The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00045

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


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Full Text
0eJewisti Flondliaiin
me 2 Number 17
of \OHTII ItnOWARD
June 15. 1973
Price 20 cer/s
EHsberg Recalls How He Got Anti-Semitic Mail
B ROBERT E. SEGAL
: advised that since I am
a Jew I am a traitor." Dr. Daniel
said on July 15 1973. in
. 'i ,,n their slow Kakaesque
ainsl him in Criminal Case
I nited State- Vl Daniel
..ml Anthony J Ru-so Jr.
On tii.it lon^ ago day. Defendant
I dm Ira insight from
the fact that most of the adverse
mail he was then receiving con-
tilted of 'anti Semitic hate mail.
He said he four.d the letter
writer- tendency to equate ':
a Jew with being a traitor fright-
ening
I ater on. government pros*
luton with i 8 Distrl I
lud It Matthew Byrne Jr bird
em persistently,
tbliged lo narrow their accusations
against Ellsber* pretty much to
simple theft.
Theft. was it? Theft of the
Pentagon Papers? We Amer-
icans have learned since then
a great t^al about theft by the
government itself. Wigs and
false credentials are stolen from
our tax money by the domes-
tically meddlesome CIA to help
equip F.. Howard Hunt, Jr.. and
G. Gordon Liddy when they lead
a team of five into the offices of
Ellsberg's psychiatrist to try to
filch confidential files there.
Our conception of American
honor is stolen from us when John
D. Ehrlichman, as the President's
chief advisor for domestic affairs,
acting on Mr. Nixon's orders,
dangles the plum of FBI director-
ship before Judge Byrne in one
of the mot brazen interferences
by the executive branch of govern-
ment with the judiciary ever re-
corded. We are robbed of confi-
dence in the government when fed-
eral authorities, at the prompting
of the highest law enforcement
officer in the land, taps tele-
phono
Later, the tapes and transcrip-
Continued on Page 8
'DttfCT OR INDIRECT WORDING FAVORED BY ADMINISTRATION
Scali Warns US. Wants
No Change in UN Resolve
'A BUM HAW
katzir Airs
Memories
Of Old Days
By PHILIP GILLON
I hr Jerusalem Poet, Apr. 13. 1973
Vi-iting Prof. Ephraim Kat-
,.-ki a week ago was a com-
Btivtlj simple affair; all one
d< d to do was to knock on the
door Visiting President Ephraim
katz-r involves a considerable
wall while suspicious security
nun compare the reality of today
with the rather flattering photo
iphi from a bygone age on my
press card and identity book.
One* inside the house, which is
so laden with flowers that I guess
the florists of Jerusalem must be
even happier than the Kat/ir>
about his new honor. I found
!' il Katzir as cheerful as ever.
his abounding good humor in no
waj abated by the glory that has
D 'hrust upon him.
The President is a burly man.
with a great depth of chest and
breadth of shoulder and a large
leonine head that wrinkles with
lines of merriment when he
Igha, which he does often, at
j kes of others as well as his
n And he wrinkles his brow,
when he ponders over seri-
:- issues.
1 btgaa our talk by recalling
Continued on Page 10
WASHINGTON (JTA) "he
United States has warned the Se-
curity Council to avoid taking any
action which would disturb Res-
olution 242. The warning came
from John Scali. US. Ambassador
to the United Nations, in a rare
appearance before newsmen at
the White House a week before
the Council was to begin what he
called a sweeping review of the
Middle Eastern problem'' and the
day before Senate hearings began
on the Mideast oil situation and
the political situation in the area.
Scali declared the U.S. position
is for Israel and the Arab nations
to enter into "direct or indirect"
negotiations to reach a settlement.
He stressed in response to news-
men's questions that the "contin-
uance" of Resolution 242 "as it is
now written" is the "takeoff point"
essential to the opening of "direct
or indirect negotiations."
Scad's remarks were seen as a
strong rraffirmation of the U.S.
position, held for more than two
years, that a solution to the
Mideast conflict must come from
negotiations between the parties.
In addition, his comment* were
regarded as a rebuff to Senate
' Foreign Relations Committee
1 Chairman J. William Fulbrights
Continued on Page 7
Egypt Ready
For Peace:
Bourguiba
Prize- Winning Book Tells
How Jews Assisted Nazis
By RICHARD VAFFE
The only pleasant thing that
ha> happened to Isaiah Trunk in
connection with his monumental
work on the "Judenrat" of the
Nail period in Europe is the Na-
tional Book Award he has re-
vived for it. It was a book that
he thought had to be written, but
whether it was more painful to
write or to read will have to re-
main unanswered.
Dr Trunk, who wrote "Juden-
rat: The Jewish Councils in
Eastern Europe Under the Ger-
man occupation" (MocmilUn),
has a^ked himself many times,
| voiced the question at the
ceremonies where he received his
award. Do I have the moral right
to receive an honor for a book
about the suffering and destruc-
tion of my people n Europe.
I who had been miraculously
saved? I doubt it."
But he accepted It with the
understanding that it was not
for him "but for the subject,
which has finally gained entry
into American historiography
not as a purely Jewish subject
but one that reflects the gen-
eral human condition."
Forced on the Jews by the
Nazis, the Councils were local
bodies, ostensibly self-governing
but created, in fact, to serve only
one purpose to execute Nazi
orders regarding the Jewish pop-
ulation.
Dr. Trunk, wno is a research
associate at the YIVO Institute
for Jewish Research and chair-
man of the Commission for YIVO
Continued on Page 6
ROME (WNS) Italian diplo-'
matic sources said Tunisian Pres-
ident Habib Bourguiba will seek
this country's support for a Middle
East peace offensive when he ar-
rives here for an official visit :
June 12.
Italy, they said, plays an im-!
portant part in Europe's Middle
East policy because it is friendly |
with both sides. One Italian official
said Bourguiba is the first Arab
leader to propose negotiations
without preconditions.
Bourguiba had said that he
was convinced that Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat is also
"ready to recognize Israel, co-
operate with Israel and allow
Israel ships to pass through
Suez." He said he thought Egypt
was ready to start negotiations
with Israel, and that whether
talks were carried out directly
or through an intermediary
amounted to the same thing.
He added that Palestine Libera-
tion Organization leader Yassir
Arafat would be a "very valid"
interlocutor in any possible talks
In Tel Aviv, Mapam Knesseter
Dov Zachin called on Israel to
agree to meet with Bourguiba "to
increase Israel's credibility and to
test the Arab's readinesss for nego-
tiations without preconditions."
Foreign Minister Abba Eban
said in Jerusalem that the Israeli
Government would readily agree
I to meet with President Bourguiba
for talks on the Middle East con-
tlict. Israel would like to hear
irom Bourguiba his ideas on where
and when such a meeting could
take place. Eban said.
HAB/B BOURGUIBA
predicts concessions
Scheel Says
Arabs Will
Talk Peace
BONN (JTA) Foreign Min-
ister Walter Scheel. who returned
, here from six days of talks with
Arab leaders in Egypt. Jordan and
: Lebanon, declared in an interview
published in the Cologne Express
that the governments of those
countries strongly desire an early
peace and are ready to make
concessions."
Scheel reported that in his talks
with the Arab leaders he had
Continued on Pane 6-
Arab Initiative Won Gurion Approval
By GEOFFREY PAUL
pit, the often bitter and bloody nature of their pre-State con-
historical vision of that struggle.
rmvM Bcn-Gurion is one of the
old Yi>huv leaders who can still
reach across the cemeteries of fme
and salute a doughty opponent.
DAVID BtH4U*ION
tncovrafe mid
inn a-.-.*- -
Muussa Alami, on the Arab side,
is another.
It was Ben Gurion who, in 1970.
persuaded Al;.mi to come out of
his self-imposed exile in Lebanon
and return to the manaeement of
his 2,000 acre farm-school for re-
fuflee youngsters near Jericho,
known familiarly as Boys Town.
Now in his late seventies. Jer-
usalem-born and Cambridge-edu-
cated Alami was a lawyer in pre-
State Palestine. He was also a
founder of the Arab Office which
propagandised the Arab case and
which, even if only by contrast
with the more murderous Arab
organizations of the time, won
friends and supporters among
distinguished Westerners.

