The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00040

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Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


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Full Text
lewisfj Florid tin
n 12
of \ORTH UROWARD
April 6, 1973
Price 20 ceata
Carl Voss To Address
vocation Here May 6
rcrr
the commu- Hermann Voss. Mrs Howard
to be held Miller chairman of the Israel 25
Fort Lauder- Anniversary Celebration Commit-
tee has announced.
In addition, the celebration
will feature a program of Israeli
entertainment headlined by The
Jerusalem Review, a group of
five talented young Israeli stars
whi.se program will include
ing. dancing and instrumental
number- Awards, "ill also be
nted to art-essay contest
winners.
Dunng his public ministry of
almost 40 years. Dr. Voss of
Jacksonville, has. as clergyman
and teacher, author and lecturer,
(voted himself to the causes of
interfaith cooperation, interra-
cial amity, and international un-
derstanding He has been in the
forefront of movements for ecu-
menical unity.
He has taucht at the New
BdMMl for Social Research. Skid-
more College, and the Theologi-
Cal School of St Lawrence I'm
versify in courses dealing with
international affairs and the role
of religion in the modern world:
The Awakening Middle BftSt,"
The Spiritual Quest of Modern
VOSS
Auditorium
nallv known nun
lied Dr Carl
Man." 'Problems and Prospects
of the World's Religions," and
"Answers for Our Age of Anxi-
ety."
At one time an executive of
the Church Peace Union and the
World Alliance For International
Friendship Through Religion, he
was editor of the "World Alli-
ance Newsletter,'" and as one of
the founders in 1942 of the Amer-
ican Christian Palestine Commit-
tee, he was for many years chair-
man of its executive council and
editor of its publication, "Land
Reborn."
Widely traveled in Europe.
Asia and Africa, he is consid-
ered an expert on international
problems and an authority on
Middle Eastern issues. On many
occasions he has conducted study
tours of Israel and the Arab
lands.
Dr. Voss is editor of Excalibur
Books, designed "to make the re-
sources of religion meaningful
and relevant to young people in
a changing world," and his own
volume. "In Search of Meaning.
Living Religions of the World."
is the initial publication of that
series.
Id Jewry Watching
iet Visa Re taxation
__ _... r.m i on ion meeting, said tha
British Jam haw
confirmation that
tax on Soviet .lev.
has been rescin i
Dt continue to "'
. accordi
Miner of Leicester
a meeting of the
deputies of British
Janaar >aid that
m o no known im-
[in the poarUofl <>(
who apply for exit
Is. m ; and the) a"'
[ harasst d
in- r was r. tarring; to
hrt- from Moscow thai
britiea had suspend* d
fca tax demanded of
fjews seeking to omi
York, the National
,,n Soviet Jawo
I h source- in
laying there had
leant changes in Soviet
jn pol'O The NCSJ
e were indications of a
e of trials for alleged
sm "
n families who had ap-
exit visas were re
rejected on the same
reports emanated from
of a relaxation of emi-
Student Struggle for
. Jewry said this week it
tamed in a telephone con-
|tion with Jews in Kiev.
. successful spplicsnts for
[visas were being informed
he Ovir (visa bureau) that
were "exceptions."
tree Kiev activists were re-
lor
fused visas during the past few
days and ware told they could
not reappl) for a year The k.'v
ud that i '- activists in
I ,,,,. also refused
.,. sss.i reported.
Foreign Ministry officials
I m far have been u'
to offer I "f
the apparent r<
i the Soviet diploma ta I
, future.
\ \ we know Is that -
N ol Jew- have been
empted." one official said in
Jerusalem We do not know U
h,, b transient move 01
beginning of something mere
permanent "
Foreign Mnlst. r Abba I
who briefed the Cabinet on the
mbjecl this week, is indent -
, ,,. | much the same
thing Absorption Minister Na-
than Paled said In an Interview
that he Ihoueht there was a
good chance' that the ROfr
SIans meant to freeze but not to
eancel the education tax on
Soviet Jews He added that only
tine would tell if the move to
end the ransom tax was per-
manent
Jewish Agency Executive
chairman Louis Pit** inter-
viewed by Israel Radio in Lon-
don said that "World Jewry will
continue to fight for the right
of all Soviet Jews to emigrate
to Israel."
Mr Pincus was attending the
Conference of Jewish ^gan.za-
tions (COJO). Moshe Rivlw
director general of the Jew.sh
Agency who returned from tne
Local Federations
Committees Active
In addition to a very active
committee working to provide a
program for Israel's 25th anni-
versary', Federation has a num-
ber of other committees hard at
work.
The Jewish Community Center
Committee chaired by Arthur
Faber has begun its task of in-
vestigating the need for pro-
grams and physical facilities to
fill the recreational and social
needs of the community. The
committee will meet on an ongo-
ing basis and progress will be
reported in the Jewish Floridian.
Working with Mr. Faber are
Martin Yohalem, Lee Weinberg.
Ludwik Brodzki, Albert Garaitz,
Dr. Edward Nacht. Jacot Lutz.
Henry Serfer. Allan Ziffer. and
Leonard Shelton:
Dr. Jack Solomon, chair-
man of the newly formed Com-
munity Relations Committee has
announced that his committee
will be meeting this week to dis-
cuss the many facets of commu-
nity relation programs which will
fulfill the needs for a community-
wide program.
Among the areas the commit-
toe will study are problems of
church-state relationship, partic
ularly as they affect the Broward
County public schools: programs
on behalf of Russian Jewry; dis-
crimination and job bias.
Serving witti Dr Solomon are
Rabbi Arthur Abrams. Rabbi
same London meeting, said that
there was a consensus that if
the Soviet government changed
it., policy, this was the result of
the worldwide struggle waged
on the issue.
Sen Henry M. said in Washington that
legislation designed to free
Soviet emigration will be
cted bj Congress despite the
hints of relaxation on restric-
tions coming from Soviet sources.
In telephone comments to the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency, the
ider of the legislation bearing
hi, name .-aid that no threat is
led against the Soviet Union
but they seek firm assurances
t the Soviet government will
live up to the Declaiatiou of
Human Rights.
"We intend to pass the amend-
. at Sen Jackson said. There
is no compromiM with principle.
We want to eliminate the issue
as a problem."
GuKstreom Democratic
Women's Club Meeting Set
A meeting of the Gulfstream
Democratic Women's Club will be
held on the second froor of the
First National Bank of Hollywood
Monday at 8 p.m.
Well-known civic leader Roger
Martin will speak on Density Prob-
lems in Relation to Construction
and the Building Moratorium in
Broward County Also on the pro-
,rram will be candidates for city
elections in Hollywood and Hal-
landale. The public is invited to
attend.
Akiva Brilliant, Rabbi Morris
Skop. Harvey Jefferbaum, Jud^e
Joel Miller, Arthur Tennenbaum,
Marvin Welles and Alan Ziffer.
The By-Laws Revision Commit-
tee chairman, Barry Stone, and
committee members Alvin Capp
and Hy Indowsky are reviewing
the Federation's By-Laws with a
view to expanding participation
of the community and its organ-
izations in the work of the Fed-
eration and promote closer co-
operation and improve communi-
cations for the entire communitv.
Young Leadership chairman
Martin Kurtz, and cochairm B.
Mrs. Roger Odwak and Alvin
Capp report that the Young Lead-
ership program initiated by the
Federation is proving to be very
successful.
Four sessions have been held
featuring noted experts in areas
of Jewish life including Federa-
tion and community organiza-
tion, an inside look at what is
going on in Israel and its rela-
tions with the United States,
why young people should be-
come involved in Jewish organi-
zational life, and a verv provooa-
tive meeting on Jewish commu-
nitv relations.
the series will include three
more programs. Jewish educa-
tion and social planning for Jew-
ish needs will be consideri.
followed by an evaluation meet-
ing.
Florida Will Not Permit
Reverse' Quotas, ADL Told
The Florida Human Relations
Commission, a state agency'- has
assured the Florida office of the
Anti Defamation League of B'nai
B'nth that the state's Affirma-
tive Action Plan for employ-
ment will not involve "reverse"
discrimination through the use
of quCas or preferential treat
ment for minorities or women.
In a letter to the ADL. Robert
Rackleff. director of the Human
Relations Commission said, "be-
cause you met with us at an
early stage in the drafting of
the plan announced this month
by the governor, we were able
to provide safeguards which will
fwevent any compounding of the
employment discrimination prob-
lem."
He said the employment plan
involves "... no quotas or any
calls for preferential treatment
of minority or women applicants
... the best qualified applicants
will be chosen."
