The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00029

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


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Full Text
pJemsb FiendVan
1 -Number 27
ot .YOUTH fffflOU IffII

November 3, 1972
Price 20c
ead Tax Waived For Three Activists
E\V YORK (JTA) Three
i,r Jewish activists In Mos-
[all with advanced academic
have boon granted per-
to leave the Soviet
tn without paying the exces-
avs levied on edu-
Soviet citizens, the Stu-
, for Soviet JewTy
has reported.
ss>l spokesman said the
fetation lairI that exit
h.i\ P beta granted to Gav-
|.ir<< Roman Rutnian and
bi.ul Miwhkln.
o, who began serv-
ing a one-year sentence at "cor-
rective labor" last month for
alleged draft evasion has had
his sentence susi>ended and will
leave the Soviet Union within
10 days, his American wife, Judy
Silver Shapiro, told the JTA.
"I"m in ecstasy, in mock, I
don't believe it," said Mm. Sha-
piro, a Cincinnati social worker
who was married to Gavriel in
a religious ceremony at his Mos-
cow home last June but was de
Died a civil marriage by the So
viot authorities, She told the
JTA tliat ihe was planning to
\Exii Visa Withdrawn,
Soviet Jew Is Drafted
B\ Special Report
lose ow A young Soviet
Twha had been told he could
[or Israel without paying
bontroversial "diploma tax"
[iummoned to the passport
la>t weak, stripped of his
and -ued a conscription
lr, i V Dubrov. 22. said in
[hi*
interview that he
ther were among the
lew i-l- Mmilies who had been
ihey would be exempt -
h. tax if they left by

I
pwi of the exemptions
simultaneously
ng m Washington
|Sow< I- Vnu rican trade pack-
,ui> Ifbaoow Jews
it relaxation of the
\. dient measure t<>
' ,> for the trade deal's
VS. Centra
\niericun senator*
l> r>il a resolution s:i\-
lh* nouM nt appreve nnt-
Ifert nation status fur Uiis-i;i.
f\ part <>l tin- trii-le aecord.
thr Sevleta lifted the ettu-
on t.i\. s.
mux*. ,| Aug. 3
B s ivl it, require
} ;ntr i lu<
the stat<> for their
I :tn go as
< I a person.
-aid that after the
re granted, lie and
I re issued So\ let
St vi, and then obtained
transit visas from the Italian
embassy 10 they could stop in
Rome on a flight to Tel Aviv
Mr. Dubro\ said when he and
hi* mother went Friday to the
Mate airllnr. Aenroflot. to buy
the airline tickets, they were
turned away and returned Satur-
day.
A ticket agent assigned the
task of issuing tickets to Jew-
ish emigrants told them that
she couldn't sell them the tick-
ets and that they should -:o to
the Office of Visas and Foreign
Registrations (OVIRl Monday
to clarify the matter.
"Early thai
n itive of OVIR rang up and
laid we ar > 1 OVIR as
quickly as > ,h''
ticket affair irked
out" Mr. I' i "We
t OVIR ih the
visas ind ;,;'1 '''
wail v' d a!1
hour "
Mr. Dobrm mid. :< repreaen-
tatlve "f the milit:ir\ committee
f,.r his district ol Moscow came
to the OVIR offl > T'e ;,rmV
rerrnite-r siinvmmeil him t" ;*
room, poshed his mother oat. and
ordered Mm to sign i drafl sum-
mons. Mr. Dubroi said be dldnt
Blgn, i-in CoLOrlgorj \. Sororh-
Mn, depot) chlel Hw m ": '
iapartmenl >f internal affairs
toM him his snd bis mothers
\iss were annulled.
The author:'
son for annullin \ th(
issuing the drafl f-________
fly to Vienna to meet her hus-
band.
Mrs. Shapiro reeeived the
Rood news In a routine telephone
conversation with Gavriel which
she made from the B'nal B'rlth
lliUel Foundation at Syracuse
University at part or a press
conference.
Mrs. Shapiro, who has been
appealing to the U.S. govern-
ment to intervene in her hus-
band'- behalf since she returned
to this country after being OUSt-
Mrs. Aaron Kaplan
Luncheon Speaker
The Fort Lauderdale Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its Youth Ali-
yah Pledge Luncheon Thursday
noon. Nov. 9, at the Sweden House.
700 So. State Road 7, Plantation.
The speaker of the afternoon
will be Mrs. Aaron Kaplan, a
member of the National Board of
Hadassah and currently national
chairman of U.S. Government
Grant Purchases and Chapter Fi-
nancial Reports. Prior to her na-
tional service, she was president
of the Northern New Jersey Re-
gion of Hadassah.
Reservations for the luncheon
may be made with Celia Goldberg
or Yvette Alderman.
las Vegas Night'
To Benefit Seniors
The genera! public is Invited to
participate In a Las Vegas Night"
ired by the National Council
of Jewish Women's Sen I e A
Saturday, Nov. 11 In the recreation
the Gait Ocean Towers,
Salt Ocean Dr., Fort Lauder-
I- ieed< of the event, which will
irked
rovide free hoi
indigent
citizens if North Broward County.
are tax deductible;
i ic payable to
: of Jewish Women.
Mrs Gilda Kopel, ways and
mi ins chairman, may be contacted
in Towers for fur-
ther in! irmation and reservations,
Mrs, Herman E. Na-
licitj chairman.______
Annexing Of Territories
'Ruled Out'By Premier
By SpwUd Report
[JER1 3 a I. KMPremier Golda
fir riled out" Israeli annex-
ion of the heavily populated
ctors of the occupied terri-
fies on the ground that this
uld endanger the country's
*ish majority in a speech
de before a conference <>f
Imeric.-.n women representing
J* O'linization for Rehabili-
tion through Training (CRT)
" the brael capital.
She d-clared that her govern-
*n''s aim was to achieve
defensible borders," not a large
Arab minority.
After we have signed peace
trt-at.es with our neighbor*, she
told 600 delegates "" > "(
United St...- "and freed*
borders, the nature oil0*> state
of Israel wUl be Jewish *h d
large Jewish majoritj
birthrate might eventually cauai
the resident Jewish population
to be surpassed.
She said she would not want
[srael to have to get up every
morning and be afraid to ask.
Who was born during the
night? m a Jew "
Arab? There is a country like
that," she went on, "Lebanon.
Under Lebanon's constitution.
the Christian communities have
Kuaranteed political control, but
the Moslem clement has grown
,o the extent that the Chnsttan
majority may be fictional now.
ed from Russia following her
marriage, said, "I suppose the
American government came to
my rescue at a very high level.
But I have no proof of that."
She said Gavriel told her that a
fellow activist, Mark Nashpitz,
did not get permission to leave.
Mr. Shapiro, 28, a chemical
engineer graduate of Moscow
University, first applied for an
exit visa to go to Israel in Feb.
