The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00048

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


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Full Text


wJewtsti Flondliaim
of AOBU II MtKOWARO
Volume 2 Number 20
July 27, 1973
Price 20 cents

:
'MUST BE A MEMBER OF A MINORITY
Charge FIU With 'Reverse'
Discrimination in Hiring
The Florida Regional Office
of the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith has charged
Florida International Univer-
sity with engaging in discrimi-
natory employment practices
through the giving of illegal
preferential treatment in hiring
to persons o{ "minority group
membership."
THE LEAGUE has asked the
U.S. Department of Health, Edu-
cation and Welfare to investi-
gate and insure the university's
compliance with the require-
ments of federal civil rights
laws.
The ADL noted its action
followed a year-long effort
to work cooperatively with
FIU to discourage them from
engaging in unlawful "re-
verse" discrimination. The
League said, however, that
university officials have on
this matter demonstrated i
"repeated failure to under-
stand the basic concepts of
equal employment opportu-
nity as required by federal
civil rights law and related
guidelines. J
In a letter to William Thomas,
regional director of HEW's Of-
fice of Civil Rights, the ADL
declared the university had un-
lawfully restricted applicants
for the position of director of
Minority and Women's Concerns
on the basis of race and nation-
ality, by requiring that the per-
son hired "must be a member of
a minority group."
COMMENTING on the matter
Continued on Page 5
Goldmann Not Optimistic About
Favorable Nazi Claims Settlement
Fulbright
'Meddling'
Stand Flayed
WASHINGTON' (JTA) Sen. Henry If. Jackson (D-Wash.) re-
plied sharply July 11 to a blistering attack by his Arkansas fellow
Democrat, Sen. J. William Fulbright, who contended in a speech here
July 11 that the Jackson Amendment aimed at a renewal of the cold
war.
FULBRIGHT, chairman of the
Senate Foreign Relations Commit-
tee, told a meeting of the Amer-
ican Bankers Association that the
Jackson Amendment, which would
withhold most-favored nation trade
status from the Soviet Union un-
less the latter permitted free emi-
gration for its Jewish and other
citizens, amounted to interference
in Russia's internal affairs and
sought "the redress of only one of
many injustices of the Soviet sys-
GENEVA (JTA) Dr. Nahum Goldmann said that he was not
Very optimistic" over the chances of a favorable settlement of claims
by Nazi victims in three areas where such claims are still outstanding.
He described as "rather heavy going" his current negotiations
with the West German government to extend reparations payments to
Jewish victims of Nazism from Eastern Europe who filed their claims
after the 1965 deadline on payments He said there also "was not a great
deal of optimism" over the chances
M. HAHUm GOLDMASN
aoavy lnf
King of Oil
Conservative
On Women
By NEIL PARTRIDGE
Jewish Chronicle F>tur- Brad
An interview granted recently
by King Feisa! to a group of Brit-
ish journalists was abruptly ter-
minated at his behest after the
first question. That question was
about the emancipation of women
in Saudi Arabia There can be no
more conservative and. in the re-
ligious sense, more fundamental
ist ruler in the world today.
Yet, when in 1962 Feisal was
entrusted by the Royal Family
with effective power, he did so
as a reforming Crown Prince and
Premier.
THE VOICE of Mecca Radio's
first woman announcer was heard
in 1963 and Feisal was reported
as saying then: "My friends, you'd
better get used to women's voices
on radio because you'll be seeing
their faces on TV soon."
A woman TV announcer has
CanUnned en Page 2
vincial governments, which, he
said, displayed less good will than
the federal government in imple-
menting existing claims and which
cause delays and heartaches. Dr.
Goldmann revealed that he had
talks with Austrian Premier Bruno
Kreisky about three weeks ago,
There was not a great deal of op-
Continued on Page 3
MXER LOSES BOUT
of compensation from the Austrian
government and that he did not i
hold out much hope of compensa-
tion from the East German regime |
for Nazi victims living outside its j
borders.
Dr. Goldmann spoke at the |
board of directors meeting of the
Conference on Jewish Claims
Against Germany which opened
here. Dr. Goldmann was reelected
president of the conference.
He noted that since the "Schluss-
Kesetz." the final law governing
compensation and indemnification
was passed in West Germany set-
ting a 1965 deadline for claims.
"Naa victims have been arriving
from the Soviet Union and other
Eastern European countries" and
they have valid claims."
But "this 'Schlussgesetz' is in
their way This is what I am nego-
tiating with the Germans about. It
is rather heavy going for a num-
ber of reasons. It is difficult to see
how the negotiations will eventu-1
ally conclude, but while I am no* rae) sports Federation, in an alter-
very optimistic, I would not give ; cation over a bout lost by an Amer-
ican heavyweight on July 11.
Chaim Wein. chairman of ths I
No-
tem."
Jackson, appearing on an ABC
television interview, called Ful-
bright's presentation "sheer non-
sense." He declared that the pur-
pose of his amendment which has
77 sponsors in the U.S. Senate,
! 'is just to bring about a tiny bit
i of freedom for Jew and gentile"
in the USSR. He charged that
Fulbright, along with Soviet
Communist Party Secretary
Leonid I. Brezhnev, is "an ad-
vocate of one-way deals with
Russiawe give and they take."
Jackson said, "I want to see
genuine cooperation, not fine-
sounding words. Genuine coopera-
tion must be based on easing the
tensions of the cold war by permit-
ting free movement of people and
Continued on Page 2
SIN. fULBMGHT
running interference
U.S. Medic Punches
Maecabiah Referee
TEL AVIV(JTA)The Mac-, vich. one of the three doctors ac- j
cabiah organizing committee is de
manding the suspension of Dr. Max.
Novich, a physician to the Amer-
ican boxing team, for punching
Shmuel Lalkin. secretary of the Is-
up hope for some
Dr. Goldmann said.
arrangement,"
He said part of the difficulty-
was with the West German pro-committee, insisted that Dr
companying the U.S. boxers, be
banned from further activities
pending a hearing by the Maeca-
biah Court ot Honor.
The incident occurred after
llaim Zilbershmidt. an Israeli
boxer, twice floored Peter Brod-
sky, 25, of Nassau County, N.Y.
Continued on Page 6
Waldheim
Will Visit
Mid East
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
No dates have been set yet for
Secretary General Kurt Waldheim's
visit to the Middle East or for re-
sumption of the Security Council's
review and general debate on the
Mideast which was adjourned a
month ago for the Nixon Brezhnev
summit talks.
WALDHEIM announced through
a UN spokesman Friday that he
had been invited by the Egyptian
government to visit the region and
that the Israeli and Jordanian gov-
ernments were also prepared to
receive him.
A spokesman said here that
there was also a possibility of
a visit to lebanon by the secre-
tary general. But he could not
say when the secretary general
Continued on Page 7

EGYPT CHIMES IN WITH SAME TALE
i
wi-
ry
p-
Algerian Aide Says Peace 'Possible9
e
y
i
N
I
I
PARIS (JTA) Algerian
Foreign Minister Abdelaziz Bou-
teflika. declared here July 11
that direct negotiations between
Israel and the Palestinians were
"possible."
WHEN ASKED how he envis-
aged a settlement of the conflict,
he said he had no "miraculous
solution" but added: "Only evac-
uation of the occupied territories
and the recognition of the Pales-
tinians' national rights can solve
the problem."
Bouteflika's visit to France
was the first by an Algerian
foreign minister since Algeria
became independent 11 years
ago. Bonteflika said a Mideast
solution "does not mean throw-
ing people into the sea and it
does not justify continuing to
push the Palestinians into the
sands of the desert."
He did not make it clear, how-
ever, whether he was suggesting
Continued on Page



tax-
Friday. Wj 2*7. ;973r
Jackson Lashes Out
At Fulbrighf s Stand
Old-Fash ioned A bout Ladies
MM
As i re r*&Mm caadartag
upaifi far ha faaV
< tfce PMuni.,
His OT.ljl-.- -o
the "?r 4
-