Jack Kassewitz. chairman of
ADL's regional board noted the
FHC drafted the Affirmative Ac-
tion Plan, and will now have the
responsibility for assuring its
implementation by state agen-
cies and universities.
He said the ADL has been in
frequent contact with the FHC's
staff in a consuhive role re
garding the plan. "One of the
needed changes made from early
drafts was the elimination of
the discriminatory' concept of
proportional representation in
state employment on the basis of
the percentage of minorities and
women in the population."
Mr. Rackleff expressed his ap-
preciation to ADL fa-
vour role in sensitizing us to the
problems Jews have experienced
in employment. You have helped
us keep the problems of all mi-
norities in perspective so that aU
can share in equal opportunities."
George Bernstein, chairman of
ADL's Discriminations Commit-
tee said 'the issue of reverse
discrimination is not an abstract
problem in our area."
He referred to ADL's contin-
uing in\cstigations during the
r>a duced evidence of discriminatory
practices by two state colleges.
"Our inquiries have resulted in
the filing of several formal
charges of discrimination with
federal government aeencies. In-
cluding the IS. Equal Employ-
ment Opnortunity Commission
and the Department of Health.
Education and Welfare." Mr.
Bernstein said.
He added that two such case*
are currently the subiect of fed-
eral inquiries in Florida.
API. regional director Arthur
Teitelbaum said, "We are pleas-
ed by the assurances from the
Florida Human Relations Com-
mission that the state's Affirma-
tive Action Plan will be imple-
mented on the concept of equal
opportunity based upon individ-
ual merit. The Jewish commu-
nity and all minorities have a
great deal at stake in seeing to
the preservation of equal em-
ployment practices. We shall re-
main helpful to that end, and
vigilant for any abuses."
**


Page 2
+JmisHkr**n <* NqhM^>*
Friday, April
Oiai Hadassah Plans | Temple Sholom Passes Half-Way Mark
Eye-Bank Luncheon"
Donors of filled "ff>le'' ftnks"
re cordially invited to be guests
of Chai Hadassah, at a luncheon-
card party to be held Tuesday.
April 12 at 1230 p.m in the Mar-
gat? Jewish Center, according to
Mrs. Nat Bodner. president
'Ihe Eye Bank" project has been
a continuing program since Hen-
rietta Szold. social worker and edu-
cator, first visited Palestine
190.1 She was deeply moved and
concerned by the poverty so pre-
valent in Palestine and the pres-
ence of th-' dread eye disease,
ti schema.
Hadassah v. as officially organized
in 1912. anJ in 1913 the medical
program was underway when two
American-trained nurses sailed f>r
Pale-tine to establish a small wel-
fare station in the old city of Jeru-
lon for maternity care and treet
ment of the eye disease. With
funds amounting to less than S300.
10.000 children in Palestine were
treated for trachoma by the two
Ml
Today, although trachoma is
practically non-existent in Israel,
the nation has extended the cam
paign again.-* the disease beyond
its own borders into the newly
emerging nations in Africa.
a i Barry
AdWtMft-M ^TCoTOred P*apW>
during a trip to Israel in Deeem
ber. 1972. said to Prof. Michaelson
head of the ophthalmology depart
ment of the Hadassah-Hebrew Uni-
versity Medical Center:
In only eight years you brought
the blessing of sight to scores of
thousands of blind Africans I only-
wish that we could get other peo
in I pie to serve Africa as you have
served."
Impressed by the large number
I jf Arab patients whom he saw \r.
Hadassah. Mr Wilkins commented
I have been impressed every
*here by the atmosphere in Israel
I have found a desire to serve
other people> which is quite re
narkable in the world of today I
want to express my admiration for
the vision of Hadassah. and what
has been accomplished, not only
for Israel, but for all men. irre-
spective of color, nation or creed "
Completed eye banks must be
delivered to Mrs. Gretchen Winn.
chairman, eye bank project, or
Mrs. Dorathy Schwartz, cochair-
man Each $5 donation is entitled
to one admission.
Noo holders of eye banks who
wish to contribute $5 to this wor-
thy cause are also welcome. All
Roy Wilkins. executive director.' guests are requested to make reser-
of the National Association for the vations.
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Stone, finance chairman,
[end Stephen Tofcos-templepree.-
-; ^T^ ,,iJs w<3mK
goaf needed to proceed with the
building of a new sanctuary and
tempie complex has been reached.
At the sroundblewing eeremon
ies held recently Rabbi Morns A
Skop. spiritual leader of Temple
Sholom. welcomed the mayor and
commissioners of Pompano Beach
who broogM greeting to the out-
doer gathering of temple meml
'and guests Following the in\.>oa
tion of prayers Rabbi Arthur Ah-
rams of Tempie Emanu-EI. Leon-
ard Cote, president of the Men's
Club, Mrs Hannah Tolcea, Slater*
hood president, temple president
Stephen Tola-- and USY preai-
dent Peter Lane indicated their
support of the temple project bad
iy needed to accommodate the i
idly growing number of Jewish
residents.
"We bVC been encounrp d I I
plained Rabbi Simp, "with the grac-
ious outpouring of spiritual and fi-
nancial support from many of our
friends, and it looks as though
shall proceed with hids within 60
days."
Greetings were brouchl from the
local clergy with cuest speaker Re\
Dwayne Black of tin- Presbyterian j
Church and Rabbi Benjamin R^
ayn of Boca Hebrew Congregation.i.
Past presidents of Temple Sho
lorn and donor families joined in
forma! ceremony of groundbreak-
ing. Rabbi Akiva Brilliant of Beth
Abess Elected To Board Of
City Bonk Of Laudertiill
Leonard I. Abeas, -ir wh" hai
beer of direr, ,
tor- of C Bank of I.auderhili
was formerl) a ant to the chairman of the board
of the Miami Itj National
Bank ration and one of thi
redevekopen in a downtown urban
renewal project.
Currently an aasistant planner
with Sadkin Associates ;i Leader-
hill development company, he i~
a graduate of Whartnn School of
Finance and Commerce at the I'm
versity of Pennsylvania
Israel offered a hopeful benediction ors and pledge of alleg,
far .saorcss and Boy licout Troop) was followed by a reecpt.,- how
463 led in the presentation of col-. by women of the Sisterho.j ^^
Participants in the Temple Sholom groundbreaking cere-
monies i.iriuded. from (left to right) Max Levey. Oscar Sin-
dell, Fred Lichtman, Mr*. Fred Lachtman. Mm. Oecar Stndell,
Mrs. Max Levey and Abe Coor.
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N eta Browt rd w tion The vi 3
p.m. gathering i!: > he! I at
Women's Club, Wilton Ma
ME 21>! Q
Is anl sight-, will he
discussed, Rhea I1 Kathan is
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by. April 6, 1973
+ UnlsHUrldtan Of North Inward
Page 3
'nai B'rith Youth Projects
Penetrate Broward County
roward B'nai B'rith Youth Or-
Ization chapters have been pen-
ing the Broward community
ft'kinj? out. and servicing peo-
Twho need more than anything
the knowledge that someone
toncerned about them.
I'nai B'rith Girls-Gimmel, whose
sident is Judy Nathanson. spear-
de the flood victims of Wilkes-
Pa.; they sent Passover
inga to Soviet Jews, and re-
itly presented a program high-
thting the creation to B'nai B'rith |
tnl Lodge.
the BBYO. There are 700 members
in the 34 chapters of Broward-
Dade area. Eight of the groups are
in Hollywood.
Chapters are serviced by volun-
teer advisors and the newly organ-
ized Broward-North Dade-Palm
Beach BBYO board of directors, j
under the presidency of Dr. Phil'
Levin which sets policy and serves;
as a sounding board for youth
leaders and advisors. A second,
board is the Miami BBYO board
of directors.
Zionist Federation To Participate
In 'Scholar in Residence' Program
IBBG-Gimmel won the non-sec-
nan National Parents' Magazine j
vard for "Outstanding Service to
Community." Chapter advisor j
Mrs. Richard Nathanson. They
HI first in Florida region in the |
lional BBYO Scrapbook Con-|
[Mark Dubin. secretary of Aleph j
iik Aleph-Massadah, reports that
feir president. Harley Ginsberg.:
hd Tom Katz, of Aleph Zadikj
Jeph (AZA)-B'nai Israel, captur
first place in the regional de-,
it<' contest; Bob Fader came in
>nd in the AZA storytelling,
Di-.tcst. and chapter chess champ,
i Jack Nadelman. Chapter advisor
Michael Specktor. vice president
the Miami BBYO board of di- (
..tors. AZA-B'nai Israel chapter
jvisor is Dr. Mark Greenberg.