1971. Roman Rutman, 38, who
was a professor of technical sci-
ences at the Institute of Radio
Engineering in Moscow, had ap-
plied for his visa in March, 1971.
It is not known when Kliachkin.
an aeronautical engineer in his
early 20s applied for a visa.
Dayan Said Illegally
Exporting Antiquities
By Steeial Report
JERUSALEM Deputy Pre-
mier Yigal Allon last week
asked the government's legal
adviser to investigate charges
that Defense Minister Moshe
Dayan illegally exported items
from his personal antiquities
collection to the United States
for sale to wealthy Jews.
Mr. Allon, acting on a com-
plaint that Dayan illegally sent
ancient artifacts abroad accom-
panied by an autograph of the
defense minister for each one.
asked that police be included in
the investigation, the deputy
premier's spokesman said.
Gen. Dayan's chief rival Jor
the premiership when Mis.
Golda Meir retires, Mr. Allon is
also Minister of Education and
Culture and is in charge of the
government antiquities depart-
ment.
Israeli law stipulates that no
antiquities may be shipped
without the department's writ-
ten approval. A sjwkesman said
this was to prevent valuable
finds from leaving the country.
Gen. Dayan's collection of
thousands of artifacts, including
a basement full of clay pots, oil
lamps and bowls dating from
Biblical times, is displayed in
his suburban home and garden.
~------ ------
,,...... ":
News Briefs
\ in in Demands Led To Break, Premier Reports
TEL AVIV (JTA) Premier Golda Meir has disclosed officially
for the first time the demands made by President Idi Amin of
Uganda that led to a break between Israel and Uganda. Addressing
the Tel Aviv Labor Council, Mrs. Meir said Amin had asked Israel
for "little things" like a few Phantom jets which, Mrs. Meir said.
he made clear he intended to use against Tanzania. Israel could
not spare the jets and. in any case, would never provide them for
use against another country, the premier said.
Dossiers Kept On Soviet Jews, Lawyer Says
NEW YORK (JTA) "A dossier of what by American stand-
ards would seem to be innocuous conduct, is kept on every Soviet
Jew so that an ever-present bureaucracy can move on an instant's
notice whenever and against whomever the convenience of the state
appears to dictate." This assessment, together with observations on
the Soviet judicial process and the trials of Soviet Jews, is pre-
sented by Jacob Fuchsberg, past president of the American Trial
Lawyers' Association, in an article in the latest issue of the New-
York Law Journal. Mr. Fuchsberg spent several weeks this sum-
mer in the Soviet Union laying the ground work for a Soviet-
American International Law Conference. At the request of the
Greater New York Conference on Soviet Jewry, he looked into
cases of Soviet Jews who are facing trials. He also met with Soviet
Procurator General Roman Rudenko and other judicial officials.
Nobel Prize Winners Active-At Weizman *
NEW YORK (WNS) A Jewish biologist from London, Dr.
Gerald Maurice Edelman, and a non-Jewish professor from London.
Dr. Rodney Porter, have been awarded the 1972 Nobel Prize.
Both of the winners have ties with the Weizman Institute of
Science in Rehovot, Israel. Dr. Edelman is a member of the board
of governors and Dr. Porter has cooperated on research in England
with the institute.
ZOA Urges President To Demand Tax End
NEW YORK (WNS)The National Executive Comirittee of
the Zionist Organization of America urged President Nixon last
week to "openly and vigorously" demand the "immediate with-
drawal of the unjust exit tax" imposed by the Soviet Union. The
committee urged the President not to rely on "silent diplomacy
as "the only instrument of administration policy where the rights
of Soviet Jews are concerned." --


Pcge 2
+Jmist>ncridri&r) f N** ***
Friday, November 3.
m
Immigrants' Relatives Can
Be Accused of 'Conspiracy'
NEW Cmtf KABBIS' HHACtUKHTt )
WASHINGTON IJTA.) Jew-.,. jft> noted that in eases of mix.
ish activists In Mas row say that marriage or conversion, permit-
t authorities have devised aion signatures would implicate!
meaoi bV which they can ini^ii-. tl>e signers in what the govern-j
cate re'atiws of emigration appli-, tnent calls "anti-Soviet conspir-.
canli in 'ami-Soviet eonspivaey." j acy."
according to Dr. David Korn. chair- i
man of the Jewish Community
('Hiifil >! CriatiT Washington.
Religious Council
Prepares To Elecf
2?TwHfcw Rabbis
Sisterhood To Hold Rummage Sale
decorated Donation will ,M,r I
coel of rofrethrnenu
I'nder the new procedures win h I
went into .-ffect early la*t month,,
applicants now need statements j
from parents or closest relatives
giving "permission" for emigra-
tion. Dr. Korn said.
The new rule MUM parents and
other relative! to also be consid-' Temple Sholom of Pompano Beach.,
Barry Stone i
Democratic
Candidate
i
Barry Stone, a past president of |
I "undesirables" subject to lass t is the Democratic candidate for
[ Supervisor of Elections in Brow-
l)i|> In Ini oIIiihhi
Accelerated iu The!
Past Year- AAJE
NEW YORK IJTA1 A de-
rHne in JewU >rhool enrollment
m the United States in recent
jmmi appears to have accele-
rated in the 1970-71 school year. ,
the American Association for
J wish Education reported this
k in Advance of publication
of t- biennial school census for
.i ichoo
'I be preliminary report, made
bj Dr. Hillel Hochberg, director
oi ;r.,' AAJE statistical reaearch
department. Indicated that re-
ported enrollment in all types al
Jewish schools In 33 cities de-
cttu .1 from llfl.fi l to 21M s
from 1960 to 1M0, a iternwar
tor the period of 12.9'. and an
average drop of .T.V. annually.
The report eted h mean de-
crease in 24 of those communi-
ties of *.'/i from 19CJI to 1971.
Itantially more than the pre.
vious mean annual drop of :t...'..
AAJE officials said the sta-
tMica apjH ared to confirm spor-
adic reports from various pacts
of the United States which indi-
aatad a tapering off from the
! k enrollment of move than
600.000 students estimated in the
a \jk national study in 1959.
Interim censuses by the A A.II-!
during the subsequent decade in-
diBatad that the school popula-
tion ami rlerrea-s;!>-. Tlie offici-
al.- said appaarad, irom the
CUTT nt survey, that there had
heen a drop of at least 20'. in
reported and estimated figittes
sin. e the 1959-60 census.
of Jobs, ipartmertta or education,
thtr* seeming to "place more hard-
ship on those who remain than on
those who aoply to leave, M a to
>t.j Jewish anaagraxiofl complete*
b Dr. Korn aid.
aid County, subject to Tuesday's
general election-.
Mr. Stone, a jwrtner in the firm
of Week and Stone, has been an
attorney in Florida for the past
nine \ ears, and has served as a
director of the Broward County
Bar Association.