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-
H-* penoaal bfc kulni
sapic at
-; Fewai h*-
i aaadfal f wth u-
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beat of hu to* Par mm
he km be*n aiaae .-
-b* is au4 la -
bwn a treat saorcr af -
'.* Him
^%%iiiuiH*f> Put l\S. In Top !pot
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Friday, July 27, 1973
+J(ntsf>FkrklK&r Of North Broward
Page 3
Where Ritual Slaughter is Banned
By GLORIA DEUTSCH
Jf\M-h ("hrrtiirle rVnturr Svixlirate
Periodically, attempts are made
I to introduce anti-shoohita legisla-
tion in England. Whether moti-
vated by an over-zealous love of
animals or a less-than-virtuous
dislike of Jews is not clear. What
is clear is that, were they to suc-
ceed, it would strike a grave
blow at the fundamental rights of
Jewry.
In Switzerland there has been
no shechita since 1893. In that
year the Animal Protection So-
ciety succeeded, after several at-
tempts, in having shechita banned
hy public referendum. 'Shechita-
Verbof became a part of the
Constitution.
It was the third anti-religious
measure to become so. In 1848
Jesuits were banned from Swit-
zerland, and in 1872 the build-
ing or restoration of monaster-
ies were forbidden. These two
discriminatory measures were
taken out of the Constitution
by public vote May 20, this
year.
So the ban on shechita is the
only remaining infringement of
the freedom of religious minori-
ties It is also now the only fac-
tor which prevents Switzerland
from becoming a member of the
Shechita has been banned in Switzerland since
1893. But in a country where 60 per cent of
Jews are marrying out of the faith,, where rrea.t
can be imported more cheaply from neighbor-
ing countries than home bred beef, and the fear
that too much agitation will arouse anti-Sem-
itism, few are willing to make a fuss.
European Human Rights Commis-
sion.
THE SWISS government is now
anxious, apparently for purely
selfish reasons, to remove 'She-
chita-Verbot' from the Constitu-
tion and a referendum will be
held later this year. It will al-
most certainly be replaced by a
federal Protection of Animals
law requiring stunning before
slaughter, so the Jewish commu-
nity will be no better off.
Opinion is divided whether
it is easier to fight a federal
law, or an article of the Con-
stitution. The more militant
members of the community
prefer to see the ban on she-
chita remain in the Constitu-
tion where at least it is an em-
barrassment to the government;
others see its removal into fed-
eral law as a step in the right
direction.
All are hampered in their at-
tempts to show the public the
justice of their cause by several
factors.
First, by the apathy of a
Jewish community where the
staggering figure of 60 per cent
are marrying out.
Secondly, by the Society for
the Protection of Animals, a pow-
erful lobby prepared to exhibit
grisly and often inaccurate
slaughterhouse pictures on TV.
THERE IS a tacit understand-
ing that so long as the Jews do
not counterattack to show their \
side of the picture the animal-!
lovers will leave untouched the
question of poultry-shechita, at
present allowed.
iapir Says Tax Funds Not Wasted
JERUSALEM (JTA) Fi-
nance Minister Pinhas Sapir
lashed out at Gahal chief Mena-
hem Beigin in the Knesset Fi-
nance Committee on July 9 for
his allegations that state corpora-
tions had wasted IL 2 billion of
the taxpayer's money.
Sapir said 41 of the 51 state
I corporations which conducted
[ commercial transactions ended
I the Last fiscal year with a com-
bined total profit of IL 205 mil-
lion.
The other 19 firms lost IL
19 million, he said. Sapir said
shortcomings could be found in
state corporations and there
was always room for improve-
ment, but by and large they
were satisfactory. He warned
private baildlng contractors
that unless they kept their com-
mitment to cut down construc-
tion by some 14 per cent this
year the government would
consider gazetting orders to
compel them to do so.
He added that if disaster hit
the building industry again, as
it did in 1965, the government
would not step in to save it as it
did at that time. Bank of Israel
Governor Moshe Zanbar told the
Knesset Economic Committee he i
convinced the Cabinet to allow I
raising of bank interest even j
during the 90-day price freeze.
This was necessary, he said,
because credit in Israel was too
cheap and it encouraged estab-
lishment of enterprises which
lack economic justification, Zan-
bar also supported cost of living
increases to be paid in July.
"Although it is an inflationary
measure," he said, "the workers
should not suffer for the recent
yrlee hike."
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They have made it clear that
if too much noise is made they
will turn their attention to hav-
ing that banned, too.
i* Thirdly there is the fear,
among the wealthy, long-estab-
lished Swiss Jews that too much
agitation will stir up anti-Sem-
itism.
Lastly, there are the prac-
tical considerations which, para-
doxically, make Swiss Jews better
off with the status quo than if
shechita were allowed. Meat im-
port licenses, normally hard to
obtain, are readily granted to
Jews.
They are thus able to buy Com-
mon Market meat at a cheaper
rate than Swiss-produced meat.
However, a small number of
Swiss Jews will continue to fight
for the basic human rights of be-
ing able to practice their religion
fully in the country of which they
are citizens.
Dr. Goldman Low
Key on Claims Issue
Continued from Page 1
timism but the efforts are continu-
ing," he said.
The Claims Conference board
of directors adopted a resolution
asking the West German govern-
ment to create a fund under ex-
isting laws to provide a measure
of compensation for claimants
who filed after the Dec. 31, 1965,
deadline and to improve the ad-
ministration of the present rep-
aration laws.
Another resolution called on the
East German government to pro-
vide a fair measure of compensa-
tion and relief and rehabilitation
for Nazi victims and to enter into
negotiations toward that end.
Dr. Goldmann disclosed that the
West German government has paid
out nearly eight times more in res-
titution and indemnification than
had been anticipated when the
reparations agreement was signed
in Luxemburg in 1952.
FACT:
rx
70.000 new immigrant
are expected "to oirrtvc
'^n Isv-ael ih 1972-
Jewish Agency immigrant hoosing
Costs have increased -frgrn
i 198 370. COO
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NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN
GROUP TOURS 26 ITINERARIES-OVER 30 COUNTRIES
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Rhea D. Nathan 9421449 North Broward Section
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Fcoe4
+JmiafkrkMar? OrNeeVauerd
Friday. July 27, 1973
frJenisF FieriJian
k HAM MX *
AI-VEE-
T- B
l-ra
^^r""*sxurji iBjuatfogw
Electronic Dilemma Includes
What Events Go First on TV
ALSOT
s*. tkt JWi* Wufcfy.
Vokw 2
27 TAMUZ 5*T3
Number 20
What Is The'Right Side?
The iimii by fcmtptt Rook Jr.. the noted crrA jb-
ertarics. that )ews are swmcihg porSficutTy towui the
~gh- MB* em Ml ze trm
The response by Hynaan Sochb-mcer at the Ansericcn
"*w-_sh Ccrr:riee thrt P.truh .s tvto" .- or mcv not be
ere rwjn 3ing potiBccIly right or
urnely ts remmm lei ox renter ns Frankhh
Semao Bwtoseveh -^5*c be un inJeresairg sociological traeetiea.
3w ::-:.; ?--: w:ls z.zz^-z w^~n B*1 DDtfext
:: z -KZZZ--Z tnat >w$ ure nsw hugely on ae wrooc
z- : c r:-z* rrril CfBjkwl ss-*s :: the dry zan I -
- am nerescre be expected re reap trie wi3c wind.
-_e Bccathjicer = re; umrtrn ot Rcuh
to assure ^e M because '=*- .-.rre ged fhefc
r:--" :" cllegicnces mey e trrt.SrcntJ.- MBM MM>
ser-te- than otfc-?rs _-. njakllii' r_mr.m perscr.nl leonl
mn pclrtrai support c: r.v-_ r.-nis strcrrie.

Damaging Division Of Ranks
m either cose both men ccree mar is at fee left end
oc the spechmm Mat Jews nrust rerncia, nc we +za serious
issue wfi that.
e pas* 2! years ot the riTil rights srucale
ftodicatod mem cud wcuten mom both the liberal acd rcn-
serv -e rmks a* Me noTaoc have ccntrJnned subeaaewaafly
-- r.. BflBflafccns je- be rrrriei ecum crporrnnrry
wzhnu: record x zone. .-ftLdcc or creed.
That sauggie that dedicat-on to the principle. Mat
this most nobie roncept or our ioscesac
-r oeioaga neither fce nehl nor to the left, hut
WASHIXGTC'N If ye !
t kse w*ut km* coew to
Tiirr tke paMfid Mirni of
tke Bntaa BiwJiwriec Corp re^
IW BBC eae Mke e^r
ru t*e Jtfclliw. It tfcee
y that the bear of the
woJd rear* the White Hooje and ]
ijefca Deaa m voeid appear be-
| Mm the Seaate Waterjate i^esti-
' saaK base. So whir* to stow the
-_k mr,' ieteate look as
FortaaatetT the Seaate iiiiit-. *"
toa chaara >u aU-aapertaat sched- HEBE. HOWEVEB. the Presi
..c so the BBC was let off the 'eat is great y hampered in two
we*. The fact rea^iai that all waps.
rts ef excuses arc besa* offered ,
iuii^sss^'s: SSfyw.w
jregwiag piece of acascase Tel
Soviet military preparations along
the Chinese bolder and elsewhere
leave no room for rational doubt
that some members of the Soviet
leadership favor the military gam-
ble.
AIsop
:.e s.z- ;:
S lhlllMBJIB<7 tO
-Inr polMM
issue.
teat otuy tnose
zre en Ml BBBwJB-
FnfcrigW's Latest Threat
S^- 1 FofisSgal D-Aiic rs rrocn our point
'-'' na Ml :.;- MM d Mi wMMMlMwMM
MM we htrr aerer los- ha roreer
^* Morfcad by c siaguioriy coid anfcpathy icr e
; Sc-k -e e rennrm _r rie^
rfia rnm rrtaat aast weec that .e Senate is meddling
*--'- "_"? r: thf MM DMM MfeM rt shows
a iowar oagree of aMhaatoazB tor the Ntxon Brezhner rnde
ogrwanjaMi Mi he Mou-d _te t: see i; the iciest example
-' :rr.~-.-5 zr.r.z ::/: Isrre! MBfcner/i
C-ns rre tkfll ?res:cen: BwBBfl pwJ h_5 wtv wrth
the "rnne cm-eeraents the Seaate MBl not make too manv
jmng wnres. B.- T-^ :nt 5 l..-.rm; ct tne Presidents
~-z-r. t: put an end -j the tcld -*-nr -jr.m the hrsei-Arah
unpesse ^ the crudest kind of notirirs.
MB even Brezhnaw tngaaaaid that America's ieehngs
about Soviet anh Sermtism and Soviet one-Israel posra-
inga couid dfiaannrW him Man striving towo:'d c 0 S-Soviet
:-r--r. Ir. tnrt BrexhawB MBB Ml :: :j OMf hi MCMM
MM Russia was well trwnre z'. these tee'.mgs nnd w-._ng
to reshape its Jewish pobtr.es to appease therm
Brezhnev may be lying about that, but he was not
lyhag about hat dean* tor MM. Why. them, does Fat-
bright have to wave the kmd at three: that the Erermin -
sett eo oavamBy avoided?
mwsidiiess of the r-:--=-
isit snewj that these pr.cr-
M BMMBwBB
TO BEcrs aB\ the rreat aa-
""ma flu thai 1 apcaaa wa- 1
.vrJisptnac Mtat*"*- *^ ** .,
rortd wc hav- tfj heca
tare the end of World Wat
->e to aa effective cad as the re-
!:t of a Soviet prevcativc attack
ea Chjaa'
If the Soviets attack China, the .
erid its' < of course end
4m Dot ead 1a the Ice A2es
A ateh as attack takes place oar
werid ool be aiaiost as aapleasaat-
ht altered as it would be bjr
ham The
a triBMf oae.
aseas. sach as the
traaaarir preaiotian of Marsha!
Vaare. urechko H the rolm.
rid rXiUahaio. the chaace of a
MOM attack oa CVaa is aew be
iac rated rather higher, too. The
cis are variously cited by the
few people ia the U S roverameat
whe bath knew the facts and are
iIMf to face theas Bat. aO agree
-ater-.a! chaace.
FOB OBYKH'S reasons, neither
'the President nor B.-erhnev eamM
OMOaawl this aaspokea item aa
t their urmli Yet the fact 11 laiai
that the Seek* threat ta Chaa
hat made passihk the whale
piex de^eiapavent of Presidear
as Sine-Satiet diplemacj
atau of that dipfamacy ara
first, to deter Mf Sc.et attack
and. second, to baild a new st
tare of world power relationships
oased oc a Soviet-Amencar-
aese great power traiafJe. Sjeh a
boob* stractare must ausamat-
icaCy emerar d there hj no Soviet
attack.
Burial Rate Significant?
There must be aorae aasaBaCMwOa in figures released
by the JerawcJem Burial Societ. which reveals that Mt
n-jmbar of tuiwinhi have dioyyad by necrry half since
a doctors' strike began hi haael INalkiiiuilf whom the
uaJsioaa of the Tel Aviv Burial Society show a ^;W
drop wham the doctors want on strike 20 years ago.
i Leonid Brezhnev, the
ilipMi u> are -ore
-
As
tit.:
A.: at km transacoons with the
Western peenri sarkedrr ia-
ftodiag his vaat ta Mi Uai'ed
Statescaa be reaa :n two ao:te
ereat wjps. rhey can he aimed
at genome limf Urm deteate. Or
they can e tranaauiniag the Umted States and
the West m preparataaa for the
attack oa China.
BBEZH5CF.V tS ia fact hem*
pasted twe ways. The Soviet
maaaaaj ^s Maflj mmMal
stage of emu ill ailing drastk
actjoa of aae aeei kind or an-
other Oae kind of paanhle ecooa
era teekaotogy. caaaui and goods.
resulUHg from a genuine deteate.
The other kind ef pnanhle action
is ta gamhat aa t tplI itiea of So-
viet military saperianty. betiaaiaf
ateag the Chinese border ami eise-
with aa attack oa China-
Soviet military preparations
where leave ao roam for 1 iliasil
doubt that same members of the
favor the mihtarv
not a majer.tj at leaot m yet,
Thus Preiidhat Nisae's short-term
amp an is to da everything he caa
to strengthen the Kremtir's op-
paneats of the nattary gamble by
^^j a
attractive as pos- r.'Je* "*** the United R
IT IS an ae inspiring ;
sihi.it> that Sen Jackson
Yea may cite the char.ce : a
-e Soviet attack on China as
low as 10 percent. No sane am
aware of the facts can pn thj
chance ioer at present You nap
further say that the Jackson
amendment will onl> rai-e >
chance to 15 percent. Ali the .
:3.-.ng the chance of aom>'
like the 'nd of the world fr
percent to 15 percent s a lamark-
abl> grave step for any M
lab
a.ready half-
:e Mrrar
\i a r.ez.jtiitor. he is also impeded
by the amend.-nent of Sen !!
'd. Ja nington. hu
tub- I to free Scnict Jews
passport restrictions Yet the
lackson .Id deny
he .c kind of trade rela-
tioasbips the>- need to do n..
' As....
*
Max Lerner
Sees It
- acted to the Supr>
mr shock, the local r
ecatars "nost peo: tJ-scc ao
0^ purely or impurely literary grour.
t Ban between the erotic and the pnrnoeranhic I ami
but I a-
diff- the dreary stuff If we can't distinguish betwevr.
them. e ought to throve in the towel as cntics.
There are commentators ho tell u they hate smat and are
aickened b] it but who also attack the Supreme Court lor tr
to d n between the tolerahk ar. i rh> intolerable. If i
th*fcl Theater decwon^
the final del traphj to local prawecetors
>ane*. I *h.-ild be shocke.: too Bat that is not bow I read tht
They are vagoeb phrased and can he interpreted -
several w.ts But far from okMbm the doer against a rater
aad nitthhl pbm. I dice Warren Burger is seek ng it
zad ha. $-jck h.< neck oat to d
w
opaaiaaa break new ^reaad oa two ceaat< T
eve awaj 1966 Mt MasaachuaetU de*:-
Pj, Mt majority) that -'
v-deemin; social ra
:nd pornoftraf hie The new and m->re sensible teat u
hMU hare 'ao senous val..
1 allow each state to frame Ma an
the aew ceert B The A^ker imt
t as no nustrust local c pj rd MB the 1r%<-
Ihe par) ha* in mind> *ocW K- "the average per-
*PP- \^~
,, ?* -d hooks, ptavs
""* r: ^d palpablv offensive- ia
t*mr that extern
crane* a kind of U a n ^ut mueh hke tbt ^^ ^
aaahal in some state* But in addition to
re- and -ofltasive'' eat -.here is a third puide!
whether Mt v>rk ha, some -serious value.-' whether Lter
tr social
Here 1 rat Md thh is where the misreading* and
ftonons have come m The average persaa 1
praneat and offensive in h: own view ia the context of
aanity. and will van wr.h the state and locality Bat whe-
ha> some serious literary or s, .alue doasa t \a-
with states and ImaMtoa, p.-rhaps not even with nation*
tryer* af fact that is, the jjry cant haw the last w
here The last critical and evaluative word betaugs with
critics and scientists. The last judicial word belongs w,th
Supreme Court
1 fl Ruraer for not haxin* made this
tinction between the first two guidelines and the third c
eeangh. True be warns of the ultimate power o.' ape*:
^"It,_t0 ataiuet *n dei*ndent review of roastrtuUona: da
T*** wecessarv He is saying here that if the state and federal
tower eeu/ta get the gaidelines wronc the appeals court Bill
overrule them.
1hk* a Mr heart of protection be offers against a
Catinaed p*^ $