A new seventh grade BBG chap- j
rr is in the process of being form
in the Hollywood area; and an |
Ither group-BBGs is being initiated j
. Fort Lauderdale. A brother AZA I
tiapter to the BBG group is also
ping organized.
Interested potential members or i
idvibors may call Girt Bossak. i
BBYO director, at the BBYO of !
\et 4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami.
B'nai B'rith Girls and Aleph
E.i.iik Aleph are components of
PICTURE
FRAMING
Reasonable Prices
ART CENTER
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NEW YORK Rabbi Israel Mil-
ler announced the American Zion-
ist Federation's participation in a
new "Scholars In Residence Pro-
gram." in conjunction with the
American Zionist Youth Founda-
tion, and the setting up of a new
educational travel service to Is-
rael. He spoke at an AZF national
board meeting here.
The meeting opened with talks
by four figures involved in the i
shaping of Israel.
Mrs. Rose Halprin. former chair-
man of the American section of the
Jewish Agency chaired the special j
session and recalled some of the;
tense moments just prior to Is-1
rael's declaration as an independ- j
ent state.
Rep. Ogden Reid. D NY., VS i
ambassador to Israel from 1959 to I
1961, opened his talk in Hebrew!
and urged the U.S. administration
to offer long range security and ;
economic guarantees to Israel
"since our security hangs together." i
The Rev. Karl Baehr. .former di-,
rector of the American Christian
Palestine Committee and a veteran |
Christian Zionist, expressed his
freling that the double standard
which allows Christians to expect
Israel to act against her own self
interest stems from anti-Semitism.
Ambassador David Rivlin. Is-
rael's consul general in New York
closed the session by appealing to
the Zionist Movement to "cease to
be a marginal factor and become
once again a leading force in Amer-
ica with a dominant altyah nucleus
that will be able to challenge and
fill the ideological vacuum which
now exists."
In announcing the AZF's partici-
pation in the "Scholars In Resi-
dence Program." Rabbi Miller said:
"We must bring the kind of people
from Israel who show Israel as
groping for spiritual values which
is the goal of Zionism and our
people."
To this end, 20 leading Israeli
intellectuals and men of letters
will be arriving as guests of vari-
ous communities throughout the
United States towards the end of
the month. They will stay and lec-
ture with the communities for two
weeks followed by a dialogue with
their American counterparts which
is being sponsored by the newly
formed Zionist Council for the
Arts and Sciences.
Tony Cohen Guest Speaker
The Sisterhood of the Margate
Jewish Center will hold its regular
monthly meeting at the center.
6101 NW 9th St., Tuesday at 12:30
p.m. Following the business por
ti.n of the meeting, the group
will hear an address by Tony Coh-
en, whose topic will be. The Work
of the Anti Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith"
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Cantor Jacob Renzer of Temple Sholom, Pompano Beach,
gave a spirited and professional recital, performing Jewish,
modern Israeli and classical songs, as the highlight of the
evening meeting of Chai Chapter of Hadassah at the temple
March 22. At left is Mrs. Oscar Sindell, program chairman;
Mrs. Nat Bodner, president of the chapter, is at right.
NOW IS THE TIME TO PLAN A VACATION
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN
Hove fours Thai Make h Easy
for You To Travel...
Couriers Take Care Of Everything!
RHEA D. NATHAN
TOUR CHAIRMAN NORTH BROWARD SECTION
Telephone 942-1449
COMMERCIAL
MEAD INSl RANCH
)&EEn SPECIALISTS
& COMPANY
INSURANCE AGENTS
2626 E COMMERCIAL BIVO
FT LfUUEROALE. FLA 33308
TELEPHONE 7721113
RON PRICE
GENE JONES
The most beautiful
Jewish Chapel in Florida
is just a few minutes
driving time from
Ft Lauderdale.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAREL. INC. FUNERAL DIRECTORS
North Miami Beoch: 16480 N. E. 19th Avenue
Tel: 920-1010
To arrange funaral anywhere in the United State*,
call tit* neer.it Riverside Chapal
Murray N.RuMn.F.D.


Fri-aY ApniJ,

wjemstMeridian MATTER OF FACT
fr MONTH ftOWARQ
Or MOUTH HOWARD
OFPCf MB PLWT !!"\E 4th StbeeT
*U>VERTI.rcn DBPARTMEXT -
MIAMI ADDRJESS P.O. Bom ifll. Miami. Florida 0*101 -____
HHOCHBT SCZaNVE SHO'HET HKLMMM THiWWT'N
FRET) K SHO"HET
TELWHOVf'm-**^
iuiwj
Florida 0*1*1
r..
Pu*>lihr
sirlant t'
OCXS
Editor and Pat>lmfc*r Kin.g'n. Ed' A-----
Por lh Jm ih Federation of North Rroward
HOWARD M MIUXK IRVING I- 'IEISHER
PumMmM Exutivf Director
Federation offu-e m$ S Andrew. A venae Ft. Uiuderdale. Fla. SJn
Telea*i<.ne 50-4SO
The Jewie* FKnten Doas Net overantec The Kaahrwth
Of The Merchants* Atfvertiaee' In IU CoWmi
Punltrtted BI-WeeAlT
Second-CJa-' Pwtigt Paid at Miami. Fl.
BNGSVILLE. Md. Amer- this Wl crowing wild in the
*. ~? c -Q a..r -t X>uth Vet no one had IM
ans *omefm<* how U| propawU. IlloU,
by JOSEPH ALSOP
The Jewian Fiord.an hat absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewxh Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate, worldwide Newe Service. National Editorial Aaseoation. American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
iy**f.WIPTIOW *AT*: ll-cal Area) One Veer S2.O0. Ovt of Town Upen
Volume 2
Friday, April 6. 1973
Number 12
4 NISAN 5733
Cuban Jews Need Assistance
When Fidel Ccstro was considered a military threat
mu:h was made of the fact that Cuba was only 90 miles
away from the United States meaning Florida. The dis-
tance hasn't changed and it might be well to point out thai
only 90 miles from us is a Jewish community which is
struggling to survive but which a recent report to the World
Jewish Congress indicates has little chance without more
help.
The article in last week's Floridian surprised many in
that it indicated a helpful attitude by the Cuban regime
even to the extent of permitting a Zionist club and other
Zionist activities despite Castro's place in the anti-Zionist
Communist world. It also pictured a tenacity to retain a
heritage in the face of a diminishing population which left
freely with the advent of the Castro government.
The question is whether it is possible to assist the 1,200
remaining Jews in Cuba with the spiritual and educational
help needed so desperately and whether enough has been
done by us for those who remain only 90 miles away.
A not unimportant by-product of the devaluation of the
dollar is the effect it will have on Jewish philanthropic ef-
forts now at their peak leveL Problems already have arisen
for a number of organizations conducting relief and re-
habilitation work in Europe, particularly the Joint Distribu-
tion Committee, HIAS and ORT. And, despite the fact that
Israel's currency has been adjusted to the dollar, the immi-
gration efforts of the Jewish Agency in Europe have be-
come more costly.
Our Diplomatic Maneuvering
The diplomatic maneuvering taking place behind the
scenes a* a result of the Jackson amendment to the U.S.-
U.S.S.R. Trade Act indicates an important principle then-
goes beyond the immediate issue of the free emigration of
Jews from the Soviet Union.
On the surface it is the determination of Jews all over
the world to help their Russian brothers who wish to leave
their Communist bondage do so with a minimum of red
tape, recrimination or excessive taxation for the privilege.
The long-range diplomatic question involved is how
much internal morality can our Congress legislate for an-
other nation and whether or not the Jackson amendment
doesn t establish a principle which could plague our for-
eign relations for years to come. There are dozens of coun-
tries m the world whose practices and philosophy are ab-
horrent to American* with whom we do business under
the same "favored nation" clause which the amendment
would deny
It would surely change the world picture if morality
rather than hypocrisy, were to become the standard of di^
plomacy. The administration is being placed in an uncom-
fortable position which threatens the major emphasis of
its present foreign policy and whether this will lead to a
reaction against Jewish interests, as has been suggested in
recent days, or to a rise in anti-Semitism among the Amer-
ican farm interests most affected, is somethinq to be
watched with great care.
Separation Of Church And State
Despite strong support from the Catholic community
and its Jewish governor, the voters of Maryland have de-
feated an amendment to that state's Constitution which
would have provided tax funds to assist parochial and
other non-public schools.