He has been active in the North
Broward Jewish Federation, serves
i ..n the board of the American Jew-
ish Committee, and i> a member
of the Chamber <>t Commerce in
Pompano Beach and of Selective
Service Board No. 150.
Mr. Stone, who describes him-
jell as a moderate Democrat, said
Broward county is "getting short
changed by eonttnuing to send mi-
nority representation to Tallahas-
-',. liace in Florida it'.- the Deino-
ratic party which get* things
done "
A former us Government ap-
neal asrent. he advocates estab-
lishment of additional registra-
tion locations to be run with a
non-part!san "atmosphere."
Mr. Stone and his wife, the for-
mer Shaii Reiter of HoI1.vw.mk1.
Dave three children Michael. 8.
Josie, 6, and (Uzabeth, 2.
I
Tenant Security Deposit
Law Will Be Enforced
Florida's tenant security deposit
law. which went into effect Oct. 1,
11.is teeth in it alter all. according
to Milton Gordon, former regional
attorney for the Fe Authority and one of the law's
early proponents.
Mr. Gordon said the Hotel and ,
Restaurant Division of the State I
department of Business Re^ula-'
lions has been named by Attorney'
General Robert Shevin to enforce
the legislation, whihe carries no:
criminal penalties. A landlord's
license may be revoked or sus-
pended, however, for lack of com-
pliance.
TEL AVIV iJTAi The Tel
Aviv Religious GasmcH met last
week to berin preparations to
elect "two new chief rabbis to
serve the city's Ashkena/ic and
Sephanlic communities
Tlie posts became available
when the Incumbents, Rabin
Shlomo Goren and Rabbi Ovadia
Yosef. were elected the Ash-
keoazic and Sephardk chief
Rabbis of Israel resp tively.
Both will retain their Tel Aviv
offices pending the elections,
which are several months oft.
Tin- speculation was that Rab-
bi lUhjik \ eiii.iv;, Fritenkel was
the most likely to tuowtf Rab-
bi OatOSt, the niau u Ini defeated
bil t*r-- yen's iigo. But lie nia>
h- chidlengtil by other rabbit
iiiiisiiuicli as the Tel Aviv rab-
binate has proven to he a Btftp-
l>iiie-stn,. to the ( hief Rahbin-
nate of Israel.
Former Chief Rabbi Unterman
and the late Chief Rabbi U/iel
both served as Chiel Rabl Is of
Tel A\ Iv, as did Goren and Yo-
1 strf. The Sephard community
was sin prised iiv the \ krtorj ol
Rabbi Y. >-. : over the Incumbent
Sephar.1 Chiel Rabbi Yitzhak
Nis.si.n. inasmuch as Rabbi Yo-
eei declared nil icj only
ih days before the elections. 8ev-
eral proralnanl SephaKll and
Yi-nii nile rabbis are said to be
possible candidates lor Rabbi
Yosef*s Tel Aviv off ce,
Chai Chapter Of Hadassah
To Mark 60th Anniversary
("hai chanter oi Hadassah
'North Broward and West. Palm
Beach I win mark the organiza-
tion's 60th anniversary Frida> eve-
ning, Nov. 17. at Margat; Jewish
Center, 6101 NW 9th St., i>> host-
ing the Oneg Shabbat foHowim
the x p.m. sen lee*
Guest cantor will be Cantor
Emanuel Mandel, national cantor
of the Jewish War Veterans of the
U.S.A.. Max Goiiub. the canter1!,
religious leader, will speak on 'Tlie ',
Time Is Now "
The Sisterhood of Margate Jew-
ish Center. 6101 NW 9th St.. will
.hold a three-day rummage sale at
'the center next week. Sales will
start at 9 am. daily Tuesday,
. Wednesday ijndTbursdfly. ^
The Sisterhood will hold its an-
nual card party Sunday. Nov. 1-'.
at Tf3 pm. in the cent, r, which
: has iieen recently enlarged and re-
pnzes,
The
ine at
Sisterhood's regular r
the center Tues lay. \
14, at 12:r p.m. will feature th
latesl fashions By Pfiyllls,
Ing the business portion. For ad.
ditiona) information, contact Mr:
Maurice WllMM, publl
num.
Sahra Chapter Planning Party
Sabra Htapter of Hada-sah will Mis Aaron Kaplan, Had
hoki its third annual paid-up mem- National Board member, Will be
berabip party at 8 p.m. Tuesday the gue1 Breaker; entertainment
! in DaarfieJd Lakes Condominium will be provided by th. "Safcr,
in DeeriieW Beach. Schleps "
The chairman for the eveofaw
All members who have paid or Ml< Al|an port(,r ^ -u^^
; win pay their 1972-7.". dues b>' ,.n((.rtainment. refreshments
Nov. 7 will !>e honored fruests of j up-to-the-minute president
the Sahra Chapter. tion reports.
ami
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Friday. November 3. 1972
V-knisHkridfam Of North Broward
Page 3
Quiz Box
fciABBI D. SA.MI-KL 4. I ox
hi W tht ninny P'"""
.,.lo nol :.r Tallin n*-
.,irh before thejf "**
"Sis "vd biU'k lh0 Tal"
r .JnKidushln. 29At whore it li
Emm thai '""' wh0 is not mar"
H|,|os not have tOCOVfT hinis, li
kith a Talith.
Ki trace this to a Biblical
Lave explaining th;it In one place
Bible the commandment to
rake "i,,:''s lT'/i"1 G'dllimi
Cw I- i" n*l a "*>
...
ilb 'vt'n a bachelor is re-
I a tradttJon t<> ; , '/our-conwad undei
L,n, to what* the T/it/ith are'.
,,,,!,..: rims, ha lull His the Bib-
Lai commandment to attach
jvitii to four^ornewa] gnr-
TV Talith. therefore, ls an arl-
i..-nt baaldaa the un-
m Apparently, wearing
lUUl iinli.'ates matur-
]:; i oi ie< elopment,
lion of being married,
j at least having been married,
li red such a desirable
, thai wearing the outer Talis
,a\ been eMaakfeMI a status
1 rhus a bachelor was ex-
Ibil nijiiiivmont.
Actually, this is considered to
ison why the bride tra-
ei the groom Kift
ilith for the wedding;. '
\th\ la it l hat onr only wean*
, T.ilitli in the morning and not
.,1 nicht?
Ti-. eaka of the fringea
i Talit n being avnething to '
to its., as a reminder
iNumbem 15:39). Daring daytime
visible; during night-
Bra generally less
rible because of the darkness
m this the rabbis deduced that
7/it/i'h or a Talith, does not
hae to l>e worn at nrght i Mena-
tDth 43 Ai.
Jt is interesting to note that
there are a number of command-
us involving practices which
t required at night IS. G.
TefUJnl Evidently, certain prao-
tirvs which serve as direct re-
| pnnden for the immediate prea-
fnw of Cod are not observed at a
time when they cannot be clearly
s"i under all circumstances, i.e..