Friday. July 27, 1973
+Jewish fkx-Mian <* North Steward
Page 5
'REVERSE DISCRIMINATION' CHARGED HERE
FIU Turns Trick Around
Continued from Page 1-j
of reverse discrimination.
George Bernstein, chairman of
ADL's Discriminations Commit-
tee, said "the League has con-
sistently fought discrimination
in employment, education, hous-
ing and other areas. However,
it is equally discriminatory to
limit a particular job to blacks
or whites, minority or majority
group persons."
He pointed out "in order to
protect all persons against dis-
crimination, civil rights laws
and HEW guidelines require
hiring the best qualified person,
after taking affirmative action
to insure both minority and ma-
jority group people are within
the pool of available applicants
that's equal employment op-
portunity on the basis of indi-
vidual merit."
Bernstein also said I'll 's
policy in this ease directly
contradicts assurances the
ADL received over a year
ago from its president, Dr.
Charles Perry, who asserted
the university would not en-
gage in discriminatory quo-
ta* on the basis of race, na-
tionality or sex and stated,
"We have not 'required' any
nit (in the university) to
hire a minority for any par-
ticular position."
Bernstein further stated that
a copy of the ADL complaint to
HEW is being forwarded to
Robert Mautz, chancellor of the
State University System, since
the case clearly contravenes pol-
icies established by the chan-
cellor in opposition to such dis-
criminatory employment prac-
tices.
IN ITS letter to HEW, the
League noted Mrs. Francena
Thomas has been hired as di-
rector of the division of Minor
ity and Women's Concerns. This
was done, said the ADL, despite
its previous efforts to point out
to the university the unlawful
and discriminatory procedure
involved in its employment pol-
icy The letter to HEW also ex-
pressed concern over some com-
ments made by Mrs. Thomas
about preferential employment
policies and the possibility of
future violations of federal law
by the university.
The Anti-Defamation League's
statement, however, emphasized
that Mrs. Thomas appears to be
qualified for the job for which
she was hired, and its complaint
to HEW's Office of Civil Rights
reflects its primary concern
with the discriminatory proce-
dure under which she was em-
ployed."
Arthur Teitelbaum, ADL's
Florida regional director, said
the FIU case is not the first
such instance of reverse dis-
crimination by a Florida col-
lege and stated "our inquiries
resulted in appropriate charges
being filed in the other cases.
"We are deeply committed to
equal opportunity for all and
shall steadfastly oppose any em-
ployment policy which requires
preferential treatment of one
person or group over another
person or group on account of
race, creed, ethnic origin or sex.
Such policies are destructive of
equal opportunity and violate
both federal law and the public
policy of the State of Florida."
K(B Keeps American Betar Youth
Group Under House Arrest 2 Days
TEL AVIV fJTA) Five
\merican Jewish students who
laim they were kept under vir-
ual house arrest for two days dur
ng a visit to Russia last week, ac-
used the FBI of trying to block
:heir trip to the USSR and said
the KGB (Soviet secret police)
cooperated with the FBI."
The five students are members
>f the militant Betar youth group
>f the Zionists-Revisionists move-
ment and are believed to be sym-
oathizers of the Jewish Defense
League. Their trip to Russia and to
Israel where they arrived late last
week, was financed by the United
Zionists-Revisionists which is ideo
logically linked to Israel's Herut
Partv.
Gordon Soldar, 23, of New
York, leader of the group, said
the FBI tried to persuade them
not to go to Russia. He said he
and his fellow students "felt this
is legal, to go and demonstrate
there for the rights of Russian
Jews." He said FBI agents were
at Kennedv Airport when they
left New York and "tried to dis-
suade us from going, but we
went."
Soldar said that at the Moscow
airport they were separated from
other passengers while their lug-
gage was thoroughly inspected and
then taken to the airport hotel
where they were confined to a
ingle room almost as prisoners."
He said. "We could not even get
in touch with the American Em-
bassy for two days." He said the
Russians finally allowed them to
contact the embassy. They were
finally taken to the airport and
put on a plane for Istanbul. Soldar
said the Russians who searched
their luggage claimed they were
looking for narcotic*.
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Jem*s*ncrk**r rf-*
Friday, Mr 27,1973
ST8HST iAU Of AMY LAKi Ci7T W TM US.
Rabbi Lavin Will
Frisco Jews are High on Intermarriage \^X^^
B* nrSE HJJCTT se Ike ^n far to* him and hu the ume. especially ia Berkeley.' RiM>. Aiaa p !_*_. aa* of u-
% XT IUJOTT
I CBrMMS* FMan Sy
TV highly assimilated Jew* oTH* SurfnKW Bar am ka*e
high** astotasamaee race af aay Urge cst? lb the tailed Sates.
the praspttu af any immmxmntL ib the
far hath hua and kts
A prospective it
sad a
to attend a
das*, ar to study ia
The
gsMgaJajaj
St per cent kae a sea tan aba has coBrerted-
U aon^rnagogw* ardduags. the ----------------------
faaare it erea tocher to T5 TVEZE IS ao
per cent. Marryiag at of the faith ta coapse keep
is a aatia1 concern ia America Mo* do aot erea ate the year's At the
At a recent New York caaJrreace tn* syaafacae isakirsfcip they Jew" are eat Matured by tboee
af Liberal nfchis. there was aa aa- *, prea. "It's very diffirak to re- who tome the faith ru the mar-
suceesafai attempt to iaatitate jarre the nrnhlrsni af latermar- n dear ar other exits.
u be Jewish either
a Jewish mate ar far
tua.
proarh h east
to affioate a:
la the sa Franc into
the ssajorit* ml rabbet wfll cno-
sariies are Jew*
liifaah res
syaagogae awsahers
i JT9KU i' it Inks
a Baaed
the haras* far a i
tor. Bat a few rabbis here Vad-
crs to the East refer i* the bar
area as a -neoert" win butt*
a Jew to a
the problems
rabbi
he says- the
that aocaaty daes he
to be married ia the
Tyoif m bat they may also hare
a cmrpa A Jewish girl may waat
her geatile fiance to follow the
of CTBsam a wtae glass,
bat that as not permitted.
As the rabbi potato oat. this
ceresaoay symbolizes that even at
a tisae of great
the groom paascs to feel ks reto
ttoaahap witb the Jewish eomaso-
aaty. "He caal bare that feebng if
be s not Jewish.* the rabbi
EAST BAT rabbis Orthodox.
Canalin and Liberal) conduct
classes four times a
12 two-hoar sessions
.copse ia the Berkeley
Oakland area alone join the Jew
M Mssssl Bjjgn **ar *i Ian Oltt*
dax nsaffai in Berkeley. 10 per
the ume. eapaoaJly ia Berkeley, i RMbhi ^^ p Lmi^ mm ^ M.
says another. -There are always, and ,h Latin^ ^ u^.
mo many aew faces ne oauJdnt toll-,,, r^^ tnom*, f y^ Jew_
who is a stranger in the synagogue lfh Theoio^i erea If we tried. ka. will be spintaal loader of Con.
Others feel that the eaauaa- gregaboo Chiaak Eaaaaah In Har.
asty stiattare is waatiag aad
-tarns afT Jewisk participation.
Oae parent complaias that iadi
vMaal syaagacaes or teea age
graaps keep to themselves aad
ceasenaeatly never meet ather
Jewish yoatk.
"The kids get ark of seeing the
same fares all the lime No won
der they inter-date regularly." she
says.
Few Jewi. *.:m:stic about stemming the tH*
of intermarriage, but concern
about that subject rallies them to
roo perate
"We're, in trouble here says on*
Orthodox rabbi "So we try to helo
each other "
(rtoburg.Pa
Rabbi Laria has a master's de-
gree ia Hebrew Lsteratare fro
the Seminary He also bak:- a
bachelor's degree ia religton ^
Temple University, com laade. ^14
a bachelor's degree in Hebrew
erature from Grata College in Ph.l-
adelpbia
Rabbi Larin slas receiTe following prizes from Abe Seffilrury
at graduation:
"Most outstanding studac*. i-
tenng senior clam." prje ;-
prsH .n Tatorad i.nrf 1
lence in Midraab.
I'pon his gradual!on frnjj -
Seminary, he also rerr;*ed 'e
highest scholastic asrar^
ofC^ U.S. Medic Punches Ref
wrth casidrea at Oakland s
day school are inter
Wts]
a FA EN AMONG rabbts who ia-
oasmskm, there is aa set
far what
Terts aaast da to
The ilBBihsriti vary greatiy. Sasae
rabbis here fssfibsriw stady ahtle
then taatot that caarrerts adept
s there so mach inter
here* Many explanations
are offered
-CaJxferaca attracts
who aoat waat roots Jews
who are iwaaiag away frost
their JawaHm Maybe they bad
ifaliii experieaces ohea tbey
they waat U
really lonely is
CaUorma They come and go all
Aide Says Peace 'Possible9
1.
the PaiestiBiaa ftiiiEat
Bjga b4bss?sj ": hahj
bsM the Isrseias
he meant there eoaad be no ls-
raeb sagatiatisai with the Arab
the Pah bib a 1 are
ME.KNWMILE there were re-
parts here that a
ranks!
of a
Is-
raels bsrderi to jabmt the Jew-
tsb state from wahxa Dr George
Habash. leader of the Pcpaiv
rroat for the Lakes boob of Pal-
that there are a
a
hnag asthm toraeTs
leas aa brae?:
the territories a captured ia Che
19C7 war thaa aa the
of a Paarstzaaaa state.
A FOREIGN Ministry
t is the Arab states wbach
be psitamn with brael ia
UaV Eastera
efforts. The
by the AI-
-ister Ahde-
si ia Pans
Jury 11 that direct
brael aa*
aere
Ota mi to
recent weeks Arab
East hare
The brael: spekcaaaaa saai it
was ap to the Arab states to
make peace susce they have been
at a state af betbgereacy wah
brael since 1MB
X SAID That siace lfBT Iv
raeL
Pai-
braefs
borders aad that they had pouted
by Pre
of
take ever
as their own state Boar
gaaba described Jordaa as aa
-artificial state" and smd King
Hasseia shsald stop down :a fa
vor af a Paint itoss Jordaa Jaa
bari. oae af the
.Vrab >aders aa the West
labeled the Taamaa Pre ndeafs
He smd that if Jordaa a aa arti
tasal state "so are all the
Arab raajiuiii."
^ The Paper Parlor
Plantation TowneMall
6900W.BrowardBhd.
581-1980
Quality Wallpapers
Custom Designed Walls of Mirror
WE STOCK
X-MAS PAPER
havtoaj a bar ssstowah? 1 a T 0
Become The Pampered Hostess
Be a Guest at Your owm Affaa- .
in invitations etc.
a Your anvnafson and Accessor.
BY AJYCjflMTMBiT ONLY
- j
invitations etc.
73-4417
need
yon.
Im can spend scene r.me.
aca a ira hours, wah someone
asho needs hand, not a Kartdout.
cal sour kcal Voiuntar*.Vrwn
: Or wrae to "\bluroe."