But Moussa Alami was more than
! a propagandist. He displayed a
! social concern for his less fortun-
ate fellow-Palestinians rare among
the Arab "aristocracy" and en-
ed himself in a practical en-
deavour to improve their lot.
His Arab Development Society,
established in 1948, remains a
tribute to his constructive effort
at a time when the thoughts of
Continued on Page 9
i
u
5
\

______.



e 2
+Jmlst>mml+w of North Broward
Friday. June 15
-
James Colin Studying
ToJiV ReforiifRalibi
- Coha i'. Ft I
m School
1AKIS COKY

prik
-
IS lift, llkr ciMirees i>l
J:id.*i*t:i WTlttra over
His other
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!iia ib veai fradaate
. h will lead to his ai
tbbi. and the degree, Doctor of
11 irish Steadies
in oaadunctioa with his aca-
eiiuc studies Jim ha* taken id-
ol the special opportun-
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, '.-., Negi and Sinai
bit. htaaeda visitiBg
- kmbotxhn, exptor
g th< byways of Israels .m.-ient.
id modern urban
Into H '
>( his n i>
. Reform rabbi
Jim was aecaptod into* the
c.n -Indent He i- -
at N Colh
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Friday. Ju 15. 1973
* Jewlst FkrMlfir Of North steward
Page 3
Chapter, Group Presidents
Are Installed By Hadassah
Tuesday evening. May 22. the
North Broward Chapter of Hadas-
sah formally came into being with
,f,r,,(. groups -Blyma. Chai. Sabra
under its guardianship.
It vias an historic moment in the
dynamic growth of Hadassah in
.North Broward. From a mere 18
n in 1966 the Hebrew inter
bolized by the number 18 Hadas-
bolia'd by the number 18Hadah .
!,i- matured to an impressiw
Sn>up of several hundred women
|1S founding parent Mrs. Oscar
!l of Fort I-auderdale. terv-
a installation Chairman.
At the installation the opening
prayer was said by Rabbi Morns
\ ->kop. spiritual leader of Tern '
She-Ion Cantor Jacob Renzer j
ol temple Sholom presented sever-
l| ,,. Nraeli songs.
The outgoing presidents. Mis
Hodner of Chai Chapter, and
Alan Marcovitz of Sabra
ler, in their farewt-ll speeches.
full recognition to their loyal
en
["he newly installed presidents
are Mrs. Alan Baxter. Chai Group
presidium representative. Mrs
Alan Porter. Sabra. Mrs. Morton
Sellner. Blyma. and Mrs. Ralph
Cannon. North Broward Chapter.
At the installation, which took
place at the Harris Imperial House
in i'ampano, Mrs. Leonard Wolpe.
national board member who in
stalled the officers, addressed the
members and guests She compar
ed the Hadassah Organization to a
\ast tapestry, each member work
b3| from the back of the can\,iv
doing her appointed task in the
weaving of the picture, thus help
ing to fashion the Hadassah pat
tern into an inspiring work of en-
during art.
However, wc must remeiliber
that our work can never be com-
pleted because Hadassah women
consistently turn toward the fu-
ture.' she -aid "Hadassah adheres
to the Talniudic adage ... it is not
upon us to finish the work and
continues to reinforce its pro-
gram.-'
Religious
Services
r-our lAuonoAii
BETH ISRAEL (Tempi*) Conserva-
tive 7100 W Oakland Park Slvd
R:>-)i "-kiv* Brilliant. Cantor Mau-
rice Niu 42
EM AN U- EL. 3349 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Arthur J. Ab-
rama. Cantor Jerome Kltment. 48
------a------
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM (Temple). 132 SE 11th Ava.
Conservative. Rabbi Morria A. Skop.
Cantor jamb J. Renzer.
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. (Con-
servative) S101 NW 9th St.
Kabbi Max J. Weilz Assumes
Coral Springs Leadership
Coral Springs Mayor
Issues Proclamation
His Honor Mayor James E Ed-
wards of Coral Springs presented
. Proclamation honoring Israel's
25th Anniversary to the Coral
Springs Hebrew Congregation last
month. On hand to accept the pro-
niuition were Art Finkel. vice
president. Sheldon Israel, second
\ice president and Mrs. Phil Gold-
farb. secretary of the congregation.
Mrs. Shirley Wolfe, president, and
Mrs. Gene Somers. secretary and
treasurer of the Ladies Auxiliary.
ibbi Max J. Weitz became the
spiritual leader of the Coral
ngi Hebrew Congregation last
h.
His previous pulpit was at the
ndale Jewish Center, where
I wai the rabbi for 6'.- years
ing the congregation from a
-hip of a few families to
BOO members.
Rabbi Weitz has been involved
in education both Hebrew and
secular, for many years, teaching
in the Dade County School Syi
tern for the past seven years He
i to headed Hebrew schools in the
Reform Movement for five yean.
I State Chairman iFla.l for adult
Jewish Education, he has lectured
land headed conclaves for both
i adults and youth groups.
Rabbi Weitz, who has been
..warded a Fellowship to FSU in
Religion and Social Studies, a pilot
j program, is a full member of the
National Association of Temple
Educators He received his teach
lag license from the National
1 Board. Union of American Hebrew
Congregations.
Rabbi Weitz has been a member
of the Human Relations Commis-
sion for the past three years. He
is also on the Clergy Task Force.
Dinitz: Does Not
Want Another Victory
LOS ANGELES (WNS) Israel
'has never lost a war. never will
I ise another war. but does not
want another victory." Simcha
Units, Israeli Ambassador to the
United States, told a United Jewish
Welfare Fund dinner here in his
first west coast appearance since I
his appointment.
"Wc don't want another victory
because wars leave orphans and
broken homes." he said. "We don't
need to adorn our army with an-
other victory." He said that Israel
has won four wars with its Arab
neighbors in the past 25 years
without achieving peace, but that
the wars had provided an idea in
Arab minds of Israel's inde-
nt ructability.
Such a conviction could lead to
a change in Arab mentality in
respect to negotiating peace, he
said, because "you don't negotiate
with a country you can destroy."
Israel, he said, would welcome
talks and remain flexible.
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>cge4
+Jmisf fhrkhsr
Of North Broward
Friday, June 15 1973
frJewist flcrUian
OF NORTH BROWARD
\ I ktPLAIfT PI \'E tri Srfir TfLiPMOst >"' -- !
ERTU1NO PKPARTMENT MtVtha"
MIAMI Vl-IUKSS PO I- \ :*: V*i. Florida r
ntEDK SHOCHET SI-TWYF JHOi-HCT SEI-.MAM TH
*l.-. \ rlh Br"Tn1
ROWAKD -V MI1J.FR IkVJ.v; 1 < IK IS* Bet
Freedom l r*+ utiv. Pire rt**
eH.ce J*i K
ftaapetooe ;**%* *
LUwlmUW FU

Aer 75 Fear Beside Point
The Jew f FK>r-4mn Docs Not Owarantee T*e Kaf-rvth
Of The Mercnand.ae (I'lwl In Iti CHrm
PuMisVr.1 n-WMUy
Secae*1 C" : M
"He Jwih ?Ter.e.an ktl afcMrbew the Jwih Uafts ara the Jew Weekly.
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ate twertwwi.se New* Service. Nilo'i' Ee.tor j Altec at 0". A-nencan As-
oc.atiew of Englisn-JrvMah NtwKiot-i ae) twe Fter.a Preaa Aaaeoat.on
S'^BSCKIPT'ON f*.TS: (Lecal Area^ One -ear IT K 0t ef Tee." Uawn'
Noaaaal
-y June 15. 1?"3
o'ohlSM 2
22 SIVAN 5733
Number l7
Sale Tied To OS. Oil Needs
There can be little question that the massive sale of
Americas nui.sary equipment to the Persian Golf states of
Saudi Arabia. Kuwait and lion is tied to the American
:-.eed tor oil from these nations whose regimes have re-
iiiaorl ioeodiy to this country.
We agree with Abba Ebon's new that Israel under-
stands the need to establish relative eecur.ry in that area.
but there is still a feeling oi ii at the sue and
quality oi equipment to be delivered, particularly to Kuwait
end Saudi Arabia who despite some ideological diifeiencv-s
vat other Arab states, would appear to be united with
-err. :.-. their honed oi Israel
The deal with Saudi Arabia includes the purchase c:
v.e highly sophisticated F-4 Phantom fighter bombers
vaich can hardly be classified as defensive aircraft ar.z
:s cause for wonder as to whet purpose such sales oaa
serve :r. the heated Middle East s.:u~:
Our State Department has provided the usual as-
surance that this country will not make any military sales
.-.at would put Israeli security in jeopardy but such state-
T.ents loday as in the past, must be taken with the usual
:op of oil Until the energy crisis is resolvedand hope-
fully Sen. Henry Jackson's inquiry into that will make sorr.e
headway -we must be on the alert to any action fetch
..oes. in tact jeopardize that security.
U.N. Report Sad Chronicle
. (htatvd Mataoni 5-r _"". .
riurt Watdheur on the Middle East ts. as it has been char-
i z sod chronicle of the known U.N. failure :r.
re-making. It certainly implied that the Jarrinc rn.ss.cr.
was a failure and made it clear that the methods use-
'equire serious reezamination.
What it all adds up to. the usual diplomatic and I' N
ianguage aside, is that the failure to bring the Arnc rac-
oons to the table with Israel in meaningful dialogue cm
he parties to the conflict means that there ccc be no prog-
ress toward a peaceful agreement at the Middle East
The upcoming meeting between President Nixon and
Russia s Brezhnev unaouotedly will cover the issues cf
the Middle East. Both powerful leaders r.-.ow by now fhal
.er alone nor in concert can a settlement be imposed
on the contending tores. Ocy their owr. efforts can do
I as the United Nations sad report makes clear
We Must Denumd Their Freedom
The appeal of 42 Moscow lews on the eve c:
rhnev's historic visit to Washington should nor
peace
not eason. Amencan Jewry must :
OQBimirment to press fc:
>edom Assembry far Sovie- Jew* s.-heculed
kgtaa on June 17. a a success ir. terns of the
r.umtaB of
The desire of all .Americans lor en er.; vrr
which has caused so many naticnal and internal::
problems during the past two decades is not in conflict with
the campaign on behalf of Soviet Je-.ery Nor I mus
added, with the needs of Israel's security Neither shosld
be the vxrems of an nrritm-rmkniini hetwsaa the rwc
great powers and we should let our President know th -
strong but respectful voice. We will not be satisfied with
mere tokens of good-will and me release of a few but only
with freedom now for all who wish it-
Back in December Rabbi Bal-
four Briekner observed that the
Campus Crusade for Christ has
a national budget of $18 million
and a suff of 3.000
Rabbi Briekner is director of
the Interfaith Department of the
Union of American Hebrew Cong-
regations, and his assessment
indicated just how seriously con-
cerned Jews are about the cru-
sade and its prototypes, including
the Inter -Vatalrj Fellowship
Jesta Prssks, and Jews for J.
Nothing has changed
then If anything there is even
more an\ 'y beins expressed.
sd it tKes the form of a grow
ing ard tht
o*i campaisn kn"wn as Kej
which involves some 130 E\an-
eelK.1. Catholic and Prutestant
bodies banned together to call
the continent to Christ
Mp*i- A Hemon-hagr
But it is 'he campus opera-
tion of Krj '73 that inspires the
greatest amount of angr> feelms
hence Rabb. Briekner s care-
fully researched statistics Jew-
bo have been the la ft la of
DroselvtizerN throughout thetr his
tor>. behe\e they are expenenc-
ed enough to take tmrt of them-
selves Wh_t womee them mt
their ehiidres
And so they seaw upon their
ancient defensive: teehmcjjt-.
priBcipall> the reerution of bibli-
esl chapter and vrse to deinon-
strate that evangelical-minded
Christun> have from the Ds)
One dtstdrted Jewish nx
about the Mesaaah to pave the
way for Jewish resurrect. >ti
through Chn>t. whom prose!
er> portray not only a a Jew him-
serf whs Hrw the l|
who first marm'acttired the bulb
and then turned it es