It nicht
-------------------------------------I
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Fabulous Tours for 1973
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN
Watch Jewish Floridian "Calendar of Events"
for Council Meetings and Activities
Rhea D. Nathan, Tour Chairman 942-1449
1973 Brochure on Request
See Two Special Tours Leaving from Miami
for Israel's 25th Anniversary Year
Israel's President Zalman Shazar (left) looks at the dup-
licate of a Tallis he will receive as a gift from the Wilkes-
Barre Jewish Community Center and thanks Seymour
Hefter. educational director of the ICC. who was in Israel
for a JWB-sponsored seminar on Jewish Program Ma-
terials. The 100th Tallis to be woven by Wilkes-Barre
JCC members was made especially for President Shazar
in honor of Israel's 25th anniversary but was damaged
in the flood when tropical storm Agnes struck the commu-
nity where Mr. Shazar's sister lived for 30 years. Looking
on is Mordecai Bar-On, chairman of the Youth and He-
chalutz Department of the World Zionist Organization,
with which JWB cooperates in a number of projects re-
lated to Israel and world Jewry.
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Page 4
&imM***im O* North leeward
Friday, November 3. I972J
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Volume 1
Friday, November 3, 1972
Number 27
26 HESHVAN 5733
___i
'Reverse Discrimination
The Anti-Defamation League's complaint against the
University of California's "affirmative action" program
claims that it has resulted in a policy of reverse discrimi-
nation. Complaints of a similar nature could be made
against most of our leading universities which receive
federal grants for they, too. cm engaged in the practice.
While the legal technicalities demand that the com-
plaint be filed against the university, the real culprit in
establishing or demanding that they be established
quota systems is the Department of Health. Education and
Welfare. Despite administration denials of encouraging
quotas, the record is clear that prestigious colleges as
Columbia, Harvard, Chicago and the like have been
threatened with the loss of needed federal funds unless
they comply.
The most ludicrous example of bureaucratic narrow-
ness comes from the State University of New York at Al-
bany which embarked on a search for a Biblical scholar
who would be "either female, Negro, American Indian or
possess a Spanish surname." This, of course, eliminates
Jews, who do not enjoy official status according to HEW,
as well as others who do not fall into the proper niche.
One can hardly deny the discrimination practiced in
the past against the selected minority groups but there
are better ways of eradicating these practices than the
quota policy determined by HEW.
A Healthy Sign
The selection of two new chief rabbis for the Ashke-
nazic and Sephardic religious communities of Israel finally
settles a problem which has kept the nation on edge for a
long time. The choice of two younger men to fill the im-
portant posts, both with records of greater leniency in the
interpretation of Hdlacha, will have its effect on the re-
ligious life of Jews throughout the world, in the opinion of
most observers.
Both Rabbis Shlomo Goren and Ovadia Yosef are,
like their predecessors, strictly Orthodox in their belief that
rabbinical law cannot be amended or modernized. Their
major support, however, came from political groupings
which felt that they are liberal to the extent that, on past
performances, they have found grounds in rabbinical
sources for less strict interpretations than have been those
of the defeated incumbents.
The past 25 years have seen the resources and ener-
gies of Israel devoted to survival. That it has finally been
able to turn its attention to the explosive religious issues is
a healthy sign.
Every Adult Jew Now Represented
Long overdue recognition finally has been given
national Jewish women's groups. The election of five such
organizations to the Conference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations raises to seven the num-
ber now represented in that prestigious body, an indica-
tion of the discrimination which has existed in the past.
The contributions that the five newly elected members
have made to American Jewish life are many and their
inclusion within the conference means that it has at last
representation of virtually every adult Jew in the United
States. B'nai B'rith Women, the National Women's League
of the United Synagogue, National Federation of Temple
Sisterhoods, Mizrachi Women and Pioneer Women now
join Hadassah and the National Council of Jewish Women
in Ae conference and the result can only be a stronger
umbrella organization.
MATTER OF FACT
AVON. Conn Here in Avon,
where this reporter came from,
we have a serious generation
gap if you will permit that
shopworn phrase to be used just
once. But it is not the kind of
gap you might suppose.
AVON IS a Yankee farm vil-
lage, turned into an Italian town,
turned into a bedroom suburb.
With one exception among the
Woodfords. who have an heredi-
tary tendency to live past 100
years, the Avon patriarchs to-
day are all first-generation Ital-
ians. The Italians began arriving
here shortly before World War
I.
The generation gap in ques-
tion is between the first-genera-
tion patriarchs and the success-
ful, now middle-aged. Italian-
Americans they have reared. In
one of Avon's leading Italian-
American families, for instance,
there are five sons. The patri-
arch, at a recent family gather-
ing, asked his sons how they
were going to vote this year.
ALL BUT one had chosen
President Nixon already, where-
upon the patriarch was deeply
angered. He remembered the
hard depression years. He re-
membered President Roosevelt
He called the Republicans "the
rich people's party," and he
warned his sons never to forget
that they were "poor people."
As a matter of fact, the sons
are by no means poor. Yet they
think of themselves as working
people (as is natural, for they
have got where they are today
by damnably hard work). The
patriarch's warning made some
of them pretty uncomfortable.
SO THERE you have our
fairly unexpected generation
gap between the patriarch,
who would never vote Republi-
can, and most of his sons, who
will vote Republican this year,
but with genuine bad conscience.
There you also have the ulti-
mate problem facing President
Richard M. Nixon if he wants
to attain his greatest ambition.
When he was a new-fledged
Congressman, dinner at Alice
Longworth's, the future Presi-
dent was somewhat idly asked
what that ambition was.
HE REPLIED that obviously
he wanted to get to the very
top although he knew the im-
possible" odds against his doing
so. "But at the top," the next
question was, "what will you
want to do if you ever get
there?"
"I'd like," said Richard M.
Nixon, "to be remembered as
the man who reversed Presi-
dent Roosevelt's great achieve-
ment and made the Republicans
into the majority party again."
IN THIS reporter's election-
perambulations, one purpose has
been to try to find out whether
the President has a serious
chance to attain his greatest
ambition. It is a subject on
which much hogwash has been
written in recent months. Among
the more left-wing analysts, par-
ticularly, everyone seems to for-
get that Southerners also have
votes.
In 1932. when President Roose-
velt took office, the electoral
votes of the Southern states
were just under half of the total
needed to elect. You can see,
then, what enormous majorities
the Republicans used to com-
mand in the Northern states to
be the majority party despite
the Democrats' former posses-
sion of the "solid South."
TODAY, in contrast, the
whole South is going to vote
Republican on the national level,
giving President Nixon just over
half the total needed to elect
because the South has gained
population proportionally since
1932. Furthermore, it is hard
to foresee any future Demo-
cratic preskJenJal candidate who
will .have mu-^h chance in this
newly Republican "solid South."
Today, therefore, the Demo-
crats are the ones who start
with a Southern handicap and^
by JOSEPH ALSOP
need the enormous majorities inl
the Northern states.