Ihr Nancna! Center tcr
Vfaaantars V-tam,
a-
Contiaaerf froai Page 1
Brndsk? rse after tke secaad
knock-do* n bat w couaud out
bj the Dutch refree anile an
his feet.
Dr Navies, rushed to the -
protest but was blocked b> 1.
whom he then punched. dra:ng
ad from his mouth.
i.;. separated the tao men
Xakk liter offered an ap
but Lalkm refused to accept it
The referee said he counted
3rod>kv out because the rules re
.-d him to raue j
ate be wanted tc
he kept his hands at Ms sk
bershmidt. an Army pa:
.- 1 recem lmmigrxat f the $0
L'nion as are se%er
bers of the brae.:
team.
*m Vaacov
burg, scored a tech ex a! '
V> ...:arr. F:r.k>. ar: A
.-t.jht Terry Scfcaa.-.
Amencan aelterweight. !os*. a
dt bed
Coral Springs Hebrew Congregations
Gets Memorial Torah Scroll from England
The Coral Springs Hebrew Con- the Coral Springs Hebrew Ota
gregataoe has been honored by re-
ceiving a sacred Memorial Scroll
from the Westminister Synagogue
of London. England
la 1964. the Westminister Syna-
gogue received 1.564 sacred Torah
srrolb which had been gathered
together in Czechoslovakia during
aad after World War II These
scrolls, along with other religious
articles, aere protected, sometimes
at the cost of human HM
The scroll that now belongs to
cation was wrrttaa hi 1S>. 1
Pragoe. Czscaosaswakxa
The scrolls ase distributed
throughout the ajarB trherrrer
they can be of moat senate Pri-
ority is givea to reoaeatJ tea: sea
congregations, particularly these
ia immediate aead at a Torah for
use in semcea.
The Torah was
time in the United
Springs July U at
tar the firs)
ia Coral
*er% ces
< o\nirK< l\l
MEAO |\sl H \M I
CE AGENTS SP\ i I \| |^ I H
2a2t f MMKIH BlVD
:' ii .-::. C.J 33Jlt
->; 'T "'3
RON PRICF
GENE JONES

THE MADISON DIAMONDS.
GEMS OF LASTING BEAUTY
4 MOST SENSATIONAL AimATM
TO THl UAL DIAkKHto
iBfJgsa Marouisa-fcwof-ald Cut-Pear
Blua EmoraW Cut-AUKVAN
Siras from 10 points to 70 carats. The
from in Florida.
Sat in Rinys of whrto or ywllow 14 M m
banquottos-in fins-Pendanrs-Eamoos and
boart pondant.
Tha Madison, incomparabla in quality
puarantaod.
a Spark V
. ;

sio*
lamnot
from $10 par earV fully
SWWM ly ABBBisltBbBBl
Cdi 743-7137
S. V0S & ASS0C GCM CUTTaS.
IMt HW. Rrst Ate, R. Laag.riaU, Fk.


Mi
MMM
iy. July 27. 1973
-Jenh'in^rkJinn of North Iroward
Pags 7
'Envoy Says Japanese
In Training With Arabs
TOKYO (JTA) Eiji To-
kura. former Japanese ambas-
sador to larael,- reported here
that he had beard that two or
three Japanese activists are un-
dergoing training in an Arab
guerrilla camp in Lebanon.
SUCH A camp was the traili-
ng ground for Kozo Okamoto and
two other Japanese terrorists
who carried out the Lod Airport
massacre May 31, 1972.
Okamoto, the sole survivor of
&
V
H
LUNCHEONS
DINNERS
11 AM. -" M.
Sa'i"0n *"">'
ID PM SO P.M.
~-TAKS OUT
HONG KONfi
VILLAGE
CWneie at'*Mranf
WN M Mwv Sana
PHONE f*l.*7
the trio, is presently scrviag a
Ufe sentence in aa Israeli pris-
on ontside Tel Aviv. Ambassa-
dor Tokura said that contrary
to reports by other Japanese
who met Okaaaoto. the pris-
oner has shown no repentance
for the shooting that claimed
29 lives.
Ambassador Tokura spoke of
Okamoto during a meeting of the
16 present and former Japanese
ambassadors to Middle Eastern
countries held here last week.
HE SAID Israeli authorities
permit no interviews with Oka-
moto; a measure to keep him
from regarding himself as a hero.
Tokura reported that Arab
terrorist activities subsided after
Israel's commando attack on ter-
rorist headquarters in Beirut last
April but that the terrorists are
now rebuilding their organiza-
tion.
We do
business the
right way.
n !.. u Jim
n OAKLAND TOYOTA
RELIEVE
GAS PAINS
AT
GERALO VOLKSWAGEN
. m tUNRISC
i p1 aeoc
Wildfire
in the south.
There's no
future in it.
Nearly hall of ail fo'esl lirta .n
!,-e South are sei on o.--o:se
ByJttQQifc a'bonisls kids out for
jinrn or grown men carrying out
ayudge wfwvlriatches
Y. roti d iika to fceip
pfftvenl arson ..
t3Qti*'-

t#
Htlp Prtvtht Forest Firtt in rh South
Waldheim to Visit Mideast Lands
Continued from Page \-i
would leave or how long a time
he would spend la the Middle
East far "a couple of moattas."
Sources said the secretary gen-
eral would have to be present for
the Security Council debate when
it resumes. The debate, to have
resumed Wednesday, was post-
poned "for a few days." It was |
initiated by Egypt and was not
likely to resume before the Egyp-
tian foreign minister, Mohammed
H. el-Zayyat, returns to New York.!
Zayyat ended a four-day visit to
Austria Tuesday and flew to Paris.
Than was no word either on j
when the secretary general's spe- |
rial representative to the Mid-
dle East, Ambassador Gnnnar
V. Jarring, would arrive in New
York. Sources said Jarring prob-
ably would come when British
Ambassador Kenneth D. Jamie-
son, this month's Security Coun-
cil president, announces the
date far resumption of the de-
bate.
sessions to last very long.
I
But sources also mentioned the
DIPLOMATIC circles here said j possibility that the debate might
they did not expect Waldheim's i be postponed until Waldheim visits
Middle East visit to take place be-1 the Middle East and returns with)
fore the debate but added that i an updated report on the situation
they did not expect the resumed there.
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required.
7. Yet for all their qualities, the ships are
priced at less than you'd expect.
8. The Mediterranean: at least twenty ports
on every cruise, many exclusive to Holland
America. Such great meccas as Morocco,
Monte Carlo; ancient islands like Delos;
discovery ports like Costa Blanca, La
Coruna
WesterrT European August 10. s.s. Veendam from
New York. 35 days. 20 ports including Madeira.
Casablanca. Gibraltar. Syracufe. Naples, Lisbon.
Le Havre. Torquay From S1680 to $5680
m
Fall Mediterranean October 6. s.s. Volendam from
New York. From Port Everglades 10/8. 41 days.
20 ports including Casablanca. Minorca. Cannes.
Monte Carlo. Delos. Mykonos. Istanbul. Rhodes,
fun.sia. Lisbon. From $1980 to $6850.
Western Mediterranean August 31. s.s. Volendam
from New York. 35 days. 23 ports including Cadiz.
Malta. Genoa. Cannes. Monte Carlo. Barcelona.
Casablanca. From $1610 to $5450.
Holland Amerk* Crvie. So.te 835. International Bids.'.......
' 2455 E. Su-v.ie Blvd.. Fl. lauderdale. Fla. 33304
: Telephone 305 565 5584 M.*mi Phone 945-4454
I Please tusn me vouf free-full color folders
; on the cruises I've listed below.
Name
Address.
City_____
-State_
-Z.p-
.' Want a call' Phone.
Travel Agent------------