..kt trj n. Is BtSf a hemorr-
se only ^
dea
jb-
>ftee ob>
eu. tr.j' Mil ea
I
b-ji -le
star* covenant to the coven
Or that a Christian thee!
ttiet sees Chnstur
:' the Jewish faith
w-!. ha\ ,W-
stroj -.ce of I
Extraordisary Inflaewces
what Chris-
tian ried to d. for 2
yearshi destroy the Jew
people Toda
(he effor-
->e threat : Jewisfe >-n.-.a.
.- a~vsi*rd by ,ief.r,.twi
B. good
de
feme again** eotrverston to w ood
Mindliii
er whether Xmerican Jews aren't
reactinii t.> violently
Rabbi Brtdmer > statistic* are
certainly !! llHpillBI But one
can"' help wondenng ju>t how
effective all that money and man-
power really i< Are Jewish
dent- on SSflegC .ind unixervitv
really a> threat
ened by SaWSpsigSl for iemi
their paient iesr My own hunch
s that the) are not.
mu lent- ir tht nation of
every relagious |Wi HiMioti. not
just Jewish itedenU, have been
through exvvptionaliy difficult
hmst since ih earl) ls*60> an I
hu'.e com<' under eMrj'irdinary
inilirenees.
F : -r the) u. r, Inspirad by the
unrest at the Inr.-rsity of Call
forma that Marxist philosopher
Herbert Marti K precipitated
there in conjunction with the stu-
dent revolutionary movemenU of
Europe eff
Rud: r ennanj
Henri-Cohn I
Amencn :
only t -
1968
With Wat < ame Dm
- I
on :
in <
l
durii

abiy
call)

\\ th
I
campus h
The reht
-
w*r-
nam Tht
MATTER OF FACT
fought and lived and lost ,
Fasses Are Gone
-
in a
!ook a: I
.
auy
inOatiea. laa

ad =ot bee-
we
all an ia aaaatwr.. after *
'a-e a!' <. .eci or
aaa earning, or bap
earn ind >a%e ;r ;-0 fulun
ok
THI DtntGI rOStS
named beeawe it is a i
tag the della
a >*M'.i'. aaad Li-- : -
world pnee of ar our.^
bneCy went
Yet t!i stacgenr n the
gold pr... gives a measure of
the 1*5


IN IHI sf
ha>
-
thee-
shou.

petitivc. the .
would DOW N
fce:
Today, the fumes are largeb
gone, at least from the cL i ,
and the rebellion is ju>t a
memory< The Jesus, mov pfl
the heir to bothto the student
viion of himself upon the bar
ncades hi- continuing agonv and
search for meaning in his ljf*>
I'ndenrtood in these tern
Jesiis movemen' ij. only
phase m that agony, tha- y
The question is whether the
Jewish student who ha
a prominent role in all n-
influence- or campu-
plav a prominent ro|o
- phasr- to which Key
rect- its enemies so co-
tiou*lv
Dr Krie M>yrs pp.-
reHgioa at Duke, argue
hey 7:t often produces a k
ipirifal ;l--v a-tatmn hi
students, guilt feeling-
siomnng activities arou
them I find that hard to b
Jewish Student is Alone
In my owe txpenenc-
challenge to the Jewish -
today is not that ChnstL
attempting to speak to h
campus, but that Judaisr
really spokeo to hir
neither on campus n.
where ehe
It never mattered h*f..?T ia
the s^c.' way Reb
that failed, experiments trttt
*
AM more importan-
than ataM *V'
; nt. like Rail
jjW jam ow
boo'h
ataag goidf-.--
'
..
i
1
i
ip
eti
.'
from tk,
I
lur
>
! he rej. I
lmosl uaaii
> auea to J

: -,-s bam ran*
- hit ihilJi-
u.-
rrv*>Mu.-:
ai->r'.
' w
Mirea
rum rhiet
-
- -
by .I0.MPH A1SIII'
i
the gocv-

b\ NOSMAJ aaaau**

- i
t1-.
;"
- r
the ene.
s-perftoal sajas an
- .
'"s >aiag the
ate are
t oatiau.d on Page *


Friday, June 15. 1973
*J(*%ist HrrfcU&n Hoti\\ Broward
Page 5
Dinitz Queries Kissinger On
Sale of Phantoms to Arabs
WASHINGTON fJT.U Israeli
Sjnbassador Simcha Dlnitl calM
Mi week on Dr. Henry Kiseinser.
President Nixon < national security
dvlsor. to express his country's
',,,,., n about the sale of F-4
.,, jhs i Saudi Arabia.
According to sources here, the
n bj Mnitt did not constitute
>t against Washington's
tiationi with -Saudi Arabia for
onis but an effort to seek
.ition on the sale. Sources
reported that Dr. Kissinger
pan the Ambassador's ob
ratiOM on to Nixon and prom-
ised I reply.
The meeting between IMniU
aid Dr. Kissiiuer a part of
:hf on coing hi*h-le\el contacts
between Israel and the I nited
States since reports disclosed
thai the U. S. is planning large-
..a!.- arms sales to Kuwait and
srfiili Arabia. Ilinitr had been
-: in it-d b> the Israeli gov-
I nment to seek full details
ii the State Department on
quality and quantity of
\m<-:i Irab states.
wank I'init/ also met with
tant Set ret Stfcf J eph
on Thuradaj th state
r B Mia
: litarj lha Per
i ill ml H' i sxal ikes
'I unt our lone
and smaller slates in the area to
|cooperate with one another to in-
sure the security of the area."
Ho sam thil policy was initiated
hen Britain withdrew from the
Persian Gulf in 1968. A senior
U. s Administration official re
portedly said the sale of Phantom
jets would take a year to complete
, and another year or two before the
planes weir delivered.
WALLPAPER
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Off. HtHM KIMNGIK
policy ot tnp|' of Israel's
secui11 >
Paul .1 Han i Department
.poke-", n. si Ihe i S
will not make am nrilitarj Bales
that would put Israel'i security
into jeapardy."
lie di lined lo protido iletails
on the sales I it n I d thai this
1.1. >n to new
problems bu i ntinuation >>f
ihe I s policj to encourt
ti-an Saudi V sbi and Kuwait
AfTl* THKEE YEARS Of CAPTIVITY
Svria Sends Home
Prisoners of \\ ar
JACK L MORRIS, D.P.M. and SHfLDOH WIILENS, D.P.M.
announce the association
IRA E. BUTENSKY
for the practice of
PODIATRY
Boulevd-a Medical B;dg.
27'4C .wood Blvd.
Hollvwod Florida 330?0
Phone 929-193i
4330 W. Broward Blvd
Plantation. Flor-da 33J ; *
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599 S. Federal Highway
Dama, Florida 330i
>hone 921-C50Q
SALEM rth Three
; i i-ouei of w.r
| ratfc aj : ihrce
.>f captivity in E
lali irtui .. the
nrptoT? wtm IBM HP
ifti i theii planes
bj
10
.-, PM The
ice -it
iii h Ju
t-. cul I top n
lioiu olved the
I R< I Cl i--. Israel and
freed Israelis are Captains
1 '. on Magi n and PMaM Nafc>
'. t!i i nd each the
ol two chlldraa, and l.t.
Eitan, h> is unmarried.
I lie three were briefly re-
BDJtSsI with their families at
Kunattn after their rrtraw and
then taken to an Air Force base
< i debriefing. Later tney were
luncheon guests of Deicnse
Minister Moshe Dayan. thief of
"tiff (.en. I)a\id BbbbW and Air
I'irte Commander Benjamin
"I'd. Pieniler C.olda Melr in-
1 niapted a Cabinet meeting ta
preet them by telephone.
Speaking to roportan at the Air
Ii.ino. the fliers .said the
Syrians had subjected them to the
methods of torture used by
'lie Turks before World War I
with some modern refinements, in-
| loctriC stlOat They said
Ah