THE DRAMA of thi< election!
consequently lies in the i;>par-
ent disappearance of longstand-l
ing Democratic majorities jn|
places like Bridgeport. Conn
Continued on Pagr 5-
As...
Max Lerner
Sees (f
ABILENE, Tex. While waiting for Kissinger-G.>4 i |n
the shape of further news about the sustained round of si
Paris talks on ending the war. we might turn to the la
frame of the Nixon-Kissinger diplomacy of which it is part.
There is a last-ditch war being waged against this "new diplo-
macy" by the far left which feels that Kissinger has sold out to
Nixon and that Russia and China have traded their revolution^
ary mission for a mess of American grain and technolocry.
The same war is being waged by the far right. You can
trace its trajectory from a diehard segment of New York's Con
servativc Party (even the Buckleys dislike Mr. Nixon* gnat
power diplomacy although they lump it) to some of the hard-line
areas here in Texas, to presidential candidate Schmitz of the
American Party, who couldn't carry his congressional district in
California but is running for President of the paleoliths on the
grandiose proposition that a great groundswell against Nixon
as an extreme liberal is preparing in America.
Hurrah for the lunatic fringes that add so much color and
verve to the texture of American life. What would America be
without its wildmen, left and right? I sat with H. L. Mencken,
back in 1948, in the press section of the convention of Henry
Wallace's Progressive Party, after an inimitable succession of
hot-eyed advocates had pleaded their kooky causes before the
platform committee, and I recall how joyously the misanthrope
6eer of Baltimore greeted their antic follies.
ALTHOUGH TEXAS WENT for Humphrey in 1%S. it will
go Republican on the presidency this year because of the basic
anti-McGovern feeling, including an over-60% rejection o: his
Vietnam views. But a moderate Democrat like Bare:nt Sand-
ers, who used to work on LB.J.'s staff, stands a good chance
for the Senate against conservative Republican John Tower.
Speaking here in an academic setting on the new chpla
I find that opinion on the Nixon-Kissinger policies ln about
evenly split, with greater approval aming the college young,
although they are puzzled at the irony of Nixon as the carrier
of the new doctrine. The interesting fact is that Sen Tower, a],
ways a hard-liner on foreign policy and a critic of Mr Nixon's
SALT agreements as being too soft on the Russians, ha: had to
keep his peace about the Nixon-Kissinger foreign policies. Such
are the vagaries of politics.
I DOUBT WHETHER MANY Texans have heard ol Henry
Paolucci. a lively politics professor and former Conservative
Party candidate, who storms fitfully against Kissinger on the
op-ed page of the New York Times, most recently for having
"tutored" Richard Nixon into becoming an Alger Hisi In his
basic foreign policies Shades of Whittaker Chambers and other
former Nixon mentors! But I take more seriously the attack
from the McGovern left, mounted by David Landau ;*ycho-
biography, "Kissinger: The Uses of Power."
Critics of Kissinger have made a to-do about the baleful
influence of Nixon's tutor's own tutor, William Yandeil
Elliot, on his Harvard graduate student. It happen* that Elliot
and I were colleagues at Harvard somewhat earlier, and lustily
at loggerheads. He was a Southern conservative, but >ne who
stood by his liberal colleagues in their ordeals with the Harvard
administration. He had done an important book on (Tie I'rag-
matic Revolt in Politics." and Kissinger might ha ^
some of his teacher's antidoctrinaire belligerence B
experience with Hitlerism had already taught him
of ideologies and given him the tough-minded '-> h* nas
retained.
THKRE ARE PERILS IN psychobiography *"
fine in this case as a study of a man's mind-psye!
his past in order to explain his present and predict I :uture
It isn't a mature enough science yet if it will e\
it will require a more sophisticated hand than Dav. : :>daus.
despite his devoted and detailed research. There hsve >
era! psychobiographers of Mr. Nixon whose faces m
dened after his Peking and Moscow journeys ami hia SAL
agreement.
As for Kissinger, it is far too early to write off his role m
the great powers diplomacy, even in the Vietnanv^ "" *
peace, ami certainly too risky to predict (as Landau lotsl I
he might back up the use of tactical nuclear weapons **"
Hanoi to make it submit to the Nixon peace formula The *
chiavelli and Metternich in Kissinger has been stressed, but tM
humanist is there, too.
Hia striking amalgam of qualities is an event in the bW
of American foreign policy not to be written off in a m*:fiaI7j
fashion. He was an actor ready and waiting for a role on
stage of history. Whatever Richard Ntaon's fautta (end tbr>
many), tkml ignore ha*having provided Kissinger with that ro


. November 3.1972
+J(nist fhfihi, Of North Broward
Page 5
iern Region's
(winter Conclave
,eduled Dec. 24
rinproximaloly 250 Jewish young
Z will assemble at Daytona
Sunday, Doc 24. for the
, Mid -Winter Conclave of
rthrm nVodri Senior Judaea.
M, represents more than 30
lerent communHiM in the south.
In* ,r"';'"' ,nis year ** "Thc
'in America." This topic will
mb** in (.very facet of the four-
, proera m which includes dU-
rions. rluh comj>etition in skit
E*li folk dancing. Hebrew sing-
C orator, r-ssay rv>etry. art and
ntsjapcr In addition, the re-
a) basketball and volleyball
Blond ip ill be deckled.
Michael Kaplan, director of the
utheni Re >"n. Mike Pousman.
Iptorida regional director. Yacov
Tinir and 1 ran Kra-Oz. emissaries
torn the Israeli Scoirta to the
Ijnithern Region of Young Judaea.
_heed up lh croup of top level
,mn::n; staff, who will guide
|tbf Judaea n- in their activities.
The Southern Region of Young
IJudaea i onsored by the South-
\m Hada-ah Zionist Youth Com-
|_s Im, Southeastern and Florida
iKaitassah.
-*.../3^ Reform Rabbis Hit Watergate Incident
JOSEPH 1LS0P
; Continued from p_K,. 4-
and in states like New York.
The states north of the Mason- |
Dixon line nonetheless continue
to possess nearly three-quarters
of all the electoral votes. They
are still the final battleground. \
To illustrate: The Provident
would have a real fight on his
hands with the Italian-Ameri. '
Cam he-.' in Avon if the Demo- |
crats had chosen Sen Hubert H
Humphrey Instead of Sen.
George McGovern. He could
even have lost the i lection, I o
if the Democrats had pi
Sen, Henry M Jackson;
"Scoop" Jackson might well
have made strong inroads in the
South.
THAT st-ms up the Presi.
dent's real problem. The Ni\ in
White House lias its admirable
aspects, hut it also has its sleazy,
ITT-secret campaign fund-Texas
oil aspect! Richard M. Nixon's
Re.Hiblican Party is rightly per-
ceived, in the words of the Avon
patriarch, a.s the rich i>eoples
party."
If the President wants to do
so. it should be possible for him
to make the Republicans into
"the middle-clasv people's party."