Strong opposition to the propel _the ,, Qne d
17 amendments to be turned down came from Jewish
roters, most of whom, evidently, continue to believe that
such funds would violate the historic separation of church
and state, a concept most American Jews traditionally
save supported. *
Illl3 Wllll""." ---------- -
honorine other people's prophets
but not their own Here in Kings
ville one of our least honored but
most honorable prophets lives in
an old, old house in the midst
of a vast half impenetrable jun-
gle of wildly assorted vegeta-
tion The thicket happens to be
a plant nursery, but you would
hardly guess it
Henry Hohman i< worth cele-
brating now precisely brcau-i be
has just been greatl> honored
but in England, where they really
care about gardens The august
Royal Horticultural Society, the
gardening world's equivalent of
the College of Cardinals, has
i nt Henry Hohman its pas
sionatei> envied gold midal The
medal came with a citation from
I Lord Abereonway, the ov. ner of
I one of England's finest modern
! gardens.
Mr Hohman." said Lord Ab-
ereonway roundly, "is the mo^t
distinguished nurseryman in
America, distinguished in the
DM thai anything others can
grow he can grow better, and
he grows a great many mure
and difficult plants that other
people there cannot grow: Thus
they are preserved in cultiva-
tion."
Jl.sT THIS, in fact il what is
going on in Henry Hohman -
jungle, although you would
hardly think so at first glance.
Furthermore, it is worth turn
ing aside for a while from the
larger concerns of this weary
world to examine the lessons of
Henry Hohman and his jungle
In an odd way. they make their
own comments or American cul-
ture (if that is the right word i
in the last half of the 20th cen-
tury'
If Henry Hohman were Jap-
anese, he would now be classi
fied as a national cultural a
as those with precious but van-
ishing skills are in fact classified
in Japan. He will not tell you
his exact age. but he began work
in 1912 He sought his first fob
with the nursery firm of Bob-
bink and Atkins because he was
already a passionate gardener
A a boy, he had fertilized and
mulched and pruned his first
roses in his salesman-fathers
West Baltimore back\and.
In 1920. he bought the land
now covered by his jungle for a
trifling sum and he set up on
his own as a nurseryman. Rare
and uncommon plants were al-
ready what interested him. H<
had no university or other train-
ing as a botanist. Yet he is b\
now the greatest American ex-
pert on rare plants, or at lead
on those rare plants that can
somehow be made to thrive in
our unfriendly climate. Yet he
il humble about his knowledr
"I HAVE studied mv work
all my life." he will tell you
gently for he has that peculiar
gentleness that seems to go with
deep religious faith and deep
love of growing things "and )
I still feel I know nothing about
it."
"Nothing." however, is a word
that here requires definition.
Henry Hohman's jungle alto-
gether contains ll.flOO species
and varieties, among which manv
shrubs that are Ins specialty Of
box alone, he has 200 specie
and var.ties, among which many
are quite wonderful hybrids for
special purposes that he has pro- '
duced himself. Of azaleas, again
ne says, deprecatingly
"I ONLY have about 1.000 spe- '
cies and varieties."
Besides being an incompar-
able hybridizer, he is the (ital) '
nonpareil (unital) of plant prop-
agators in this country. The
rarest of all American shrubs
Franklinia Alatamaha. found
Just once in Georgia in the 18th
century and preserved ever since
in cultivation is a splendid flow-
enng ,hrub called Ilhotia Race- i
nosa.
THESE IS one tiny clump of I
until Henry Hohman experi-
mented, wr.h his unual imagina-
tive, delicate precision, with
propagation by root cuttings.
Now the world's great nurseries
and public arboretums are lining
up hat in hand and from Bel-
gium to Boston, for their ration
i I.ito-s
vjOOj
b ,nor
H
of the newly propagat
(two per arboretum)
SO WHAT are the
this prophtt without
our country' To btgn
can still do \cry *..]; ln
ica if you are better than ai
else, and have enon
too for it takes gU
managing a jungle ,
Continued on L*aa g.
/\&
Max Lerner
Sees It
th.
iur H
-<*n>fi
I > 's ANi.EI.I : :.:?.. t
of the Apo. img America today By my cunt given fa,
low t; i u least seven of tlvm The chronic nx
California, political and etherwtee, seems to be on .
le. svitb a wild presaging of first and last thin?
mood comes, both here and elsewhere, from the aaxk
that then an problem which defy solutions.
I find people matching tneir lists of such probk i For
rlarttj dd first peel away the things that an
task* bat not insoluble problems Family Mriitanu
mental health profraau eellart rolls. hoiiMn,
insuram B, th.- attack on the remaini:.j h.,
of poverty these have been the darlings of liberal
and are basically questions of social technology
Ife) ihoul m the end >u Id to social will We km>. pretty
well vhel has to be .lone about them The chief question, are
those ol priorities, financing and the will to tackie |
Bui rr.y Si ren Bur win ride horses of a differed color
They represent not tasks hut knotty social and pv>,
proMeai thai have thus far eluded solution, or eeea any .
r,)lJ- "" Tha< !'> I suggested some week, ago
m this spuoe -the creation of a federal office of social r-vlli-
gence thai would prob, v,h problems in depth thru
mal mpuhlk br-instorniing sessions of some of the b.
of the nation
HIRFHTTH MY IIST Or THE SEVEN. It etarti m
-elf. which man has tolerated for centuries, a* part of
Of th:ns This is too dangerous a view t., B) I re I
I glimn I ,.f hope that the final Powers, scared bv the
of Backer easeMe. may edge the.r way into som- son of pohaaj
\vstem of th.- impossible van which may then be foil,..,'. b
a ban on the possible ones, and undo the v-.sion ;n 'King Lear"
'hat 'Humanity must perforce prey on itself Like easten of
the deep '
Tho second is the pollution, congestion, stranimlation of
society call it what you will It. too. could yield to tech .loo
and social will but it runs head-on into the need even toe**
took for growth rather than stagnation How to square the tee
becomes the unyielding problem
Racial hatred is a horseman that nd> everv society, but
American, feel its whiplash hard because it goes against every
Principle the society avows Ex en the gains on the md M
mnWit) of access have failed to resolve it. since thev m:,< -he
remaining distance more dramaticallv visible What ma'-
worse U that It g*t.s tied up w.th everv other problem tha '. -d
on poverty, squalor and social resentments
The fourth is crime Organ./ed crime is Ortnafrj the lesi
difficultI pha>< f the problem I, reSU|U from organization and
Weed I riuation can be smashed bv a resourceful us" of
'he street mme that comes out of disorganized lives a..d de-
sens,t.7.-d brut;iljt> hafc ^^ to d()minatp |b- j(ira| (i|..pnt
Wetton campaigns in New York. Los Angeles and elsrwh,
Unked w.th it || the fear of the impact of diu:s-on the
>oung. on crime, on the cities, on the fiber of the societv IBM
and drug* in harness together, ere the lethal pair that r.de
Americana hardest, and define the image of A-MsiS. abroad
, "& -it In eopmg with this pair, the danger is that we will ad"-" I
Mngle simplistic approach Crack down on them with harsher
Penalfes, says Gov Rockefeller, and now President Nixon pro-
Poses reviving the death penalty for major drug-bnked crimes.
in? '"I them- ,a> ,he ,h<,raP'sta. Do away with their breed-
ing grounds, say the sociology.
nn.Jh"e Uld n beUer to**"** ot h* inadequa!' the
one,l,mcnsional approach ,s on problems that ncuirc a mM'i-
dimensional understanding and attack. Central to all the dm-.n-
ons is the habit of violence and the emergence of a drug mys-
tique among a segment of the young.
tmn7!T XT ,W noren,*n al*> run in Undem One is the sUena-
oe?l Tit? "''-^tw-n ethnic groups between the
Sutl'l ehU!S- ***" on. The other is the d,-
new 1" T" n"mbCr f ,radiin-l values, not vet replaced bf
ZHH T r ,he> add up ,0 a "*" of the connec-jon.
the unsnT >- """"""''y- wrk. country, religion which form
the unspoken myth, and therefore the cement ot the society
to it^fhl T !he_burd''n of Ameriea today, and the challenge
h,nk 22. SR CM,kwd ,rok"*n'- tat rmt insoluble To
- m* etement, Ha absence the damning one.


iday, April 6. 1973
of North Bfoward
* JfmUfi flerHtor
Page 5
' *
theTreasury Supermarket
. 11
pAssoverc foods
Make Treasury your headquarters for Passover food
shopping. We're proud to feature the brands you
know and trust. See our special display, make your
selection early.