ay
>
t brand
n, at i '< r :<<' and
: the
9j i: admit* 'I 'here i
the
PWs but said,
rii.,; no) "ii Vou are
Israelis li ment
was < d bj rep.
I and body.
Miic,I prts
om., tured
rib< m > ad urrence dui
ing tl Brsl f< nonths ol their
rii. y re ex
amii | ,nl\ to see
if iii. ng < tough
to t> .ii furthi. lure.
Cant who brok -i
le._ when hi said he
I ment for
days bat .'.i- repeatedly
beaten by hi I during that
interval tun d lag and
'on his head H said 'hat as
result of head injuries he per-
manentl) I 1 rhs hearing o! one
eat.
('apt Nahmanl, who broke a
account of his treatment. He
said they wrie not -isited by
Red Cross representatives for
4': months after their capture,
and thai |* riml was the worst.
Rut even later, when their
treatment had improved, it was
still far from what the doom
Convention required.
Opt Hagen laid that while a
prisoner he was able to take
corraapondenci course in median
leal engJoaaring from the Haifa
i,,inn..n He said btatbaoki m
rlebrew and BngUah were sup
plied to him through the facilities
of the Red Cron
Dayan, who was on the Golan
Heights to Mitness the PW S>
Change, told reporters that it
, might pave the way for I similar
I exchange with Bgypl hut that he
didn't want to miM KM much hope
for that prospect. Thee are ten
Israeli I'Ws hi BaTPt, moat of
then downed flic", and 56
Egyptian PWs l" UnA
a
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f acre o
Page 6
f-JfnisMerHkM North Browtrd
Fridcy. June 16.1973
Prize-Winning Book Tells How Jews Assisted Nazis
C? ... ____ n,^n uhptto lords. Tl
Continued from Paf 1
Archives and Library, mows the
subject at first hand. He was in
h.- native Poland during the
Holocaust and after the war
served on the editorial staff of
the Jewish Historical Institute ic
Warsaw until 1950.
The Judenrat." he said, "is <
subject that has been discussed
;th much passion but with com
paratively little historical com-
petence. I approached this diffi-
cult subject in full consciousness
cf the great academic and social
responsibility, with the unbiased
striving for a historical study
Dr. Isaiah Trunk is a Poiish-born Jew now
living in New York. He has recently been
awarded the 1973 National Book Award for
his book, "Judenrat," a study of Jewish coun-
cils which operated under the Nazis in East-
ern Europe.
baseo on oDjective documenta-
tion
"I have not attempted to
render a social verdict, for or
against the Judenrat. but to
understand the complicated
constellation of external social
factors and conditions under
which the Judenrat had to op-
erate, the nrotivi s of the people
involved, and the result of their
actions."
Scheel Certain Arabs Ready
To Make Peace Concessions
Continued frov rage .
stressed Vest uermany s "neu-
trality in the Middle East conflict"
and the "balance of our Middle
East policy."
He said that Israel was going too
far in demanding a settlement out-
side international organizations.
"One must see whether other
that the Arabs, who are the un-
derdogs, do not want to enter ne-
gotiations with the victors alone
and unprotected.' he said.
One must see whether other
ways are open." Scheel said,
adding that he thought it would
he useful if the whole problem
ceaJd be kept within the United'
Nations.
Scheel made similar remarks in
a television appearance and an-'
other newspaper interview since |
his return from the Middle East. I
They drew sharp attack in the
Bundestag from Erik Blumenield
oi Hamburg, a member of the
opposition Christian Democratic
Union and a member of the Ger-
man-Jsrael Society.
Blumenield said it was incredi-
ble that Bonn could adopt a neu-
tral stance when the survival of
Israel was at stake. He censured
Scheel for stressing West Ger-
many's balance and neutrality
which he claimed was the kind of
diplomacy that could raise mis-
understandings in the minds of
Arab leaders about West Germa-
ny's attitude.
Blumenield s criticism was re-
jected on behalf of the govern ]
ment by Transport Minister Laur-
itz Lauritzen. who said it would be
wrong for Germany to be partial
to one side or the other in the
Middle East conflict.
Scheel said in an interview
published in the weekly. 'Writ
Aaa SonnUg." that he thought
renewed warfare between the
Arabs and Israel was highly un- lations with Israel which have a
likely'. He said his recent talks "special character" arising from
with President Nixon, Soviet the terrible past under which
Communist Party Secretary Leo- jews anc| Germans have suffered
nid I. Brezhnev and Soviet For
BBW Chapter Plans Danct,
Paid Up Membership Dinner
Ahavah Chapter. B nai B'nth
Women, will hold a "Dunk in-
Dance" party at the Gait Ocean
Mile Hotel Saturday at 8 p.m.
The chapter ptans Us third an-
nual paid up membership dinner
Wednesday, June 27. at 8 p.m. in
the Sunrise Recreation Center.
1720 60th Ave.. Sunrise.
eign Minister Andrei Gromyko
indicated that both superpowers
agreed on some points in their
assessment of the Middle East
situation.
He said the U.S. and the USSR
both saw a peaceful solution as
the only way out of the conflict
and each acknowledged that nei-
ther could derive any benefit from
new hostilities.
Scheel said he had the impres-
sion from Brezhnev and Gromyko
that the Soviet Union wanted a
lasting peace in the Middle East
through political means. He also
stressed that Germany did not
want a mediator's role but was
ready to throw its political and
economic weight into the balance
in order to help find a just and
lasting solution together with its
partners in the European com-
munity.
Scheel said that in his talks with
Arab leaders be had explained, and
the Arabs were well aware, that
West Germany maintains good re-
in thi-. century."
Although he found certain gen-
eral trait- in me activities of the
council-., in their -ocial policies.
m the motives of their strategy
and tactics towards the Nazis, he
came to the conclusion that the
eBtlrt problem of the Judenrat
\.6 to be individualized.
In the finl analysis." he said.
we are dealing with people of
various socio-psychological con-
struction who react variously to
ilBilar situations and challeng-
Therefore. "simplification
^energization' must be
avoided.
Although the ghettoes were
similar so far as their formal
framework or repressive limita-
tion! -nd the role they were ex-
pected to play in the "final solu-
ion o: the Jewish problem were
concerned, they were not homo-
geneous in their internal demog-
raphic- and socio-economic struc-
ture. Dr. Trunk said
Tl re were also historical and
geographical differences as well
as the location and extent of
the extravagances of the local
Fuehrer Principle' of the Ger-
re-
man ghetto lords. The-e differ-
eneaa were reflected in the
spectivc Judenrat- "
The book show- H
there were a number of Cour. .1
mi mbers wno chose suicide i
er than cooperate with the N
many served the German-,
in police and deportation
Dr. Trunk hastens to explain:
the members of the Countil
-were upnder the pressure of
onlcal. rr.erciles terror h> the
Nazis at all times, that the
piospect of being killed sooner
or later was a concrete eventu-
ality, and that even' step taken
was liable to postpone or
hasten it.
(inly in the contev if
extraordinary situation is it pos-
sible to grasp at all or explain
the activity of the Council- Cr
their members."
Dr. Trunk was born in Poland
in lttOo and holds a master de-
gree from the University of War-
saw and a doctorate in Jewish
literature from the Teach* --'
Seminary of the Jewish Thc<>
cal Seminary' of America
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^MUIXL


Fnday. June 15 1973
*Jt*i* F*rrkfk*n of North Broward
Page 7
Scali Warns U.S. Wants
No Change in UN Resolve
Continued from Page 1
:iiion in a Senate speech that
it powers shouTd impose a
lenient through the United
lions. Fulbright had scheduled
:nns for two days on the Mid-
lld the oil situation as it
U the U.S.
Scali said the U.S. "attitude" in
Security Council will be "in-
icnced by two main considers
These, he said, are that
the principal parties to the dis-
pute have each accepted Resolu-
tion 242 "as a basis for a settle
eot' and that "while we recof
./c that each side has long held
different interpretations of this
-dlution, we continue to feel it
a fundamental framework whose
continued existence is essential."
Continuing. Scali said: "We be-
ve that the Council must avoid
any action which would have the
effect of altering its substance and
delicate balance. Equally import-
ant, we have noted in this regard
that whenever United Nations
t odies seek to reinterpret Security
. Council Resolution 242 or have
?uggeited procedures not accept-
able to both sides, they have im-
. peded rather than promoted nego-
tiations between the parties. We
believe, therefore, that the Coun-
cil must avoid any action which
would make more difficult the
achievement of a meaningful dia-
U between the part.'
Seali's reference to ^inter-
pretation of the resolution ap
pears to be a strike against the
renewal of Ambassador Gunnar
Jarring's proposal of February.
1971, in which he set forth sug-
gestions for Israeli withdrawal
from the occupied territories.
' Scali also said that the I'S.
I would be "guidei! by our friend-
, ship and esteem for both sides" in
the Councils discussion and would
work for "a constructive outcome
JOSEPH flLSDP
( ont. fr.Hr Face 4-
ng exceedingly numerous Many
A the independent oil compa-
nies are in danger of going to
the wall. But these developments
threaten our comfort rather than
our dollars.
The threat to our dollars can
be located, rather, by such signs
<. the new, far more pessimis-
tic projections recently made
by the Chase Manhattan Bank.
TTie bank's energy expert, John
Winger, is one of the more con-
servative and disinterested men
n his difficult field. But just
the other day, Winger got out
a revised forecast showing the
cost of U.S. imports of crude oil
and other petroleum products
rising to $17.5 billion a year
within three years' time.
Projected imports will there-
fore approach 50 per cent of
Winger's projection for U.S. de-
mand for crude oil and petrol-
eum products. This means crip-
pling dependence on overseas
i nergy sources, which we are
quite unable to control or to pro-
teet But from the standpoint of
he future of our dollars, the
cost figure is still the key figure.
THE COST figure for imports
rmuh that the United States
will have to find this much
money to send abroad in pay-
TM-nts for energy in 1976. Since
>mand for energy is both un-
>ntroUed and rising rapidly,
he cost figure further means
hat we shall have to find a lot
more, year by year, in each year
after 1976. But the worst trou-
ble is that all these projections
are strictly theoretical.
They are the figures the peo
pie are looking at who arc cast-
infl in their dollars any buying
cold These people know there
nothing in the U.S. balance
of trade to suggest that we will
hu\e such huge sums to pay for
"ii projected imports of crude
I other petroleum products
I people also know that if
I country cannot pay up. one of
two thlnfi must happen. Usually
happen.
Pint, the country's currency
rapidly loses its normal value
\uii second, because the cur-
rency begins to resemble Con-
(ederata greenbacks, sellers over-
u ... refuse to accept it. That is
*here the energy crisis will take
and our dollars if we do not
I take corrective action soon.
that will enhance and not impede
the prospects for a just and cqui-
uted agreement be-
tween the parties.' He cautioned
that "No one's interest is served
by resort to recriminations or un-
.. 01 Kable procedures."
| to questions. Scali
said not anticipate a veto
by the U.S. in the debate would
be necessary.
Hi be said, although the
' S. has no plans to introduce its
wn resolution he would be "pre-
(I to take whatever action is
necessary in the debate which be-
thii week Regarding the
prospects for talks between the
: ...- Scali said that much would
depend on the "temperature of
the debate.' whether it would be
. 'constructive'' or whether it
wuid be an "exchange of deunci-
1 ation and insult "