Rates per person, based on double occupancy and
subject to availability. The s.s. Veendam and
s.s. Volendam are registered in the Netherlands
Antilles. See your travel agent, or clip the coupon.
We're Dutch and we want everything to be perfect.
Holland America Cruises
CELEBRATING A CENTURY OF LUXURY SERVICE


Page 8
+Je*isiiFk)ridHair> North *w*
Friday. July 27. 1973
meIchels
by NORMA BARACB

How would you like to try baking an unusual, chocolaty
cake that will win you high praise as an innovative cook? Try
this one on your family.
CHOCOLATE FUDGE ROLL
4 efffs (separated) ** pack vanilla sugar
'* tsp. salt cup potato starch
'i cup sugar cup cocoa
Beat the egg whites with one-quarter teaspoon saM: grad-
ually add one-quarter cup sugar, beat until stiff. In another bowl,
beat yoDu with one-half cup sugar and one-half pack vanilla
sgar until thick and lemon colored; stir into yolks, on slow
speed, one-quarter cup potato starch and one-third cup cocoa.
Fold yolk mixture into whites gently. Line greased jelly roll pan
with plaia paper bag cut to size and grease bag. Bake in 400
oven for 12 15 minutes until top springs back when touched.
Turn pan over onto a cloth (linen towel) sprinkled with a mix-
ture of cocoa and potato starch, cut off crisp edges, remove
paper, roll up cloth; cool before filling.
Frosting and Filling
Melt six ounces bittersweet chocolate bar in bowl or pan
over hot mot boiling) water. In the meantime, beat two eggs
with one-half cup shortening (hard white type not oil or mar-
garine). Add melted chocolate, beat well. Spread over cooled,
unrolled cake and reroll. Frost top (optional); decorate with
tines of fork; chill in refrigerator before serving. This cake can
be frozen.
*
Now that the Passover holiday is over, everyone is anxious to
get back to using 'regular" ingredients. A sure hit at our house
is this chocolate chip pound cake taken from a recently printed
cookbook by the Margolit chapter of Mizrachi Women of New
York. Anyone interested in copies may write to me c o Cleve-
land Jewish News. 13910 Cedar Rd., Cleveland. Ohio 44118. This
cookbook has an excellent selection of cakes and pies.
CHOCOI.ATE CHIP POUND CAKE
1 cup pane margarine 1 tsp. vanilla
1 cup sugar 3 cups flour
4 eggs 3 tsps. baking powder
1 cup Mocha Mix 12 oz. chocolate chips
Preheat oven to 350". Cream sugar and margarine. Add
eggs, one at a time. Add vanilla: mix well. Add sifted flour and
baking powder alternately with Mocha Mix. Stir in chocolate
chips. Pour into greased 10-inch tube pan. Bake 55-60 minutes or
until cake leaves the side of the pan.

My request for cookbooks from various organizations has
paid off with the receipt of a new cookbook put out by the Sister-
hood of Um United Orthodox Synagogues of Houston. Tex called
"Kosher Menus With Recipes to Match." This particular recipe
caught my eye and I would like to share it with you.
GRAHAM CRACKER CHEESE TARTS
\ cup graham cracker crumbs 1 can pie filling of choice
H cup melted butter 1 egg
9 paper cupcake holders cup butter
% lb. cream cheese 1 tsp. vanilla
Mix graham cracker crumbs and one-eighth cup melted
butter together. Fill cupcakepapers with one tablespoon of this
mixture. Press down with a glass. Cream together the cream
cheese, one egg. one-quarter cup butter and vanilla. Beat until
smooth. Put cream cheese mixture on top of graham cracker
mix. Leave open one half inch from top. Bake 10-12 minutes at
375 After baking let cool and then top with a can of apple pie
or cherry pie filling or any other kind. Keep in refrigerator
until serving.
S -Cr ft
With veal prices sky high, here is the Israeli version of "veal
cutlet." using white chicken. Fresh lemon and onion rings give
it an extra touch.
ISRAELI CHICKEN CUTLETS
chicken breasts (boneless) poultry- seasoning
matzo meal oil
1 egg onion rings
garlic powder
Pound chicken breasts to flatten them. Dip in egg, season
and then dip in matzo meal. Fry in small amount of hot oil. Brown
onion rings. Serve onion rings on top of chicken breasts and
with a wedge of fresh lemon. Serve hot or cold.
Cz -ir it 'ft & iV
Would you like to try a moist, flavorful cake that has the
added bonus of keeping well? Try this cake on your company
for size.
APPLE-CHIP SPICE CAKE
3 eggs
2 cups sucar
2 sticks margarine
'_ cup water
2'; cups all-purpose flour
2 tbls. cocoa
1 tsp. baking soda
1 Up. cinnamon
1 Up. allspice
1 cup finely chopped nuts
M cup chocolate bits
2 apples, cored and grated or
finely chopped (2 cups)
1 tbls. vanilla
Beat together eggs, sugar, parve margarine and water until
fluffy. Sift together flour, cocoa, soda, cinnamon and allspice.
Add to creamed mixture and mix well. Fold in nuts, chocolate,
apples and vanilla until evenly distributed. Spoon into greased
and floured 10-inch loose bottom tube pan. Bake in 325 oven
60-70 minutes untii cake tesU done. Makes one cake, 10 servings.
i
Religious l
Services \
FOVT LAUDEROAlt
BETH ISRAEL (Temple) Coneerva- I
tivt. 7U W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neil.
EMANU-El. i.-9 w. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform. rUbbi Arthur J Ab-
rama. Cantor Jerome Kl-mer 48
POMPANO EACH
HOLOM (Temple). 1S2 SB tlth Ave.
itlliK naobi Morrta A. fckop.
Canter Jacob J. Renter.
MAROATE
MARQATE J1WISH CINTtR. (Cen.
aervative) 1101 NW 9th St.
CORAL SPRINGS
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON
OREGATION (Reform) 3501 Uni-
versity Dr., Coral Springi. Rabbi
Max Weitz.
Friday, Sum. I
**r>**r>rV*r^rVSrVW%r>******
Jl LY 29, SINDAY
Temple Emanu El duplicate bridge 7:30 p.m.
AUGUST 1. WEDNESDAY
Temple Sholom board meeting
AUGUST 1. THl-RSDAY
Temple Emanu-El Congregation board meeting
Fort I>auderdale Hadassah
MJGL'ST 7. TUESDAY
Jewish senior singles of Quad City 1 p.m. DBVid Park
Pavilion
AUGUST 8. WEDNESDAY
JWV and Auxiliary 730
Coral R'dge ORT general meeting
AUGUST 9. THURSDAY
Fort Lauderdale Hadassah
North Broward Hadassah
Temple Beth Israel Congregation board meeting
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
27 TAMUZ 7:50
f

*+++*******+W+*+******S**^
El Al Shows Net Profit At
End of '72-'7:J Fiscal Year
Family Plan
Cruise Kales
Available
New special summer family plan
cruise rates are effective immedi-
ately at Carnival Cruise Lines to:
allow parents with children under
16 to sail aboard the TSS Mardi
Gras for only $50 more for each
child.
The 27.250-ton Caribbean cruise
liner sails from Miami to San Juan.
St. Croix. St. Thomas and Nassau
even Saturday for 7-day cruise
holidays.
In addition to the new super
low fare for young people under
16 years. Carnival Cruise Lines of-
fers spec.al youth fare for the 16-
25 age group, singles only, with 4
in a room, pegged at $195 per per-
son.
Fl A!"s president. Mordechai
Ben-Ari. in reviewing the balance
sheet, noted that the past year had
been a Jifficult year for the cm-
pany.
In the year ending March SI,
1973. El Al faced a series of
strikes and other labor problems
resulting in financial loss and in-
terference with scheduled flight
operations. But for these setb.uk-
El Al could have finished the >. BT
with an additional $1,666,667 prof
it.
Careful manacement and admin
istration including the paring of
expenditures, allowed El Al to suc-
ceed in balancing its finances and
in creating a basis for economic
achievement in the years to follow.
El Al completed fiscal 1972 73
with a net profit of $243,005 after
an appropriation of $226,190 for
deferred income tax fund.
Other salient statistics w<
In fiscal 1972 773 El Al trans-
ported a total of 714368 patten-
gSTI tl ;i-' i-t 691.572 the previous
rear; |>bibiniwi load factor v.ai
88 3 per cent a* against 68.2 per
cent :n 1971 72.
The number of passengers pass-
im: through I.od win 1.661 32 al
I compared with 1.608.59b' tat year
an Increase of 3 6 per cent El
AJ'i share of traffic at I.od wa 45
Bet c ent as again-t 44 i per cent
last year.
Total revenue in 1972 73 was
$129,965,000 as compared with
$120,227,000 last year
In fiscal 1972 73 El Al trans-
ported a total of 30.237 tons of
-as against 25.459 tons the
previous yearan increase of 18 8
per cent Total amount of freight
I passing through IxhI was 42,475
' tons as against 36.237 tons last
year El Al s share at Lod rose
from 70.3 per cent to 71.2 per cent
in 1972 73
2' 2SO grots torn formerly Impni oi Canjd* f agino ot rr CjnaMn PacAc Fleel
41 cloy cruise to europe,
the itiediterToiicc.ii
ond 8 cloys in isroel
(Sn,p la your Hotel Throughout Kosher K.tchen Aboard)
pt.8to0ct. 19. 19
miami-cue-res
itopics (route) atheiu
hoif o (tel oviv &
Jerusalem)
lit/onto (florcncc &
piso) mojorco
modciro iniomi
SEE YOUR TRAVEL AGENT or Call
CARMVAURIISK UNJ$.IN.
The biggest fastest moai
beautiful the one true ocean fcoer
from Mian* Cru.s>ng at its greatest
the tmest food, emertunment
service cr.-w ana staffme ery
largest staterooms tor your
comfort Reserve No*'
s1695o
$3995
I Carnival Cruise Lm*s, Inc.
1820 Biscayne Blvd
Miami. Fla 33132
I Gentu
a Please send me color brochure
N.tme ^___
. J K
on your lyaei cruise
I
Address