Manischewitz
Marble Cake Mix
Fruit Filled Mandel
Cranberry Sauce
Seel and Cabbage Soup
T-^ato Mushroom Sauce
Jel'ied Fruit Slices
Beverages
Manischewitz Wine
Mogen David Wine
Kosher Pepsi Cola
Swee-Touch-Nee Tea Bags
Horowitz Coffee
Dade County Dairy
Homo Milk
Cottage Cheese
Sour Cream
Horo-.v-itz Bros, and Margarten
Matzo Farfel
Passover Bartey
Potato Pancake Mix
Spices
Egg Kichel
Concord Sauce
""-"ape Juice
Mothers
Borscht, Reg., Unsalted, Diet.
Old World Gefilte Fish, jar
White Fish and Pike in Gel.
Matzo Balls
King Sour Dressing
Techper's Sponge Cake Mix
Goodman
Square Matzos
Egg Matzos
Matzo Meal
Egg Kickel
Cocoanut Macaroons
Chocolate Macaroons
Honey Cake Mix (with pan)
Rokeach dc Sons
Getilte Fish
Matzo Ball and Chicken Soup
Kosher Soap
Products of Israel
Aeiv Matzos
Telma Mushroom Soup
These are just a few of the items in our Passover display. All items are priced for Total
Savings.
It's the "Tape Total that counts 'cause that's where the savings show.
theTreasury Supermarket
Perrine
16051 S. Dixie Hwy.
Lauderdale Lakes
U.S. 441 and Oakland Park
Hialeah
103rd off Palmetto Expwy.
Hollywood
1951 South State Road *7


Poq6
of Mae* kVawacal
Friday. April 6. 1973
AJCongress President Calls
For New Jewish Commitment
Sadat Dismisses Premier,
Scores L.S. Jet-Sale Plans
By Special Report
WASHINGTON. DC Rabbi
Arthur Hertxberg. president of the
A-tncan Jewish Congress, said
last *eek that the great enterprise
of Jewish hfe in the 1970s must be
to transform our organizations so
that they are consciously designed
tc increase Jewish knowledge and
comitment
Rabbi Hertzberg spoke as the
Congress' national governing coun
a. adopted a resolution calling on
th* organization's chapters to ""in-
ter.- ?: Jewish education for our
leadership and grass roots mem-
ber-
it his address. Rabbi Hertzberg
warned that Jewish communal ro-
atitj'ioos were 'failing to meet
the..- primary responsibility of pro-
ig American Jews with a basic
education and a deep sense of
roc'cdness in the Jewish group "
He cautioned, however, that
.-h continuity cannot be as-
sured by turning inward so that
we worry only about "what's good
1 Jews There can be no seeur-
it I-,r *he Jewish community by
I to the ghetto If we take
Of religion and ourselves senou-
ly m mun as a people speak out
< 2eoualy for those concern*
, of human dignity, equality and
freedam which are authentic to
the Jewish soini
"But commitfneBt to good works
is only one aspect of what it means
to be a Jew in America today We,
most also make a commitment to
ourselves and our own future as a
people"
To fulfill this commitment.
Rabbi Hertzberg said, "we must
provide increased financial support
for those programs that strengthen
Jewish affirmation and that en-
courage the search for Jewish!
roots" He told AJCongress na-
tional women's division convention
meeting: 'The American Jewish
community is increasingly becom-
ing a kmd of accidental associa-
tion of Jews who come together to,
deal with general problems.
"But if Jews are to survive as a
people, the content of Jewish hfe
must be filled with something more
than building hospitals, founding
universities, and offering social
services to the community at large.
' All these good works as im-
portant and vital as they are
are only ways of filling the void
left by the evaporation of positive
Jewish content within Jewry The
enterprise of Jewish life in
the 1970s must be to transform
our organizations so that they are
consciously designed to increase
Jewish knowledge and commitment
Florida leaders of the AJCon-i
gress women's division played key-
roles at the women's division na-
tional biennial convention this
week in Washington, D.C
AJCongress women serving on
the committee for the meeting.
whose theme was Our Past as Pro-
logue." included Mildred Berlin.
Fay Danzig. Gertrude Ehrenpreis.
Sylvia Kaplan. Eve Leikon. Muriel
Meyerson. Sonya Roth. Sylvia Sil-
vers, Jeanne Spevack, Charlotte
Wheeler and Henrietta Weiss.
More than 500 women leaders of
the AJCongress from throughout
the country' attended the four-day
convention, which marked the
women's division's 40th year and
the 25th anniversary of Israel
Sisterhood Donor Luncheon
The Sisterhood of Temple
Emanu-EI held its annual donor
luncheon at Eduardo's Restaurant
in For. LaLiJerdj.*- Ittt week Pro-
ceeds were earmarked for the Jane
I-awson Nursery School
WASHINGTON (JTA)White
House Deputy Press Secretary
Gerald Warren declined to, com-
ment last week on Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat's dis-
missal of Premier Aziz Sidky
and his announcement that be
was assuming the Premiership
to prepare Egypt for total con
frontation with Israel."
Sadat annaaaeed his govern-
meat shake-np at a Joint meet
iag af the Peaa*e"s Assembly
and the central committee af
the Arab Socialist I'nioa.
Font's only political party. He
stressed that Egypt must can-
duct a dual polio of military
pressure on Israel and continued
efforts to gain a political settle-
ment.
Sadat criticized the Inited
States for its plans to sell Israel
more F-4 Phantom jets and A-4
Skyhawk attack planes He also
said that Egyptian relations
with the Soviet Union had again
been put on a solid ba>i
Lad su Mat expelled
20.000 Soviet military ad-
- and technicians, from
Sadat rejected aiain any ter-
ritorial caaceasiaas M ^
far aagotiattoas with Israel
Kojectiag aton the idea af din*
tails, he safl Egypt would net
accept a "partial settlement"
that as aat Baked to eventual
total Israeli withdrawal from the
administered territories, or a
I separate settlesneat in which thr
latereato af the ''Palestiuii
1 rtaiataact" aad af Israels other
Arab neighbors woald be ,.
rtflced."
Hafez Ismail. Egyptian na.
tional security affairs advisor.
is to meet President George,
Pompidou and other French of-
ficials next month. French offi-
cial circles reported, confirming
a similar report from Cairo TV
circles said no final date ha.
been set. but that the meeting
will probably take place a' soon
as the new French government
is formed, probably by mid-
April
lauderhill diopter Meets
The next gneral men.1
meeting of the Laudcrh:..
of Deborah Hospital will held
Monday at 7 30 p m in
munity Room of the Atlantic Fed-
t-ral Savings and Loan A
.t and Stati R ..! :
FREF PARKING AT ALL JAA STORES!
E.
GIVE AND ENJOY
PASSOVER CANDIES AND CAKES
Barton's Passover selection of chocolate and
baked specialties bring delicious and
festive accents to your holiday entertaining
and gift-giving. JM's enticing selection
includes:
A. Passover Bartonettes, 1 pound box, 275
B. Seder Mints. 9 ounces Parve, 1.79
C. Egg Kichelach, 6 ounces Parve, 1.49
D. Mande! Brodr, 8 ounces Parve. 1 59
E. Almond Kisses, 1 pound can, 2 89
CANDIES, at all jm stores except pompano
It's to your credit to say "charge it'' at jm


Apia Br .1973
* legist fhrkHrw Of Nor* Irowwd
' .. <-
Page 7
8f#*
*
#
^
&#
Citizens Federal celebrates its move to ,arfrJ?"8 ~
now located next to the Cafeteria in Lauderhill Mall
COME TO OUR HOUSEWARMING -
THE GIFTS ARE ON US!
FOR SAVING 7 $5,000 OR MORE
J (2-Year Savinqs Certificate)
The Body Lounger
The chair that lets your body movement tilt il forward o- tack -
a-d ah relax' Head cradling loam cushion, sculpt.red armrests.
-j canvas body in Florida coles U|hMwight aluminum
- totes easily, folds up for storage
OK.
* *
The Big-Job Mixer
It m.ies rrashes beats and creams used lUtiOMry or as a
BC"Jb! Powerful 3 speed super torque rro'or. automa,: beater
tJKttf complete w.th stand and m,.ng b0*l UL approved, fully
g.a-jr.teed.
FOR SAVING \ $1,000 OR MORE
Tasty Temp food Server
K-eps food hot o- cold thiough the life of the party- lust add hot
/y or to the outer i.ner Elegant blue smoke cover and
"ft It. 2 compartment insert to keep .too* separate.
Stain resistant, diswasher safe 13i9';
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The Detecto Bath Scale
One toots., tickler' Topped with super thick fluff mat. its .
Sehgh. during e,gh,ns Ma, is -ashab^dia. H easy to read
280 lb capacity White, verdian green. goU
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FOR SAVING / $500 OR MORE
14 pc. Served Store Set
Toogh enough -or everyday k.tchen ,obs. f^SS^
^gh,ndsP.usP2 hand, measure scoops Rambov, colors
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Page 8

fJewltffhr**** ** -*.