Simcha Dinitz (center), recently appointed ambassador
to the U.S., and Elmer L. Winter (left) of Milwaukee, presi-
dent of Manpower, Inc., newly elected president of the
American Jewish Committee, exchange views about their
new posts with Philip E. Hoffman, US. representative to
the U.N. Human Rights Commission, whom Mr. Winter
succeeded as AJC president, at the organization's 67th
ennual meeting in New York. Mr. Dinitz was principal
speaker at the closing luncheon of the four-day meeting.
Holland America's s.s.Volendam and s.s.Veendam present:
8
temptations to
a Mediterranean
cruise
1. You'll sail either the Volendam or
Veendam. They were the Brasil and
Argentina, two of the most luxurious ships
that ever graced any sea, now made even
more so.
2. You'll stroll a brand new multi-million
dollar Promenade Deck, with new pool,
shops, bistros and lounges.
3. You'll dine in the unique poolside Lido
Restaurant
4. Staterooms are not only supremely
coacious. 90% face the sea
u. Each ship is a full 22.000 tons, yet the
niinirr* 4K.

capacity is 550. hundreds fewer than ships
cf comparable size
6. You'll have the nicest crew in cruising
at your beck and call, and no gratuities
required.
7. Yet for all their qualities, the ships are
priced at less than you'd expect.
8. The Mediterranean: at least twenty ports
on every cruise, many exclusive to Holland
America Such great meccas as Morocco,
Monte Carlo; ancient islands like Delos;
discovery ports iike Costa Blanca. La
Coruna
Western European August 10. s s Veendam from
New York 35 days. 20 poits including Madeira.
Casablanca. Gibraltar. Syracufe. Naples. Lisbon.
Le Havie Torquay From S1680 to $5680
MOIJlk
utOMAI
Western Mediterranean August 31. 8.8. Volendam
from New York 35 days. 23 ports including Cadiz.
Malta. Genoa. Cannes. Monte Carlo. Barcelona.
Casablanca. From $1610 to $5450
Holland Amtrki Crunei. Suile 80S. International Bldg........
2455 E. Sunrise Blvd., h. lauderdale. Ha 33304
Teleohone 305 565 5586 M.*mi Phone 945 4454
Please rusn me your Iree-full color folders
on the cruises I've listed below.
Name.
Ad dry_____
-Stale.
-Zip.
Want a can' Phone
Travel Agent______
Fall Mediterranean October 6. s.s. Volendam from
\ev\ York From Port Everglades 10/8 41 days.
20 ports .nclud.ng Casablanca. Minorca Cannes.
;e Carlo. Delos. Mykonos. Istanbul. Rhodes,
a. Lisbon From $1980 to $6850.
We're Dutch and we want everything to be perfect
Rates per person, based on double occupancy and
subject to availability. The s.s Veendam and
s.s Volendam are registered in the Netherlands
Antilles See your travel agent, or clip the coupon.
Holland America Cruises
?

CELEBRATING A CFMTURY OF LUXURY SERVICE
i
in
s

o
i
Ii
i.


f acre a
Page 8
*Jeisi> rhrMiw North 8fOW,rd
Friday June 15. 1973
Civil Aviation
Body Exonerates
Israel in Disaster
LONDON (JTAJ The Inter-
national Civil Aviation Organiza-
tion dCAO> has reportedly ssjaeV
rated Israel for the Libyan air-
liner disaster that occurred Feb. 21
over the Sinai According to a
noort in Friday's "Daily Express."
in advance ol tie 1CAO report's
official release dale June 5. the
civil aviation group stated that the
Israeli pilots "complied with the
accepted procedures" to warn the
lb* an airliner pilot that he should
land his craft, pointed to the air-
field where Uw airliner could have
landed safely." and fired harm-
It sal) at the ;.ir!! HT.
According to the Express
story, the ICAO report "also
exonerated the Israelis from the
false charge that they had
tampered with the black box of
the Libyan aircraft." Libyan
and Egyptian orfHia after the traj "dv that Israel had
tampered with the plane's re-
cording mechanism < brim; it
in line with Israel > report that
the piiot hid !>i-en given all
acceptable > il ni \: > before firing
on the plane.
The Expn 54 lenee editor.
(h;.pman Pirn lei commenting on
the ICAO report, stated: "This
toner; to:- the Israelis to
such .in extent th;it :nany countries
and organizations which criticized
the L-rae u unprovoked act
of 'barbarism will .:.. < t > do
izing." The Expi i
on the report provided the
i .wnu inf(
Th- <'< d
in Libya before takeoff was b?lo\v
Btandard. Unusua srfndi ,n
t i ;i hicti put the p
i i ourse wi re n il even men
i
The In i was not
i the C>
approach ntrol : W lanr
i : ir \vas ui Mc Aimi K
i t had devi
: m hi iri and b
get lot la rada.
from bu H>
h ;-
...- acki
never *:\< n I
About this time a shift ehanRe
of the air traffic controllers at
Cairo Airport was taking place.
When thv Cairo controllers
eventual cleared the airliner
to descend for landing, belie*
ing it was 13 Bailee away the
plane was actually crossing the
f.ulf of Suez in good visibiliiv
I and enteriag Israeli-occupied
Sinai soane 1M miles away.
Whea Cairo instructed it to
descend to 4.000 feet, it was 105
miles away and only 15 miles
from an important Israeli defense
base and military airfield. Even
when the pilot saw the airfield he
vas still in touch with Cairo and
*as so convinced that he was near
Cairo that he mistook Israeli
Phantoms for Egyptian IfJGt.
The Israelis picked up the plane
by radar before it crossed the
Qadf of Suez Phantoms with the
Israeli Air Force Ma-en David
learly -narked on them went up
Thus, they complied with the ac-
cepted procedure. The leading
Israeli pilot rocked his Phantom's
wings which is an order for a
uspected aircraft to land The
Libyan Boeing pilot did not com
ply and he was still talking to
Cairo Airport about landing there.
The Israelis repeatedly pointed
to the airfield where the air-
liner could have landed safely.
Rut the Bating co-pilot, a Libyan,
indicated that he wanted to fly
straight ahead. The Israelis then
fired tracer bullets harmlessly in
front of the Boeing.
These wan seen by both pilots
of the Boeing. The Israelis then
fired Si the Libyan aii liner's star-
board wit": tip without doing
Mil damage. When the Boeing
-till f.ulid to comply they fired at
its starboard wing root and this
forced the plane to descend, but
-till under control. The pilot then
Tied to land in the ilesetl and
crashed The map attached to the
report n il onlj confirn 'he Israeli
ion but shows that the plane
a even further into Sinai. The
epei KOBI rates the Isi.
from the .' cha thai they
hid 1 ilack box
of fi Libyan aircraft
TOdo
business the
right way.