i^BHH
Mi
[y, July 27, 1973
+J(nif FkricttfiUl Of North Broward
Page 9
Tew Era for Office Memos
there is anything that Wa
ate should be teaching us, it
Jiat officials in the public
in, elected and appointed.
it to be careful about their
kos. logs and even telephone
In sations.
|has come to thisthat we are
in a surveillance-stricken
. little different except in
je from the one George Or-
[described to us in his "1984."
Iparently. a City of Miami
fh special investigator has
to learn the lesson,
issue is the story of an
itic pig mysteriously discov-
] to be swimming off the shore
liami Beach sometime before
fpendenee Day.
lie U.S. Department of Agri-
jre decided to kill the pig,
aning that he might have
_ from a Caribbean or Latin
ntry and therefore bo the car-
[ of a foreign disease.
A Spirited Imagination
own reaction to all thi- is.
jeve, reasonably speculative
jnly slightly flamboyant.
[Reasonably speculative: How
pig get into such dwep wa-
it an estimated 19 miles off
koast of South Florida?
lightly flamboyant: Like
[other refugee, the pig de-
to swim to freedom from
ial tyranny, hoping to ar-
m Jul] 4 and celebrate
bus liberation and the 197th
p{ American independence
iame time.
no*, so for Special [nvu*
Jchn B. Tomamo, who
I apparently find this sort of
lizing too tame for his
id imagination. Instead, in
lice memo to Miami Beach
Manager Frank R. Spenee,
Inn used the occasion to or-
rate something far more
Ir.t.
MW advise" him. he asked
p. on what to do about the
-that non kosher itrafe)
are swimming ashore off
Beach."'
ps type of meat,"' Tomaino
. in his precious memo, is
porcus Domesticus,' more
alv known as 'PIG'."
V: *>
DiscemaWe Difference
the capital letters for
I don't really know.
fhaps Inspector Tomaino
chosen this scholarly
Jology" i notice his prop-
for "scholarly methodol-
in the cleverly-conceived
us Domesticus" latinism) to
fbe, classif;. and catalogue
eneral species of swimmer.
Rh and human, to be found
the Miami Beach seashore.
Implication of course is
[here is no discernable dif-
\e in the species They are
line, and the "PIC" in cap-
Ittteri seems intended to
riM the point.
is not to say that Inspector
no in fact draws this im-
on from the fate ot the un-
|ate animal. But I can well
stand the rage of those who
ie he does.
fr all. Tomaino's memo,
tn on official City of Miami
stationery, concerns itself
[a community which is pri-
Jewish and whose swim-
l
Mindlin
'"'HI.! v ,.
mers at the seashore would be
inclined to be primarily Jewish.
They are not likely to take
lightly anybody's observation,
however innocently or foolishly
conceived, least of all a city em-
ployee's observation, whose 1 iv -
lihood derives from their taxes,
that pigs swim at their beaches
or even the converse of that
which is to say that those who
swim at their beaches are pigs.
Inexcusable Politics
Tomaino characterizes the
"irafe meats" in question as "sub-
'crsive forces" constituting "a
definite threat to the Kosher se-
curity of Miami Beach."
"As you will note." he reminds
City Manager Spenee. "the date
of the invasion coincides with
the arrival of the Soviet leader.
Leonid Brezhnev."
Opines Tomaino. now in the
role of political analyst: "Poor
relations between the State nf
Israel and the Soviet Union and
the success of the Israeli's (sic)
bond drive has (sic) evidently
forced the Soviet I'nion into d
vrloping this Maritime Mammal
Marvel and is therefore deposit
Ing said Mammals from subma-
rines ,>ff the coast of Miami Beach
in an effort to wreck our Ko-her
institutions."
Tomaino's grammar is not
much better than his scholarly
latimsms. His politicizing his in-
excusable.
-to Non-interference Principle
The City Managers office is
these days explaining the To-
maino memo as "a joke." and
there is genuine evidence that
Tomaino has equally genuine re
grets about it But irate Miamians
see nothing funny in it.
If the "Porcus Domesticus"
business at best elicits not a
single guffaw among them, the
Brezhnev reference has the
Watergate Lesson Too Late
Since World War II. we have
interfered in the internal affairs
of Italy, Greece. Turkey. Cuba,
Chile Cuatemala and Peru, not
to mention all of Southeast Asia,
without the slightest qualm.
Only when it comes to Jews are
politicians vigorous in their pur-
suit of the diplomatic niceties,
This is something Jews feel
sensitive about, and particularly
Miami Jews. They find it hard to j
forget the more than 700 Jewish I
refugees aboard the St. Louis who I
blew themserves up off the coast
of Florida some 30 years ago
rather than return to Hitler Ger-1
many when neither Miami nor
New York nor Boston nor any I
other of our nation's ports of en
try would let them in: although
these days we let in Cubans. Hail
ians and e\ erybody else, except
that poor unfortunate pig, with
impunity.
And so it is perfectly under-
standable why Inspector To-
maino's "joke" just doesn't come
offnone of it. not even the bit
about "our Kosher Food inspec-
tor" who should bo "immediately
equipped with red swimming
trunks and swim fins" to go out
to meet the invading tide with
"a pig-pen and two slop buckets."
What is not so understandable
is that he is learning the Water-
gate lesson about memos too late.
As.


Max Lerner
Sees It
< S itinued from Page sVJ
whimsical and variant application of the guidelines. But he
should have made it clearer that local prosecutors and juries
cannot substitute their own aesthetic judgment for that of the
critics. They and they alone must be the arbiters of the third
guideline, and the courts must try to get at what those judgments
are, and enforce them.
Justice Burger could have rested content with correcting
the silly earlier emphasis, and shifted from "utterly" to "seri-
ous" and let it go at that. He would have escaped most of the
rotten eggs and tomatoes thrown at him. He ehose to include
the local option judgment, probably because he felt that the
hard-core smut couldn'l be gotten out of the "adult bookshops"
and the "adult theaters" without considerable harassing by
local prosecutors.
They are going to have a field day of it. and some will use
it politically to show their antismut muscle: some will go ber-
serk and crack down on works bexond their comprehension
works that will live .long after their own wretched sensibilities
are dead.
It remains to be.seen whether the frenzy of harassment bo-
comes too high a price to pay for Burger's new guidelines. But
when the dust has settled, we shall still be reading D. II. Law-
rence, Henry Miller. Philip Roth and Norman Mailer Playboy,
too. since its "serious value" has long been established. "Deep
Throat" will probably become an underground item, and so will
most of what its success hat spawned. But no one will dare to
ban "Last Tango" and get away with it. A critical audience won't
let them, and it is what counts.
We've got
the nicest 10-day
Caribbean cruises
for you,
and 9 reasons why.
1.
Your ship is the s.s. Nieuw
Amsterdam, largest liner sailing
regularly from Florida. At 37,000 tons, she's
mphasizin- the twice as big as some Florida cruiseships
anguish ihej feel sboul classical but carries no more passengers.
tottssiss* 2 Sovou'"havea",heroorvoud,
- ever need to experience the grandeur
of this great luxury liner: staircases that
spiral; ceilings that soar; mahogany and
leather lounges; a dining room that's
brakes on the Nixbn-Breshnev actually two decks high.
ZTJSSSL rffitS O Ybtf I have feasts four times a day.
\i,t anti-Semitism are really in- \J a!i included in the fare.
terfering in the "internal affairs" Jhe Nieuw Amsterdam is one of the
of a foreign nation. % ^ few crujseshjps where you can
Fulbrlght, who has made a re- g|jp ^^ 0(Jt 0f the Lido pool into a full
; selection of luncheon delectables right on
7.
9.
Sen. J. William Fulbright ob-
terved hotij the other day that
people like Sen. Jackson and his
supporters who are putting the
markable career by
his historic anti civil rights bigo
tnes into the image of- himself deck. And no plastic plates on this brand
as a flaming constitutionalist, re- Lady of the Sea.
minds me of all our mealy
mouthed American leaders, in- Q ^
Clllding PresidSJti Koo.sevclt. who
sat in stonv silence as Hitler
destroyed Jews bv the millions No corners cut or expenses spared to give
because to warn H.tier to stop you a real home away from home.
would have been to interfere in r* You'll have the nicest crew in
the internal affairs" of a foreign O cruising and more of them. Almost
nation. twice as many ;is some smaller cruiseships. :..c.'!y:
Staterooms are bigger, more
comfortable. No convertible sofa
beds. No curtains where doors should be.
No need to carry a pocketful of cash
around. You can sign for just about
3verything.
8 You don't have to worry about
tipping either. No gratuities required
The islands: Curacao, Grenada, La
Guaira. Guadeloupe, St. Thomas,
St. Maarten and San Juan. The best of the
Caribbean and every side of it too, from
beaches and bargains to sightseeing,
sports, nightclubs and casinos.
10- Day Cruises from Port Everglades to 5
Caribbean and South American ports.
Alternate Monday and Friday departures
all-year long.
The s.s. Nieuw Amsterdam is registered in
the Netherlands Antilles. For more
information, see your travel agent or send
us the coupon.
Holland Arrxric* Cruises, Suit* 805. Internal cnal Bldl.
2455 E. Su: sc Blvd.. Ft Uudtrdafe, Fla 33304
Tclcohone 305 565 5586 Miami Phono fi-:5 -1454
Please tush rv I full-color Caribbean
Ctuise brochures vuth rates, dates, all the details.
Name_
Add m .
_Suu.
-Z'P-
WANTED
rolTH DIRECTOR AND OR TEACHER
FOR TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Conservative
Please call or write t:
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale 33313
Phone 735-4010
We're Dutch and we want everything to be perfect.
Holland America Cruises
by
al
of
/i-
of
he
rt
)S
>a
et
V
r-
m
d
ie
a
*
e
s
i-
a
I
l
s
I


Page 10
+JmitfncrH*9r
Of Nftt trowarw
Friday. July 27. 1973
By RABBI SAMl'EL J. FOX
(Ci. 1*~3 Jewi'h T>lr*raph'.- A*.
What is meant by Kiddnsk-
Heshem"
This term is technically trans-
lated as "the santification of the
name of God." The expression is
taken from the Bible (Leviticus
22:32 > where it is stated in the
name of the Almighty I will be
sanctified among the children of
Israel ."
The usual interpretation of Hafci
concept is the one whereby Jc
are commanded to sacrifice their
very lives to honor the name of
the Almighty i Talmud Sanhedrin
74a).
The rabbis (Sifra Emor 13) state
that the exodus from Egypt took
place so that the children would
be ready to sacrifice their very
lives should the honor of His name
require it. From this the rabbis
deduce that a Jew should forfeit
his life before committing the
transgressions of idol worship, im-
morality (i.e., incest and adultery)
and murder.
In times of religious persecu-
tion at the hands of a hostile gov-
ernment who would try to abolish
the Jewish religion, a Jew is re-
quired to sacrifice his life before
he transgresses and Jewish Com-
mandment. (Maimonides. Laws of
the Principles of the Torah, 5:
1^3).
There are other ways in which
a Jew can sanctify- the name of the
Almighty without risking his life.
This is analyzed in the Talmud
(Yoma 86a) as accomplished by
studying the Holy literature, serv-
ing the wise disciples, and being
pleasant in one's dealings with
other people.
What b "CUlal Hashem?"
This term is technically trans-
lated as "the desecration of the
name of God." It is a derivation
from the Biblical prohibition
where the Almighty tells the peo-
ple of Israel "Neither shall ye
desecrate my holy name .. ." (Lev-
iticus 22.32).
The author of the Sefer Mitz-
oth Gadol (S'mag) states. "Those
who deceive and steal from non-
Jews desecrate the name of the
Almighty. They cause non-Jews to
exclaim. "Israel has no Torah."
The text further states that non-
Jews who observe Jews acting in
such a manner will eventually say.
The Almighty chose a nation of
thieves and liars for himself."
According to the rabbis in the
Talmud, the greater name a man
has the more he must guard against
the possibility of desecrating the
of the Almighty.
S.S. Nieuw Amsterdam Offers Low Rates
Meeting Schedule Change*
B*nai B'rith Women of Fort
Lauderdale will meet the first and
third Tuesday of each month be-
ginning Aug. 7. Board meetings
are scheduled for the first Tues-
day, the regular meetings are held
the third Tuesday, according to
Mrs Charles Stock, publicity chair-
man
POUT LET WOR MAIL END
UP IN THC DEAD LETTER
OFFICE. WAKE SURE
YOUR ADDRESSES ARE
iCi -r
n
_!
,*/'
WH^m '**Z.:m. 'J,u MjiwH*sim"l8;- **
;uji;:::;i*i*~'*M,'1* **""" ..... ......
*.
-