Friday, April 6,
/sroe. rtttfoorof Foundlion luncheon For Wo/.ywooo'-Httfwrtrft
JHmiimr of 7rt
April 12 Seminar At New Holiday Inn JOSEPH ILSI
X I "n't. from l>aKP 4
Lists* Financial Expert Sam Shulsky
Sam Shulsky. noted author of the
na'ionally syndicated column, in-
vestor's Guide" will be featured
ket story five times a day for a, vesting for Your Future.-" whult b
major wire service. A graduate of revised periodically, and most re
centlv. investment Guide for
A FAVOR FOR YOUR
NEW NEIGHBOR
DO YOU HAVE A NEW
NEIGHBOR WHO IS NOT
RECEIVING THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN? PLEASE CALL
THE FEDERATION AT
565-4869 AND LET US
KNOW.
WANTED
For
Certified Teacher
Temple Emanu El Nursery
kW
3 or 5 Morning per week
Coll 735-3849
(Evenings)


the University of Rochester, he I
did graduate work at New York
University.
Four books are among the wri-
tings of Mr. Shulsky Included arc
'Stock Buying Guide." "Vocational
Opportunities in Finance." in-
Women "
The Israel Histadrut Foundation
i> the agency which raises funds
through wills, bequests, annuity
trusts, annuity funds, income fund*
Israel-Made Missile
4Shafrir' For Sale
SAM SKUISKT
wpntm April 12 at a Forum on Fi-
rrncial Planning at the new Holly-
wood Holiday Inn, 4000 South
Ocean Drive.
The It a.m. session, which will
be followed by luncheon for all
those attending the forum, will
op^n the National Spring Confer
ertee of the Israel Histadrut Foun-
dation. Dr. I.eon Kronish, rabbi of
Temple Beth Sholom in Miami
Beach, is national chairman of the
board of the Israel Histadrut Foun
(Uiion.
Mr. Shulsky. a former financial
editor of New York daily news-
papers and national wire services,
is past president of the New York
f icancial Writers Association. His
column appears in New York. Mi-
ami Beach and. across the nation
though King Features Syndicate.
I allowing the luncheon which
Is (ree but for which reservations
re required individual consul
teiioiis on personal financial plan
nirg wiD be given by Mr. Shulsky
and by Dr. Sol Stein of New York.'
Or. Stein, national president of
the Israel Histadrut Foundation
and a renowned economist, will
phare the platform with Mr. Shul-
sky at the opening 10 a.m. session.
Ambassador Jacob Barmore. Is-
rael's envoy to the United Nations
and one of his nation's most elo-
quent spokesmen, will be the prin-
cipal speaker at the closing session
. ted for 8 p.m. All of the confer-
ence's meetings will be held at
the new Hollywood Holiday Inn.
Mr. Shulsky has covered Wall
Street for more than 31 yean, and
at one time updated the stock mar
TEL AVIV (JTA) A new,
highly sophisticated, air-to-air
missile developed by "Raphael.'
Israel's Weapons Development
Authority, was unveiled to
Israeli and Foreign newsmen
this week.
Jordanian
Denies Bid
By Cabinet
JERUSALEM (JTA) An-
war Nusseibeh former Defense
Minister of Jordan, denied a re-
port this week that he would
join the Jordanian Cabinet as
Minister in charge of the Admin-
istered Territories. He has been
in retirement from politics since
1967
The report, in the Beirut
newspaper A Nahar. said that
Mr. Nusseibeh traveled to Am-
man to discuss the appointment
with King Hussein. Mr. Nussei-
beh. who is 60, lives in Jeru-
salem.
He stressed that he knew noth-
ing about the report. He told
newsmen that he "had not been
requested by anyone to go to
Amman."
The missile, named "Shafrlr."
reportedly has been tested in
combat.
No details of the missile or its
testing have been published so
far. It is believed to be similar
to the American -Sidewinder."
but is morv sophisticated. It re-
portedly has two homing devices
one radar-controlled and the
other infra-red.
The "Shafrir." (Canopy) was
bi.'ilt at a reported cut of $22.(XK)
each at the "Raphael" work
shops. Dr. Zeev Bonnen. director
of "Raphael,' headed the team
that developed the weapon.
The Defense Ministry is
portedly prepared to sell the
missile to friendly foreign
powers.
According to unofficial and
unconfirmed reports, the "Sha-
frir'' has been employed in
aerial combat, ana scorea direct
hits on Egyptian and S\rian jets
that were downed during the
past two years.
and other forms of deferred giving
fur the health, educational and
welfare programs of the Histadrut
in Krarl.
The Histadrut. Israel's General I
Federation of Labor, operates a
nationwide medical network, the.
Kupat Holim. This service pro
(idea health care for more than 70.
per cent of Israel's population.,
More than 1.150.000 persons be
long to Mi-l.tdrut in Israel.
The April 12 session will include
audl topics U "Stocks. Bonds and
Mutual Funds, Are They For You"""
Other items will include "How to
Imrease Your Spendable Income,"
"Your Batata and Taxes: Pitfalls in
Drafting a Will" and "Helping
Yourself While Helping Israel."
t'on't. from l'aK, 4
gle handedly. and you 1
ed work in 1912 The us
tO*is. Akm great American
deners. the major foreign rin
ries, still follow EmersonV
about beating a path to the
of the man who has
mousetrap.
the
Yet on the otter hand, hj
a look at any commercial AnJ
ican plant nursery where
annually increasing million/
Americans who care about
dens make their purchi
Deadly sameness, deadly
ness. all in tne name of
production these arc the 1
menial themes if wc cease'
be able to tell "beaT
"good." the future will be as jJ
pressing as rows of magerJ
araleas planted fainst gracio|
suburban brick
V^SAVVVV^NAVSN^SAiVVVVVVVVV*VM^VVVVVVSAi
Jewish Federation
of North Broward
Wishes You Atul Your Family
A Happy Passover
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Friday. April 6. 1973
+ k*istfk*Hif*r Of Nth ***
Page 9
Now, the
> _--.<
have their own.
The Encyclopaedia Judaica gives
Jewish families a complete and
authoritative single source for every-
thing related to their Jewishness.
The 16 magnificent volumes are filled
with facts about people, places,
events and ideas.
What is a Jewish encyclopaedia?
It is a "Jewish" encyclopaedia in
the sense that each topic covered is
thoroughly researched and written to
emphasize its relationship to Jewish
thought or activities.
The impact of Jewish thought
and traditions on the world around
us is also covered in detail.
The biography of Albert Einstein,
for example, deals less with his scien-
tific contributions (such information
is available from many sources) and
more with his involvement in
Jewish life.
Similiar emphasis can be found in
articles on psychology, sociology, sex
education and other broad general
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It is this emphasis, this editorial
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Encyclopaedia Judaica unique ... and
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The Jewish love-of-learning
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The word "Bible" means book,
and it is because of this relationship
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the Jews have become known as
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But the staggering proliferation
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Page 10
*Jri*tfhri*ir Of Non* B,ow.rd
Friday, April 6.
i
[
Jlie tKitbbi *^peaht
J-rom
C7i y>ju
Seder Unique 'Festival'
By
RABBI ARTHUR J. ABRAMS
Trmple Enianu El
Fort Lauderdale
tomi/es a proud heritage But more
than that, the Seder extols human
dignity.
The Jew. in celebrating Passover
should be sensitive to the search
for social justice for all mankind.
The family should carefully pre
pare for the Seder and enjoy the
beauty of its ritual, pageantry, and
literary content. It is a highlight
in the cycle of holidays and as such
-hould be conducted with decorum
and dignity.
All should share the same Hag
gadah so that there may be unity
in participation. The Hebrew and
F-nslish should be read with mean-
ing.
There is room for innovative
comments about current issues,
surh as the Russian bondage. You
may wish to invite a Christian
guest to share it with you, or a
'"wish student.
The songs should be sung and
additional folk melodies added. In
With its rich literature. gl?aned so doing, you will indeed be re-1
from the Bible, rabbinic material warded by a most significant per-
nd more recent additions, it epi | sonal experience.
It is the Seder that is central
to Passover observance. In our
storehouse of Jewish memories,
this experience
must figure
prominently. It
is truly a "festi-
val" and is uni-
que.
It is a state-.
ment of Jewish
history, but
more than that,
it is an expres-,
sion of the best
that our culture
has to offer.
Recounted in
the Haggadah is the story- of en-
slavement and freedom, of the
promise of life. It is a blending of
past, present, and future aspira-1
tions.