*r 3* sjhsJ e- B .C

lore OAKLAND TOYOTA
having a kr mitxvah? Planning a wedding?
anticipating months of nervous frustration?
Become The Pampered Hostess
Be a Guest at Your own Affair .
let invitations etc.
handle all Your invtiat'on and Accessory Neecs .
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY
invitations etc.
KEN TARNOVE
972-4417
Ellsberg Recalls How He Received
Anti-Semitic Hate Mail
Continued from Page 1
lions disappear rot .. wniie into
the mud along the Potomac
There should be a lesson for all
elder hawks in the Ellsberg trial
if only they will give it a chance
:o settle into their minds and
psyches. Daniel Ellsberg and
1 Judge Byrne are both in their
ataif 40s. They were both teen
igers when World War II was
binding down. Both now know
what a monumental blunder it has
been for the United States still
iffected by the McCarthy-Birch
tendency to elevate fear of Com-
munism above all considerations
lo remain so long involved in
Vietnam, so free with the spilling
of its blood and the blood of inno-
cent Asian women and children
Ellsberg was anything but a dove
when he first went to Vietnam.
His detractors have conveniently
forgotten that he was a Marine
lieutenant, a war planner in Viet-
nam. It was only after lie gar*
long dedicated service to the De-
fense and state Departments, u
well as to the Marine Corps, that
he concluded, in his own words.
that our involvement in Asia was
based on "lies, deception, and
secrcc*.' that the s.vslem he had
been laboring for wai DM that
Iron top to bottom had conH
acl reflexively. automatically, to
Iconceal murder for political con-
: veniencc b] lying."
With mistrial declared, with
the Pentagon Papers charges
dismissed, with assurances given
that Ellsberg and Russo are not
to be tried again, with this trial
that lasted 89 days at a cost of
somewhere between a million
and two million dollars finally
closed out. all good citizens will
insist that the government begin
to come clean on the complex
issue of protection of its docu-
ments.
Ironically enough, we can make
a beginning by recollecting cer-
tain words of the high government
official moat sc\ercl\ .iff cted bj
the Ellsberg cast dismissal, Pres-
ident Nixon. Fed this same
President who or,,, -aid.
Fundamental to our way of life
is the belief that when information
which properly belongs to the pub-
lic is systematically withheld hy
those in power, the people looa
become ignorant ol their own af-
fairs, distrustful of those who
manage them, and eventually
incapable of detenninin, their
mn destinies''
Far from committing espion-
Ige, Ellsberg ha helped commit
many of us to a new resolve to
halt Washington > march to i Mm
where the Republic ends and the
police state take- ov r.
Dl
el
ol
ti
,i
d;
ti
B
I
Dl
St
aftH
ch
of
t '
Wildfire
in the south.
There's no
future in it.
Nearly half o' the South an
By woodsa'w.' kidSOUtlOf
a Ihnll Of grown men .frying out
a grudge with matcl
If youd like to
prevent arson
report III ^
Ml.- yk gab
Help Prevent Forest Fires in the South
ts* C.
41 day cruise
to europe,
the mediterranean
and 8 days in israel
Sept 8 toOct 18. 1973
miaini oxores
naplcs (roinc) cithens
hoifo (tel civiv &
Jerusalem)
li'/orno (florcncc &
madeira JSL?2.
miami $399S
The tvggt
most 11 i '
true h
Miami Cru i.'"
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Fiiday. June tt IS'/b
+Jtnisti fhrtdfotf Of North Broward
Page 9
Arab Initiative Won Gurion Approval
Continued from Page 1
many Arab ukn were turned
.|-where.
I was in 19+8 after the division
0f a hat had been forr erly Pales
,.. that Alami started farming
iiiic-i of desert land in the Jor-
darhadtniniitcred section of Pales-
tine between Jericho and Allenby
Bridge Some M] that he wta in-
ipired bji the kibbutz example.
r later, having found
,..;. par.dcd the farm
created there Boys Town.
caUj | ittr for young sons
fugee familial and |lve them
iductivc rapacity which would
-elp lift them out of the mire of
.amp life.
His efforts were not appreci-
ated by Arab extremists. On
several occasions, armed attacks
were made on the farm and
Mami was denounced for "try-
ing to liquidate the case of the
refugees
But he persevered until the Six-
Day War and the Israeli occupa-
tion. While the Israelis destroyed
wells to prevent their being used
as terror:-t hideouts and took other
secuiity precautions, the Joidar
\imy compounded Boya fawn's
Misfortunes with a heavx -helling
Question Box
Why do some people change
the name of a person who is
critically ill?
I hi- trad 'u is based on a
. vment r the Talmud (Rush
ikJtashaoi Mb ahlch claims that
changing a person's name is one
M the mean- f changing his de-
liny. Commentaries (e.g.. Rashi.
Genesis 15 S laim that a change
of name brings a change <>f fata.
Same derive this from the in
.statue- in the Bible where a
Change of name did bring forth a
new dimension in the life of the
individual leg. Abraham. Sarah.
Jacob).
Some claim Wat Mfflera are per
haps two destinies in the life of
every individual: the real potential
and the empirical The empirical
which, while causing no casualties.
did thousands of pounds worth of
damage.
From afar. Almi supervised the
work of rehabilitation until, three
years ago. he returned to reei-
dence in Jerusalem and direct
supervision of his farm-school.
The Jordanian Army saluted him
at ana side of Allenby Bridge, the
Israel Arn .. greeted him warmly
at the other.
Hi- pledge not to engage in
political activity was apparently
matched by an Israel undertaking
not to hamper the development of
Boys Town
But. subsisting on charity, and
tiny may lead one into great
danger A change of name may !
I).' the mean- of bringing this I
potential destiny into focus and ,
avoiding the accidental fate that
laema to impend.
The mystics put it vary simply
by saying that the angel of death
receives an assignment to bring
in an individual of a certain name.
Changing the name of the indi- i
vidual defeats the assignment of'
the angel of death.
with little international Arab sup-
port, financial problems abound.
Alami grows no younger and is
concerned to ensure that the work
'ie started will not fall apart for
jck -\* KinWs- and This explains how such strong
critics of Israel as Sir Harold
Beeley. frnir British ambas-
sador in Cairo and John Red-
law ay. former I'nrwa deputy
.ommissioner. could steel them-
V.V
My Son, the Dancer**
How good it is

linslon
'LfC
selves to join other associates
and Alami in Israel occupied
territory earlier this month to
discuss Boys Town's future.
Su Harold, joined by Mrs.
Dianne Gibson Watt, even called
on Defense Minister Moshe Dayan
to seek his co operation in easing
conditions at Boys Town. A per-
sonal approach was also made to
Km* Hussein
With Governments abroad being
asked to help and much good will
all round, the signs are that
IfOUaaa Alami will have the as-
surances be seeks that his work
will go on.
--2s
&
Z.K-
SSfcfl
yM d^fuh,
iH/
"tr> a a&Ga
. daughter's vxedding
unique wedding present:
it of Empire Kosher
ideal gift for the young
maker! test quality poultrv,
ready-to-co >k
eni Inspected. Protectively
d n do HO lust till in
ittach n to the Wedding
(We won't <
i ilies
I. W1
jet '" is' '

id ma}
Winston tastes good, |
when a cigarette should.
./-**

: rful!
- -
\\" sjPtRKING
OR KING
r > -r.c crce fO.
SUPER '.
;, 14 mg meoti-e. BV rip*" nc "*fli U-

State

..rrivc aft*
\
^6^-^^fe^&^es^'