Then he will pain his greatest
ambition. But it will take some
doing after what has happened
already.
By |paeU Report
CINCINNATI Leaders of the
American Reform Rabbinate this
we.k expressed "shock at the wide-
spread evidence of gross immoral-
ity both in the government and in
the current political campaign"
and called for immediate Congres-
sional investigation of the Water-
gate case and similar incidents
with the full cooperation of both
presidential candidates and their
parties.
In their denunciation of immor-
| ality in the presidential election,
the Reform rabhis also voiced dis-
may at "the apparent indifference
of so many citizens to the immor-
ality."
The grouo, representing 1,100
Reform rabbis in this country and
Canada, insisted that "in the spirit
of Judaism, both government and ]
individuals must abide by man's
noblest ethical values."
The CCAR called upon their
colleagues to join with their local
interreligious ministerial associa-
tions in mobilizing national public
opinion against such practices.
By postal regulation The
Jewish Floridiau is not al-
lowed to publish articles
mentioning door prizes, raf-
fles, bingo, "night *f game*"
or other forms of gambling.
The Floridian also doe-* not
print prices or phone nun
bent in its news stories.
A statement adopted by tho|
executive board of the Central
Conference of American Rabbis.
meeting here at the Hebrew Union
College-Jewish institute of Re-
ligion, further asked that Presi-
dent Nixon and S n. McGovern
and all participants in the current
election, "follow In practi < the
ethical i teals ihey go frequently
-< In words."
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\labbi Miller's Address Opens Alf's Convention In Chicago
Rabbi Israel Miller, president
I of the American Zionist Federa-
| lion, opetvd its second national
convention in Chicago Oct.
:i with a far ranging policy
address which included a call
for a massive pragmatic cam-
paign for the Jackson Amend-
ment an I acainst U. S. commer-
cial trade agreements with the
U.S.S.R.
The Chicago Convention is
launching the AZF observance
of both the 75th anniversary of
the World Zionist Organization
and the 23th anniversary of the
State of Israel.
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FLORIDA HOUSE Of REPRESENTATIVES
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Paid for by Z Committee to E.ec E^RY STONE


Page 6
*Jeis*ncridHan of Nor,h Broward
Friday, November 3
. .<
Few Think for Themselves
B> K \KJ)1. AKIVA BRILLIANT
Temple Beth Israel
Only rarely do we como across
an individual who has taken the
pains to delve into the origins of
It la generally believed that mo I- ^h^,,,, ftnd familiarized Wm-
ern man thinks tot himself better <.c\{ w|th the Biblo tno Ta]mu,|,
than did his ancestors. We are
more advanced
in the x-ienees.
The communica-
tive systems of
radio. TV news-
pa|>ers. and mag
a/ines keep us
constantly in-
formed as to
what is hapi>en-
feflg around the
world. A good
education is en-
Brllllant *** b>' rp
young people to
day than ever before.
Psychologists, however, inform
us that very few people today
think for themselves, make their
cmr decisions, and guide their own
destinies.
The very eommunk-ative and ed-
Rabbi
and the grettl commentators and
thinkers of our people
Only rarely do we meet people
who have arrived at their religious
convictions through a process of
personal soul-searching, and earn-
est and honest reflection. Seldom
l- religion today judged objectively
irrespective of its popular social
ma>s-;ip!>eal.
We do little to discover the true
nature of things for ourselves. \\V
accept things on their face value,
or better, on their group value. If
the group value is superficial the
rcsuh is the Individual understand-
ing is equally su|>erficial.
Religious
Services
FORT IAUDERDAIE
BETH ISRAEL (Temple) Conierva-
tive. 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Rabbi Akiva Brilliant. Cantor Mao
rice Neo
42
Oakland Park
rama. Cantor Jerome Klement.
rar
.r .
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM (Temple). 13S SE 11th Awe.
Comervative. Rabbi Morria A. Skop.
Cantor Jacob J. Renzer.
The Baal Shem commented; It
states in our prayers "The G-d of
Abraham, the G-d of Isaac, the
G-d of Jacob." It does not say the
G-d of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob,
uca'ionalsvatems that should have! True that Isaac and Jacob ac
enabled man to think better and | cepted Abraham's tradition, but
more inxU-pend.cn: lv tend to chan- they moreover sought G-d through
Del man's thinking into precon-1 their own personal unique ex|vu-
ceived accepted pattern*. Instead ence. They made Judaism their
of givig him intellectual and own.
moral freedom, they enslave him Wp mm{ |J-o m&ke Judajsnl our
more than ever before. | QWn ,^,,,,.,1 ^session. Then, the
We are today in the mip of con- people of Israel shall emerge
formism Majority not only rules stronger than ever: a= strong as
the Senate, it rules the tastes, the, its individual links,
heart an I niin.ls of most Ameri-;
cans.
Krich Fromm has pointed out
that we are primarily not con-
cerned with what i> justice and in-
justice, with what is right or
wrong, good or bad. We are in-
terested mainly in success within
the present system without ques-
1.oning its goals and practices. Dr.
Fromm explains that conformism
e*erts a strong attraction, be-
cause it rescues the individual from
his oppressive aloneness. The in
dividual finds security in common
thinking and practices.
Rabbi (apian Elected
Alumni Vice President
Rabbi Jonah Caplan of North I
Miami Beach has been elected I
Southeastern regional vice presi-i
dent of the alii rinf association of
the Rabbi Isaac Kichanan The-1
ological Seminary of New York |
Rabbi Caplan, spiritual leader |
of Sky Lake Congregation, joins j
national officers headed by Rabbi |
Max I loch of the Concourse. Bronx,
NY., president The seminary is
a division of Yeshiva University.
C
otnmun
ittf L~*alcndcty
W. Averell Harriman, for-
mer governor of New York,
ambassador-at-large, and
elder statesman, has been
named 1972 recipient of
the annual America-Israel
Friendship Award of the
Mizrachi Women's orga-
nization of America, it was
announced by Mrs. Milton
S. Jacobson, national pres-
ident of the women's re-
ligious-Zionist organiza-
tion.
S\TI K1>\V. NOVEMBER 4
EPnai B'rith Women 345 Kl Casino Night
MONDAY, NOVKMKKH 6
Temple Bath Israel Sisterhood Board Meei.
Margate Jewish GalHer*S!tterhoed Board Mi
TTKSDAY, \<)\ EMBER 7
Temple Kmanu-EI Sisterhood General Mil I
Mai Kate Jewish Center Sisterhood Rummage Sa
Sabra Chapter ol Hadassan Paid-up Membershi
WKDNESDAY. NOVEMBER X
Fort I.aiiderdale-I'c.npapo Chapter. Brandeis I |
National Women's Cummlttoa study QroU|i
Jewish War \'i. UM and Auxiliary
Margate Jewish Center Sisterhood Rummagi Sa
Workmen's Circle 1070 B pm.