The 37,000-ton luxury Liner S.S. Nieuw Amsterdam of Holland America Cruises glides smoothly through a calm
Caribbean Sea
Attractive low seasonal rates
starting t a minimum of only
$285 are now in effect through
December 7 for the 10-day cruise
program of Holland America's
S.S. Nieuw Amsterdam sailing
from Port Everglades. Florida,
according to the company.
The rates, which start at $285.
range upward to $895 for outside
deluxe cabins. These prices in-
clude air-conditioned shipboard
accommodations, all meals, en-
tertainment and other extras. Hol-
land America's unique policy of
"no gratuities required" also ap-
plies to all of these cruises.
Each of the Nieuw Amster-
dam's II remaining cruises for
this season are identical in that
they all visit the same ports of
call. These include Willemstad.
Curacao: La Guaira (for Caracas),
Venezuela: St George's. Grenada;
Basse-Terre and Pomte-a Pitre on
Guadeloupe: and Charlotte Aim-
lie. St. Thomas. Departure dates
for the cruises are June 29 July
27; August 6 and 17: October 5.
15 and 26; November 5, 16 and
26: and December 7.
The exceptions to this series of
10-day cruises are three eight-
day ones which depart on July f
and 18 and September 26. These
will all call at the ports of Char-
lotte Amalie. St. Thomas: Philips-
barg. St. Maarten: and San Juan,
Puerto Rico. Rates on these
cruises start at S225 and range to
a maximum of $715.
A cruise to the Caribbean today
(or anywhere else for that mat-
ter) means one of the last stands
of the old-time art of pampering
that has long been forgotten on
land. On the Nieuw Amsterdam,
the "treatment" starts immediate-
ly after the ship has sailed. One
rejoices at unpacking all his suit-
cases, hanging up his clothes as
in a hotel, and then storing his
bags away for the next 10 days.
A typical day at sea begins with
breakfast in your cabin (if you
wish) followed by a leisurely
reading of the ship's daily pro-
gram showing the events sched-
uled for the day. Next comes the
great responsibility of actually
having to decide what to do. And
the selection is enormous: toning
up with morning exercises, prac-
ticing golf shots under the watch-
ful eyes of a pro, playing tablfc
tennis, taking a dip in the out-
door pool, sun-bathing, shooting
trap oi learning the latest dance
steps in the morning so that ou
can practice them at night in the
Ritz Carlton Cafe or the Stuy-
vesant Cafe.
On the Nieuw Amsterdam there
also is a fully-equipped gym. an
indoor swimming pool. Turkish
baths and massage rooms. Chess
and bridge games flourish in the
lounges. If you wish, you can im-
prove your bridge game by at-
tending lectures by a "Travel
with Goren" expert. Or you can
simply rest in a deck chair, take
a ua.k around deckor best of
all. just relax and meet some of
your fellow passengers.
Then, one has to decide whether
to have lunch down in the cool
dining room or up on the sunny
deck. Next more decision.*
whether to laze quietly and look
at the sea. or jump up for some
sports or another swimor may-
W a movie. Then a delicious tea.
followed by a lively chat on deck,
waiting for the swift sunset to
occur. Next, a longdrawnout
bath followed by dressing up in
one's brightest clothes for din-
ner. While there will be formal
evenings, such as the special Cap-
tain's Welcome Aboard Party and
the farewell gala, the stress is on
informality.
Of course, one of the main at-
tractions of cruising on the Nieuw
Amsterdam is the cuisine. When
the gong sounds for dinner, a
great event is in the making.
You'll be presented with course
after course of delectables from
one of the finest restaurants
afloat. All prepared by Holland
America's fine chefs who are
members of the Confrerie de la
Chaine des Rotisseurs, world-
famous gastronomical association.
Following dinner mere is a
show in the Grand Hall by Euro-
pean and American artists of
stage and television with lots of
laughts, spoofing and sophisticat-
ed doings and dancing till the late
hours. Finally, a midnight buffet
officially closes the evening. But
for the "night owls" who hate to
go to bed. the Jungle Bar opens
up. There is music and the party
goes on, often until the wee hours
of the morning. But before bed-
timedon't forget that stroll
around the deck to breathe in
the pure air of the sea and watch
those blinking stars.
Another reason that passengers
find these 10-day cruises of the
Nieuw Amsterdam fascinating are
the ports of call. They enable you
to sample a little bit of Holland.
Spain. England, France and Den-
mark without traveling all the
way to Europe to do so
For example, the first stop
after leaving Port Everglades is
Curacao where the Nieuw Am-
sterdam docks at Willemstad. the
capital, which is divided into two
parts by Santa Anna Bay. In tbe
city's Punda section, you'll find
government buildings and banks
as well as throngs of shoppers
strolling the wide malls, pausing
at international shops, or sipping
drinks in palm-lined sidewalk
cafes. In the other action of
town, called Otrabanda. are more
shops. All of Willemstad is made
more interesting and colorful by
its tall, authentic 17th century
pastel-colored buildings as well as
the Dutch-styled houses, clean in
their little green Hardens.
At the city's Floating Market
boats from "enezuela. only 27
miles aw iv, tie up laden with
fruits and vegetables. Close by is
the Queen Emma pontoon bridge
which opens up to let ocean-going
ships pass through the middle of
town. Other interesting sights to
see are the Mikve Israel Syna-
gogue, the oldest one in the West-
ern Hemisphere, and Fort Am-
sterdam with the Governor's
House. Whether you choose to
take advantage of the low prices
or just relax, Willemstad is
in the city on a shopping spree
uniquethe quaint, tidy atmos-
phere of the Netherlands set in
the lush, blue-green magic of the
Caribbean.
From Curacao the ship then
sails for La Guaira. the port city
of Caracas, the capital of Vene-
zuela. This young and growing
city is separated intr two distinct
sectorsthe old area, with its
charming Spanish architecture,
and the new Caracas with enor-
mous superblocks. regular squad-
rons of cement buildings painted
in vivid colors, spread over the
hillsides.
The heart of the new Caracas
is the Centro Bolivarthe Rocke-
feller Center of Venezuelaan
imposing group of buildings cul-
minating in two 32-story towers.
And the city's shops are com-
parable to New York's Fifth Ave-
nue But Caracas is not all ultra-
modern. In the old section you
can visit Simon Bolivar's home
where this freedom fighter was
born and the National Pantheon,
his tomb. Also not to be missed is
the fantastic cable-car ride up to
the mountain range surrounding
the city. You may find yourself
engulfed in the low clouds at the
top and the ride down is thrilling,
with a marvelous view of the city.
The cruise next calls at Gre-
nada, southernmost of the Wind-
ward Islands, which is oval in
shape with a spine of volcanic
mountains. Its primary crops are
cocoa, nutmeg and mace which is
why the ls.'and is often referred
to as "The Spice Island of the
West." Grenada is a photog-
rapher's delight and practically
any trip into its lush, mountain-
ous interior with its swift, bub-
bling streams is scenically re-
warding. Also quite beautiful are
the numerous smaller islands and
cays that adjoin it
Our port of call is St. George's.
Grenada's capital, which rises in
terraces around its harbor, mak-
ing it one of the most picturesque
of the West Indian ports. A walk
along Wharf Street gives the vis-
itor a revealing glimpse of West
Indies trade as reflected by the
busy waterfront and you'll also
want to see Market Square. Build-
ings of interest include the
Anglican Church. York House and
the old Gregorian buildings on
the Carenage. Exploring the bat-
tlements of Fort George, Fort
Frederick and Old Fort gives one
an interesting look into the is-
land's historv.
Plan to visit Grand Anse Beach,
perhaps the island's most notable
tourist attraction, which is among
the most spectacular beaches in
the Caribbean. It stretches for
two palm fringed miles and offers
safe swimming in a setting that
is almost dream-like.
Guadeloupe is next on the
Nieuw Amsterdam's itinerary
where the ship arrives at Basso
Terre for a short call to enable
overland tour participants to get
off. This town is an interesting
study of the past, with beaut..'...
parks, historic buildings, a 17th
century church and a fort called
Rich'pance Although known a-
the "Emerald Isle of the Carib
bean.'' Guadeloupe is actual!}
two separate islands divided b>
a narrow four mile strait called
the Riviere Salee. The Guadeloupe
section is a lush, mountainous
region dominated by a volcar.c
called Soufriere. The eastern por-
tion, called Grande Terre. is some
what less rugged and is the site
of our second port of call, Point*
a-Pitre.
As in most Caribbean cities.
Pointe a-Pitre's churches and gcv
eminent buildings yield valuable
insight into the island's past
Among the more notable of these
are The Court of Law. Museum
and the St Pierre and St. Paul
Church. Outside of the city
Guadeloupe is girded by a shore-
line roadway which offers spec
tacular seascapes. The region sur
rounding Soufriere offers many
fine views complete with racing
mountain torrents, hot sprints
and dense rain forests. Nearby
Trois Rivieres and its "Valley of
tbe Ancient Caribes" is a treasury
of Carib Indian art. On Grande
Terre, Le Moule Beach has carved
its way into an old cemetery
where one can see petrified
skulls outlined in the seaward
rocks. Gosier and La Pergola are
beaches close to Polnte-a-Pitre.
Next you arrive in St. Thomas,
the island known as the "shop
ping paradise of the Western
Hemisphere." Leaving the pier in
Charlotte Amalie, you can drive
to Bluebeard's Castle, once a
fortress, now a hotel. Here you
can see the tower, carefully
restored according to the original
plans. Leaving Bluebeard's, you
can continue up Mafolie Hill tc
Drake's Seat, a lookout point
which gives you a lovely view of
Magens Bay and out across Sir
Francis Drake Channel to tbe
many American and Bridal
Virgin Islands nearby.
Then it's on to Mountain Tof
Hotel where >ou can sample the
"speciality of the house"their
world famous banana daiquiri
Charlotte Amalie's shopping area
is next. It is difficult to mention
the many types of bargains avail-
able hereand most of them at
duty-free prices. And. don't foi-
getcustoms still allow an extra
$100 of duty-free purchases ir.
this port and you can bring on.
full gallon of "spirits" back dut>
free as well.
Although St. Thomas is the la.-t
port of call, the ad- enture is not
over yet. There are several more
days and nights at seatime t
reminisce and absorb what ha-
DM1 MM and to exchange < I
periences with fellow passer,
.-.nd new friends before retur:
10 Port Everglades.
For complete information and brochures on the 16 Caribbean
cruises sailing from Port Everglades write: Holland Amend
Cruises. Department F. Pier 40. North River New York, New York,
10014. or phone Fort Lauderdale 56^5588


