, remains a puzzle to those of us
who are livine in free democracies.
Rt SSI AN JEWS cannot even formally protest
gainst such treatment. Only an indirect protest,
such as the presence of thousands of Jewish
vounc men singing and dancing on Simchat Torah
in front of one or two Moscow synagogues as a
symbol of resentment of the treatment of the Jew-
ish religion there, is permitted by the authorises
* knisHfrricfifrr ** North Broward
Page 15 B
And so the fight for the equal treatment of
Judaism with the other religions in the USSR
must mainly be carried on from abroad, must be
conducted by the Jews of the United States and
the other free democracies.
Thus we see that the struggle for religious
freedom on the part of Jews and others in various
pails of the world has not been completely won.
In Fascist Spain and in several Latin Amer-
ican countries, Protestants are not permitted by
the authorities to carry on missionary activities
in these overwhelmingly Catholic lands. Even
here in the United States, where religious tolera-
tion is fairly widespread, some Christian sects
like the Old Amish and Jehovah's Witnesses occa-
sionally complain of religious discrimination
against them by governmental authorities and the
public generally.
WE CAN only hope for the arrival of a time
in the near future when both government and
the public will grant full rights to all religious
Croups who observe the elementary decencies,
the ethical principles which are common to all
mankind, to worship God as they please and to
live the kind of life which they believe that God
has ordained for them.
That is what the Maccabees fought for, and
what we celebrate on Chanuka.
Florida Rabbi On Nat'l Commission
NEW YORK. N.K.Rabbi Ar-
thur I. Baseman of Temple B'nai
Israel, Clearwater. has been
named as a member of the na-
tional Commission on Synagogue.
.Administration of American Re-
form Judaism in the United States
and Canada.
The Commission, a joint-body
of the Central Conference of
American Rabbis and the Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions, formulates various programs
essential for the professional op-
eration of a synagogue, special-
izing in the preparation of sur-
veys covering various financial
functional apd business facets of
a house of worship.
Rabbi Baseman will serve as a
representative of the CCAR. rab-
binic association of more than
1,100 Reform Jewish spiritual lead-
ers in the United States and Can-
ada.
ja/ GETTO UPHOLSTERY
6242 Pembroke Road
rWramar 33023
MARYLAYERATT
Registered Real Estate Broker
3100 E. Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale 33308
THE STYLE SETTER
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6491 Sunset Strip
Fort Lauderdale 33313
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Known among our people as the
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o bring you a unique kind of cof
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Share Yuban with your yom tOV
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. A Happy And
Pleasant
Hi
DAGMAR
FASHIONS
720 E. Us Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale 33301
JOHNNIE LOWERY
DRAPERIES
801 NW 7th Avenue
Fort Lauderdale 33311



Pjtoftf fhrrfiir <* Nerffc Broward
Friday, December 11 19)3

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Believing is building new lives.
GIVE TO TH ISRAEL MRGNCY FUND
Jewish Federation Of North Broward
JEWISH FEDERATION OF NORTH BROWARD, 3905 N. Andrews Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33309/Phone: (305) 565-4869
CoonlOutiorw to tttt Israel Emergency Fund insure the continuation of greet humanitarian programs Tha Fund makes posucta
care and assistance lor hundred* of thousands of .mrmgrem* we helped bring to lsrae4. mcludmg lan* of thousand* of Soviet Jaws,
All Contributions to th* Unrtad Jawish Appeal are tax deductible.
I
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