Till'KSHAV. XO\ EMBER 9
Foi-t Lauderdale Hadasaah Youth Allyah Lun
Noon
Sabra Chapter ol Hadasaah General M
Mai [ate Jewish O i ter Sisterhood R
Chai Chapter of Hadassah Pinner B]
SATIRDAV. NOVEMBER II
National Council ot Jewish Women Las V. gas
Gall Towers
SI XDAV. NOYEMBKR 12
Temple Emanu-EI Chanukah Bazaar am.
T1ESDAY. NOVEMBER 14
Fort I au.lerdale B'nai B'rith Women Board Meel
Fort Laudtldale B'nai B'lith MM Meeting
Mar-ale Jewish Center Sisterhood Fashion Shew
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WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 18
National Council of Jewilh Women Genera' Ml I
Temple Emanu-Ej Con jn gation General Martins
TUESDAY. NOVEMBER H!
Foit Lauderdale Hadasaah
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11
Chal Chapter at Hadaaaali One- Sha I
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Geneiai Meeting
Gary Walker Opens lauderdale Salon
Opening ol a OOStttotology salon,| The addition w.A
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jjoveBlbr 3, 1972
* Jmisil fkrrdmr of North Broward
Page 7
Israel Newsletter
By Carl Alperi
Parade Decision Sparks National Discussion
ME lABAEL i.oVKRNMKNT has rtached for-
[Tn.:l; decision W hold a huge military parade in
r. 1973. u part of th celebration o(
1 the country* 25th annlvenar)
The lad such para le was held in
l9i>8. when ii terved aa a dem-
onatmtaoa of both victor) ami
stivncth. The decision has been
| announced, but it haa aparked a
l great national discussion in which
the press and public personaliti.*
[give voice to various conflicting
[Varna A sampling ot this disciis-
illuminating.
Minister of Welfare Michael Ilazani opines that
iff millions ot pounds which the parade wiU cost
Mukl be better spent meeting some of the urgent
sociai and housing and poverty problems which
(if the country. On the other hand. Minister of
Moshe Kol points out that the paraaai will
I ,i major drawing card for tourists who are ex-
pected to bring over $300 million into the national
. \t year The costs of th.' parade will be
lion of that.
What are the purposes of the paradi Som
n it will demonstrate to enemies and t.. t
thai we have the men, the arms
and the organization required to defend ourselves.
le will be a aorl ol flexing of the ran
a necessary exercise to remind any would-be ag pea-
""' ol Uie danger he would face should he seek to
attack.
Opponents of the parade reply thai Israel has
reached a Stage where it does not need to prove its
military supremacy. The Egyptians, the Russians,
the Americans, everyone know- it. The parade is
therefore unnecessary.
How about the home front? The march is
intended to build up confidence and faith. It will
be | valuable stimulant to the tens of thousands
of new immigrants who have come here since Baal
and have never seen such a parade in Israel. But
morale is very high in Israel today, and a great
military demonstration is not needed to sustain
public spirit.
An odd paradox should be noted. Moshe Dayan.
Minwier ol Delense, and sometimes thought of as a
hawk, was against holding the parade but was out-
And Pinhas Sapir, thrifty Minister of Fi-
nance, voted in favor desnite the greal cost:
Perhaps the parade should be seen in a broader
perspective. On the da) on which it is held it will
be the dominant element in the 25th anniversai-v
celebrations. But it will be but one of a long series
of events stretching out over the entire year. It
will be prccecded and followed by cultural events
in the fields of music, drama, ait. and dance; there
will be mass picnics and fireworks: demonstrations
of cultural growth and educational progress and
agricultural and industrial development. It will be a
lull and festive year.
There is no doubt that a parade is a deeply
stirring event. Moshe Shamir, on of Israel's dis-
tinguished literary figures, even in his opposition
to the parade can not refrain from repeating the
story which was current here during some of our
more difficult years. An Israeli couple is watching
the military parade of that year. As the soldiers
march smartly by, and the heavy tanks rumble on
the roads, and the plane tormations sweep overhead,
and all observers are carried away by a breathless
thrill of pride, the wife turns to her husband and
says: "Don't you ever again dare complain about
income tax!"
No tourist who sees this parade will ever for-
get it. And this leads Shalom Rosenfeld to gh the
answer In "Maariv," to those who fear that the
spirit oi' militarism is taking over. This is not
"militarism" he says, but "milltourlsm."
BOOK REVIEW By Rabbi Barry TabachnikoH
Crusader In The Holy Land
JEWS IN SPORTS
By Haskell Cohen
1(11 H\ BERN H'KITTFA about Jeru
yean, especially since 1967 The
i-r In The Hl) IjmkI. hy Moron Benvenistl 'Mae
c new dimension to the land that
people late uniquely with the Biblical Era The
Panorama
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
iSluil Iii A Museum
J<>\\ rill KK is NO F.XCI'SK tor not going 10
hui There one in America's greal Metro-
>n Museum of Art on Fifth Avenue In facl
they have hall a dozen or more
lt them there synagogues from
all parts of th-- world; ayaafagaiM
in which Jewi prayed almost two
thousand years ago in the Orient:
synagogues in which Jews prayed
in Poland Inindmt- ol years ago,
and a synagogue in which the Jew-
li-.li "founding fathers" prayed in
IT7B.
Going to synagogue is not aa popular as in
I HnK and maylie we have Buffered a- I
l days, a Jew would go to the tyna-
| talk out his troubles with God. Today he
- io the psychiatrist, who ahargn Mm S"*1
I"0: (or listening and doesn't do as much. God ol
fives M< aarviac tree You don't e\.n have
Medicare.
Von will not be ahle to do an) pi tying iii
' at the museum Thej are all mlnia-
' model reprodueriona of the oM synagogues
ol the models la thai ol a synagogue dug
wars ago by the chaeo ogists In
bbutl. I recall the Vlsil to America
kck ot Sekunlk, the noted Israeli
I '. with reproductions of the murals of
I I Uiese excavated synagogues II had been
l^s-ht thai the oid aynagoguea did not ps*mit
Jetting on uuiLs. but these murali were full f
Pwtings of Biblical scenes, Hoses and the burning
Abraham and the scene of the aacriflce ol
and the intervention of the angel and so
K Int. estlngly to... the figures ol Moses and
1^""'" """"-d without head coverings, it wan
ISekuniks belief that the custom ot wearing hats
|m"i' synagogue was a relatively late development
The -m;i. American synagogue exhibited is thai
"' Newport, R.I., watteh goes back to UK Thai
J*^ iust about ",0 years after 'he PUgrkna '*n*d
I, N-^'".rt fawa were fugitives from the Spanish
I ind Um ir synagogue In New
then- ..id Spanish synagogue, includ-
I irwaa lav aaaapa
N
the Newport syna [ogue th
ol.lv one
ivaimah Qa. 1 Shearith
their
auihoi follows th. example ol Yigael Yadin whose study
oi Massada relied upon archaeological studies as well as
historical references in restructuring a period of Israel's
hi*tor) thai had been incomplete for centuries.