Friday, July 27. 1973 fjenist Fkridlinn Page 11
Joseph f^olahoj-j-
Congress Has Been Asked to Act on Exotic Tay Sachs Disease
TWENTY-THREE senators led
by Jacob Javits (D-N.Y.) and
IHarrison Williams (D-N.J.) are
lacking Congress to establi-h a
[national program for the 'diag-
I control and prevention of
|T.i>-S~chs disease," which attacks
children who are born seemingly
healthy and normal and is fatal,
usually by the time they reach
the age of two.
Addressing the Senate. Javits
said the disease affects one in 30
American citizens of Eastern Eu-
ropean Jewish origin who con-
stitute 90 per cent of the U.S.
Jewish population, or one in 300
of the general American popula-
tion.
Sen. Williams reported "medi-
cal science has provided the
\^cuntour ^[j. a>Lrieb
ntan
Battleground of Fact and Fantasy ji
Battleground: Fact and Fantasy in Palestine."
*^ by Samuel Katz (Bantam Books, $1.501
should be read by every Jew and Christian who
a Slid know the facts about the Middle East
augh the author is slightly tendentious in
nz much of the blame for the Arab-Jewish
90 Hli shoulders of the British, this criti-
, ~m is quantative rather than qualitative. The
I have the blood of Jews and Moslems
on their hands.
We believe that the folktale reported by
te author is symbolic of much Arabic thinking.
The story concerns a man who was taking an
afternoon siesta and was disturbed by children
shotting below his window. Me went to the bal-
and called. "Children, how foolish you are!
While you are playing, they are giving away
in the marketplace."
The children rushed off. and the man went
bach to resume his nap. But just as he was
about to fall asleep, the thought aroused him.
"Here I am, lying around, when there are free
figs to be had in the marketplace." For Arabs
fantasy too often replaces fact.
Thi re are innumerable aspects of the Jew
iafa Arab relationships which are unknown to
many, including Uiose who are considered knowl-
edgeable. Katz footnotes most of his sources so
that his assertions are authoritative.

'In Hitler's Shadow," by Leland V. Bell
(Kcnnikut Press, S7.95. 135 pp.) is an historian's
account of Nazis and pro -Germans in the United
States from the time of Hitler until today. While
there is not much new light that the authoi castl,
we appreciate the contribution because of the
excellence of the treatment of the material, the
footnotes and bibliography. The photos are
needed as a reminder that it must not happen
here. The chapter on the "Neo-Nazis." George
Rockwell and his ilk,-constitute a brief account.
means of avoiding this cruel dis-
ease in nine out of 10 cases" and
urged governmental responsibil-
ity in making medical advances
in the field used "as widely as
possible throughout the country."
The proposed legislation would
authorize the Department of
Health. Education and Welfare
to make grants and contracts to
establish voluntary Tay-Sachs
screening and counseling pro-
gram- The bill asks for an au-
thorization of S3 million for the
first year of the program.
The federal government has,
to date, spent $1.5 million for
Tay Sachs research through a se
ries of projects and has invested
$3 million in related research.
Over the past two years. Jewish
Centers in major American cities
have been conducting numerous
screening projects for the testing
of possible carriers of the dis.....
In 1969. "a major breakthrough
in medical history." said Javits,
iJHemri JL~itft
Shall Among (he Jews"
Is Headed for (he Screen
wid t^chwartz
Honey Lender Shunned Interest
f L>*
- -r
LONDON Jew, Marcus SchlomovitZ, is suing the
| Uumry The publisher- of the Oxford Dic-
Okford i< one of the famous universities,
rhags the mot famous. A fen yean bach, Sir
lac Wolfson gave it a big buil ling. Jews like to
|:> alticatii>n. but Mi. SchlomOvitl doesn't think
\'. it should do. He says the Oxford's definition
In word Jew is slander u-
inr for Instance, you come from some far
pi.ice .T-d never heard the word Jew. What
.rid can it he, you a~k yourself,
"i ru..hi. its there. The Oxford Dictionary defines
a a* a perSBfl of the Hebrew race, an Is
You iOBatOh >oui head What is S H brew '
Hebr"\v and it is defined as a Jew.
it dbesh'l help you much. Also Israelite seems
[:m:^\ !h ,t a Jew is lomeon? who lived in the
of Moses So j i m -'i'l worried, b,it you
her in the Oxford Dictionary a second i:y
fnitxm: "Alfa a name of opprobium specifically
I Do a pispinf ..:- extort lonej lender
isuier wiwdiwr-s a hard bargain or le ils craft-
whf, now >ou ami. what the
,:nks a Jew is Bj we
t| ikjng uf one of these p n <" \ exl rtionate
}ew|ecj when we read the or; in the papers
6ie SUM against the dictionary.
It happened this way. We wanted .o write
about Jews connected with the birth of American
independence, since it was the month of July. We
should have liked to write about some Jew in
Congress in 1776. but there was no Jew there.
There was Ben Franklin. He gave a contribution
once for a synagogue in Philadelphia, but he wasn't
a Jew. There was one Catholic. Charles Carroll.
There was a Quaker; there were a number of busi-
nessmen. Maybe one of them is a Jew. but John
Hancock the merchant was no Jew. and Robert
Morris was a businessman, and he was DO Jew. But
when we thought of Morris, we remembered he
had a Jewish friend.
He was a money-lender. Haim Salomon. No
man is mentioned as much in the diary of Morris
as this Jewish money-lender, Salomon was respon-
sible for selling more war bonds than anyone else
and contributed of his own fortune in emergencies
What kind of a man was this Jewish money-
lender'' We get some idea from the letters of James
Madison, "the father of t1.''' Constitution." In one of
hi< letters, Uadfson tells of his monej problems,
li. has been hew" going bj Salomon, he writes,
but he hates to ''..new money from him. for Salo-
mon i. fa- ike any interest. Salomon told him
the price of mom high that interest should
only be taken from th e who use it for speculative
investment Haim Salomon "lied a po.ir man.
demonstrated "the absence of a
newly discovered enzyme, hezo-
saminidasc (Hex-A for short)
was the specific cause of Tay-
Sacha disease."
The discovery of the missing
enzyme made it possible to iden-
tify adults of child-bearing age
as carriers. Individuals having
the "carrier state" are themselves
healthy, but if two happen to
marry, onequarter of their chil-
dren run the risk of having Tay-
Sachs disease, according to
Javits.
Describing Tay-Sachs, Javits
stated, "The children gradually
are debilitated showing early clin-
ical signs of the illness at nine
months and losing more func-
tions controlled by the central
nervous system such as sight and
control of swallowing. They have
frequent convulsions and. as a
consequence of their increasingly
>e\ere Illness, require chronic
hospitalizatiqn for average peri-
ods ol two years before they die."
Hollywood
ssgjhaft Among the Jews" is
* the latest book from the
pen of Ernest Tidyman. Academy-
Award winning author of the
screen play, The French I
uection." Tidyman also created
the black superman character.
"Shaft,'' first as a novel and sub-
sequently for the screen. While
his new book is being published
in the U.S. and England. Tidy-
man arrived in London to produce
the moMon picture "Forfeits" for
Columbia Studios' British subsi-
diary.
The picture is based on his
own scenario of the Dick Francis
novel. The prolific Mr Tidyman
is currently writing the screen-
play to "Absolute Zero." to be di-
rected at the year's end by Peter
Medak. with Peter Sellers in the
starring role.

V.BEN HANDEL and Herman
Cohen have written the script to
1 >," a thriller originally
titled "Infernal Idol." which
started sh i ting at Britain's
Sh< perl m studios early in
March. Freddie Francis directs
for producer Herman Cohan.
Jack Palance, Martin Potter. Di-
rt:, a Hers. Michael Jayston, Hugh
Griffith and 85 -> ear. Id Dame
Edith Evans head the east
MICHAEL CAINE. the English
Star nominated for an "Oscar"
for his performance in "Sleuth."
will star with Ernest Borgnine
and Simon Ward in "They Strike
at Dawn." The Britain-based film,
directed by Michael Tuchner. is
on location in Yugoslavia: it
went before the cameras late in
March Clark Reynolds from the
I'.S. has written the screen play
of the World War II action dra-
ma v hich he also produces for a
private financial group.

IRWIN ALLEN, formerly a
Hollywood press agent, and an
intimate friend of Groucho Marx,
has crowned his 20 year career
as a producer with his film. "The
Poseidon Adventure." The film
has netted seven Academy Award
nominations this year, including
one for Shelley Winters as Best
Actress. In it- opening weeks in
the United States, the film has
earned 125 million. Directed by
Englishman R maid Neame, "The
Poseidon Adventure" is currently
the sensation of the London cin-
ema, though critics regard the
fi m as .1' fashioned corn.

PF.TF.lt SELLERS, a man of
many faces, appears currently be-
fore the cameras in the comedy
"Th* 0| I mists."
There's Plenty of Money for Guns...But No Funds for Our Health
"IT'S BAD legislation." the President said, as he re-
centlv vetoed the federal vocational rthabitation
I 1 Bad legislation bearing an alluring label." And
thus, declared Congressman John Brademas. the Presi-
nt slammed the door in the face of disabled Anted-
, Those who defend Mr. Nixon's action in saying -i
$2 8 billion appropriation designed to h.l-> the
ippled the biind. the otherwise disabled find their
btufjous way back to a degree of self-sufficiency, in-
-t that The'CoTl?re lo-gflCeTers riding'fast and hard towards a national tax
[increase Mr Nixon, they maintain, is quite right
fKcrcrl
t^ccyaf
when he says the degree of spending must be held to
the level he has imposed.
Strange how silent they are when the question
of increased military spending in the absence of war
i~ raised, hew sympathetically they nod the'r heads in
agreement when the Defense Department insists that
the arena of nuclear missiles and big bombers has
executive privilege protecting it from any economy axe.
So now the stage is set for the next, similar strug-
gle between Congress and the chief executive on the
monumental issue of health legislation. Not all Amer-
icans are affected by the plight of the handicapped,
but where is the family truly unconcerned about health
protection, health costs, and this nation's shameful lag
in health care for all?
Who will pay the piper of this new regressive
tune? The elderly, including the elderly poor
by
al
of
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.


Pcge 12
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Friday, July 27 j(
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