Religious
Services
FOKT LAUDHDAlt
BETH ISRAEL (Tempi*) Coni*rv-
live. 7100 W. Oakland P"h ';*
Babbi *kiv Brilliant. Cantor Miir
EMANU-EL. S845 W. Oakland Park
Bivd Reform. Rabbi Arthur J. Ab-
ram*. Cantar Jerome Klement. m
Friday Ai.ni IS p.m.. aervtce win
iu. ...i b) Rabbi AbnmawltM*
Thr < rii' IflXl'
ai 'i
*v
be,
topic will
the Jewa.' Batardaj am
Mlurah: Bradley A aon "'
\|.. |:. ri...t I r*M< dW"
Frida) April IS. I IS P m
i.. "The
Uon Batnrda] n < -
,..,, .,.., ,.( Mr ..'..I M'- "1
A\r<.n
PASSOVER Mondaj
p m. animal community
s. .1. r Tu. Ida) ':
r'lfth Quea-
Bai M
I
I
:
POM'ANO SlACH
3HOLOM (Temple). 132 SE ""*
Conaervatiwe. Rabbi Morn* A. Skop
Cantor Jacob J Renxer.
MAtOATf
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. (Con.
aervatiwe) 6101 NW 9th St.____
MH Akrams
V*V**SrV*W CANLHEUGHTING TIME
4 NISAN -
9
Ex-Nazis Given Light Sentences
6:19
ArV^nA^VA
Community Calendar
SATIRDAY. APRIL 1
limarac Jewifk Center Dinner Dance Salt Ooear
Hotel
MONDAY. APRIL 9
Bnai B nth Board Meeting
TUESDAY. APRIL 10
Fort Lauderdale B'nai Brith Women Board Ifei tmg
Fort Lauderdale B'nai B'nth Men General Mooting
Margate Sisterhood General Meeting
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 11
Brandois UoJventtj Women's Committee Study Group
THIRSDAY. APRIL 12
Fort Lauderdale HBtaMMB Study Group
Sabra Hadassah General Meeting
thai Hadassah Board Meeting 10 a.m. Temple
Sholom
TUESDAY, APRIL 11
First DaJ of I'avsover
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 18
Second Day of Passover
THIRSDAY. APRIL 19
Fort Lauderdale Hadassah General Meeting
William M. Landau
New JTA President
BONN (JTA i A Munich court
hai sentenced four former Nan
police officeri to jail for com-
plicity in the murder of about
2.000 Jews in southern Russia in
the fall of 1941 They are Erich
Bock. 61 (HtoKrnst Prast. SB, and
. I Wilhelm Spiokormann. 60. who
JTA distributes its news to the ...
thr0U),n I each got four and a half years.
and Hans Discar. 60. who was
Raymond Epstein, vice pres-
ident of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, announced on March 22
that William M. Landau has been
elected president of the JTA and
will take office April 1. Landau.
47, succeeds Robert H Arnow who
has been president since April.
1967. The announcement by
Epstein came at the annual meet-
ing of the board of directors of
the worldwide agency that gathers
and distributos news and informa-
tion concerning the Jewish people
the world over.
Landau, a graduate of LebJgfa
University and New York Law-
School, is managing partner of
Fred Landau 4 Co., a U.S. national
accounting firm. He is a partner
in Jenks Landau & Co.. an inter
rational accounting firm with of
fices abroad including Great
Britain, Canada, Australia and
South Africa. He is a member of
Die New York Bar Association and
a Certified Public Accountant in
New York, California and Chicago.
A New York resident, Landau
is a member of the board of the
United Jewish Appeal and a mem- j
ber of its campaign cabinet. He is i
associate chairman of the UJA's j
accountants division and a mem-
ber of the board of the New York
Association for New Americans.
Landau is also a member of the
board and was a vice president
of the JTA prior to his election
to its presidency. He is a member
of the board of trustees of a
Westchester synagogue and a
anember of the board of trustees
Of the Young Men's Division of the
Albert Einstein College of Med-
icine.
Other officers elected were:
Robert H. Arnow, chairman of the
board; Raymond Epstein of Chi-
cago, Jerold C. Hoffberger of
Baltimore, and Philip Slomovitz
of Detroit, vice presidents; Julius
Berman of New York, secretary,
and Abe Goodman of New York
treasurer.
Current directors of the JTA
board who. were reelected were:
Victor M. Carter, Los Angeles;
Gottlieb Hammer, N. Y.; Irving
Isaacs, Pittsburgn; Morris Levin-
on, N. Y.; Morris Rodman. Wash-
ington. D. C; Hyman Safran, De-
troit; Joseph D. Shane, Los An-
geles, and Stephen L. Stulman.
N. Y. New board members are
Melvin Swig, San Francisco; Ben
ett L. Aaron, Philadelphia: I
Marshall Weinberg, N. Y.: and
Donald Carr. Toronto. Moshe Riv-
lin. director general of the Jewish
Agency in Israel, and Nessim Gaon
of Switzerland were elected as
directors.
The board of directors took cog
nizance of the long and devoted
service of Elcazar I.ipsky. board
chairman, and appointed him as a
director for life to be listed on
the roster as "Past President and
Director for Life."'
Aa president of the JTA, Landau
will be the top lay officer of a
ni ws service operating in more
ihan 50 countries and transmitting
more than 10.000 words of news
each day Tlio JTA serves 65 news-
papers in the I'.S. and Canada
and scores more around the
world.
It provides direct .sen ice to Jew-
ish communities, central organiza-
tions, the Jewish leadership and
Jewish institutions through daily
news bulletins published in the
United States. England, France,
South Africa, Argentina and Peru.
Israeli press and radio
ITIM. the Israeli newspaper co
operative. In addition to the JTA
Daily News Bulletin issued in New
York. JTA publishes the JTA
Weekly News Digest, a weekly
review of the major developments
of the week and the JTA Com
munity News Reporter, a weekly
report on activities in the Jewish
community and a weekly feature
service to the American-Jewish
press and the Jewish press abroad
sentenced to two \ears impriMin
ment The public prosecutor had
asked for ten years
Two former SS officers wall oa '
rial in West Berlin this week
i-harged with the murder and com.
plicity in the murder of more this
1.000 Jews and gypsies in PolaBj
from 1941 to 1943 Thi \ an Jc-
hann Baecker, 81. and Han- lyuanv
busch. 67 They are a No i n trial
as so-called "excess criminals."
Both are alleged to hau -hot
babies, young girls, womtr. *cd
men.
I TOO OLD TO SPEAK
ANOTHER LANGUAGE?
Not of You've read this far.
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April 6. 1973
+ Uv>istJbrk1i*r of North Broward
Page 11
Israel Newsletter
By Carl Alpert
Israel 9s Latest National Holiday April First
PRll. FOOL'S DAY is known and "observed1'"**'
U over the civilized world we are told, but
in Israel the citizenry braces itself each year
I for who knows what rash of
pranks.
For some reason the students of
the Tcchnion have established a
reputation for prcpetratins the
I cleverest or mot sophisticated
jokes on the public For them it
I is a one-day release from the rig
| ors of their serious studies.
They don't Co in for anything
as innocent as calling attention to an alleged ink
pot mi your face, no indeed. On the campus itself
- one classic which is repeated every year.
the morning of April i some member of the
staff who misses his car realizes sadly
he will find it on top of the roof of one of the
I i~ buildings. Sometimes a crane has been
arj l'> remove the vehicle; how the students
I up there in the first place remains an enij
Inccring secret.
The stunts spread to the public as well Last
the front walls of the citv's banks were plas
I with big notices to the effect that the hanks
dosed until further notice. Curiosity gave
s\ t i panic when the banks actually did not open.
[t ins the students had at the same time gummed
ill the keyholes, and the bank officials had a
Book Review Seymour B 1 .iehuian
Jews In Time, Space
tf/U JAPANESE AM) THE JEWS by Isaiah Ben Hasan
..lohr. Weatherhill. $6 95) is an intneuing. diverting
and occasionallv. disturbing book The
author s name is presumed to be a p
] lonym. He claims to have been born in
|.\obe. Japan, of strict observant .uw
sh parents
Mystcn surrounds his identity When
Ihis book won the Japanese Ojrt Frue
leomparahle to our Pulitzer, he sent a
[prosy. There is no doubt that he pos
esses a <>od knowledge Of Judaism and
although it is not free of error. It also apt* an
Eat he Knows the Japanese and their history but he id
Vuts thai certain of their eharactenstes or idiosyncra. 901
in besond his comprehension.