r


Page 10
+.imistith)r/4k*r)
Of North Itoward
Friday, June 15. 1973
PreS. Katzir Recalls Old Days I Community Calendar
Continued from Page 1
an old Russian story: the peasant
woman who didn't have any
troubles, so she bought herself a
little pig. What had made him
decide to move out from his lab-
oratory into the palace of the
President?
NEUMANN'S WARMING
That reminds me of some-
thing that Israel's first Presi
dent. Chaim Weiimann. a'se a
scientist, once said to me. When
l came to Rehovot in 1948, I
became very friendly with him,
and one of my duties was to
visit him every couple of weeks
to summarize developments in
all the sciences for him. One
day he looked at me very
thoughtfully for some time, and
then said: You know, I think
you're going to make a good
scientist, but God forbid you
should ever get involved in pol-
itics. Think what would happen
to you if you did you would
become just like me.' "
Heedless of Weizmann's warn-
ing, he now becomes, at the age
of 57. Israel's second scientist-
president, after attaining almost
even, scientific honor possible in
his field.
"You wonder why I need a
headache' To answer you. 1 think
I have to analyze my life, to
draw up a kind of spiritual sum-
mation of the years behind-me.
When I look back. I see two di-
rections that I have taken, not
contradictory to each other.
\\ hen I was 16 or 17, I was deep-
I] involved in Hagana (pre-State
army), in fact I attended the first
illegal course for platoon com-
manders the highest military
training then available. Yigael
Yadin (Israeli army's first Chief
ot Staff, and well-known archae-
ologist) was one of my tutors;
Alex Keynan (a vice president of
the Hebrew University) and Yitz-
hak Navon (now Deputy Speaker
of the Knesset) served under me.
I also worked very hard in Noar
Oved (Working Youth Organiza-
tion) and the Socialist Club.
THRILLED BY SHAZAR
"When I visited President Sha-
zar on the night I was elected, he
recalled coming to speak to our
club twice: I remember how
thrilled we were by the way he
got so excited about his subject
matter that he walked round the
stage. I still meet people all over
the country, many of them Se-
phardim (Orientals) from the
poor areas of Jerusalem, who
have done very well for Israel,
and who say that the starting
point for them was in Noar Oved
or the night school we ran in
the Socialist Club.
"I like people and I try to un-
derstand them. But sometimes I
feel that I have to get away from
them and deal with nature, so I
go to the laboratory, and try to
understand nature. But my lab
is not an ivory tower. I have al-
ways tried to serve my people in
whatever I did."
No other bub, except per-
haps his brother, Aharon, who
was killed in the I-od Massacre
last year, has played so im-
portant a role in the statesman-
ship of science in Israel, in
getting research and develop-
ment a fair place in the Israel
Min and in government budgets.
He has served as adviser to
every Prime Minister, Minister
of Defense, and Chief of Staff;
he has shaped scientific policy
through membership of govern-
ing boards and council.
"In the War of Independence,
Ernst Bergmann, the .'ate Prof.
Yohanan Ratner and I created
the research unit for the army
first called Hemed. later Rafael.
Many of the people we got to-
gether at the time helped re-
cently to develop the Gavriel and
Shafrir missiles. Some marvelous
things have been done by such
scientists and engineers for de-
fense. As an Israeli and a scien-
flfSIOfMT KATZIf
tist, I naturally pray for peace.
people 'mttrttf him
An extra reason for wanting
peace is that if we divert such
men to peaceful scientific work,
they could improve our industry
immensely by two magnitudes;
they are so good at taking an
idea from the laboratory bench
to the production line.
ADVICE FROM B.-G.
"I started as an adviser to
Ben Gurion or rather as
the recipient of advice from
him. He asked my brother.
Aharon and me what we wanted
from him, and then gave it to us.
He helped us immeasurably: his
respect for science and learning
goes very deep. He used to say
to me at the end of an official '
conversation. "Now let's talk
boot important things what's ,
happening in science?'
"He often said that he would
iiave done research in biology
his daughter is a biologist if
he hadn't got involved in politics.
"Once when I was telling him ,
about my work on the structure
of proteins, he said. "Why don't
you do something interesting
why don't you study the brain?' j
A couple of weeks ago, the work i
my group is doing on cell mem- 1
branes resulted in my going to
a Conference on the Brain in
Boston, and I thought to myself, j
'Yes. B. G. was right again!'"
The late Prime Minister,
Levi Eshkol, persuaded Ka-
tchcalski to head a committee
that investigated all the re-
search and development done
in government ministries, and
to formulate a policy for the
future. He worked on it for
three years. One of his main
recommendations was that a
chief scientist should be ap-
pointed for every ministry's
decision making.
This proposal, affecting the
Ministries of Commerce. Com-
munications, Agriculture. Health,
and Development, was accepted
and the Ministry of Defense
already had a Chief Scientist, one
Professor Ephraim Katchalski.
One of his proposals that was
turned down was the creation of
a completely independent Sci-
ence Authority maybe the ex-
perience with television and
radio had made the government
rather chary about scattering in-
dependence wholesale.
"I'll tell you a really typical
Eshkol story. The first time
Danny Shimshoni (then Director
of the National Research Council)
went to see Eshkol, he prepared
a long lecture, and he took with
him all kinds of charts and data;
he even took a blackboard, so as
to prove to Eshkol that science
is a good thing. He also asked me
to come along to give him moral
support. Eshkol interrupted the
lecture after five minutes, and
said. 'I know all that. In even
public speech I make. I say that
we couldn't survive for a moment
without science. But now we're
talking in private, tell me
straight. 'What use is it?"*
He has been in close contact
with Golda Meir about science
policy. "She is always very lucid
and comes straight to the point "
One way and another, he has
been closely associated with all
the leaders who shaped the des-
tiny of Israel in the last thirty
years. Thus he sees nothing in-
congruous in his accepting an
office that has political implica
tions. despite his scientific in-
terest.
Israelis, he says, have always
had great respect for science
and scientists, and he believes
that this is the reason the lead-
ers asked him to take office.
When he demurred at first, they
agreed with him that it was
very important for the image
of the country, both in Israel
and in the rest of the world,
to have as president a scientist
who had been removed from
the political struggle, somebody
not involved in the day-to-day
process of decision-making and
the exercise of power.
SYMBOLIC VALUES
"Why do democracies like Eng-
land. Sweden and Holland have
kings? What is the function of a
Preside.".* in a country like
Israel? I believe that he has to
symbolize and cherish the values
of importance to everyone in the
community. Every executive de-
cision must of necessity displease
please some people as as please
others. The fact that the Pres-
ident does not make executive
decisions is an advantage, it lifts
him above the executive process."
NIXT WltK. Kmttir was *f impressed
when President Skuiar visited him.
Did You Know?
PINHAS KOPPEL. former ln-
!< for -<;ener:il of Police, his
beii appointed ly the Kupat
Holini (enter to he the adminis-
trative director of its .Veuev dis-
trict, one of 15 into which the
country ht divided. The district
has 131 clinic* and 213 doctors,
with 158 nurses to core for an
insured population of 200.000.
* a &
EL AL has widened the age
bracket eligible for reduced rates
on flights to Europe. Young
people up to the age of 26 will
now he able to travel from Israel
to Europe for $85 plus taxes,
without being required to pro-
duce student certificate*. Desti-
nations to which the reduced rate
applies include Purls. Marseille*,
.Vice, Brussels and Amsterdam.
* -Cr -fc
THE GAZA STRIP'S fifth cit-
rus packing plant has been
inaugurated In Nnssirat north of
Gaza, The IE 5 million plant will
employ .%# workers with a dally
output of 20.000 crates. All five
of the Strip's citrus packing
houses were set up after the Six-
Day War.
b -Cr THE BOARD of Governors of
the Inlverslty of the Nf*
elected Prof. .Meshe Prywes as
the first president of the uni-
versity. Prof. Prywes, 58.. who
was vice- president of the
Hebrew I'nlverslty, I* Editor-in-
< hief of the Israel Journal of
Medical Science*.
need
you.
If you can spend some ime.
even a few hours, with someone
who needs a hand, not a handout,
call your local Voluntary Action
Center Or wtiic to "Volunteer,"
Washington. DC. 20013.
The National Center tor ^fflr
Voluntary Axtion. ^r
f t m i Z7i*. smum w
SATURDAY. JUNE 18
B'nai B'rith. Ahavah Chapter, Beach Party. P.M.
MONDAY, JUNE 18
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood Board Meeting
TUESDAY. JUNE It
Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood Board Meeting
Brandeis University Women's Committee Study Group
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2t
National Council of Jewish Women General Meeting
THURSDAY, JUNE 21
Ft. Lauderdale. Hadassah General Meeting
SATURDAY. JUNE 23
Ladies Auxiliary Coral Springs Hebrew Congregation
Barbecue and Pool Party
MONDAY. JUNE 25
Brandeis University Women's Committee Study Group
TUESDAY. JUNE 26
Ft. Lauderdale B'nai B'rith General Meeting
WEDNESDAY JUNE 27
Jewish Federation of North Broward Board Meeting
B'Dll B'rith, Ahavah Chapter. General Meeting
THURSDAY. JUNE 28
Sabra Hadassah Meeting
Brandeis University Women's Committee Needlepoint
Study Group

M EIC H L S
kv NORM* BARACH
How would you like to try baking an unusual, chocolaty
cake that will win ynu high praise as an innovative cook"
this one on your family.
CHOCOLATE FUDGE ROLL
4 eggs (separated)
It tsp salt
" cup sugar
. pack vanilla sugar
* cup potato starch
1 cup cocoa
Beat the egg whites with one quarter teaspoon salt: cr. i-
ually add one-quarter cup sugar, beat until stiff. In another bowl,
beat yolks with one-half cup sugar and one-half park vanilla
sugar until thick and lemon colored; stir into yolks, on -i if
speed, one-quarter cup potato starch and one-third cup cocoa.
Fold yolk mixture into whites gently. Line greased jelly roll pan
with plain paper bag cut to sis* and grease bag. Bake in 400
oven for 12 15 minutes until top springs back when touched
Turn pan over onto a cloth (linen towel) sprinkled with a mix-
ture of cocoa and potato starch, cut off crisp edges, renvne
paper, roll up cloth; cool before filling
Frosting and Filling
Melt six ounces bittersweet chocolate bar in bowl or pan
ovei hot (not boiling) water. In the meantime, beat two
with one-half cup shortening (hard white type not oil or m-.ir
garine). Add melted chocolate, beat well. Spread over tot
unrolled cake and reroll Frost top (optional); decorate with
tines of fork; chill in refrigerator before serving. This cake can
be frozen.
*
Now that the Passover holiday is over, everyone is anxiou-
get back to using "regular" ingredients. A sure hit at our hou-e
is this chocolate chip pound cake taken from a recently printed
cookbook by the Margolit chapter of Miirachi Women of He*
York. Anyone interested in copies may write to me CO Cles"
land Jewish News. 13910 Cedar Rd Cleveland. Ohio 44118 Thu
cookbook has an excellent selection of cakes and pies.
CHOCOLATE CHIP POUND CAKE
1 cup parve margarine 1 tsp vanilla
1 cup sugar 3 cups flour
4 eggs 3 tsps baking powder
1 cup Mocha Mix 12 oi chocolate chips
Preheat oven to 350 Cream sugar and margarine. Adi
eggs, one at a time. Add vanilla: mix well. Add sifted flour and
baking powder alternately with Mocha Mix. Stir in chore. 1j'
chips. Pour into greased 10-inch tube pan. Bake 55-60 minute> or
until cake leaves the side of the pan.

My request for cookbooks from various organizations ha-
paid off with the receipt of a new cookbook put out by the Si
hood of uie United Orthodox Synagogues of Houston. Tex cal
"Kosher Menus With Recipes to Match This particular n
caught my eye and I would like to share it with you.
GRAHAM CRACKER CHEESE TARTS
* cup jjraham cracker crumbs 1 can pi? filling of choice
' cup melted butter 1 egg
9 paper cupcake holders cup butter
'i lb cream cheese l tsp vanilla
Mix yraham cracker crumbs and one eighth cup n
butter together. Fill cupcakopapers with one tablespoon of
mixture. Press down with a glass. Cream together the en
cheese, one egg. one-quarter cup butter and vanilla. Beat until
north. Put cream cheese mixture on top of graham era.
mix Leave open one half inch from top. Bake 1012 minute
375 After baking let cool and then top with a can of apple
or cherry pie filling or any other kind. Keep in refrisers- '
until serving.
a*