This is a broad undertaking that endeavors to restruct-
ure in the 11th and 12th centuries when the Cru-
aden dominated what is now the State of Israel. Ben-
-n draws upon a variety ot' sources to reconstruct a
Iflcant period in the history of the Holy I .and which
has long been a focal point ol diverse cultures. Usually
.; Iced to the personalities of Saladin and
Richard the Lion-Hearted. The author succeeds in reach-
in.: beyond the Christian-Muslim conflict into the broader
subject of the cultural achievements which have become
a parl ot the heritage >>i the laud
The author uses numerous maps, pictures and archi-
tectural drawing! to illustrate the extent of activity
during this period. He graphical]) portrays the impact of
the Crusaders in the extern of building and economic ac-
thit) during these years. He treats each city as a sep-
arate entity and proceeds geographically to describe the
process <>t conquest, fortification, building of facilities,
expansion of economic endeavors and the significant
church related activities. The Introductory survey is de-
liberately brie! and therefore somewiiat incomplete. Com-
, nsation for thi- brevity is found in the concluding see-
lions, Which elaborate in greater detail on the historical
I, uvhes and monasteries buill by the Crusaders and the
..icral Hfe style ol the Franks
ihe result i- a probing analysis ef historical Infor-
.., W1 in the context ol an archaeological study
,-,. rea(|er is rewarded with a careful analysis of a fas-
,...,.,._ period o row* and conflict. It is admittedly a
work ...tended for the general reader rather than the
scholar: however, the absence ol even a limited MbUog-
, M,,n is a decided shortcoming in such a specialized texl
While th. formal and writing style lend themselves to
e^, comprehension, little guidance is given toward
,abltehing the contexl ... *.......vents in the period pre-
ceding the Crusaders or in pointing to Its impact on the
following era.
Technically. Benvenistl has succeeded In organizing
I ictg culled front dtftawent disciplines to produce a fuller
andM*m <" ****~* *+* m ,h" "~Z t
,,. Holy Und- White **" ,ndvi,1"al faC,s m n'
. origuwi research, hi la to be congratulated tor his
.Kll muting mt.mnat.on from different sources and
ii;r,;iM, .,,,. ,r: abroad overview ot the ..eld.
' ,.. live supports the author's con-
.1 dv.....nie grow* and raligioiia teal WMk
. illusion, much of the t 1 ol
thorough
""
Ihehlsto
who are stud. **
Maccabiah Alumni
TIIK TK.\( Ii COACH at C. W. Post. Royal C'her-
nock, won the Mel Intercollegiate Outdoor
Championships in his team's first appearance in
them. Harry I.itwack of Temple, the 1957 Mac-
cabiah hoop coach, was honored as the "Man of
the Year" hy the Jewish Basketball League of
Philadelphia. Soccer player Dan Raskin be-
came the new assistant varsity basketball coach at
Niagara, while Ron Aurit turned to boxing at West
Chester State Teachers. Abe Wolonow was a mem-
ber of the Elizabeth, NJ. Sport Club team that
won the U.S. Soccer Football Association Champ-
ionship
Garry C.ubnor. Maccabiah gold medalist in the
shot and heavyweight weightlifting. will be a can-
didate for the '73 team. Golfers Mrs. Walter
Cooperstein won the Women's Metropolitan Asso-
ciation Championship while Dave Muraskin took
the New Jersey State Amateur title. Tennis
player Pam Richmond won the Women's National
Intercollegiate Doubles titles for the second year
in a row- Pro Tom Okker of Holland was the
runner-up in the U.S. Pro Tennis Championships,
and Paid Cranis. who became the father of a girl.
Whiteney Abbe, won the New York State 35-year-
old division clay court division.
Abramson swimming brothers Allan left the
staff of Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City to
start military duty as Navy lieutenant commander
at Camp LeJuene, N.C; David has two more years
of medicine at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in
New York City before a stint in the U.S. Public
Health Service; Richard left the Air Force as a
captain to enter investment banking. Washington's
Jim Bregman .- president of the U.S. Judo Associa-
tion.
Rebecca Seitlin was named to the Miami Her-
ald's All-City swimming team in the 100-yard but-
ter, ly and 200-yard medley relay. She also was
named an NCAA Ail-American in the one-and three-
meters. Coxswain coach Allen Rosenberg con-
tributed a coaching article called "The Rosenberg
Style" to the May '72 edition of the Oarsman. Allen
coached the Vesper Boat Club eight to an Olympic
gold medal in Tokyo. Water i>olo player Krvin
Veg received the Jules Aminal Award a> the per-
son who has done the most for the sirt in the New
York area. USC water polo player Dennis Nee-
dleman COB I was given the highest rating of any
player on the Trojan's 1971-72 team as determined
by goals scored, assists, fouls and minutes played.
. Swimmer Andy Lehner. holder of the national
prep school record in the lOD-yard butterfly, is
headed to USC this semester.
Tennis players Grant Golden haa been elected
president ... the Chicago Tennis District and is also
coach of that citys Junior Davis Cup team, while
l.en Schloss Is teaching pro in the Miami area. .
Table tennis players Bernie Buklel and Irene Ogus
u ked fourth and 'bird, respectively. .
Golfer Ed Preisler, the 1865 M
is, tcam member, won the Tournamenl ol
,;,,, 'hampions senior eon-petition and the
Nation,;! ScnlOl hlP


Page 8
Jmist>ncr*Ma*7 North Irow.rd
Friday, Normbr
flf r^^H
=5= 1

If there is a crisis
in the Middle East,
who would you
want sitting
in the White House?
/Thechoice, of course, is between Senator McGoverii,
"and President Nixon.
J Senator McGovern has suggested that Israel return to
Ihe insecure boundaries existing before the Six Day War.
And he wants to reduce the American Sixth Fleet-
aircraft carriers and all-which is in the Mediterranean
!as part of our N. A.T.O. commitment and which is
.important to the stability of the Middle East.
President Nixon, on the other hand, has provided
Israel with more military and economic aid than all
previous administrations combined. He has maintained
America's strength in the Mediterranean. And he is
commited to the idea that peace will come only when all
countries in the Middle East "feel secure from the threat of
military dominance and recognize that the only
permanent way to resolve deep-seated difference is by
negotiation and never by war.".
The President is a level-headed internationalist who
believes in the need for a strong national defense. Always
ready to support America's allies, he is equally ready to
seek out new avenues to peace. ~'
w> No wonder, then, that so many AmericansN
Democrats, Republicans and Independentshave already
made their choice for President. The man they would want
sitting in the,White House in a crisis is the man already there.
mmtmSmk 9*m****M f *r*
President Nixon.
Now more than ever.
I* !!-* *t Himiim. M. H 1UM. CtM,C. I. .,


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