The book might best be labeled comparative study
| aspects of the cultural aninr. pologS of '<'*
H Hh fust chapter. "The C lb Bt analysis of how these tWO peoples uev
JO. ioity This ap;>rai.al also applies, to his chapters
Uitu lea toward animals, tune polities, and divine and
It* Unfortunately, the author rarely supplies
fun on .li.da.sm exc-pt those Iron, tin
We an re more than nsvpleaod by the stsaamenl
IMmown rabbi V ''" ''
i,,; the Am-H.....tea -:. I "could and ahould
i, from iimb- becauee "the) ranked low*
b, (Local rabbis who -"'-
ICh Talmudual
. author raaa nd ,!l-'"'
i< : and Chi- hwrd
led to an ,:h"
bathe fa
who hai abaorbed
l.srwitness U i wish History, edit. Uriel ]
Grod Goodman and Uvta Ka '
lean He.,,-.., Congregations, 17-W) u "" '
' excerpts from books, dJariee, tra elers not.
.,,,, etc. written between 586 B.C.K Md I "** "
Preceded by a brief explanatory note. The book is an
excellent tool for educators provided it is skillfully used
pome selections are gem. which deserve reading by adults
-hey call to mind Gray's memorable line, -many a Bower
is born to blush unseen." Pierre Van Paaaen's description
;.f the Moslem slaughter of the Jews on a Sabbath eve in
lebron ,n 1829 required retelling and wide dissemina
ion.
Morris Golombs Know Your Festival, and Enjoy
...em (Shengow Publishers. $5.50) is intended for Talmud
forah classes but will prove to be a delight for adults
[he author is an outstanding Jewish educator Each fest^
I explanation and history is followed by quizzes and
swers and many include legends, myths, or tales that
conversation pieces.
' Way 'time explaining matters to a growing queue
of nervous depositors until the doors could be
forced open.
45 We Were Saying: By ROBERT E. SEGAt
Growing Old,
Growing Poor
RABBI BEN EZRA taught it to Robert Browning;
and '.he Knglish poet passed the world along to
all mankind that sweet assurance that everybody
crowing old with the rabbi would
discover in his sunset years that
life was at its best. But time and
economic dislocation, longevity, in-
flation, and the curs-.-d ways of
modern life have shot holes in Ben
Etra'i honeyed promise.
Here's a report, for example.
thai the American Jewish Con
:n Fleming special consultant on the aaed at the high
est national level, that a! least 75 per cent of Amer
ica's impoverished .lews are over 65 and that most
of these poor elderly receive little or no govern-
mental assistance.
Will help for these and other needy among the
nation*l 20 million men and women 65 and over be
coming from Washington these next few years'
We commit ourselves to helping older Americans
achieve greater self reliance and greater opportuni-
ty- for direct participation in the activities of our
OCiety." the platform of the winning political party
declared We believe that the later years should
be. not Isolated years, not yuan of dependence, but
jreara of fulfillment and dignity."
Yes. .sir' \r.d when time CUDC for the President
to make his second Inaugural address, he spelled
out his conception oi the commitment by aaeerl
"In our own Uv lei each of us ask not just what
w.ii government do for me, but what can 1 do to
for
You had belter believe it. you older poor, you
inhabitants of the nursing home of no return in the
d(I! decrepit thousand* who would give most
anything to prove you can lttll support yourselves
if oi and the government would give you
rtrength to at. uf Jt of bed.
o/hal ha n w\ Lew with our greyheads? Simone
dc Be..L...: < elaasit study, "old'" and "poor" have
b MOM radically synonymous. Here we are told
th.. practically half of America's accd live in ex-
treme p verts thai mans in that segment try to sub
iial ,, less 1 lan 1200 a month for a couple. In a
Nob d) Ever Died of Old AgC,'
companionaU Sharon R Curtain pronounces a harsh
ludgmenl on Ihe moat of us for "the spiritual ahelv
. ior) by .. aoclety thai worship*
th." Wist! I aotuetimea fear ft I
last gen. to know M P.
I to learn thai
insweriiuj proudr,
Panthers has com.
. tal run around, ^:i ^
f the you W
,;. : Thes an
ointment]
. the elder may of
- ... llion. And
> oommand -
luster.
,] to aarch through the anguiahad
ned elderly poor, you will
fma< ,. latified demands They ask
ai d d ahM i seniors:
1. A ch.i' ce tfl .share in the powerful American
economs that many of them helped build. A nation
with a gross national product of approxjmately $1
trim on should do better by its elderly.
2 An end to cold, mandatory retirement at 65
Increasingly, such cut offs are seen as discrimina
tory.
3 A readjustment oi Social Security in a way
to enable people to continue receiving promised
benefits for the handicapped and others on welfare
after increase has been voted In Social Security
4. The assurance of adoption of national mini
mum standards for private pensions.
5. Partial exemption for property tax for those
over 65 with limited family income.
6. A sound national health plan, with the fed
eral government giving more thought to UM need-
of the elderly than to the money hunger of insurance
I companies.
* III I !! -------------- "".....*.....""''
In Tiberias reports of a goJd mine discovery
spread like wildfire, helped along by discreet scat-
tering of brass shavings in the area.
Two years ago the junior traffic experts of the
Technion put up one way signs along Tel Aviv i
principal thoroughfare, Dizengoff Blvd. At firs'
caused consternation, but it seemed to solve the
traffic problems so well that after serious con.sid
eration the Tel Aviv city fathers made it permanent!
Throngs at Lydda Airport were amused to hea r
a hostess. i>erhaps not too conversant with English,
summoning "Mr. Chamber Pot" to report to the
tourist desk.
When April Fool's Day falls on Shabbal. as in
1972. the students thoughtfully observed it the fol-
lowing day.
Showing journalistic enterprise the Technion
students produced a special edition of the popular
afternoon paper. "Yediot Aharonoth." which sell
on the streets better than the original, especially
since the big black headline proclaimed that. "0
ernment Announces Discovery of First Temple
Belonging to Second Temple Period.' 'Yediot" has
Umed to get a court order against the intpoeter
paper.
There has been no end to the pranks from yea
to year. Posters announced discovery of a new.
dangerous virus in drinking water; everyone who
has drunk water in the last 24 hours should report
at once to a hospital or clinic.
\ roup of Becrsheba students mailed out of-
ficial looking invitations to a non-existent corner-
stone ceremony The officials hastened to d oral
the site with flags, and throngs showed up 11
April Fool's Day
As these line are being written it will toon be
April 1 again. What do the students have up thetr
sleeves this tune"
Panorama:
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
Moses Didn't I se Oil
kJOKI USE SHOl I.D be made of the coal ro
soi.ices of the world, according to Golda lit
"Moses, she said, led the Jews, for 40 yean in
the wildernoas and didn't use any
oil There la less pollution from
power produced bs eoaJ A writ.
in the New York Times the oi
day proposed that Israel in..
rate a craah pre p am to produ
tying ear rUH by elect :
to h. Ip save the world.
The oil power i .i .' "i ile
be rd to the world as
war.
v.... dl ln'1 use oil and he could ''' i
world another lesson He waanl in a hurry.
i Egyptians pursuing the laraeUtea had
canthe chariots The laraelKos jual walk.
The Egyptian ears rolled over In the Red
while the Israelites marched safely on.
People say 'in the lone run" The long run
bad and the short run is bad. Walk.
According to the Israeli daily. "Maariv." Golds
Meir. out of curiosity, asked one of the recent
Russian immigrants what he thought should be
done about the occupied territory.
"Well," he replied, "territories which were'
freed should be kept, but those which were con-
quered, should be given their freedom."
"Which were freed and which were conquered''
asked Mrs. Meir.
"Well, such territories as Golan Heights. Gaza,
Sinai were freed and should be kept. But territories
like Rumania, Hungary. Czechoslovakia were con
quered and they should be let go."
re
i:-
*.,.. '.'-.'


Page 12
+ kistfkrH>ir Of *k* Brow.nl
Friday, April 8,
GiveTo UJA-Jewish Federation Campaign Now!
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NO TIME
NO TIME TO RE1
NO TIME TO
Ve'H really do it next
We must do it this
Tens of thousands of immigrants are.
self-sufficient.
Thousands more r
assistance to br
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f ffUfcmlhat kno^s nCpeace.
The trag ed y t^ Mipich. T^TIj^:
Massacre at Lo^Sj||rt -J!t&
For the Israelis, there is no time to rest.
io* there is runtime to rest. While the '
of Israel continue their struggle for sur-
,we must-match their commitment by p*o-
i unaqm needs of 70,000 n e wcome
ers
<3VTQTI!E
ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
s w. THE UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
JEWISH FEDERATION
OF NORTH BROWARD
3905 N. Andrews, Ft. Louderdole,
FWh*o 33307
TtUphtn, MMMi


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