. June 15, 1973
* k*i*9 f&trSditor) of No,,h B'oward
Pan'
s
H.,UI
men
liaskelhail (nil
Makes (iame
Tour of Israel
Til AVIV Tnis !. mv 3I.|
trip to i Mnio-i
\ sit has been in conjunction with
ng event, either the Mac
i ran Intern.th ma!
Vouth Feel .. youth Baa
II J.iniiw Currently. I
; ive been ihi h rding an Ul
iki tball i
> ol pla; (i
Matioi \ -in iatii In
u to I
nave pro
ting th
im fou tiou
tfl bl I, ] im.i.
in. sin the exci'lli
irti i in I: '.
Over the I
d, on thi si arts ink I
at thr moat
stars are thoai who item I
the Yeshivas or daj
S anehow a trip to larael m< i
ore i" them than in the avei
American Jewiah youngstei who
- nut have ,i traditional or r<
om bscfcground
Apparently the same holds
t for religious non-Jewish
I'S.
Quite a few of the NAIA boys
i nsntrieulatinj at Protestant
and Catholic institutions. Their
.I'litucif on tht- tours has nirpris-
(I their hosts the larael Basket-
ball Federation Federation of
f.ciais have raral) seen such .i
up of Christian youngsters as
thaae boys who displayed so
much internal and exettemcnl on
daily tour.
Two of tht" bOYS, handsome.
iilack players Fred DeVaughn of
Vn'stmont and Ron Johnson of Bi-
.i two denominational colleges
:n California, promised school
is upon entering then- re
in colleges that the) would
drink, smoke oi dance during
; tour year tenure as under
latea DeVaughn visited I-
ii previously in 1971 with a
Bible Class Tour He is the SOD
Baptial minuter.
Of the players. 7 ft All
i John Laing of Angles)
a Lutheran college in 111]
' premltted one la rnnd past
jot ins diary concerning his ex-
' experience in Israel He
1 I .is follow s
"You just can't describe what
it is like to be here it is a conn
ory that ra I
lan't fully realize all of the
things that you ass bn I two week
period its beyond comprehen
feion to understand the meaning
ading at the birthpl.e
( hrist or wnlking on Calvsr) Hill.
We tried to Ret pictures of W
erything w BSW. which was im-
possible, It was even more diff
cult to try and remember all ol
the things that the tour |
told hi
1 'ii. of the things that struck
1 most bars was the fria
i th- people and the mallei
Ol tart way the) go about
daily baatneaa. Ones you're ei
here, you'd novel gUeSB that this
was a country involved in a war
situation. Everything is so Ml
j/al and relaxed
-TVy/nom- ^/>. JL^Ubman

Christian Views Church Imperialism'
Ii f
I JZuft
"iivnn ill.11 -
I constitute a #
per rapproche- f.
\ Roj Eckhardt, chairman of the Depsrl
' n of Religion ol Leigh University, has writ-
ten .. k whu-h deserves stud) bj Christians
and those Jews who view ecumenical meetings
a- the dawn of a new era lot
h-i 'mis!,.,n r,. Btionships
l.ldcr and YoutiUri Brother
(Sohocki n i'.Kiks. S3 45) |j
analysis bj devout learned
Chi siian of the reasons that
Christian beliefs
block to a prop.
me'.: bi tween the two faiths.
Eck irdt'd concludin p u i
graph should serve as an eye-opener for the
lirectors ol <. national
' encies He writes Tradition illj we
are told thai the Jew I the inhei il
if tl faith 'ii it the ( iristian is th only
.. i i. qualified
I : us,
- .i I !-.
. Chri -
tl ... it odd
chanc '
ie fills a lowly s
> ath ii i ius< tl.....nlj scat pr
brol
, itl Ih( point I al "oi i
Israel's persistence is a mysterj somehow as-
sented to in the strange providence of God The
inner mysterj ol the people of God remains a
mysterj of faith." He ad. tea that Christian
n tins (Jewish) faith. He dispels the Cath-
thesis thai the church and its disciples are
the sin,, nor to the p I i- ael ami to th
nant ol God with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob
Those who naivelj believe thai Key 73 Is
not intended for the conversion of .lews will learn
the truth from the chapU Israel and the
h The Rhetoric i t Discontinuity.'' The
F..niton Report to the World Council of Church
s pul t quite bluntly. "God will manifest His
glorj by bringing back His 'eldest son' unto the
fol l of His grace 'and this is an
elemi nl of our on i for Jew
Gentile in Jesus Christ "
'.ar.it lays it on th I fte n he
id I I I
II to i I ..... has
-in ii. n >t a< iah "
tl I. ian .. '''. thai thi
enci *
1 in nol iu "the
Israel thai lives is
md iatir I I I I re<
di\ ine |
iKovcrt .^coit/
House Committee Soon Over the Hill
SM till ( KKIHT OF President Nixdn. the In
ternal Security Division of the Justice De
pnrtmenl sad buadlo Of red. white, and blue
flotsam from Joe McCarthy\
day* baa finally been phased
out To be =ure we car. still
find BOOM remnants of this
anachronism in the Criminal
Division of Attorney General
Elliot Richardson's bureau, but
with a declining number of
witch.-, whether real or IOB-
uspected. to hunt, the security
unit hu been in need of chloroform for some
time
Uii.; that agency and the troublesome Sub-
versive Vctivltiea Control Board both pretty well
discarded, hopes are a bit higher that thi- House
s., tirltj Committee, more widely known by iis
.id name House Un-American Activities Con
mittee will soon be pushed ovei the political
mil.
You no Americans who were not born or
were at best toddlers at mid century. have little
understai d ag of the needlesj indignity and fright
these engines of governmenl risltod on the
The measuring roc: was "-persons suspect d
ol farthering the Communist cause" when the
passports were denied; and when shrivel natured
state Department bureaucrats seize such an am-
biguity, they can have a field day.
Encouraged by this kind of legislation, some
people in power continue to visit disquiet on all
of us who cherish tne Bill of ligMsS A sampling
Of trends reported in the press brings these
examines:
According to the New York Police De-
partment manual, accounts of political activities
of some 240.000 persona and 12,5!M) orsanizations
gathered by the Police Department are share.1
by that body with 11 city agencies, 17 federal
agencies, five state agencies, and the intelligence
units of local police departments throughout the
I lilted States.
The surprising federal action cited above
the ditching of the Internal Security Division of
the Justice Department is a bit of sun from
behind the clouds And a renewed effort to do
way with the House Internal Security Commit-
tee, supported by lit law school deans and a
growing number of Congressmen, adds to this
bit ol optimism
.-jDki\ia Schwartz
Polities lor Scientist a Big Headache
THE Pi sldenl of Israel, Dr. Katchalaki, can't
warn in time Some 23 years
1,.,,-k ten he began work at the Weismana Sci
entitle Institute In Rehovcth.
pr Webuuann said to him. "Yon
knew 1 Ihink you will make a
gOOd scientist'' and then he
a4l,K .. id (orbid that yon
ihould gel mixed up In politics
then you will be as ba I off as
i ,,,; a, -im.. spake of i*'
htical life u aheedsche." Whj
(lj,i latandiag shemlst.
get nit < it
Perhaps be Ihoughl the chemistry of the
Jewish people seeded changing it ataanl I
Hosm """" **" '"' "* **'
tncyme of nat.cMihood ano he as well a> the
President had done much experraasaanaaen with
'll.'Vllles
F'erh.tps ke looked on all Israel as a hand oi
l.,nd ot chcmisiiv. with a chain of new chemical
iiidu.-lnes tarnishing the major field of employ-
i There is some e\ ioeiKc tnat Weizmann did
One n port told of the asacovcaj by D Kogan
i i Israel of a procesj which will cheapen the cost
id the de-al.nation oi SM water by some 25 or
:tn per cent This should be al great help not only
to larael but eapecieUj to tas krtlb nations wh eh
much desert land wnnli could be fruc
.1 bj sea water. The othio report told of an
LraeU scientist finding a type of bacteria which
i insumes and nullifies the pollution caused by
oil sludge.

Film Cioes
Before Hie (amera
In Filat Koralioii
UOLLYWOOtS "Billy Two
Hats," .. unique HTesI
ring Gregory Peck as s i
outlaw and Deal Arnei, Jr., i i
young half-breed Mexican, ele-
vates the Israeli port citj oi FiLt
to a center national cin-
I hen of
Ho Ij m >. -! Iom ards the Pn
I Land i Lot Stl
Gulf of
of Eilal has the
p .
mad Los A
C the 1
i

vi.'in-
i uin-

I
-: !i lend-
to the
di. ., pe o(
i hank rob ers relentlemfey
. ued bv .-, n sher-
iff to ii Jack War-
den, the onh lewish actor in the
C.l.-t
The pn duction unit of No-
man Jewison's film company ia
photographed near King Solo-
mon's ancient copper BjtaSS
where one finds windeeadsd
stone chimneys thai seem to be
lifted from Death Valley.
We came to Israel because we
found places here that looked
exactly like tile American West
of yesteryear. We dont have to
dadgs television antennas and
telaphona Boats," said Jewisoa
with whom I talked at the Pine-
wood Studios in England where
the scoring, dubbing and editing
has been completed "There is a
sincere independence here."
Gregory Peck, the Academy
Award winning actor, added to
the comment. a responsibility
for life and death, and the feeling
of treasuring each moment of
lite In'cause of the uncertainties
ot lite that our forefathers felt
100 years age. '
"Hilly Two Hats' a United
Artists release is an international
project. The script was written
by Alan Sharp, a Scotsman who
had never left the British Isles
when developing the SSgS ot the
American West, Ted Kolcheff,
the director, an.l Jewisoa, the
producer, arc Canadians who
made geed in the stiiies
The picture was packaged in
London and filmed in its entirct>
in Israel, w.th the governmssst is
Jerusalem helping the company.
Rianangtag for location permits,
clearing customs and eliminating
red tape and Offering I rebate of
23'l per cent on all foreign cur-
rencv exchati
"'
Tin- Day of the Jackal." from
the novel by Frederick I'orsyth
(author of the anti-N'a/i yarn.
The Odessa File," now before
the csjnesna), deads with the true
story of a ptcasassonal ssaaas
hired to kill French President
Charles de Gaulle in the winter
of 1962 on orders of the OAI
(Secret Army Organization) for
his sellout of the patriotic move-
ment and the withdrawal from
Algeria.
>
it
n
i
In
lu-
ll
t>
i
*
s
w


Ixige 12
MmittntrkmM* ** North B*w*r_
Friday, June 15 1973
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Your car's tank won't ho'd more gas
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because Michelm X Ra j^a's roll easier.
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